101228 open ideo kumasi sanitation challenge

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presentation for open IDEO kumasi sanitation challenge

presentation for open IDEO kumasi sanitation challenge

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  • 1. Moving People Up the Sanitation Ladder An answer to the Open IDEO Challenge Ensuring safe and sustainable public sanitation solutions in urban and semi urban Ghana
  • 2. BACKGROUND
  • 3. STARTING ASSUMPTIONS
    • Innovations on a technical level exist and have been implemented extensively in developing areas, some with great and some with lesser success. There are a number of successful technical solutions that can be imported both in terms of waste management and disposal (e.g. ECOTACT)
    • In our view, innovation needs to happen on a HOW rather than a WHAT level, meaning we will attempt to innovate a PROCESS rather than a PRODUCT.
    • Both factors of successful implementation need to be addressed: SUPPLY as well as DEMAND
    • Success needs to be measured by scalability and transferability; while the ideas here represent an approach for Ghana and its urban landscape, the ideas must be applicable to universal factors rather than merely geographical factors.
  • 4. PERSISTENT ISSUES
  • 5. “ Who wants their name attached to toilets ”… Kumasi Assembly man on sanitation ACCOUNTABILITY
  • 6. Toilets consistently have been poorly managed and have been the site of local political conflicts – toilet wars – despite efforts at franchising them and involving communities in their management. This is attributable to the politics of patronage at the urban level, the relationship between city government patronage and community level groups, and the failure of regulation. Public-private partnerships have not worked. TRUST
  • 7. SKILLS While Ghana is a top 10 country according to the overall Ibrahim index, when it comes to key functions important to sanitation (urban private sector development, infrastructure and public management), the score is less impressive
  • 8.
    • KEY PROBLEM
    • Approaches have been fragmented
    • and nobody “owns” sanitation
  • 9. THE CORE IDEA
  • 10. 3 ASPECTS A SUSTAINABLE PROCESS NEEDS TO ADDRESS supply demand ownership and accountability PROMOTING ‘ SOCIAL HEALTH’
  • 11. FROM SANITATION TO SOCIAL HEALTH ownership and accountability WOSUK demand supply THE WOSUK def: Women’s Sanitation Union of Kumasi
  • 12. WHAT IS WOSUK
    • The Women’s Sanitation Union of Kumasi is a neutral organization with a CHARTER signed by Unilever, the Kumasi government and the ‘population’ which will champion, promote and monitor healthy and safe sanitation solutions in Kumasi. The key functions of the Union will consist of:
      • ‘ Moving people up the sanitation ladder’ through awareness and demand driving initiatives
      • Play and active role in designing alternative, transparent and improved supply chain and maintenance solutions
      • Act as a benevolent watch dog to ensure proper and ongoing maintenance standards
      • Be the financial broker or facilitator between good ideas and funding
  • 13.
    • WHAT IS THE WOSUK
    • In short, the UNION will act as the anchor of ownership
    • and accountability in sustaining SOCIAL HEALTH of the
    • community
  • 14. WHY THE WOSUK?
    • Sanitation is not about sanitation
      • Sanitation is about choosing how to spend money (buyer)
      • Sanitation is about civility (proof of functioning society)
      • Sanitation is about economic power (seller)
    • Because it is not just about sanitation, proper sanitation is not the easier choice
    • Because it is not just about sanitation, different agenda’s and priorities change and corrupt
    • The UNION would leverage skills that Ghanese Govt is less equipped (and more importantly not trusted) to handle like urban demand creation, project management, gaining trust from locals .
    Sanitation is a part of the social health of a human being
  • 15. WHY WOMEN
      • Sanitation needs are of a higher order for women and girls due to privacy, menstruation…yet due to cultural factors women’s needs in society are placed in a secondary priority
      • WOSUK will empower women to address and solve issues directly related to their needs
      • Women are the natural care takers of a community
  • 16. WHY UNILEVER
    • In many developing countries, brands have the power, infrastructure and business acumen (along with social missions) to deliver services, create habits and maintain accountability of quality.
    • Their attachment makes sanitation to big to fail, thus creating faith amongst locals that change is possible to sustain.
    • A great example is the CEMEX “Patrimonio Hoy” program in Mexico, who have attached their name to improved living quarters and have started empowering civilians to do work themselves alongside the local government to great success.
