Running head: PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                   1                             PTP – Veteran Student...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                               2                    ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                               3situations, leaving ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                               4With the increase of...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                              5       Although this ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                                 62010). Also, the e...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                                7population is consi...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                                8relevance to their ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                           9       Albeit veteran st...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                            10speaking, and an under...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                            11       The implementat...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                             12                     ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                             13Ethnicity: (check all that apply)___ ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                        14I will return, but would l...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS   15     TBD
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                           16                       ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                    17o The learning outcomes addres...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                          18The workshop was informa...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                          19      The guest speaker ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                           20                       ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                  21___ Latino___ African American__...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                22                         Thank you!
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                       23Set-Up, Materials Needed, e...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                          24                        ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                 25___ African American___ Native Am...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                      26                            ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                          27                        ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                   28   ___ Sophomore   ___ Junior  ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                 29             1           2       ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                   30The lunch series have helped me...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                        31                          ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                          32                        ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                          33       193–212.Kolb, A. ...
PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS                                                                          34       diversity educati...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Ptp nguyen ramirez_wami_wright

393
-1

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
393
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ptp nguyen ramirez_wami_wright

  1. 1. Running head: PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 1 PTP – Veteran Students Tam Nguyen, Brittany Ramirez, Chimzi Wami, Andrew Wright July 14, 2011 California State University, Fullerton
  2. 2. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 2 Identify the purpose and importance of the paper Within the United States’ higher education community, there exists a multitude of diversepopulations, all of which require different services to succeed in education. One such populationis U.S. veterans. According to the American Council on Education (ACE) as referenced byRadford (2008), this diverse group faces much adversity upon reintegration to the civilian lifeand higher education after serving in the military. ACE, as reported in Radford (2008), statesthat this generation of veterans will be poised to contribute to their communities as civilians.There is no question about the state of our current economy and the need for a well-qualifiedworkforce. U.S. veterans offer years of experience and leadership that will assist in therebuilding of our economy, but to be considered for many positions, veterans must first reachtheir educational endeavors. “As of March 2007, just over 1.5 million members of the armed services had beendeployed and had served in either Iraq or Afghanistan” (Defense Manpower Data Center, 2007)."As these conflicts continue, the number of combat veterans who become college students willlikely increase. Given what we have learned about assisting the members of a special studentpopulation with relation to achieving their educational goals, it would be a disservice to treatveterans as if they were invisible" (Ackerman, DiRamio, & Mitchell, 2009, p. 12). Veteranstudents are a unique population due to the “many broad, positive, and insightful developmentalexperiences during their military service (i.e. living around the world and experiencing differentcultures, technical training for their respective occupations, and professional military education).Many of these veterans have survived, endured, and excelled in artificial and real-world
  3. 3. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 3situations, leaving them both resilient and self-confident” (Hassan, Jackson, Lindsay, McGabe,& Sanders, 2010, p. 31). The purpose of this paper is to analyze developmental reintegration of U.S. veterans intothe university population, and to assess the benefits of peer mentor programs as support for thesestudents. The theories that inform this analysis are Schlossberg’s Theory of Transition, Kolb’sTheory of Experiential Learning, and Sanford’s Theory of Challenge and Support. An overviewof these theories will be provided to create a framework for understanding the importance of apeer mentor program for the veteran student population. Using the theoretical frameworkprovided, a peer mentor program entitled “For Veterans By Veterans” (4VBV) will be designedto ease the veteran student’s adjustment into the university’s social construct. A discussion willbe provided on the implementation process of 4VBV and will conclude with an evaluationproposal of the program and recommendations for future improvement. Literature Review Peer Mentoring According to Kuh (1993), as cited in Wawrzynski, LoConte, & Straker (2011),undergraduate peer mentor programs are gaining popularity as an influential form of support forcollege campuses. The programs provide students with an innovative way to help other studentsovercome issues in their lives. Peer mentor programs allow open space for students to discussissues regarding sexuality, drug use, and other personal issues (Wawrzynski et al., 2011).Reports have suggested that orientation sessions provided for veterans by veterans, along withmentoring programs that incorporate peers can be beneficial forms of support (Ackerman et al.,2009; National Association of State Head Injury Administrators, 2007; Brown & Gross, 2011).
