History of Japanese Quality Movement Management Theory & Practice Nimal C Namboodiripad
The Foundations <ul><li>1942 – Japan bombed Pearl Harbour as part of their empire building activities – it was the beginni...
The Start of the Beginning <ul><li>After accepting Japan's formal surrender aboard the battleship Missouri in Tokyo Bay Ma...
The Beginning <ul><li>Gen. McArthur invited Homer Sarasohn, then 29 to head the rebuilding of the Telecommunication infras...
The Beginning <ul><li>Along with Protzman he conducted CCS Management Seminars in Tokyo and Osaka for inculcating quality ...
The end of the beginning <ul><li>Although by 1950 the US withdrew from the Occupation of Japan the Japanese were by now no...
The Impetus <ul><li>1950 – Kenichi Koyanagi, MD of the Union of Japanese Scientists and Engineers(JUSE) brought Edwards De...
The Catalysts <ul><li>Not only did Deming and Juran bring with them the pioneering ideas of Walter Shewhart in Process con...
The Process <ul><li>Alongside them were fiercely patriotic Japanese like Kaoru Ishikawa and Genichi Taguchi who themselves...
The Process <ul><li>Genichi Taguchi made Japanese machines which were considered very sensitive more robust. </li></ul><ul...
Disseminating Japanese Management Principles <ul><li>It was people like Nonaka, Masaki Imai (Father of Kaizen: Continuous ...
Disseminating Japanese Management Principles <ul><li>The best compliment that anybody could give the Japanese was when US ...
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Japanese Quality

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Lecture of MPOB, MBA course

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Transcript of "Japanese Quality"

  1. 1. History of Japanese Quality Movement Management Theory & Practice Nimal C Namboodiripad
  2. 2. The Foundations <ul><li>1942 – Japan bombed Pearl Harbour as part of their empire building activities – it was the beginning of the end </li></ul><ul><li>1945 – Post Hiroshima and Nagasaki Japan surrendered </li></ul><ul><li>They were left with no empire but three huge legacies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An economy that was in shambles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Practically no resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A tag “Made in Japan” that meant it was absolute poor quality </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. The Start of the Beginning <ul><li>After accepting Japan's formal surrender aboard the battleship Missouri in Tokyo Bay MacArthur set up his General Headquarters (GHQ) in the Dai Ichi Insurance Building, one of the few major structures left standing in central Tokyo. </li></ul><ul><li>As Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, or SCAP--an acronym applied to himself as well as headquarters--MacArthur represented the victorious allies </li></ul>
  4. 4. The Beginning <ul><li>Gen. McArthur invited Homer Sarasohn, then 29 to head the rebuilding of the Telecommunication infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>He helped restart NEC, Matsushita, Furukawa, Fujitsu and Toshiba, although many were part of the banned Zaibatsu – a conglomerate of companies which acted as a cartel </li></ul>
  5. 5. The Beginning <ul><li>Along with Protzman he conducted CCS Management Seminars in Tokyo and Osaka for inculcating quality consciousness </li></ul><ul><li>He taught the Japs to use statistical quality control in the manufacturing process </li></ul><ul><li>Two companies which profited from his insistence on quality was Mirakawa Electrical, now Sharp Electronics and Tokyo Communications Engineering, now Sony Corp. </li></ul>
  6. 6. The end of the beginning <ul><li>Although by 1950 the US withdrew from the Occupation of Japan the Japanese were by now not only focused on quality but also ensured that it became a strategic weapon to beat the Americans by calling up Americans to help in the process </li></ul><ul><li>Edward Deming and later Joseph Juran were also invited to Japan </li></ul><ul><li>In a clever tactical move they also advertised the fact to the world that the effort was on! </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Impetus <ul><li>1950 – Kenichi Koyanagi, MD of the Union of Japanese Scientists and Engineers(JUSE) brought Edwards Deming to speak at a dinner in Tokyo </li></ul><ul><li>Kaoru Ishikawa the president of JUSE invited the top 21 industrialists who left after promising full support for Deming’s principles of improving quality and reducing costs through total quality management </li></ul>
  8. 8. The Catalysts <ul><li>Not only did Deming and Juran bring with them the pioneering ideas of Walter Shewhart in Process control they became brand ambassadors for the Japanese quality revolution. </li></ul><ul><li>While Deming spoke of TQM Juran emphasised on the implementation of quality using such tools as the Pareto analysis </li></ul><ul><li>To show the world that Japan was worshippers of quality they also instituted the Deming Prize for Quality in 1951 </li></ul>
  9. 9. The Process <ul><li>Alongside them were fiercely patriotic Japanese like Kaoru Ishikawa and Genichi Taguchi who themselves worked towards improving the quality of Japanese goods </li></ul><ul><li>Ishikawa took Deming’s and Juran’s ideas and implemented it at the lowest level using the Fishbone diagram and Pareto analysis </li></ul><ul><li>For this he used an employee empowerment technique called Quality Circles liberally, which in effect was a group problem solving approach </li></ul>
  10. 10. The Process <ul><li>Genichi Taguchi made Japanese machines which were considered very sensitive more robust. </li></ul><ul><li>Through the 1960s through the 1970s Japan made a name for itself as a quality and customer oriented nation in terms of its industries </li></ul><ul><li>But how it was done and the management practices involved remained a mystery for long </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Because of the Japanese aversion for English </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Because of the fact that people who knew about it wouldn’t write English for their life </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And also their deliberate secrecy on the same </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Disseminating Japanese Management Principles <ul><li>It was people like Nonaka, Masaki Imai (Father of Kaizen: Continuous Improvement), Akio Morita (Sony Co-founder, Author, Made In Japan), Kenichi Ohmae (Mind of the Strategist), and William Ouchi (Theory Z) who wrote in detail about Japanese principles </li></ul><ul><li>Later people like Takashi Osada (5S) also contributed to the Japanese literature </li></ul>
  12. 12. Disseminating Japanese Management Principles <ul><li>The best compliment that anybody could give the Japanese was when US themselves instituted their own award the Malcolm Baldridge Award in 1987 for quality. </li></ul><ul><li>Now, with the problems in economy and loss of competitive advantage Japan is no more the power it was. Let us wait and watch… </li></ul>
  13. 13. Thank You
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