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Meeting Place  The Canberra IndigenousAustralian Art Exhibition 2007
Canberra
Canberra   Old Parliament House   Parliament House   Australian War Memorial   Questacon   Australian Institute of Sp...
Meeting Place: The Exhibition   7 pm Friday 5th December   5 pm Sunday 7th December   Tickets will come in One Day, Ful...
Featured Artists   Jim Williams   Danie Mellor   Duncan Smith
ACT Indigenous Textile Artists            Group (ITAG)   Jenni Kemarre Martiniello   Lyndy Delian   Renee Smith   Kerr...
Market Research Results   Interested in       Indigenous cultures       Australian culture       Fine art – artists, b...
Rydges Lakeside Hotel
Accommodation   200 rooms   City or lakeside views   Museum Discovery Deal - $155       Overnight accommodation      ...
Additional Services   Kemarre Arts   Canberra Theatre Centre   Privileges Card       70% Urban       Casino Canberra ...
Opportunities & Outcomes   Canberra as                  Educational    recognised cultural              Increased resea...
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Meeting Place Event Pitch

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This document was created for the purpose of assessment for Diploma of Events Management at Southbank Institute of Technology in 2007. ALL INFORMATION IS FICTIONAL.

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  • CANBERRA 325,000 strong population The name means “meeting place” named by the local Ngunnawal Indigenous people.
  • DATE/TIME – 7:00 pm Friday December 7th – Sunday 9th 5:00 pm TICKET PRICES - $10 for One Day, $40 Group, $30 Full The artists are encouraged to sell their artwork and merchandise however this will be closely monitored in order to preserve the authenticity of the work.
  • Jim Williams is a renowned elder and artist of the Canberra native Ngunnawal community. Painting for over twenty years he chooses to create mostly murals, tile sculptures and acrylic paintings on canvas and many of his works have been showed in Canberra museums and galleries. Danie Mellor , despite born at Mackay and currently in Sydney, is a true member of Canberra society. Of Mamu/Ngadjonji origin he taught print media and drawing at the Australian National University’s Canberra School of Art while completing a doctorate and is currently a lecturer in art theory at the University of Sydney College of the Arts. His works often involve both native and introduced Australian cultures and environments and these are often represented at numerous galleries around Australia including the Fire-Works Gallery in Brisbane, the Uber Gallery in Melbourne, the Reid Fine Art in Sydney and the Solander Gallery in Canberra. Duncan Smith is a Wiradjuri artist and winner of the 2003 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Artist of the Year Award. His topics of interest are mostly spiritual and deeply connected to his ancestors’ memories, and these form a strong relationship with his culture through the arts. Having great family values, his children are often involved with his group Wiradjuri Echoes which performs dances and teaches Aboriginal art and culture regularly by demand in Canberra. Duncan Smith is very involved with Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC Week celebrations each year.
  • Founded in 2003, ITAG has seventy years of collective artistic experience spanning cultures from every mainland state of Australia except for the Northern Territory. Internationally and nationally renowned for their expression of traditional and contemporary Indigenous cultures, members have been showcased in over fifty exhibitions in just fewer than five years of operation. The following artists are members of ITAG: Jenni Kemarre Martiniello’s traditional affiliations are with the Southern Arrernte, Kemarre skin of South Australia. She is the current Director of Kenmarre Arts and the ACT representative on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Board of the Australia Council for the Arts. She has won Canberra awards for literature and visual artistry while studying the arts and teaching. Subjects she has taught include Contemporary Indigenous Social Issues at the University of Canberra and Cultural Studies, Indigenous Art History and Creative Writing at the Canberra Institute of Technology. As an artist her works have been exhibited all over both regional and metropolitan Australia and she runs countless regional creative workshops. Lyndy Delian is a popular paint and textile artist, musician and writer while also a founding member and the current coordinator of ITAG. Shown in collections of the National Museum of Australia, the National Gallery of Australia she taught Indigenous Art and Fashion at the Canberra Institute of Technology were her works are also displayed. Lyndy’s family originated from Blacks Town in western Victoria and she is a mother of