Introduction to
Poetry
TO BE REPORTED BY:
NIEL RICHARD LOPEZ
RONALYN BUEZA
Definition
• A collection of words that express an
emotion or idea.
• Poems are literary attempts to share
personal experi...
Which half do you use when
studying poetry?
• Poetry requires creativity
• Poetry requires emotion
• Poetry requires an ar...
Purpose of Poetry
• To express ideas, feelings and emotions.
Types of Poetry
Free Verse:
Poetry that doesn‟t
follow any specific
patterns in rhythm,
rhyme scheme, or line
length; free...
Types of Poetry
A three-line Japanese
poetic form in the lines
follow the pattern of
five syllables in the
first line, sev...
Types of Poetry
Types of Poetry
Narrative Poem:
A poem that tells the sequence of events of a story;
“The Song of Wandering Aengus” is a n...
A poem that tells the sequence of events of a story;
“The Song of Wandering Aengus” is a narrative poem
THE SONG OF WANDER...
A poem that tells the sequence of events of a story;
“The Song of Wandering Aengus” is a narrative poem
When I had laid it...
Types of Poetry
Sonnet:
A very structured fourteen-line poem that
follows a specific rhyme structure and rhythm.
The two m...
A poem that tells the sequence of events of a story;
“The Song of Wandering Aengus” is a narrative poem
Shall I compare th...
Quote of Day
Elements of Poetry
Meter
• The length of a line of poetry is measured
in metrical units called “FEET”. Each foot
consists of one unit of rhyt...
(This is where it‟s going to start sounding like geometry class, so
you left-brainers are gonna love this!)
Each set of sy...
II.
One shade the more, one ray the less,
Had half impaired the nameless grace
Which waves in every raven tress,
Or softly...
Stanzas
• It is one of the divisions of a poem,
composed of two or more lines usually
characterized by a common pattern of...
Rhyme
One of the most beautiful elements found in
poetry is rhyme.
Rhyme is the matching of sounds that are
similar.
Say, ...
Rhyme
When working with rhyme, you should
always remember that the most important
part of verse is the last word.
• The la...
Practice
Nature‟s first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf‟s a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf ...
Practice
When I was one and twenty
I heard a wise man say.
„Give crowns and pounds and guineas
But not your heart away;
Gi...
Rhythm
• It is a movement with uniform recurrence
of a beat or accent." In its crudest form
rhythm has a beat with little ...
Alliteration
• The repetition of the initial letter or sound
in two or more words in a line.
To the lay-person, these are ...
She Walks in Beauty
I.
She walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that’s best of da...
Repetition
• Using the same key word or phrase
throughout a poem.
This should be fairly
self-explanatory,
but . . .
at ris...
Time to spend;
time to mend.
Time to hate;
time to wait.
Time is the essence;
time is the key.
Time will tell us
what we w...
So, which is the repeated key word
or phrase?
Time to spend;
time to mend.
Time to hate;
time to wait.
Time is the essence;
time is the key.
Time will tell us
what we w...
So, which is the repeated
key word or phrase?
Fairly obvious, huh?
Refrain
• The repetition of one or more phrases or
lines at the end of a stanza.
• It can also be an entire stanza that is...
Phenomenal Woman
by Maya Angelou
Pretty women wonder where my secret lies.
I‟m not cute or built to suit a fashion model‟s...
I walk into a room
Just as cool as you please,
And to a man,
The fellows stand or
Fall down on their knees.
Then they swar...
Figurative Language
Simile:
Example:
A direct, explicit comparison of one
thing to another in which the
words like or as a...
Figurative Language
Figurative Language
Metaphor:
Example:
An indirect comparison of one
thing to another in which one
thing is given characte...
Figurative Language
Personification:
Example:
The strategy of giving
animate qualities to abstract
concepts, or inanimate
...
Figurative Language
Onomatopoeia:
Example:
The attempt to echo or
imitate sounds with words.
Bow-wow, oink-oink, tic-tac, ...
Figurative Language
Hyperbole:
Example:
An exaggeration
I have been waiting for a million years.
Imagery
A poet must stimulate the imagination. He
or she has to use a language that creates
mental pictures or images.
Sen...
Quote of the Day
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Poetry

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Poetry

  1. 1. Introduction to Poetry TO BE REPORTED BY: NIEL RICHARD LOPEZ RONALYN BUEZA
  2. 2. Definition • A collection of words that express an emotion or idea. • Poems are literary attempts to share personal experiences and feelings. • Good poems show images which leave the reader the sense of delight, awe and wonder.
