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Using PowerPoint for Graphics
 

Using PowerPoint for Graphics

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"When [PowerPoint] 2007 came out, it scared the design world because the average user could now create some impressive-looking work," Darla Wigginton, creative director at eVision Design, San ...

"When [PowerPoint] 2007 came out, it scared the design world because the average user could now create some impressive-looking work," Darla Wigginton, creative director at eVision Design, San Francisco. In this presentation you will learn how to: create animations; use SmartArt to create eye-catching 3-dimensional diagrams and charts; use shapes to build the images you want; find & modify Creative Commons images; add WordArt to an image; use cropping, Quick Styles and Effects to shape your images; and save your graphics as pictures to use outside of PowerPoint!

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    Using PowerPoint for Graphics Using PowerPoint for Graphics Document Transcript

    • Page
1
of
1
 Using
PowerPoint
for
Graphics
 Nikki
Massaro
Kauffman,
nikkimk@psu.edu
 Lesson
#1:
Find
more
images
via
Microsoft
Online
&
Flickr.
 Exercise
#1a:
Use
Expand
your
ClipArt
gallery
with
Microsoft
Online.
 1. On
the
Ribbon,
click
the
Insert
tab.
 2. Find
the
Illustrations
group
and
click
the
Clip
Art
button.

The
Clip
Art
 panel
appears.
 3. In
the
Search
for
field,
try
one
of
the
following
and
click
 Go:

 a. Student
 b. Read
 c. Library
 4. Now
try
clicking
on
the
Clip
art
on
Microsoft
Online
link.

 You
will
be
taken
to
a
Website.
 5. On
the
Microsoft
Office
Clip
Art
Online
Website,
enter
the
same
search
 term
into
the
Clip
Art
field
and
click
Search.
 6. Place
checkmarks
next
to
files
you
wish
to
download
to
your
Clip
Art
gallery.
 7. When
you
are
finished
making
selections,
find
the
Selection
Basket
section
 on
the
left
and
click
the
Download
#
Items
link.

You
will
be
taken
to
a
 download
page.
 8. Follow
the
download
instructions
on
the
page.

The
Clip
Art
will
be
added
to
 your
Clip
Art
gallery.

(Macs
may
have
additional
tweaking.)
 
 Exercise
#1b:
How
was
the
selection
from
Microsoft
Online
different
from
your
 initial
search
of
your
local
ClipArt
gallery?

Do
you
plan
on
using
Microsoft
Online
 in
the
future?
 TIP:
Go
to
the
Discovery
Day
session
on
Using
Flickr
Quicker
or
go
to
 https://wikispaces.psu.edu/display/training/Using+Creative+Commons+Image s+from+Flickr
to
learn
about
another
site
you
can
use
for
images.
 
 
 
 Lesson
#2:
Create
objects
the
way
that
artists
do,
by
breaking
them
down
into
 simple
shapes.
 Exercise
#2a:
Use
Shapes
tool
to
create
footprints.
 1. On
the
Ribbon,
click
the
Insert
tab.
 2. Find
the
Illustrations
group
and
click
the
Shapes
button.

A
dropdown
menu
 of
shapes
will
appear.
 3. Under
Basic
Shapes,
select
the
Oval.

    • 4. Use
the
Oval
to
draw
a
foot.

When
you
finish
you
will
see
a
series
of
white
 dots
and
squares
surrounding
the
Oval
as
well
as
a
single
green
dot
above
it.
 5. Shape,
resize,
and/or
position
your
Oval
as
necessary:
 a. Use
the
white
dots
on
the
corners
of
your
Oval
to
resize
it.
 b. Use
the
white
squares
to
adjust
its
proportions.
 c. Use
the
green
dot
to
rotate
it.
 6. Click
the
Shapes
button
again.
 7. Under
Basic
Shapes,
select
the
Chord.
When
you
finish
you
will
see
the
same
 white
dots
and
squares
and
the
same
green
dot.

 However,
you
will
also
see
two
yellow
diamonds.

 8. Shape,
resize,
and/or
position
your
Chord
as
you
did
 with
your
Oval.
 9. Use
the
yellow
diamonds
to
alter
the
angles
of
your
 Chord.
 10. Move
the
Oval
and
Chord
together,
making
the
 necessary
adjustments
until
they
look
like
a
single
 footprint.
 11. Select
both
the
Oval
and
Chord,
right‐click.