  4. 4. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 4With the increase of veteran students on our college campuses, veteran peers will serve a vitalrole in the transition to college life from military life. Schlossberg’s Theory of Transition As our veteran population transitions into their new identities as civilians and students,they face a variety of changes. Schlossberg’s Transition Model introduced in 1984 and revisedin 1995 provides theoretical underpinning for understanding the shifting process that veteranstudents experience. Transitions are characterized by changes due to the shift in roles, routines,and relationships (Schlossberg, Waters, & Goodman, 1995). The process of transitions areunderstood using the three phases of “moving in,” “moving through,” and “moving out”(Schlossberg et al., 1995). Reports show that individuals leaving the military and enteringcollege, experience difficulty balancing multiple transitions simultaneously (DiRamio et al.,2008; Harper, Wilson, & Parks, 2010). Returning as adult learners, veterans are changing theirroles at home, in the community at large, and in their educational environment (Schlossberg,Lynch, & Chickering, 1989). During their “moving in” phase, veterans express a sense ofdisconnect between their personal experiences and those of traditional-age students on campus(DiRamio, et al. 2008). While they progress in their “moving through” period, they areconfronted with balancing their lives along with their new student role (Schlossberg et al., 1989).As veteran students approach the “moving out” phase, they have experienced the end of theirnew transition as students and are now questioning the next steps in their lives (Schlossberg etal., 1989).
  5. 5. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 5 Although this theory is useful in creating a foundation for understanding transitions inour veteran students, the lack of assessment of this theory limits its validity within ourpopulation. Kolb’s Theory of Experiential Learning Veteran students’ enriching and global experiences bring a higher level of experientiallearning into the classroom (Hassan, Jackson, Lindsay, McGabe, & Sanders, 2010; Radford,2009). Kolb’s Theory of Experiential Learning provides an understanding of the importance ofexperiential learning to veteran students as well as their classmates. Kolb (1984) stated that“knowledge is continuously derived from and tested out of the experiences of the learner” (p.26). According to Evans, Forney, Guido, Patton, and Renn (2010), the purpose of experientiallearning is to help students make connections to the subject matter. A number of works based onKolb’s Theory of Experiential Learning have shown that connecting the student’s personal life totheir academic experiences will enhance the comprehension of the content being presented(Enns, 1993; Kolb, 1984; Rainey & Kolb, 1995; Kolb & Kolb, 2006; Kolb & Kolb, 2005). Themore real life experiences the student is exposed to, the more likely the student is to makeconnections between their personal life and academia. As a student develops and experiencesmore, the learning process is altered by those events. In addition to developing their ownlearning experience, the veterans are also positively impacting the educational experience of thestudents that attend alongside them. One of the limitations of the experiential learning theory is that it focuses primarily onthe student’s learning in a given context, not taking into consideration their personal level ofintelligence or how cognitive complexity can influence their capacity to learn (Evans et al.,
  6. 6. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 62010). Also, the experiential learning model is conceptualized within the context of formaleducation, posing the question of how applicable it can be toward students in non-traditionalcareers, which is a viable path for veteran students to pursue (Evans et al., 2010). Sanford’s Challenge and Support Theory Once a veteran transitions into the role of a student and is working toward applying theirmilitary experience to their current education, it is important to focus on the interaction that theveteran has with the environment. According to a recent report, the transition from soldier tostudent poses a number of challenges and it is the responsibility of the campus to provide thesupport necessary for students to be successful (Hassan, et al., 2010). To further understand thisconcept of support for veterans, Nevitt Sanford’s (1966) Theory of Challenge and Support is anappropriate framework to consider. According to Sanford (1966), challenging students to pushthemselves forward developmentally is crucial, but an adequate amount of support must beprovided. A balance between challenge and support is achieved when students try to minimizethe tension found on a college campus through the support that is available to them (Sanford,1962; 1967). Ackerman et al. (2009) referenced participants of their study who explained thatveterans experience difficulty in moving from a strict and structured environment to a looselyconfigured campus. Higher education professionals should familiarize themselves with thechallenges that veterans may face and show support for veterans by reaching out to them andletting them know that they understand their challenges (DiRamio & Spires, 2009; Cook & Kim,2009). While the generalizability of the Challenge and Support Theory allows for the possibilityof adaptation to a variety of situations, it can be a hindrance as well. The veteran student