  3. 3. Which half do you use when studying poetry? • Poetry requires creativity • Poetry requires emotion • Poetry requires an artistic quality • Poetry requires logic.
  4. 4. Purpose of Poetry • To express ideas, feelings and emotions.
  5. 5. Types of Poetry Free Verse: Poetry that doesn‟t follow any specific patterns in rhythm, rhyme scheme, or line length; free verse may contain rhymes, but they are not used in a prescribed manner
  6. 6. Types of Poetry A three-line Japanese poetic form in the lines follow the pattern of five syllables in the first line, seven syllables in the second line, and five syllables in the third line. Haiku Kochira muke Ware mo sabishiki Aki no kure Will you turn toward me? I am lonely too, This autumn evening.
  7. 7. Types of Poetry
  8. 8. Types of Poetry Narrative Poem: A poem that tells the sequence of events of a story; “The Song of Wandering Aengus” is a narrative poem
  9. 9. A poem that tells the sequence of events of a story; “The Song of Wandering Aengus” is a narrative poem THE SONG OF WANDERING AENGUS by: W.B. Yeats WENT out to the hazel wood, Because a fire was in my head, And cut and peeled a hazel wand, And hooked a berry to a thread; And when white moths were on the wing, And moth-like stars were flickering out, I dropped the berry in a stream And caught a little silver trout.
  10. 10. A poem that tells the sequence of events of a story; “The Song of Wandering Aengus” is a narrative poem When I had laid it on the floor I went to blow the fire a-flame, But something rustled on the floor, And some one called me by my name: It had become a glimmering girl With apple blossom in her hair Who called me by my name and ran And faded through the brightening air. Though I am old with wandering Through hollow lands and hilly lands, I will find out where she has gone, And kiss her lips and take her hands; And walk among long dappled grass, And pluck till time and times are done The silver apples of the moon,
  11. 11. Types of Poetry Sonnet: A very structured fourteen-line poem that follows a specific rhyme structure and rhythm. The two most common sonnets are the Italian sonnet and the English sonnet. William Shakespeare wrote many English sonnets, which are also referred to as hakespearean sonnets.
  12. 12. A poem that tells the sequence of events of a story; “The Song of Wandering Aengus” is a narrative poem Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed, And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
  13. 13. Quote of Day
  14. 14. Elements of Poetry
  15. 15. Meter • The length of a line of poetry is measured in metrical units called “FEET”. Each foot consists of one unit of rhythm. So, if the line is iambic or trochaic, a foot of poetry has 2 syllables. If the line is anapestic or dactylic, a foot of poetry has 3 syllables.
  16. 16. (This is where it‟s going to start sounding like geometry class, so you left-brainers are gonna love this!) Each set of syllables is one foot, and each line is measured by how many feet are in it. The length of the line of poetry is then labeled according to how many feet are in it. *there is rarely more than 8 feet* 1: Monometer 2: Dimeter 3: Trimeter 4: Tetrameter 5: Pentameter 6: Hexameter 7: Heptameter 8: Octameter
  17. 17. II. One shade the more, one ray the less, Had half impaired the nameless grace Which waves in every raven tress, Or softly lightens o’er her face; Where thoughts serenely sweet express, How pure, how dear their dwelling-place. She Walks in Beauty I. She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellowed to that tender light Which Heaven to gaudy day denies. III. And on that cheek, and o’er that brow, So soft, so calm, yet eloquent, The smiles that win, the tints that glow, But tell of days in goodness spent, A mind at peace with all below, A heart whose love is innocent! Reading this poem out loud makes the rhythm evident. Which syllables are more pronounced? Which are naturally softer? Count the syllables in each line to determine the meter. Examination of this poem reveals that it would be considered iambic tetrameter.
  18. 18. Stanzas • It is one of the divisions of a poem, composed of two or more lines usually characterized by a common pattern of meter, rhyme, and number of lines.
  19. 19. Rhyme One of the most beautiful elements found in poetry is rhyme. Rhyme is the matching of sounds that are similar. Say, Pay, Tray, Spray, Day, May Blue, True, zoo, do, too
  20. 20. Rhyme When working with rhyme, you should always remember that the most important part of verse is the last word. • The last word of each verse is what establishes they rhyme. Twinkle, twinkle little star! How I wonder what you are Up above the world so high. Like a diamond in the sky. A A B B Rhyme Scheme
  21. 21. Practice Nature‟s first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leaf‟s a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf So Eden sank to grief So dawn goes down today. Nothing gold can stay. A A B B C C D D Was it Easy?