A
context
sensitive
menu
will
 appear.
 12. Choose
Group
to
group
the
items
together
as
a
single
object.
 13. Click
CTRL+C
to
copy
this
item
and
then
CTRL+V
to
paste.

A
second
 footprint
will
appear.
 14. Select
both,
right‐click
and
select
Group
from
the
context‐sensitive
menu
to
 create
a
single
graphic.

 TIP:
This
graphic
can
be
copied,
rotated,
resized,
and/or
combined
with
 other
graphics
to
create
the
art
you
see
here.
 
 
 Exercise
#2b:
What
shapes
were
used
to
construct
 the
graphic
on
the
right?
 
 Exercise
#2c:
Use
the
Shapes
button
to
make
a
 graphic
of
your
own.
 Lesson
#3:
Combine
several
images
or
shapes;
make
a
collage!
 Exercise
#3a:
Make
an
image
for
a
presentation
called
“Email
Safety:
Avoiding
 Emotional
Injury
in
the
Workplace”.
 1. Search
Microsoft
Online
for
the
photos
pictured
on
the
 right
and
place
checkmarks
next
to
them.
 2. Add
these
images
to
your
Clip
Art
gallery.
 3. Insert
the
hard
hat
first.
 4. Select
the
Picture
and
the
Picture
Tools
Format
tab
will
 appear
on
the
Ribbon.
 5. Click
on
the
Format
tab.
 Last
printed
1/7/10
2:45
PM

    • Page
3
of
3
 6. Under
Picture
Styles,
choose
Rotated,
White.

The
image
will
be
rotated
 with
a
thick
white
border.

(If
the
border
seems
too
thick,
undo,
make
the
 image
larger,
and
try
again.)
 7. Now
insert
the
@
symbol.


 8. Select
the
Picture
and
choose
FormatPicture
StylesSoft
Edge
Oval
 Picture
Style.

The
image
will
be
cropped
around
the
@
symbol.
 9. Drag
the
symbol
on
top
of
the
hard
hat
(resizing
and
rotating
if
necessary)
 and
Group
the
two
together.

You
will
have
a
new
email
safety
graphic.
 
 TIP:
For
quick
and
easy
formatting
of
pictures
and
ClipArt,
you
can
use
the
 Format
tab’s
Picture
Styles.

You
can
use
Picture
Shape
(to
the
right)
to
 change
the
shape,
and/or
Picture
Border
to
add
a
border
as
well.

The
 Picture
Effects
button
has
quick
special
effects
that
will
be
discussed
in
the
 next
section.
 If
you
would
like
detailed
formatting
options,
click
the
Format
Shape
 button
(lower
right‐hand
corner
of
Picture
Styles
group)
to
open
the
 Format
Shape
dialog.
 
 
 Exercise
#3b:
Look
at
your
Libraries
Discovery
Day
schedule
and
select
a
 presentation
title.

What
are
some
examples
of
images
could
you
combine
to
 represent
that
session?

 
 Lesson
#4:
When
you
have
an
abstract
idea,
add
WordArt
to
the
mix!
 
 Exercise
#4a:
Combine
images
and
WordArt
to
create
a
graphic
for
a
presentation
 on
leadership.
 1. Search
local
ClipArt
gallery
and/or
Microsoft
Online
for
several
images
that
 represent
leadership
to
you
and
insert
them.

(Without
the
context
of
the
 presentation
or
this
assignment,
would
someone
know
you
were
trying
to
 represent
leadership?)
 2. On
the
Ribbon,
click
the
Insert
tab.
 3. Find
the
Text
group
and
click
WordArt.

A
dropdown
menu
of
WordArt
styles
 will
appear.
 4. Select
a
style
for
your
WordArt.

Your
WordArt
will
be
placed
on
the
slide.
 5. Click
the
WordArt,
and
change
the
text
to
“Leadership”.

Notice
that
the
 Drawing
Tools
and
Format
tab
now
appear
on
the
Ribbon.

Format
is
 already
selected
for
you.
 6. 
Use
the
WordArt
Styles
group
as
necessary:
 a. Click
the
Quick
Styles
dropdown
menu
to
pick
a
different
style.
 b. Click
the
Text
Fill
button
(looks
like
a
plain
letter
A)
to
change
the
fill
 color
of
your
Word
art.

