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Cmptr ch22

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  • 1. Chapter 22Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint
  • 2. Learning Objectives• LO22.1: Understand object linking and embedding (OLE)• LO22.2: Import and export data• LO22.3: Use the Object command to insert text from a file• LO22.4: Copy and paste among Office programs• LO22.5: Create PowerPoint slides from a Word outline• LO22.6: Create form letters with mail mergeCMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 2
  • 3. LO22.1: Object Linking andEmbedding• Topics Covered: – Creating an Embedded Excel Chart in Word or PowerPoint – Embedding a Chart Created in an Excel Worksheet in Word or PowerPoint – Editing an Embedded Excel Chart in Word or PowerPoint – Linking an Excel Chart to a Word Document or PowerPoint Presentation – Linking Excel Worksheet Data to Word or PowerPoint – Updating Linked Objects When the Destination File Is Open – Updating Linked Objects When the Destination File Is ClosedCMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 3
  • 4. LO22.1: Object Linking andEmbedding• Office 2010 supports object linking and embedding (OLE), a way of transferring and sharing objects between programs.• The program used to create the object you want to integrate into another program is the source program. – The file that initially contains the object is the source file.• The program used to create the file where you want to insert an object created in a different file is the destination program. – The file where you want to insert the object is the destination file.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 4
  • 5. LO22.1: Object Linking andEmbedding• When you embed an object, a copy of the object along with a link to the source program become part of the destination file.• When you link an object, a direct connection is created between the source and destination files.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 5
  • 6. LO22.1: Object Linking andEmbeddingCMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 6
  • 7. Creating an Embedded Excel Chartin Word or PowerPoint• If you want to embed a chart in a Word document or PowerPoint slide, and the chart or the data to create it does not already exist in a separate Excel file, you can create the chart from within the Word or PowerPoint file.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 7
  • 8. Creating an Embedded Excel Chartin Word or PowerPointCMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 8
  • 9. Embedding a Chart Created in an ExcelWorksheet in Word or PowerPoint• If a chart already exists in an Excel worksheet, you can copy it from there and then embed it in the document or slide.• You can then use Excel commands to modify the chart from within the document or slide.• Your changes, however, will not appear in the original file.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 9
  • 10. Editing an Embedded Excel Chartin Word or PowerPoint• When you edit an embedded object within the destination program, the changes affect only the embedded object; the original object in the source program remains unchanged.• To edit the embedded object, click it to display tabs and commands on from the embedded object’s source program on the Ribbon.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 10
  • 11. Editing an Embedded Excel Chartin Word or PowerPointCMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 11
  • 12. Linking an Excel Chart to a WordDocument or PowerPoint Presentation• If a chart exists in an Excel worksheet and you think you might update it in the future, you can link it to a Word document or PowerPoint slide instead of embedding it.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 12
  • 13. Linking Excel Worksheet Data toWord or PowerPoint• To create a stable link in a Word document or to create a link in a PowerPoint slide, you need to use the Paste Special command.• Then, just like with a linked chart, you can edit the source file, and the edits will appear in the destination file.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 13
  • 14. Linking Excel Worksheet Data toWord or PowerPointCMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 14
  • 15. Updating Linked Objects When theDestination File Is Open• When an object is linked from a source file to a destination file, you can edit the information in the source file, and the changes will appear in the destination file.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 15
  • 16. Updating Linked Objects When theDestination File Is Closed• When you link objects to a file, they are set to update automatically or manually.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 16
  • 17. LO22.2: Importing and ExportingData• Topics Covered: – Importing an Excel List into an Access Table – Exporting Access Data to a Word FileCMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 17
  • 18. Importing an Excel List into anAccess Table• You can only import data that is in the form of a list—a series of paragraphs or worksheet rows that contain related data, such as product names and prices or client names and phone numbers.• Each row of data becomes a record in the database, so there should not be any rows above the column heads and there should not be any blank rows.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 18
  • 19. Importing an Excel List into anAccess TableCMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 19
  • 20. Exporting Access Data to a WordFile• If you want to export to a text file, you can choose the Text file type, which creates a document with unformatted text, or Rich Text Format (RTF), a text format that preserves the layout of data.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 20
  • 21. LO22.3: Using the Object Commandin Word, Excel, and PowerPoint• The Object button in the Text group on the Insert tab in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint allows you to insert the contents of one file into another file.• In Wordyou can also use the Text from File command on the Object button menu to insert only the text of another text file into the destination document.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 21
  • 22. LO22.4: Copying and PastingAmong Office Programs• You can use Copy and Paste commands to copy data from a datasheet, and then paste it to a PowerPoint slide as a table.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 22
  • 23. LO22.5: Creating PowerPoint Slidesfrom a Word Outline• You can use an outline in a Word document to create PowerPoint slides.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 23
  • 24. LO22.6: Creating Form Letters withMail Merge• Topics Covered: – Selecting a Main Document and Data Source – Inserting the Merge Fields – Previewing the Mail Merge and Checking for Errors – Finishing the Mail MergeCMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 24
  • 25. LO22.6: Creating Form Letters withMail Merge• A form letter is a Word document that contains standard paragraphs of text and a minimum of variable text.• The main document contains the text and other information that you want to keep the same in each form letter. – It also includes merge fields. – The variable information is contained in a data source.• The process of combining the main document with the data source is called a merge. – A mail merge is when you merge a starting document with a list of addresses from a data source.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 25
  • 26. Selecting a Main Document andData Source• The main document of a mail merge can be a new or an existing Word document.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 26
  • 27. Selecting a Main Document andData SourceCMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 27
  • 28. Inserting the Merge Fields• A merge field is a special instruction that tells Word where to insert the variable information from the data source into the main document.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 28
  • 29. Previewing the Mail Merge andChecking for Errors• You can choose to merge the data to a new Word document or directly to a printer.• It’s a good idea to proofread the final document before printing all of the merged documents.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 29
  • 30. Previewing the Mail Merge andChecking for Errors• It is also a good idea to use the Auto Check for Errors command to check the main document for errors.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 30
  • 31. Finishing the Mail Merge• After you have inserted all of the merge fields, previewed the merge, and checked the document for errors, you can finish the merge and either print the form letters or save the completed letters to a new document so that you can print them later.CMPTR Chapter 22: Integrating Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint 31

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