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Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
Lesson 2: Effective Communication
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Lesson 2: Effective Communication

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  • 1. Mama’s Subs LESSON 2: EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
  • 2. Mastering effective communication involves six steps: 1. Saying what you mean and meaning what you say 2. Using nonverbal communication 3. Putting words together: grammar 4. Asking the correct questions and answering questions correctly 5. Dealing with the customer when they say no 6. Listening actively EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
  • 3. By the end of this lesson you should know: How to say things in the right way to convey the right message How body language and other forms of nonverbal communication impact your message to the customer How to use proper grammar when speaking with customers How to ask the correct questions How to answer customers’ questions correctly How to deal with customers when they say no How to listen effectively to customers EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
  • 4.  When you communicate with customers at Mama’s Subs, you can either speak or listen  As the speaker, you control the conversation  As long as you say something that interests your customer, you have their attention  As the speaker, it is your responsibility to get your message across the way you mean it–you may not get a second chance to explain STEP 1: SAYING WHAT YOU MEAN/MEANING WHAT YOU SAY
  • 5. Choose the right words  Think before you speak  Choose words that the listener will understand  Opt for easy and familiar words when describing the menu items to customers:  “Would you like chips with your order” vs. “May I assist you in developing your order with the addition of chips?” Add welcome words your vocabulary  When you use words that sound positive and confident, you will project a positive and confident attitude  Use welcoming words such as:  Sure!  Definitely!  Absolutely! SAY WHAT YOU MEAN
  • 6.  Make sure your tone fits the message you are sending  How you say something can be more important than what you say  In addition to choosing the right words, think about what tone you should use to convey them  If you’re tone is negative, the message may also be conceived in negative terms  When speaking to a customer who is upset, use a serious, helpful tone  When asking a customer if you can help, use an enthusiastic tone  When asking a customer a question, use a tone that shows you are truly interested in the answer  Pay attention to nonverbal cues to make sure your tone fits your customer SAY WHAT YOU MEAN
  • 7. Be professional While Mama’s Subs strives to maintain rapport with customers, there is a point at which what you say can be unprofessional Keep conversations with customers on a professional level Do not ask intruding or personal questions to customers Talk to them in a respectful manner Treat them as you would treat a respected boss SAY WHAT YOU MEAN
  • 8.  As has already been mentioned, how you say something can be more important than the words you choose  You can choose the right words and use the appropriate tone, but still send a different message to customers through nonverbal communication  Your appearance and behavior when you talk with customers are also important for nonverbal communication STEP 2: USING NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION
  • 9. Remember that actions speak louder than words  You may have a great attitude and personality, but your actions leave a lasting impression on your customers  Always be aware of your body language to make sure that you are sending the right nonverbal messages Smile often  A smile is one of the most powerful messages you can send  A smile makes the customer feel welcome  Get in the habit of smiling often  When you make a habit of smiling, your smile will look more natural NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION
  • 10.  Make eye contact  If you are uncomfortable making eye contact when you speak, first get into the habit of making eye contact when you listen  Once you are comfortable doing that, then try to make eye contact when you speak  Wandering eyes send the message that you are bored  Keep your energy level steady  Choose healthy, nutritious foods that will give you long-lasting energy (e.g., some of the lighter options at Mama’s Subs)  If you start feeling drowsy during the shift, breathe deeply and do a few stretches  Maintaining posture also helps keep energy levels up  Try to get enough rest in your daily life NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION
  • 11.  Proper grammar is critical for effective communication  When you use proper grammar, it is easier to communicate messages to customers  Proper grammar is important for taking orders and dealing with monetary (cash, credit, or debit) transactions  It is also important for handling any issues customers may have  Proper grammar signals to the customer that you are an effective communicator STEP 3: PUTTING WORDS TOGETHER: GRAMMAR
  • 12.  Reflect Mama’s Subs’ personality  At work, you are the voice for Mama’s Subs  You should always choose words that reflect the restaurant  For example:  “Hi! Welcome to Mama’s Subs, where we make subs just as good as mama does. How can I help you today?”  Notice in the previous example how professional, yet somewhat informal the greeting was  While some so-called “fine-dining” restaurants may require their employees to use formal language when speaking with customers (e.g., “Hello” instead of “Hi!”), Mama’s Subs is all about casual, welcoming (yet professional) communication GRAMMAR
  • 13.  Speak Clearly  Using overly casual terms or running words together can make a message difficult for some people to understand  Get in the habit of using the correct words in their correct form  EX: saying “Hi” instead of “Hey, man”  Speak clearly, and you will present yourself as an intelligent, competent person  Avoid using slang, jargon, or shorthand terms related to working at Mama’s Subs  Customers are not likely to know jargon or terms related to working at Mama’s Subs  This may cause confusion and frustration as the customer tries to specify how they would like their food  Explain items on the menu, deals on orders, and any pricing information using language that customers will understand GRAMMAR