  7. 7. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 7population is considered a special population, and special populations are not directlyrepresented by the Challenge and Support Theory. Characteristics of Veteran Students U.S. veterans are a growing group of students that enhance the diversity of theircollegiate environment. Veteran students are typically first-generation adult learners who vary inethnic makeup and are twenty-four years of age and older (Brown & Gross, 2011; Radford,2009). A majority of veteran students arrive on campus with financial benefits and transferablecredits earned while on active duty (Brown & Gross, 2011). Many veterans also suffer fromPost-Traumatic Stress Disorder, a condition which creates barriers to their academic success(Cook & Kim, 2009). Veteran students display strong qualities of teamwork, sacrifice, courage,and perseverance that are key foundations for success in academic and professional careers(Hassan et al., 2010). Veteran students’ previous military environment provides for a differenttransition than that of other adult learners as they take on a new student role. Veteran studentsneed a period of reflection to understand how their previous militant roles can enhance theircurrent student identity, and it is through the experiential learning process that this can beachieved (Merriam, Caffarella, & Baumgartner, 2007). A report has shown that upon entering college many veterans experience a sense ofdisconnect between their veteran status and how that fits within the campus environment (Brown& Gross, 2011). This sense of mattering is extremely important for veteran students and isrelated to their sense of engagement in their learning (Schlossberg et al., 1989). Additionally,veteran students suffer from low retention rates as a result of an institutions improper evaluationof transfer credits and inappropriate placement of veterans in classes that lack academic rigor or
  8. 8. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 8relevance to their degrees (Brown & Gross, 2011). They are also greatly challenged bytransitioning from a command and control environment to a loosely structured college campus(Brown & Gross, 2011). Challenge and Support The theories presented in the literature review are pertinent in order to understand theanticipated challenges and the needed support that the veteran population will encounter duringtheir collegiate career. Schlossberg’s Transition Theory presented a framework forunderstanding the transitional phases of veterans as they progress through their new role asstudents and members of a higher education learning environment. Proper challenge and supportduring this period can come from various aspects within the college community. The mainchallenge that these veterans are facing is the questioning of their presence in the collegiatecommunity, and how they can relate to other students. Support can come from connecting withother veterans on campus; that support can be comprised of students, staff, or faculty to helpthem transition to the “moving in” phase. Faculty and academic advisors can also providesupport for veteran students who are experiencing difficulty adapting to various learningenvironments. The low structure teaching style of some teachers may aim to promoteindependence and creative thinking, but in turn can be complicating and frustrating for veteranstudents who are conditioned to follow commands. To address these learning issues, anunderstanding of the experiential learning theory would allow veterans to explore their previousexperiences in the military and link them to their current student experiences. The appropriatechallenge for this learning process is to encourage students to reflect on their experiences andfurther explore the importance of the previous experience and the transition out of their old role.
  9. 9. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 9 Albeit veteran students require support in various forms to succeed in their newtransitions, their mental capacity as adult learners to handle stimulating tasks should not beforgotten. Sanford’s Challenge and Support Theory can be used to explore areas where thecollege community can acknowledge the veteran’s capacity to be mentally challenged, and helpthem grow as learners by expanding on their previous experiences. Peer Mentoring Program: 4VBV Designing a comprehensive peer mentoring program is an appropriate programmingoption to assist in the success of incoming veteran students. The support program created is “ForVeterans By Veterans”. The goal of 4VBV is to assist in guiding veteran students through theirtenure at the institution of attendance. This program is designed to inform the students beingserved of the resources offered on campus that will aid in their progression and successfulcompletion of their educational endeavors. One-on-one mentorship would be instrumental in helping a student adjust to collegiatelife as an adult learner. This intervention aligns with the “moving in” phase of Schlossberg’sTransition Theory. Through one-on-one mentorship with students who have previouslyexperienced similar adjustments, students can receive advice about their changing roles at home,in the community, and in their new school environment. This program, featuring veteran peermentors who have attended the institution for a minimum of one year, will be charged withmentoring first-year veteran students. Students will meet bi-weekly with a trained veteranstudent mentor and will be consistently informed of events occurring on campus that may be ofvalue to the new veteran student. Peer mentor training will include subject matter such as public
  10. 10. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 10speaking, and an understanding of campus resources. In addition, students will plan eventscatered to their mentee’s needs. (See Appendix A) The next component of the 4VBV program is a series of workshops that are provided as areflection of Sanford’s Challenge and Support Theory. These workshops will provide thenecessary support to new veteran students by addressing challenges they may encounter as aresult of insufficient information. The workshops will address the veteran students’ needs byproviding information regarding topics such as veteran-related benefits, writing, and mentalhealth and relaxation techniques. (See Appendix B) The third component of 4VBV is group discussion sessions that will encourageconversation between veteran students and their college community on how to apply theirprevious military experience to their classroom in order to facilitate student success. Thisintervention is reflective of Kolb’s Theory of Experiential Learning. (See Appendix C) The 4VBV program will also include a monthly brown bag lunch series to lend anopportunity for students to socialize and meet other veterans, therefore easing their transition intocollegiate life. This intervention correlates with the “moving through” phase of Schlossberg’sTheory of Transition. Each lunch would encourage student discussion of current issues in theveteran community as well as issues pertinent to general campus populations. In addition, thebrown bag lunch series would be open to the campus community to increase awareness of theveteran population on the campus and to assist veteran students with their reintegration. (SeeAppendix D) Implementation and Conclusion
