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Dermatologic Picture-Taking    (Images/information provided in this          section are courtesy of         Dr. Hon Pak, ...
Standard Views   Standard Views    o Human body can be separated into anatomic units    o Each anatomic units will have s...
Anatomic Regions or Units (Standard Sets)     Hands/feet/ Nails     Face/ Scalp     Genitals     Arms     Trunk     ...
Face Standard Set          Then Take:              - Complementary Views if appropriate              - Close ups (of repre...
Hair Protocol   Take Standard image sets for    Head and Scalp   Take close up of involved    area   Photos should clea...
Truncal Standard Set             Then Take:             - Complementary Views if appropriate             - Close ups (of r...
Arm Standard Set                   Then Take:                   - Complementary Views if appropriate                   - C...
Leg Standard                                           Optional Set: Then Take: - Complementary Views if appropriate - Clo...
Hand/Feet Standard Set            Then Take:            - Complementary Views if appropriate            - Close ups (of re...
Complementary Sets If a condition involves certain locations, “complementary    areas” may need to be examined or photogra...
Dermatologic Photography:Factors to Consider      Orientation      Framing      Leveling & centering      Close up & l...
Orientation                                         Good   Orient the camera to allow    maximal utilization of space    ...
Framing  Ensure that the framing shows   the extent of involvement  Must include involved AND   uninvolved area         ...
Level & Center (BAD) Examples                                © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
Level & Center (Good) Examples        +                                 +                                     © ClickDiagn...
Close Ups  Centered:    o The primary lesion(s) must      be clearly identified,      focused and centered in      the cl...
Symmetry  If the pt has multiple lesions, be   sure to document symmetry    o Front/back, left/right    o Take pictures o...
Background                                         Good  Background can be very   distracting  Use a non reflectant (blu...
Marking  If the lesion is subtle, mark it!                                       © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
Preparation of room/patient   Room size 10’ minimum     o Full length photo   Dark blue/ Green non-reflectant cloth     ...
Preparation of Patient  Inform the patient why you are   taking pictures  Position the patient (and yourself)   comforta...
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How to take Dermatology Pictures

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  • Make sure your photograph is centered and straight. [Will ask Dr. K what is meant precisely by level.]
  • [These represent the ideal situation.]
  • Transcript of "How to take Dermatology Pictures"

    1. 1. Dermatologic Picture-Taking (Images/information provided in this section are courtesy of Dr. Hon Pak, LTC MC and Dr. Carrie Kovarik, MD ) © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    2. 2. Standard Views  Standard Views o Human body can be separated into anatomic units o Each anatomic units will have standard image sets  Standard views/framing should be used for most if not all conditions. o Show entire anatomic unit (e.g. trunk) if a lesion or rash is within this unit © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2008 COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
    3. 3. Anatomic Regions or Units (Standard Sets)  Hands/feet/ Nails  Face/ Scalp  Genitals  Arms  Trunk  Legs © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2008 COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL
    4. 4. Face Standard Set Then Take: - Complementary Views if appropriate - Close ups (of representative lesions) © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    5. 5. Hair Protocol  Take Standard image sets for Head and Scalp  Take close up of involved area  Photos should clearly show any erythema, hair loss, scaling, or crusting o May have to part and/or clip hair to expose the involved area © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    6. 6. Truncal Standard Set Then Take: - Complementary Views if appropriate - Close ups (of representative lesions) © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    7. 7. Arm Standard Set Then Take: - Complementary Views if appropriate - Close ups (of representative lesions) © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    8. 8. Leg Standard Optional Set: Then Take: - Complementary Views if appropriate - Close ups (of representative lesions) © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    9. 9. Hand/Feet Standard Set Then Take: - Complementary Views if appropriate - Close ups (of representative lesions) © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    10. 10. Complementary Sets If a condition involves certain locations, “complementary areas” may need to be examined or photographed. If Involved: Include Look / Ask / ? Include Hands Feet Elbows/Knees Feet Hands Groin Elbows Knees Scalp Knees Elbows Scalp Scalp Face Knees, Elbows Popliteal fossa Antecubital fossa Neck, Face, hands Antecubital fossa Popliteal fossa Neck, Face, hands Nail (any) All nails Oral Mucosa Groin Buttocks Hands & Feet Face (Eyebrows, NLF) Scalp Oral Mucosa Genitals © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    11. 11. Dermatologic Photography:Factors to Consider  Orientation  Framing  Leveling & centering  Close up & location  Symmetry  Background  Marking lesions  Preparation of room  Preparation of patient © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    12. 12. Orientation Good  Orient the camera to allow maximal utilization of space o Most anatomic units are longer than wide –just like the image frame. o Turn the camera on its side when taking most anatomic unit pictures (face) Bad © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    13. 13. Framing  Ensure that the framing shows the extent of involvement  Must include involved AND uninvolved area © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    14. 14. Level & Center (BAD) Examples © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    15. 15. Level & Center (Good) Examples + + © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    16. 16. Close Ups  Centered: o The primary lesion(s) must be clearly identified, focused and centered in the close up view  Perpendicular: o In general, the image should be taken on a plane perpendicular to that of the lesion.  Anatomical Location: o Ensure that the location/anatomy is identifiable at least on one of the images © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    17. 17. Symmetry  If the pt has multiple lesions, be sure to document symmetry o Front/back, left/right o Take pictures of symmetric parts even if there is no abnormality on other side © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    18. 18. Background Good  Background can be very distracting  Use a non reflectant (blue or gray) background Bad Bad © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    19. 19. Marking  If the lesion is subtle, mark it! © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    20. 20. Preparation of room/patient  Room size 10’ minimum o Full length photo  Dark blue/ Green non-reflectant cloth o Background (Wall) o Portable drape  Well lit room o Avoid direct light (window)  Stools/ Exam Table © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
    21. 21. Preparation of Patient  Inform the patient why you are taking pictures  Position the patient (and yourself) comfortably o Leads to less movement  Instruct patient to undress appropriately o Gown © ClickDiagnostics, Inc. 2010
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