  22. 22. Practice When I was one and twenty I heard a wise man say. „Give crowns and pounds and guineas But not your heart away; Give pearls away and rubies But keep your fancy free‟ But I was one-and-twenty No use to talk to me! A B C B C D A D How many stanzas and verses does the poem have?
  23. 23. Rhythm • It is a movement with uniform recurrence of a beat or accent." In its crudest form rhythm has a beat with little or no meaning.
  24. 24. Alliteration • The repetition of the initial letter or sound in two or more words in a line. To the lay-person, these are called “tongue-twisters”. • Example: How much dew would a dewdrop drop if a dewdrop did drop dew?
  25. 25. She Walks in Beauty I. She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellowed to that tender light Which Heaven to gaudy day denies. Let’s see what this looks like in a poem we are familiar with. Alliteration AlliterationAlliteration These examples use the beginning sounds of words only twice in a line, but by definition, that’s all you need.
  26. 26. Repetition • Using the same key word or phrase throughout a poem. This should be fairly self-explanatory, but . . . at risk of sounding like a broken record . . .
  27. 27. Time to spend; time to mend. Time to hate; time to wait. Time is the essence; time is the key. Time will tell us what we will be. Time is the enemy; time is the proof. Time will eventually show us the truth. Time is a mystery; time is a measure. Time for us is valued treasure. Time to spend; time to mend. Time to cry . . . Time to die. Valued Treasue by Chris R. Carey
  28. 28. So, which is the repeated key word or phrase?
  29. 29. Time to spend; time to mend. Time to hate; time to wait. Time is the essence; time is the key. Time will tell us what we will be. Time is the enemy; time is the proof. Time will eventually show us the truth. Time is a mystery; time is a measure. Time for us is valued treasure. Time to spend; time to mend. Time to cry . . . Time to die. Valued Treasue by Chris R. Carey
  30. 30. So, which is the repeated key word or phrase? Fairly obvious, huh?
  31. 31. Refrain • The repetition of one or more phrases or lines at the end of a stanza. • It can also be an entire stanza that is repeated periodically throughout a poem, kind of like a chorus of a song.
  32. 32. Phenomenal Woman by Maya Angelou Pretty women wonder where my secret lies. I‟m not cute or built to suit a fashion model‟s size But when I start to tell them, They think I‟m telling lies. I say, It‟s in the reach of my arms, The span of my hips, The stride of my step, The curl of my lips. I‟m a woman Phenomenally. Phenomenal woman, That‟s me. Remember this
  33. 33. I walk into a room Just as cool as you please, And to a man, The fellows stand or Fall down on their knees. Then they swarm around me, A hive of honey bees. I say, It‟s the fire in my eyes, And the flash of my teeth, The swing of my waist, And the joy in my feet. I‟m a woman Phenomenally. Phenomenal woman, That‟s me. Men themselves have wondered What they see in me. They try so much But they can‟t touch My inner mystery. When I try to show them, They say they still can‟t see. I say, It‟s in the arch of my back, The sun of my smile, . . . The grace of my style. I‟m a woman Phenomenally. Phenomenal woman, That‟s me. Look familiar? That is refrain.
  34. 34. Figurative Language Simile: Example: A direct, explicit comparison of one thing to another in which the words like or as are used. She looks like an angel. Her lips are as sweet as honey.
  35. 35. Figurative Language
  36. 36. Figurative Language Metaphor: Example: An indirect comparison of one thing to another in which one thing is given characteristics of another. My love is a flower He was a lion in battle.
  37. 37. Figurative Language Personification: Example: The strategy of giving animate qualities to abstract concepts, or inanimate things. This handless clock stares blindly from its tower.
  38. 38. Figurative Language Onomatopoeia: Example: The attempt to echo or imitate sounds with words. Bow-wow, oink-oink, tic-tac, howling
  39. 39. Figurative Language Hyperbole: Example: An exaggeration I have been waiting for a million years.
  40. 40. Imagery A poet must stimulate the imagination. He or she has to use a language that creates mental pictures or images. Sensory Images: • Visual- to the sense of sight. • Olfactory- to the sense of smell. • Gustatory- to the sense of taste • Tactile- to the sense of touch • Auditory- to the sense of hearing
  41. 41. Quote of the Day
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