  • 17. KEY SATRTEGIC PLATFORMS
    • 1. Leverage assets across all stakeholders
      • Employ resources from private sector – logistics, management, demand creation, quality control, buying power
      • Involve Ashantee Diaspora through Sanitation remittance program
      • Get local government to agree “not to add red tape”
      • Open sourcing program for parts/services to be assembled locally
    • 2. Drive visible changes to the environment
      • Import working (African) solutions and knowledge
      • Empower women through proven practices to own good sanitation in their neighborhoods
      • Create quality control and evangelist teams
      • Rapid response number (complaints will be dealt within 24 hours)
    • 3. Drive ‘culture of social health’
      • Community wide health initiatives about the broader value of sanitation
      • Sanitation pledges – CLTS style workshops
      • “ Teach through tech” program
        • Source used camera’s and recording equipment for schools so they can learn to use it and help document bad practices around sanitation (again part of social health)
  • 18. IMPLEMENTATION
  • 19. A. OWNERSHIP & ACCOUNTABILITY: CREATING THE WOSUK
  • 20. WOSUK CHARTER MEMBERS EXTERNAL Unilever: sponsor NGO/AID ORG: technology & funding INTERNAL KUMASI Govt: regulating support WOMEN’S LEAGUE Leading women champions/activists technology & know how regulation and administrative facilitation local representation regional/city district women’s chapters recruited by WOSUK representatives STEP 1: drafting and committing to a CHARTER on sanitation standards – this will create a sense of commitment but also an objective and measurable definition of what proper sanitation standards are
  • 21. AUDIT OF CURRENT DEMAND AND SUPPLY STEP 2 : mapping out the Kumasi settlement, auditing current supply, identifying needs (e.g. number of latrines per square kilometer), regional special needs - e.g. school districts assessing current standards and developing an action plan for upgrades, new construction – additionally review existing technical solutions to source
  • 22. ENERGIZE ALL PARTIES INVOLVED STEP 3: Planting a public flag that the WOSUK is here to stay and committed to improving the Kumasi sanitation situation. Not by creating aid dependency, but by being demand driven, implementation focused and aware that in order for sanitation to be improved other life aspects need to be better as well.
  • 23.
    • OWNERSHIP AND ACCOUNTABILITY
    • WOSUK CHARTER & STANDARDS
    • AUDIT, MAP AND PLAN
    • PLANTING THE PUBLIC FLAG – COMMIT
  • 24. B. ENDORSING A VALUE ORIENTED AND TRANSPARENT SUPPLY CHAIN
  • 25. CURRENT SUPPLY CHAIN
    • Non standard constructions which leads to inconsistent quality – sub standard quality
    • Corruption and lack of transparency
    • Poor maintenance - lack of upgrading on a systematic level (e.g. adaptation to new technologies)
    • Stigmatized industry
    • Lack of funding (market driven or otherwise)
  • 26. SUPPLY CHAIN INSPIRATION Objective: standardized for quality and economies of scale – construction materials, toilets, ventilation… Service offer: two tiered service – standard and premium. Both offer the agreed sanitation standards and cleanliness/functionality – the premium service would include added values services such as bathing facilities – this accounts for various income levels and price elasticity while creating aspiration to ‘move up’
  • 27. AUDIT BEST PRACTICE IN AFRICA AND OTHER BOP MARKETS STEP 1: mapping out proven business models and practices that move people up the sanitation ladder. The UNION is not here to reinvent the wheel, but to improve the sanitation situation. If something works somewhere else, the UNION is eager the get those practices on board, obviously tailored to the Kumasi situation.
  • 28. CREATING A NEW SUPPLY CHAIN STEP 2: creating an open bid for a new industry – latrine building materials (creating the latrine IKEA) The best business model (s) will receive venture capital to source and market standardized and quality assured construction materials This will be the supplier of record for entrepreneurs bidding for sites to build and operate neighborhood latrines A franchising model will create value throughout the supply chain. The WOSUK will act as a financial broker, facilitating the financing of sound business ideas.
  • 29. CREATING A NEW SUPPLY CHAIN Local franchisees Open bid for contracts Local franchisees Open bid for contracts Local franchisees Open bid for contracts Local franchisees Open bid for contracts Local franchisees Open bid for contracts Local franchisees Open bid for contracts Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews Local operators and maintenance crews
  • 30. CREATING ADDITIONAL FUNDING STREAMS STEP 3: By being transparent about cost and allegiance, the UNION can now start tapping the Ashantee Diaspora for funding/seed money. The Ashantee (of which Kumasi is a part) receive highest remittance (average $412 p.p per year). But this money is often given without specific purpose and through informal channels. The UNION can be a channel that is secure, and provides and investment opportunity for the Diaspora and anybody else wanting to invest.