  11. 11. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 11 The implementation of the 4VBV peer mentoring program aims to create a supportiveand welcoming college environment to assist veterans through this transitional period in theirlives. In understanding that veteran students are similar to other adult learners in that they havevarying responsibilities and educational needs, the 4VBV peer mentoring program implementedvarious interventions in order to address the needs of their diverse student population. The goalof this program is to create a network of support that provides veteran students with a securesense of belonging within their college environment. In addition, it is the intent of the programto provide services that will allow veteran students to view the 4VBV peer mentoring program asa comfortable space for reflection and sharing of their previous experiences. Also, 4VBVintends to provide a feeling of support during the transitions into their new roles. To measure the success of the program in terms of whether or not it has reached itsprogrammatic goals and has achieved the intended student learning outcomes, a quantitative andqualitative evaluation piece will be implemented. Throughout the semester, individualevaluation forms will be given to the students in attendance at the one-on-one mentorshipmeetings, workshops, group discussions, and brown bag lunches in order to monitor the successof each intervention as it progresses. To follow, a survey (See Appendix E) will be sent out toall participants that have been involved in any number of the interventions provided by the4VBV program in order to obtain feedback on overall practices of the programs at the end of thefirst semester. We will also conduct a small voluntary focus group by randomly selectingparticipants from the four different interventions to provide us with quantitative data.Improvements to the program will be determined based upon the feedback provided.
  12. 12. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 12 APPENDIX AOne-on-One Mentoring Sessions – Lesson PlanDescription of InterventionThe peer mentor program will incorporate one-on-one mentorship opportunities where studentswill meet for one hour, bi-weekly with a trained student mentor who identifies as a veteran. Mentor training will include subject matter such as public speaking, and understanding campusresources. In addition, the mentors will assist in planning some of the events catered to thementees. Through one-on-one mentorship with other students who have previously experiencedsimilar adjustments, mentees may receive advice on their changing roles at home, in thecommunity, and in their new school environment. This program, featuring veteran peer mentorswho have attended the institution for a minimum of one year, will be charged with mentoringfirst-year veteran students and keeping them informed of events occurring on campus.Student Learning Outcomes1. SWiBAT recall (knowledge) specific pieces of advice provided by the mentor regarding theirchanging roles at home, in the community, and in their new school environment.2. SWiBAT identify (knowledge/comprehension) faculty mentors who may assist them with theissue of transitioning from their role as a soldier in combat to their role as a student on a collegecampus.Connections to Theoryo The learning outcomes integrate Schlossberg’s “Moving In” phase.o The learning outcomes address the need for one-on-one mentorship in the transition from the student’s role as a soldier to their new role as a student by providing the student with a comfortable and private environment in which they can speak about their challenges and gain support in order to overcome them.Assessment Strategy One-on-One Mentorship EvaluationDate: __________________Peer Mentor Name: ____________________________Gender:___ Male___ Female___ Decline to Disclose___ Other: ___________________________
  13. 13. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 13Ethnicity: (check all that apply)___ Caucasian___ Asian Pacific Islander___ Latino___ African American___ Native AmericanAge:___ 18-23___ 24-30___ 31-35___ 35+Use the following scale to answer the questions below:1- Strongly Disagree2- Disagree3- Neutral4- Agree5- Strongly AgreeThe peer mentor provided me with a comfortable environment: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableThe peer mentor was attentive to my needs: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableThe peer mentor provided the services I was looking for: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableThe peer mentor aided me in progression in to my new role: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableI will return to see the same peer mentor: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not Applicable
  14. 14. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 14I will return, but would like to see a different peer mentor: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicablePlease provide any additional comments that may be used to improve our services. Thank you!Materials Needed  Evaluation form  Campus event information (i.e. brochures, announcements)Activity Outline 1. Check-In (20 minutes) Begin mentoring session with a check-in, asking the mentees how they are feeling about their day. The mentor’s role is to create a supportive and caring environment by allowing the student veteran to openly discuss their thoughts. 2. Facilitation (20 minutes) Ask the mentee to describe how they are feeling about their educational journey at that point in time. Ask them specific questions about their classes and their interactions with other students on campus. This will provide the mentees with an opportunity to intentionally reflect on these current experiences and potentially identify areas that need additional support. 3. Closing (17 minutes) Depending on the outcome of the check-in and facilitation, the mentor can assist the mentee in identifying a goal they would like to achieve before their next session, along with identifying other members on campus that may be able to further aid in their transition. The mentor may also take this time to invite the veteran to attend events around campus. 4. Distribute Evaluation Form (3 minutes)Assessment Results  TBDNotes, Future Changes, Etc.