    • c. Click
the
Text
Outline
button
(looks
like
an
A
drawn
by
a
pencil)
to
 change
the
outline
of
the
word
art.
 7. Click
the
Text
Effects
button
(looks
like
a
glowing
A)
to
add
special
effects
 like
Shadow,
Reflection,
Glow,
Bevel,
3­D
Rotation,
and
Transform.
 8. Rotate,
resize,
and
arrange
the
WordArt
and
images
as
you
wish,
making
the
 necessary
adjustments:
 a. To
move
an
object
in
front
of
 one
or
more
objects,
choose
 FormatArrangeBring
 to
Front,
and
choose
Bring
 Forward
or
Bring
to
Front.
 b. To
move
an
object
behind
 one
or
more
objects,
choose
 FormatArrangeSend
to
Back,
and
choose
Send
Backward
or
 Send
to
Back.
 c. To
line
up
several
objects
evenly,
select
the
objects,
choose
 FormatAlign
(looks
like
several
rectangles
and
a
left
arrow),
and
 then
select
one
of
the
six
types
of
alignment
(Align
Left,
Align
Center,
 Align
Right,
Align
Top,
Align
Middle,
Align
Bottom).
 d. To
space
several
objects
evenly
apart,
select
the
objects,
choose
 FormatAlign
(looks
like
several
rectangles
and
a
left
arrow),
and
 then
select
either
Distribute
Horizontally
or
Distribute
Vertically.
 9. Select
all
of
the
objects,
right‐click,
and
select
Group
from
the
context‐ sensitive
menu
to
create
a
single
graphic.
 
 Exercise
#4b:
Take
a
name
(i.e.
yours,
a
friend’s,
a
relative’s,
a
favorite
team’s,
etc.),
 and
illustrate
it
as
we
did
in
Exercise
#4a.

 
 TIP:
When
selecting
a
piece
of
WordArt,
the
Format
tab’s
Shape
Effects
 button
includes
some
of
the
same
special
effects
as
the
Text
Effects
 (Shadow,
Reflection,
Glow,
Bevel,
and
3­D
Rotation)
button,
but
works
on
 the
WordArt
text
box
instead
of
the
actual
text.
 When
selecting
ClipArt
or
an
image,
this
button
is
called
Picture
Effects.
 
 
 Lesson
#5:
You
can
save
PowerPoint
slides
as
pictures.
 Exercise
#5a:
Save
every
slide
as
an
image.
 1. Click
the
Office
Button
(multicolored
Windows
symbol
in
the
upper
left
 corner)
and
choose
Save
AsOther
Formats…

 2. In
the
Save
As
dialog
box,
do
the
following:
 a. Select
a
destination
for
your
images.
 Last
printed
1/7/10
2:45
PM

    • Page
5
of
5
 b. Under
File
Name,
give
your
collection
of
images
a
name.
 c. Under
Save
as
type,
click
the
dropdown
menu
and
select
one
of
the
 following
image
types:
GIF,
JPEG,
PNG,
TIFF,
or
BMP.
 3. Click
Save.

When
you
navigate
to
the
destination
you
selected,
you
will
find
a
 folder
with
the
file
name
you
selected.

It
will
contain
an
image
of
each
slide.
 
 Exercise
#5b:
Save
a
single
image.
 1. Make
sure
you
have
grouped
and/or
selected
all
objects
that
comprise
the
 image.
 2. Select
the
image
and
right
click.
A
context‐sensitive
menu
will
appear.
 3. Choose
Save
as
Picture…
 4. In
the
Save
As
dialog
box,
do
the
following:
 a. Select
a
destination
for
your
images.
 b. Under
File
Name,
give
your
image
a
 name.
 c. Under
Save
as
type,
click
the
dropdown
 menu
and
select
an
image
type.
 5. Click
Save.

When
you
navigate
to
the
destination
 you
selected,
you
will
find
a
single
image.

If
this
did
not
work,
you
may
have
 to
go
back
and
make
sure
you
have
grouped/selected
every
object
in
the
 image
and
save
again.
 
 TIP:
By
saving
a
PowerPoint
image
or
slide
as
a
picture,
you
can
use
it
 anywhere:
 • Design
an
official
logo.
 • Export
graphics
for
handouts.
 • Create
images
for
Websites.