  • 31. THE ROLE OF THE WOSUK
    • Lead the Latrine Audit and develop a development plan
    • Monitor and lead the open bid process for transparency and ethical standards
    • Act as the steering committee for assessment of submitted business models
    • Facilitate ‘seed money’ and technical support (sanitation best practice/systems)
    • Act as a monitoring body of latrine maintenance – apply a system of accountability for sub standard service (according to charter)
  • 32. ACCOUNTABILITY & FAIR PRACTICE
    • BUSINESS THAT SIGNS UP MUST:
      • Publicly commit to produce against pre set price levels frozen for the duration it takes to go break even (3 to 5 years on average, based on the ECOTACT business model )
      • Provide technical and aesthetic expertise to the WOSUK
      • Agree to leverage their marketing and PR resources to spread message
      • Agree to random inspections to ensure commitment and quality
  • 33.
    • SUPPLY
    • AUDIT OF BEST PRACTICE GLOBALLY – SEARCH AND REAPPLY TECHNICAL SPECS
    • OPEN BIDS FOR STANDARDIZED CONSTRUCTION & FRANCHISEE/OPERATORS
    • ADDITIONAL FUNDING
  • 34. C. ASPIRATION, DEMAND AND USAGE
  • 35. OVERDELIVER AT LOWER PRICES
    • STEP 1: Creating faith through visible changes.
      • Working from the sanitation map the neighborhoods with highest chance of impact will receive support in establishing their business.
      • Public commitment ceremony
      • A temporary immediate reward system for proper disposal of human waste (C.O.D. in the form of books or school clothes)
      • Opening up a direct line of communication between the people and the WOSUK for complaints and question via SMS
  • 36. AWARENESS & EDUCATION
    • STEP 2: The UNION funds and executes district campaigns and educational programs promoting the concept of SOCIAL HEALTH with a focus on:
      • Progress through better sanitation
      • Health issues and standards
      • ‘ for the good of the community’
      • Part of modern and progressive living
      • The latrine as the ‘pride of the neighborhood’
      • Entrepreneurship education through entire value chain of sanitation
      • Accountability. Via African mix of Brazilian ‘Punto de Cultura ’ program. Women and schools improve ‘social health’. in return safeguard standards
  • 37. VALUE BASED PRICING AND PAID USAGE
    • STEP 3: Create a ‘no free defecation’ community
      • Members of the community can get a pre paid card that is valid for a predetermined number of uses. This to sustain and promote habitual use and make paying for proper latrines as part of everyday life. The cards can be for Standard or Premium service.
      • When topping up the card (via mobile device or ‘bank’) the user accumulates bonus points redeemable for other services of value: discounts on hygiene products, volume discounts for latrine use…
  • 38. THE ROLE OF THE WOSUK
    • Ensuring that participating parties:
      • Publicly commit to the project for the duration it takes to go break even (3 to 5 years)
      • Agree to enforce or report violations of sanitation practices
      • Get the local community leader to endorse the Charter and WOSUK
      • Agree to joint bank account with the WOSUK so that finance is transparent
      • Evangelize one new neighborhood
      • Agree to sell at set prices (based on demand research) to make sure as many people as possible can use better sanitation tools.
      • Agree to random inspections to ensure commitment and quality
  • 39.
    • DEMAND
    • OVERDELIVER TO CREATE FAITH
    • PR, EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT INCENTIVES
    • VALUE PRICING STRUCTURE WITH ‘UPGRADING’ OPTIONS
  • 40. OUTCOME MOVING PEOPLE UP THE SANITATION LADDER 1. Starting point: sub standard public latrines 2. Standardized supply and organized maintenance operations 3. Standardized supply and organized maintenance operations 4. Two tiered ‘service’ offer that raises aspirations and demand 5. Value oriented pricing structure to push habit, high perceived utility or value 6. Seeding the desire, demand and expectation of home plumbing
  • 41. SUMMARY
  • 42. FROM SANITATION TO SOCIAL HEALTH ownership and accountability WOSUK demand supply PR, EDUCATION, COMMUNITY INVOLVEMEMT VALUE PRICING MODEL WITH UPGRADING OPTIONS AUDIT OF BEST PRACTCE – SEARCH AND REAPPLY OPEN BIDS FOR STANDARDIZED RESOUCRES AND FRANSHISES INNOVATE FUNDING RECRUIT, ORGANIZE AND ‘OWN’ DEFINE STANDARDS AUDIT AND PLAN
  • 43. Establish the UNION and CHARTER Audit of status quo and needs Open tender for sourcing and franchisees Awareness and education Habitual usage incentives Ongoing monitoring of best practices, technical advances in sanitation aspects for upgrading the system on an ongoing basis
  • 44. WHAT’S NEXT
  • 45. WOMEN’S SOCIAL health UNION OF KUMASI
  • 46. Thank you @jo_vanna @NikoHerzeg