History of Business Intelligence

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What is business intelligence? Where have we been, where are we now, and where are we going? These slides provide a brief history of business intelligence, enjoy.

What is business intelligence? Where have we been, where are we now, and where are we going? These slides provide a brief history of business intelligence, enjoy.

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  • Immensely helpful! Your presentation style is captivating...
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  • The presentation was really helpful, at least for those who didn't have a clear clue about what was BI about. Thanks!
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  • Thank you for your presentation it was very informative. I really enjoyed it as well, you have a particular talent for putting the material in a fluid and entertaining way. So please take the following comments as a way to improve an already wonderful presentation.

    I think you said in your presentation that Edgar Codd invented the database (minute 3:39);however, This information is inaccurate Dr Codd did not invented the database but the relational database theory.

    About the single version of the truth, different versions of the truth could be valid and necessary. It will be almost impossible to maintain a simple version of the truth but we can significantly improve the veracity of the data maintaining data governance.
    Thank you again
    Dr Quintana
    BI Consultant and Database Data mining Professor at TUA
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  • Good Job ! it´s a nice presentation about BI.
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  • Awesome.. It really helped a lot.. Now I can say I understand the basics of BI
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  • 1. What is Business Intelligence? A brief history of Business Intelligence
  • 2. Where have we been?
  • 3. Where are we now?
  • 4. Where are we going?
  • 5. Why should you care?
  • 6. What is Business Intelligence?
  • 7. According to
  • 8. The Definition of Business Intelligence is… Skills, knowledge, technologies, applications, quality, risks, security issues and practices used to help a business to acquire a better understanding of market behavior and commercial context. For this purpose it undertakes the collection, integration, analysis, interpretation and presentation of business information. By extension, quot;business intelligencequot; may refer to the collected information itself or the explicit knowledge developed from the information.
  • 9. WHAT?
  • 10. The Definition of Business Intelligence is… Skills, knowledge, technologies, applications, quality, risks, security issues and practices used to help a business to acquire a better understanding of market behavior and commercial context. For this purpose it undertakes the collection, integration, analysis, interpretation and presentation of business information. By extension, quot;business intelligencequot; may refer to the collected information itself or the explicit knowledge developed from the information.
  • 11. Still confused?
  • 12. BI seems hard
  • 13. Is that what it took
  • 14. for a business to be intelligent?
  • 15. What is intelligence?
  • 16. Knowledge and understanding?
  • 17. Meaning and context?
  • 18. Foresight?
  • 19. Solve complex problems
  • 20. to make decisions?
  • 21. Who makes decisions?
  • 22. How do people make decisions?
  • 23. We make decisions all the time
  • 24. Go all-in or fold?
  • 25. Hold, sell, or buy?
  • 26. Sometimes people make poor decisions
  • 27. Intelligence = decisions
  • 28. Decisions = people
  • 29. What makes a good decision?
  • 30. How about information?
  • 31. Intelligence + information = the right decision?
  • 32. What is information?
  • 33. Throughout history information was used
  • 34. To share stories
  • 35. To learn
  • 36. Johannes Gutenberg
  • 37. Printing Press, 1439
  • 38. And discover things
  • 39. Christopher Columbus
  • 40. Use this
  • 41. North America, 1492
  • 42. It kept track of things
  • 43. In these situations (jail cell, chalk count)
  • 44. Or here (castaway)
  • 45. Over time
  • 46. Information helped provide answers
  • 47. To unlock secrets E= MC 2
  • 48. Which allowed for innovation
  • 49. From something big
  • 50. To small
  • 51. To smaller
  • 52. To help build something big again
  • 53. Information provided answers
  • 54. Answers allowed people
  • 55. To make decisions.
  • 56. How did business people get answers?
  • 57. They had something called data
  • 58. Business data
  • 59. about people
  • 60. about products
  • 61. And about places
  • 62. And they had questions
  • 63. Which products are best?
  • 64. How are my sales?
  • 65. How are my people?
  • 66. But before they could get answers
  • 67. They needed insight into the data
  • 68. Otherwise it was guess work
  • 69. Except you’re the Donkey
  • 70. Data had value
  • 71. It was precious
  • 72. Where do you put something precious?
  • 73. It needed to be stored.
  • 74. Before the 1960s
  • 75. Data was stored here
  • 76. When computers arrived
  • 77. It went places
  • 78. Like here
  • 79. And then here
  • 80. But storing something precious that way was
  • 81. Risky Business
  • 82. And difficult to manage
  • 83. Eventually data would be stored
  • 84. In something like this
  • 85. called a database Invented by Edgar Codd, 1969
  • 86. The database provided
  • 87. A way to store
  • 88. Business data
  • 89. about the people
  • 90. about products
  • 91. And places
  • 92. But it wasn’t that straight forward
  • 93. To get the data in here
