BRAZIL BUSINESS CULTURE AND ETIQUETTE GUIDE

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BRAZIL BUSINESS CULTURE AND ETIQUETTE GUIDE provides over 100 tips on etiquette and protocol, negotiation strategies, verbal and non-verbal communication in Germany.

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BRAZIL BUSINESS CULTURE AND ETIQUETTE GUIDE

  1. 1. BUSINESS CULTURE AND ETIQUETTE IN BRAZIL
  2. 2. 1. Greetings 2. Names and Titles 3. Business Meetings 4. Conversation Topics 5. Negotiation 6. Business Entertaining 7. Gift giving 8. Practical Advice BUSINESS ETIQUETTE IN BRAZIL Business Culture & Etiquette Guides
  3. 3. GREETINGS Greetings can be effusive, with extended handshakes common during the first encounter, progressing to embraces once a friendship has been established. Women often kiss each other on alternating cheeks. Depending upon your location in Brazil, they may kiss you twice if you are married, three times if single. It is polite to shake hands with everyone present in a group, both upon arrival an upon departure. Business Culture & Etiquette Guides
  4. 4. When applicable, titles such as “Doctor”, “Professor”, and so forth are used to address acquaintances. Or the term Senhor (Mr.) or Senhora (Mrs.) is used to precede the surname. Be aware that people may sometimes introduce themselves using their titles and their firs names (e.g. Doctor John). Unlike Spanish-speaking countries, the order of names in Portuguese in first name, middle name, last name (from one´s father). NAMES AND TITLES Business Culture & Etiquette Guides
  5. 5. In initial interviews Brazilians do not give many details and may even give confusing information; they expect the other party to do the same until some degree of trust has been achieved. The negotiation process is slow. You should not behave arrogantly or with an air of superiority, as Brazilians take offence to such attitudes. In meetings they usually serve a coffee (cafezinho) at any time of the day. You should drink it out of politeness. As it is the national drink, in many restaurants it is served free. BUSINESS MEETINGS Business Culture & Etiquette Guides
  6. 6. In conversation sensitive topics such as politics, religion, poverty or deforestation in the country must be avoided. It is preferable not to make comparisons with Argentina. Anyway Brazilians are very open and it’s hard to be offended. Favourable topics are football - the national team known as the canarinha (by the yellow color of your shirt reminiscent of the Canaries) is the most decorated in the world - the music (samba and bossa nova) and family (especially children). Brazilians consider themselves American. To refer to them you should not use the terms “Latin”, “South American” and less “Hispanic”. CONVERSATION TOPICS Business Culture & Etiquette Guides
  7. 7. In initial interviews Brazilians do not give many details and may even give confusing information; they expect the other party to do the same until some degree of trust has been achieved. The negotiation process is slow. Brazilians are not very keen on haggling either. Concessions are generally made at the end of the negotiation. Agreements are negotiated generally, rather than point by point or in order. NEGOTIATION Business Culture & Etiquette Guides
  8. 8. Lunches are a way of continuing a business conversation in a less formal atmosphere. Dinners are exclusively social. If you take a customer or Brazilian partner out for a meal, you should choose a prestigious restaurant. Do not make a reservation at the hotel where you are staying. Do not expect to discuss business during a meal. You should participate in the conversation but not try to direct it too much. Wait until coffee is served to broad a work-related topic. BUSINESS ENTERTAINING Business Culture & Etiquette Guides
  9. 9. Giving a gift is not required at the first meeting. Gifts should be given at the end of the negotiation. Wait until after the formal meeting is over to present a gift. A relaxed social situation is the best time. GIFT GIVING Business Culture & Etiquette Guides
  10. 10. To obtain the Brazil Business Culture Guide with more than 100 tips about etiquette and protocol, verbal and non-verbal communication, negotiation strategies, etc., clic on: Brazil Business Culture and Etiquette Guide To obtain Business Culture Guides in other countries clic on: Business Culture and Etiquette Guides in 70 countries PRACTICAL ADVICE Business Culture & Etiquette Guides

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