  15. 15. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 15  TBD
  16. 16. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 16 APPENDIX BWorkshop – Lesson PlanDescription of InterventionThe peer mentor program will offer a series of workshops for first-year veteran studentsfeaturing topics such as:Writing: The writing workshop will be the first of the spring semester and will lastapproximately ninety minutes. It will provide an opportunity for tutors from the AcademicResource Center to speak with students in attendance. Students will be informed of the servicesoffered by the Academic Resource Center and students will be given basic writing strategies. Toconclude the workshop, attendees will be invited to have writing assignments reviewed by awriting tutor.Benefits: The benefits workshop will be the second of the spring semester and will lastapproximately one hour. The topics discussed in the workshop will include the GI bill, benefitsfor dependents, local community benefits (i.e. store / entertainment discounts), and financial aid. It is the goal of 4VBV to provide an atmosphere that encourages dialogue in the event thatstudents feel intimidated.Mental Health/Relaxation: The mental health/relaxation workshop is a one-hour workshop thatwill take place prior to finals week. A mini health and wellness fair will be set up so thatstudents may take items and brochures from various campus offices that correlate with mentaland physical health, and wellness. The offices will include the wellness center, counselingoffice, student health center, and recreational center. Information presented will cover varioussubjects including street management techniques, biofeedback, the importance of sleep, dangersof alcohol and other drugs, and will feature free massages.Overall, these workshops will provide the necessary support to new veteran students byaddressing challenges they may encounter as a result of insufficient information.Student Learning Outcomes1. SWiBAT discuss (comprehension) the challenges that were being faced upon entering theworkshop and the sources of support that were provided to overcome these challenges.2. SWiBAT apply (application) the resources provided in the workshops in order to overcomechallenges faced on campus.Connections to Theoryo The learning outcomes integrate Sanford’s Challenge and Support Theory.
  17. 17. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 17o The learning outcomes address the need for information about resources on campus in order to overcome the challenges of becoming a college student in adulthood.Assessment Strategy Workshop EvaluationDate: __________________Name of Workshop: ____________________________Gender:___ Male___ Female___ Decline to Disclose___ Other: ___________________________Ethnicity: (check all that apply)___ Caucasian___ Asian Pacific Islander___ Latino___ African American___ Native AmericanAge:___ 18-23___ 24-30___ 31-35___ 35+Use the following scale to answer the questions below:1- Strongly Disagree2- Disagree3- Neutral4- Agree5- Strongly AgreeThe workshop provided me with a comfortable environment: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableThe workshop was interactive and interesting: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not Applicable
  18. 18. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 18The workshop was informative and I gained the information that was intended: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableThe workshop provided me with new information that I was unaware of prior to attending: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableThe workshop provided information/resources that will help me overcome challenges: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableI will return for future workshops: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicablePlease provide any additional comments that may be used to improve our services. Thank you!Set-Up, Materials Needed, etc.  Sign-in sheets  Pens/Pencils  Any necessary handouts  Place any necessary handouts on each desk prior to start of workshopActivity Outline 1. Sign-In (10 minutes) Each participant will sign in prior to the workshop beginning. 2. Welcome (10 minutes) The director of the 4VBV program will welcome all attendees, followed by an introduction to the topic of the day, its relevance to the veteran population, and introduce the guest speaker as well. 3. Presentation/Activity (30 - 60 minutes depending on workshop as workshop lengths vary)
  19. 19. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 19 The guest speaker will address the topic of the day and provide an open and supportive space for questions from the participants. Any activities (i.e. mini resource fair for the mental health/relaxation workshop) will occur prior to the presentation. 4. Closing (5 minutes) The presenter will provide contact information as well as additional resources for the veterans. 5. Distribute/Collect Evaluation Forms In A Closed Box (5 minutes)Assessment Results  TBDNotes, Future Changes, Etc.  TBD