  • 94. required a lot of expertise
  • 95. The business needed a way
  • 96. To enter data
  • 97. 1970s
  • 98. Business applications were created founded in 1972 founded in 1977
  • 99. And improve business process
  • 100. Why business applications?
  • 101. Business applications provided a better way
  • 102. to collect data
  • 103. Database = data storage
  • 104. Business applications + Database = Ease of data entry
  • 105. And more data.
  • 106. What about access?
  • 107. Data + Access = Answers?
  • 108. access wasn’t easy
  • 109. For example
  • 110. Can I have some data? Please?
  • 111. It wasn’t that easy
  • 112. Data was coming from multiple locations
  • 113. from business applications
  • 114. And in the database
  • 115. Why not access one-at-a-time?
  • 116. They tried with Reports
  • 117. But they were one-dimensional
  • 118. And could only provide access in
  • 119. Silos
  • 120. Which meant the data was
  • 121. Fragmented
  • 122. They needed more insightful access
  • 123. Across multiple locations
  • 124. So they moved the data
  • 125. Into a data warehouse
  • 126. Which was made popular in the early 1980s Ralph Kimball Bill Inmon
  • 127. Now the data could be organized
  • 128. And could come from multiple locations
  • 129. To be managed
  • 130. and accessed
  • 131. Now data could be served
  • 132. Data access + management = consumption
  • 133. Business Intelligence 1.0
  • 134. BI tools could
  • 135. Report Analyze
  • 136. In 1989 term BI was born Howard Dresner, coined the term 'business intelligence' in 1989
  • 137. BI vendors started to pop up 1990 1993 1985 1989
  • 138. BI vendors promised more access
  • 139. Across multiple locations
  • 140. To report and analyze the data
  • 141. Why?
  • 142. more data = more demand
  • 143. The business wanted
  • 144. Data faster
  • 145. BI was about performance.
  • 146. What happened next?
  • 147. The data didn’t stop
  • 148. Things began to move quickly
  • 149. The business needed more answers, fast
  • 150. The 90s brought more BI tools
  • 151. And there were lots
  • 152. BI tools were everywhere
  • 153. But it still didn’t work
  • 154. The data usually wound up here
  • 155. Which became
  • 156. Which eventually became
  • 157. There was no
  • 158. single
  • 159. version
  • 160. of the
  • 161. Truth
  • 162. In summary
  • 163. BI tools created more access
  • 164. More access = Multiple versions of the truth
  • 165. New challenge of data management.
  • 166. What about cost?
  • 167. Hard to maintain
  • 168. BI vendors needed a way
  • 169. To offer more functionality
  • 170. The first BI platforms emerged
  • 171. Acquisitions
  • 172. Business Intelligence 2.0
  • 173. More BI tools
  • 174. More BI functionality
  • 175. Offline and online
  • 176. Market consolidation
  • 177. At this point
  • 178. BI was a top priority (top priority for CIOs)
  • 179. It was Bigtime
  • 180. Bigger than Lebron James
  • 181. But it still didn’t work
  • 182. Something was broken
  • 183. Business people were still
  • 184. CONFUSED
  • 185. Business Intelligence has not changed The definition of BI is… Skills, knowledge, technologies, applications, quality, risks, security issues and practices used to help a business to acquire a better understanding of market behavior and commercial context. For this purpose it undertakes the collection, integration, analysis, interpretation and presentation of business information. By extension, quot;business intelligencequot; may refer to the collected information itself or the explicit knowledge developed from the information.
  • 186. What wasn’t working?
  • 187. The business still couldn’t get the answers Access to BI (20%) No access to BI (80%)
  • 188. It wasn’t about people
  • 189. It was still about
  • 190. Systems
  • 191. What wrong with that?
  • 192. It required access
  • 193. Who provided access?
  • 194. Typically it was IT
  • 195. What happens when
  • 196. 80% of the people call IT for data
  • 197. Why not go around IT?
  • 198. BI tools were not
  • 199. intuitive
  • 200. Business people didn’t have
  • 201. Time
  • 202. It was about
  • 203. Intuitive access
  • 204. And timeliness of data
  • 205. BI was about usability
  • 206. To turn data
  • 207. Into the right format
  • 208. And be easily consumed by more people
  • 209. And be easily managed by IT.
  • 210. But it wasn’t just about the data in here
  • 211. There was unstructured data
  • 212. What’s the difference?
  • 213. Unstructured came from places
  • 214. Like blogs
  • 215. Wiki’s
  • 216. emails
  • 217. Documents
  • 218. Presentations
  • 219. Videos
  • 220. And there was lots “80 percent of business is conducted on unstructured information.“
  • 221. BI = Right Data + Right Time + Right Person
  • 222. BI needed to be people centric
  • 223. Oldschool BI didn’t work
  • 224. Because people make decisions
  • 225. Not systems
  • 226. It was time for a change
  • 227. The BI of the 90s
  • 228. was “Iced” out
  • 229. The business needed to do more
  • 230. To collaborate
  • 231. Search
  • 232. And communicate
  • 233. About their questions
  • 234. and their answers
  • 235. To drive innovation.
  • 236. Today, there are new pressures
  • 237. An economic crisis
  • 238. But times are changing
  • 239. BI can work the way you do
  • 240. To provide better insight
  • 241. and better decisions
  • 242. for more people
  • 243. and drive innovation
  • 244. How can you get it?
  • 245. You already have it.
  • 246. Follow the new BI conversation http://blogs.msdn.com/bi
  • 247. Follow the conversation http://blogs.msdn.com/bi Get updates on Twitter http://twitter.com/nicfish This presentation style was influenced by Dick Hardt