The shocking reality of a government  day-hospital in Cape Town Health department DGThami Mseleku told MPs in parliament l...
Robbie Nurock Day Hospital   – view of weeds, rusted through gutters and cracked walls from courtyard
Another view of the courtyard, showing rusted pipes, mould on walls
View from inside hospital – crumbling walls
Plastic bags covering patient files to protect them from water dripping through roof
Cracked walls and mould above the toilet wash basins (no soap available)
Hole in the ceiling in main entrance
Inside the toilets – missing toilet seat, cracked tiles, dirty and mouldy
Cardboard boxes to mop up water from leaking roof
Rubbish accumulating in courtyard
Other observations included: <ul><li>Mould on inside walls and ceilings, large cracks in the walls, and gaping holes in th...
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Shocking state hospital conditions, South Africa

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Photos of the shocking conditions in a state day-hospital in Cape Town - a poor testament to the quality of government health care in South Africa

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  • Another thing that worries me is why I am being put on this BLOOD PRESSURE MEDICATION which I don't feel that I need. I have my own blood pressure monitor which I use at home to take my blood pressure. It is still the same as it was in April before I was on the medication. I know that high blood pressure is the silent killer in America, etc., but I just don't feel like sitting there month in and month out, losing a day's time and work for medication which I may not really need - I can drink green tea and use natural remedies to bring it down. When I went to the day hospital in Plumstead, I was concerned about the ULCER on my right medial malleolus, my right lower leg. I do not have diabetes, but I was SHOCKED when I saw the number of AMPUTEES. I have another story, but don't have time now, I have been crippled by a state doctor since 2008 when a tiny hammer toe op failed in that I got infection in the screw the dr. put in and it had to come out again six weeks post-op. Now I must live on tackies and orthotics for the rest of my life, being punished because I complained. The op was done at Victoria Hospital, then I was transferred to Groote Schuur Hospital (Orthopaedics) where I sat for TWO YEARS like an idiot being told to wear ORTHOTICS and that there is risk of amputation if I get infection again, which is UNACCEPTABLE, as I saw a Dr. at Constantiaberg Medi Clinic (a hand and foot specialist) who told me that OF COURSE it can be corrected - the toe is floating, I need contracture release and am in 24 hour discomfort, but because I don't have medical aid, I cannot afford to have the operation done privately and the state doctors have rejected me. I had the same experience at Tygerberg Hospital, I saw an orthopaedic doctor there, I was BOOKED for surgery, planned, prepared, etc., went in on that day only to be told that my foot looks nice, 'die voet lyk mooi' - so that was it. I don't understand how this time of treatment is allowed. I am a SA citizen, born in Pietermaritzburg, lived here all my life, a white woman alone, but when you have all these bad experiences, you wish you could leave instead of suffering neglect, humiliation by certain people employed in Dept Health.
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  • I am having endless hassles with Victoria Hospital and the day hospital in the southern suburbs (Lady Michaelis) - I am an out-patient, a white woman aged 56. They force you to sit there for hours waiting for BLOOD PRESSURE medication, emphasise the blood pressure, took wrong readings, whereas my main reason for going there is because I had a non-healing ulcer on my lower leg. Then Victoria Hospital sister GRUDGINGLY treated me for a venous ulcer, probably did more harm than good. I complained about irregular dressings, etc. and because I complained, the medical supt's defence was that I am 'mad', an old psychiatric patient, whereas I had not attended their clinic for about 20 yrs since my son died tragically in 1996!! To cut a long story short, I was told by dr at Victoria Hospital that he is NOT ALLOWED to treat me any further. I was then transferred to GROOTE SCHUUR HOSPITAL Varicose Vein dept where they did a biopsy and the diagnosis was that the 'ulcer' was cancerous, I had Squamous Cell Carcinoma. I would have had to wait until JUNE 2012 for an appointment at Groote Schuur Hospital. FORTUNATELY, it was cut out, excised. I have lost an entire year sitting at Lady Michaelis day hospital, going for wrong treatment at Victoria Hospital, now the slow process of healing post-op, the op was on 14 July and I had to fend and see to myself after discharge about an hr maximum after the op; my daughter is also in UK. I feared infection, septicaemia, all those things, was afraid of wrong treatment in the dressing room, because of my past bad experience. I am so sorry about your sad experience and so glad that you said something as most state patients are too afraid to say anything out of fear of not being treated further.
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  • My mother, fell at her house, her blood pressure was low. Then the GP came out to the house and sent her to Karl Bremer Hospital. First off, she was supposed to go to a Trauma Unit, like Tygerberg Hospital and be put in ICU and checked out as to why her blood pressure was low. By the end of that day, she was just lying in a ward with other patients, nobody was checking on her. BY the evening they took ONE x-ray of her hips. They did not try to find out why her blood pressure was so low. The same day, she just died! She was not sick or anything. When I travelled to South Africa for her funeral, I went to the hospital and spoke to a Dr Stander at the Emergency room. She told me something major must have happened they do not know what!!!!If we want to know exactly what we must have an autopsy done. I said, my mom was already buried, on the death certificate it said she died of natural causes! I have heard numerous stories of patients going there, just dying for no reason. People going there in the ambulance, waiting up till 8 hours to be seen and they die there. Now they say if you this side of Voortrekker road, you go to Karl Bremer and that side you go to Tygerberg Hospital. But there is no ICU at Karl Bremer and they do not have the facilities to take x-rays in case of falls. The GP of a practice on Voortrekker Road, Parow, just sent her there, not even thinking or assessing her. It is really sad. Louise Van der Bank
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  • After you got all the information on Fioricet, another point on your agenda should be the price for it. http://www.fioricetsupply.com resolves this problem. Now you can make the decision to buy.
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Shocking state hospital conditions, South Africa