  20. 20. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 20 APPENDIX CGroup Discussions – Lesson PlanDescription of InterventionThe peer mentor program will offer small group discussion sessions that last approximately twoand one half hours. Throughout the discussions, veterans will lend a wealth of experiences theyhave faced with other attendees. Due to the likelihood that the veteran students in attendancewill be adult learners, the goal of 4VBV is to intermingle fellow adult learners with traditionally-aged classmates. In addition, small group discussions will encourage veteran students to usesimilar applications in the classroom to facilitate student success.Student Learning Outcomes1. SWiBAT discuss (comprehension) their experiences in the classroom as done in the groupdiscussion in order to inform classmates of their background.2. SWiBAT correlate (analysis) experiences from the military with classroom material in orderto enhance the comprehension of the content being presented by discussing experiences aloudwith other group discussion attendees.Connections to Theoryo The learning outcomes integrate Kolb’s Theory of Experiential Learning.o The learning outcomes address the benefits of veteran students sharing their experiences in the classroom.o The learning outcomes address the benefits of veteran students sharing their experiences in order to enhance their comprehension of the content being presented.Assessment Strategy Group Discussion EvaluationDate: __________________Date of Group Discussion: __________________Gender:___ Male___ Female___ Decline to Disclose___ Other: ___________________________Ethnicity: (check all that apply)___ Caucasian___ Asian Pacific Islander
  21. 21. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 21___ Latino___ African American___ Native AmericanAge:___ 18-23___ 24-30___ 31-35___ 35+Use the following scale to answer the questions below:1- Strongly Disagree2- Disagree3- Neutral4- Agree5- Strongly AgreeThe group discussion provided me with a comfortable environment: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableThe group discussion provided me with the outcome I was looking for: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableThe group discussion gave me confidence to speak to my classmates about my experiences: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableAttending the group discussions will help my comprehension in the classroom: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableI will return for another group discussion: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicablePlease provide any additional comments that may be used to improve our services.
  22. 22. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 22 Thank you!
  23. 23. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 23Set-Up, Materials Needed, etc.  Sign-in sheets  Pens/Pencils  Any necessary handouts  Place any necessary handouts on each desk prior to start of group discussionActivity Outline 1. Sign-In (15 minutes) Each participant will sign in prior to the workshop beginning. 2. Introduction (45 minutes) Director/Program Representative will open the discussion with an icebreaker activity to introduce the attendees. 3. Facilitation (65 minutes) The Director/Program Representative will open the group discussion to allow members to share about their current experiences in the classroom, encouraging older veterans to share in order to ease the tension of the newer veterans. 4. Closing (20 minutes) The Director/Program Representative will close the session by thanking the veterans for sharing their experiences, and validating their current hardships while also encouraging them to be persistent in their education. The Director/Program Representative will use the concepts of experiential learning to help provide guidance on how to draw connections between the student’s learning and their prior military experience as a way to connect both military and student role. 5. Distribute/Collect Evaluation Forms In A Closed Box (5 minutes)Assessment Results  TBDNotes, Future Changes, Etc.  TBD
  24. 24. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 24 APPENDIX DBrown Bag Lunch Series – Lesson PlanDescription of InterventionThe peer mentor program will incorporate a monthly veteran’s brown-bag lunch series. Eachmixer will last two and one-half hours. The purpose of this lunch series is to lend an opportunityfor students to socialize and meet other veterans in a casual environment, therefore easing theirtransition into college. The campus community would be invited to attend this event. Eachlunch would encourage student discussion of current issues in the veteran community as well asissues pertinent to general campus populations to assist veteran students in their reintegration.Student Learning Outcomes1. SWiBAT identify (knowledge) the names of three faculty mentors present at the brown baglunch who will aid them in the process of balancing their personal lives along with their newstudent role.2. SWiBAT establish (application) relationships with other veteran students who were present atthe brown bag lunch mixer in order to assist them long-term with the issue of balancing theirlives and their role as a student.Connections to Theoryo The learning outcomes integrate Schlossberg’s “Moving Through” Phase.o The learning outcomes address the need for veteran students to socialize with other veteran students and faculty in a casual environment in order to ease the transition in to college.Assessment Strategy Brown Bag Lunch Series EvaluationDate: __________________Date of Brown Bag Lunch: ____________________________Gender:___ Male___ Female___ Decline to Disclose___ Other: ___________________________Ethnicity: (check all that apply)___ Caucasian___ Asian Pacific Islander___ Latino
  25. 25. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 25___ African American___ Native AmericanAge:___ 18-23___ 24-30___ 31-35___ 35+Use the following scale to answer the questions below:1- Strongly Disagree2- Disagree3- Neutral4- Agree5- Strongly AgreeThe brown bag lunch provided me with a comfortable environment: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableI enjoyed meeting other veteran students at the brown bag lunch: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableI was able to connect with faculty mentors at the brown bag lunch: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableI was able to connect with other veteran students at the brown bag lunch: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableI will return to future brown bag lunch sessions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicablePlease provide any additional comments that may be used to improve our services.