  • 14.  Customers ask questions to gather information: information about the food, the prices, deals, children’s options, etc.  Typically, you will ask questions to complete an order, solve a customer’s problems, or resolve a customer’s complaint  There are two types of questions:  Open questions: require more than a yes or no answer and encourage the responder to provide information  Closed questions: require only a one-word (e.g., yes vs. no) or short answer and are often used for clarification purposes STEP 4: ASKING THE CORRECT QUESTIONS AND ANSWERING THE QUESTIONS CORRECTLY
  • 15.  Keep your questions simple  Stick with one type of question  When you lump two types of questions together, you run the risk that customers may not register all the responses they need to give  If a question is long and involved (e.g., determining what kind of combo they may want), break it down:  Employee: “Would you like to add the $1.99 medium combo to your sub today?”  Customer: “Yes, please.  Employee: “Great. What kind of drink would you like?”  Customer: “A Coke if you have it.”  Employee: “We sure do! And with that side item, what kind of drink would you like?”  Customer: “Chips, please.”  Notice in the previous example that the employee at the cash register broke the question up by asking each individual part separately ASKING/ANSWERING QUESTIONS
  • 16.  Before answering a customer’s question, make sure you understand it  If you do not understand a customer’s question, recap it or ask a clarifying question question rather than guessing the answer:  Customer: “I want that combo deal you have with my order.”  Employee: “Do you mean the $1.99 medium combo or the $2.49 large combo?”  Customer: “The $2.49 large combo.”  Also, never answer a question unless you are sure your answer is accurate  It is better to say “I don’t know, but I can find out for you” than giving an answer that may be incorrect ASKING/ANSWERING QUESTIONS
  • 17. Try to give more than a one-word answer  No matter which questioning technique customers use, answer as though the question is open ended  Giving more than a one-word answer can have an added bonus: you can generate sales:  Customer: “Can I get chips with the $1.99 combo?”  Employee: “Yes, ma’am! Or you can get potato salad, coleslaw, fruit, or yogurt. You can also add extra side items to your for only $0.64.”  Notice in the above example that the customer now has many options to choose from  They may decide to order more than one side item as well ASKING/ANSWERING QUESTIONS
  • 18.  You will definitely have to deal with customers who say no  When you offer a valid solution and your customer says no, your job is to uncover the reasons for your customer’s objections  When you get a real reason for the objection, you can figure out the best solution for that particular customer STEP 5: DEALING WITH CUSTOMERS WHEN THEY SAY NO
  • 19.  Listen to the customer’s objection  To learn the reason behind the no, ask a combination of open and closed questions  You need to understand why the customer is saying no so you can best help them  Acknowledge the objection  Always validate the customer’s reason and then respond with a positive statement:  Customer: “I do not want the $2.49 deal. It is too pricey.”  Employee: “I can understand that the price seems too high, but it is only $0.50 higher than the $1.99 combo, and the drink is twice as large as the drink in the $1.99 combo.”  After acknowledging the question, follow up with “how does that sound?” WHEN CUSTOMERS SAY NO
  • 20. Consider the customer’s answer to your proposal for their objection The customer’s response will determine whether they are objecting because they do not agree with your proposal or whether they are looking for more information In the previous example, if the customer says “that costs too much for me”, do not press the issue further If the customer responds with “twice as large? How man ounces is that?”, proceed to answering their question and getting the sale locked in WHEN CUSTOMERS SAY NO
  • 21.  Speaking is important because you are delivering a message, but listening is often more important because you cannot communicate the message without listening to the customer carefully  If you do not listen to the message, you might easily give the wrong response STEP 6: LISTENING ACTIVELY
  • 22.  Focus entirely on the customer  Think of the customer you are helping as the only customer in the restaurant  When you are listening to the customer, stay interested (even of the message is long)  Nod occasionally and say something like “I see”, “tell me more”, or “hmmm” to show you are listening  If your customer gets off track, politely interrupt and ask some clarifying questions to take control of the conversation  Listen completely  When you listen and talk at the same time, you do neither effectively  Pay attention to the customer  Try not to think of your response while the customer is talking  Wait until the question is winding down before thinking of how you want to respond LISTENING ACTIVELY
  • 23.  Handle interruptions from other customers professionally  If another customer interrupts you while you are listening to your customer, explain to the interrupter that you will be with them as soon as you are done helping your customer  If it is an unavoidable interruption, excuse yourself momentarily from your customer to answer the other person then quickly return attention and apologize for the interruption  Remain objective  Before drawing a conclusion or making a judgment, gather as much information as you can  This will help you avoid jumping to conclusions  Listen for what is not said  Pay attention to the customer’s nonverbal communication  Pay attention to what customers are really saying  If a customer appears on edge or upset, show empathy in your replies LISTENING ACTIVELY

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