  1. 1. The shocking reality of a government day-hospital in Cape Town Health department DGThami Mseleku told MPs in parliament last month that South African hospitals led the world “from a clinical point of view”. Ironically, a visit to the Robbie Nurock Day Hospital -a hospital only a stone’s throw from Parliament showed a facility falling into ruin through shameful neglect. DA MP Mike Waters, upon visiting the hospital declared: “ While the disintegration of any health facility is a disgrace, the fact that a hospital so close to a centre of power should be in such a state shows exactly how blind the ANC is to the conditions faced by the poor.” IS THIS THE HEALTH CARE SOUTH AFRICANS DESERVE?
  2. 2. Robbie Nurock Day Hospital – view of weeds, rusted through gutters and cracked walls from courtyard
  3. 3. Another view of the courtyard, showing rusted pipes, mould on walls
  4. 4. View from inside hospital – crumbling walls
  5. 5. Plastic bags covering patient files to protect them from water dripping through roof
  6. 6. Cracked walls and mould above the toilet wash basins (no soap available)
  7. 7. Hole in the ceiling in main entrance
  8. 8. Inside the toilets – missing toilet seat, cracked tiles, dirty and mouldy
  9. 9. Cardboard boxes to mop up water from leaking roof
  10. 10. Rubbish accumulating in courtyard
  11. 11. Other observations included: <ul><li>Mould on inside walls and ceilings, large cracks in the walls, and gaping holes in the ceiling, with water dripping into the patients’ waiting area and onto patients’ files. </li></ul><ul><li>Broken toilets, and a foul stench pervading the toilet area. No soap available at all, despite a notice warning nurses to use soap. </li></ul><ul><li>Piles of rubbish that have clearly been lying around for many weeks, weeds growing everywhere, and gutters completely clogged up with grass and litter. </li></ul><ul><li>A window to the pharmacy opening on to the street with medicines easily reachable from the street. The pharmacy failed its inspection in January but nothing has been done to improve its functioning. No proper mechanism in either the pharmacy or the ARV section to keep medicines at the right temperature.     </li></ul><ul><li>Staff reported they regularly find rats hiding under rubble. </li></ul><ul><li>No confidentiality for HIV/AIDS patients, because dispensing areas for HIV drugs open directly on to the waiting area for all patients. </li></ul><ul><li>Many wooden floor tiles are loose or missing. </li></ul>

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