  26. 26. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 26 Thank you!Set-Up, Materials Needed, etc.  Sign-in sheets  Pens/Pencils  Any necessary handouts  Place any necessary handouts on sign-in desk prior to start of brown bag lunchActivity Outline 1. Sign-In (15 minutes) Each participant will sign in prior to the workshop beginning. 2. Welcome/Introduction (20 minutes) The Director/Program Representative will welcome the group to the lunch session and introduce members of the college community that are in attendance. 3. Facilitation (20 minutes) The Director/Program Representative can use this time to bring up current events in the community that may relate to the veteran community and create discussion among attendees. 4. “Mixer Time” (80 minutes) Students will intermingle and visit with each other. This is a low structured session where veterans and the college community are able to socialize and build relationships. 5. Closing (5 minutes) The Director/Program Representative will close the lunch session by thanking those that have attended and also inform them of the next lunch session. 6. Distribute/Collect Evaluation Form In A Closed Box (10 minutes)Assessment Results  TBDNotes, Future Changes, Etc.  TBD
  27. 27. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 27 APPENDIX E 4VBV Overall Program Assessment PlanTo assess whether or not the current program is meeting its programmatic goal of informing thestudents being served of the resources offered on campus that will aid in their progression andsuccessful completion of their educational endeavors, a satisfaction survey will be sent out to allparticipants of the 4VBV program. A program database will be compiled from the sign-in sheetsthat were obtained from the one-on-one sessions, group discussions, workshops, and brown baglunch series. The following survey will be sent out electronically using Student Voice, a thirdparty assessment provider, at the end of the first semester. 4VBV Overall Program Assessment SurveyDear participant of the 4VBV program, please fill out the following survey to assist our programwith improvement of services in order to continually meet your needs.1. Please select the programs that you have participated in: (check all that apply) ___ One-on-One Mentor Sessions ___ Workshops ___ Group Discussions ___ Brown Bag Lunch Series2. Gender: ___ Male ___ Female ___ Decline to Disclose ___ Other: ___________________________3. Age: ___ 18-23 ___ 24-30 ___ 31-35 ___ 35+4. Ethnicity: (check all that apply) ___ Caucasian ___ Asian Pacific Islander ___ Latino ___ African American ___ Native American5. Select your student standing: ___ Freshman
  28. 28. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 28 ___ Sophomore ___ Junior ___ Senior6. Did you transfer from a different college institution? ___ Yes ___ No7. Are you the first in your family to attend college? ___ Yes ___ No8. How long have you been away from active duty? ___ 0-1 year ___ 2-3 years ___ 4+9. Do you suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? ___ Yes ___ No ___ Unsure ___ Decline to DiscloseUse the following scale to answer the questions below: 1- Strongly Disagree 2- Disagree 3- Neutral 4- Agree 5- Strongly Agree 6- Not Applicable One-on-One MentoringAfter my one on one mentoring session with my peer mentor, I was able to recall advicegiven to me regarding my changing roles at home, in the community, and in their newschool environment. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableAfter my one-on-one mentoring session with my peer mentor, I was able to identify facultymentors who may assist me with the issue of transitioning from my role as a soldier incombat to a student on campus.
  29. 29. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 29 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not Applicable WorkshopsPlease indicate which workshop(s) you attended: ___ Writing ___ Benefits ___ Mental Health and RelaxationThe workshops provided me necessary resources for overcoming the challenges that I hadpertaining to the topic of the workshop. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableI was able to apply the knowledge gained from the workshops in order to overcomechallenges faced on campus. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not Applicable Group DiscussionsThe group discussions provided me an opportunity to share my learning experiences in theclassroom with other veteran students. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableThe group discussions allowed me to connect my experiences from the military withclassroom material as a way to enhance my comprehension of the content being presented. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not Applicable Brown Bag Lunch SeriesThe lunch series has helped me identify names of faculty mentors who have aided me in theprocess of balancing my life along with my new student role. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not Applicable
  30. 30. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 30The lunch series have helped me establish relationships with other veteran students whowere present at the brown-bag lunch mixer that have assisted in with balancing their livesand their role as a student. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableOverall, the 4VBV program has assisted in my transition as a college student. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableI would recommend this program to incoming veterans. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicableI will continue to participate in this program next semester. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Strongly Disagree Not ApplicablePlease provide any additional comments that may be used to improve our services. Thank you for completing our survey!
  31. 31. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 31 4VBV Focus Group AssessmentThank you for volunteering for this focus group. The purpose of this assessment group is tounderstand your experiences with the 4VBV program and use your recommendations to makeimprovements to our program.Consent:Your participation in the 4VBV focus group is voluntary, and the personal risks here areminimal. We will use your information to make improvements to our program, but in reviewingthe data we will not disclose your identity. You may withdraw from this focus group at any timewith no harm done to you.If you consent please sign below to continue:Participant name _______________ Signature ___________________ Date______________Questions:1. Of the four services 4VBV has provided, which are the most beneficial to your transitioningprocess as a veteran to a student and why?2. Which service(s) would you change if given the opportunity and how would you changeit/them?3. Which services would you like to see added to the 4VBV program?Thank you for your participation in this focus group! We appreciate your time and feedback andwe hope to see you at our future events.
  32. 32. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 32 ReferencesAckerman, R., DiRamio, D., & Garza Mitchell, R. L. (2009). Transitions: Combat veterans as college students. New Directions for Student Services, 126, 5-14. doi: 10.1002/ss.311.Brown, P. A., & Gross, C. (2011). Serving those who have served: Managing veteran and military student best practices. The Journal of Continuing Higher Education, 59, 45-49.Cook, B.J., & Kim, J. (2009). From soldier to student: Easing the transition of service members on campus. Washington, DC: American Council on Education.Defense Manpower Data Center. CTS Deployment File Baseline Report (March 31). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Defense, 2007.DiRamio, D., Ackerman, R., & Mitchell, R. L. (2008). From combat to campus: Voices of student veterans. NASPA Journal, 45(1), 73-102.DiRamio, D., & Spires, M. (2009). Partnering to assist disabled veterans in transitions. New Directions for Student Services, 126, 81-88. doi: 10.1002/ss.319.Enns, C. Z. (1993). Integrating separate and connected knowing: The experiential learning model. Teaching of Psychology, 20 (1), 7 – 13.Evans, N.J., Forney, D.S., Guido, F.M., Patton, L.D., & Renn, K.A. (2010). Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Hassan, A. M., Jackson, R. J., Lindsay, D. R., McCabe, D. G., & Sanders, J. E. (2010). The veteran student in 2010: How do you see me? About Campus. May-June 2010. doi: 10.1002/abc.20020.Kolb, A. Y., & Kolb, D. A. (2005). Learning styles and learning spaces: Enhancing experiential learning in higher education. Academy of Management Learning and Education, 42,
  33. 33. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 33 193–212.Kolb, A. Y., & Kolb, D. A. (2006). Learning styles and learning spaces: A review of the multidisciplinary application of experiential learning theory in higher education. New York, NY: Prentice Hall.Kolb, D. A. (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.Merriam, S. B., Caffarella, R. S., & Baumgartner L. M. (2007). Learning in adulthood: A comprehensive guide (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.National Association of State Head Injury Administrators. (2007). Traumatic brain injury facts. Retrieved from www.nashia.org.Parks, K., Wilson, N.L., & Harper, R. (2010). Returning veteran with an acquired disability: Laurie. In R. Harper, N. Wilson, & Associates (Eds), More than listening: A casebookfor using counseling skills in student affairs work (pp.165-182). Washington, DC: NASPA.Radford, A. (2008). Military service members and veterans in higher education: What the new GI bill may mean for postsecondary institutions. Washington, DC: American Council on Education.Radford, A. W. (2009). Military service members and veterans in higher education: What the new GI bill may mean for postsecondary institutions. Washington, DC: American Council on Education.Rainey, M. A., & Kolb, D. A. (1995). Using experiential learning theory and learning styles in
  34. 34. PTP – VETERAN STUDENTS 34 diversity education. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.Sanford, N. (1962). Developmental status of the entering freshmen. In N. Sanford (Ed.), The American college student (pp. 253-282). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.Sanford, N. (1966). Self and society. New York, NY: Atherton Press.Sanford, N. (1967). Where colleges fail: The study of the student as a person. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Schlossberg, N.K., Lynch, A. Q., & Chickering, A. W. (1989). Improving higher education environments for adults. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Schlossberg, N.K., Waters, E.B., & Goodman, J. (1995). Counseling adults in transition (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Springer.Wawrzynski, M., LoConte, C., & Straker, E. (2011). Learning outcomes for peer educators: The national survey on peer education. New Directions for Student Services, 133, 17-27. doi: 10.1002/ss.381.

×