seven. Renee Smith has lived in Canberra for over ten years. Her father is from the Wiradjuri areas of New South Wales and Victoria and her maternal grandmother originated from the Gamilaroi nation around Tingha in New South Wales. After studying Indigenous Art and Fashion at the Canberra Institute for the Arts and the Canberra Institute of Technology, Renee began to explore styles beyond the traditional in her creative works in textiles and art in order to express her cultural heritage and childhood memories. She currently runs a solo arts online business called Googarh Designs. Kerry Reed-Gilbert is a proud Wiradjuri creative artist and family woman from central New South Wales. Her talents include creative writing and poetry, photography, graphic design, editing and publishing as well as managing her successful business Kuracca Consultancy & Communications (White Cockatoo) from 1993. White Cockatoo’s aim is to “achieve self-determination and self-management by addressing the interests, concerns and issues of the Indigenous People of this land” through liaisons with government and non-government parties and Aboriginal people. Judy Hammond is of Aboriginal, Irish and Anglo-Celtic origins with family ties to the Carnarvon Gorge of Queensland. Qualified in Art Therapy she studied Community Counselling at the University of Canberra and currently studies at the Canberra School of Art. Her work is often digital and photographic works on textiles which explore aspects of Indigenous identity and survival through imagery of her people and family members. Sarah Fahey’s family originated from Mildura on the Murray River near the Victorian/New South Wales border. She has recently joined ITAG in order to revive a vibrant artistic career which she had before raising a happy family of five in Canberra. Noelene Morrison is a recent member of ITAG and expert in Indigenous Health from the Nyoongah nation in Perth, Western Australia
  • TARGET MARKET – Those interested in or involved in fine art. Academics, artists, Politicians and VIPs
  • HOTEL SUITABILITY – Rydges Lakeside Hotel has been chosen as a suitable venue for the exhibition not only because of the immediate benefits to the event, but also to the convenience to travelling visitors. close to areas of interest - 10 minutes from the airport Relevant facilities include Eight conference rooms The Great Lakes Ballroom - Capacity for 1000 people The Hotel boasts Guest laundry and valet service 24 hour reception and room service Porterage Foreign currency exchange Gift Shop Secretarial services Undercover parking
  • Rydges Lakeside has four star accommodation with wonderful views of either the city or Lake Burley Griffin. Among the venue’s many accommodation specials ranging between $119 and $289 per night, the Museum Discovery Deal will grant the patron ….. This special for $155 per night will continue to be valid until late January next year.
  • OTHER LOCAL SERVICES Kemarre Arts “an Indigenous Australian owned and operated art business which provides Creative Arts Development Services, Creative Writing Courses online and a Gallery of original textile and glass works and photography by Australian Indigenous artist Jenni A Kemarre Martiniello.” Their workshop repertoire includes creative industries, professional development planning, intellectual property and community rights, marketing, sponsorship and funding, all available for arts groups and organisations. In addition, Inter-cultural awareness education is available to non-Indigenous organisations in order to increase the quality of professionalism between people of various cultures Canberra Theatre Centre home to the Canberra Theatre, The Playhouse and the Courtyard Studio, totalling to a capacity of around 1,300 people. Located in Civic Square near Canberra Ticketing, the centre shows the nation’s best performing arts including genres of theatre, drama, dance, cabaret, comedy, circus, music, puppetry and more. The Bell Shakespeare Company and the Australian Ballet are regular companies who use the Canberra Theatre for performances Privileges Card - Should visitors want to visit Canberra extensively during the exhibition, there is a discount service known as the Privileges Card or The Card. This grants the user discounts of between twenty and fifty percent off the cost of various venue services around Australia and New Zealand. The Short-Term Card is the lowest costing card at $35 and is valid for one month, while the Card of Cards is valid for over two thousand businesses in Australia and New Zealand. These cards can be purchased from the Canberra and Region Visitors Centre. 70% Urban - an exhibition that is currently showing at the National Museum’s First Australians Gallery celebrating urban Indigenous culture and identities. It will run until January 2008 and features creations from Ian Abdulla, Lin and Bill Onus, Albert Namatjira and Jack Wherra which present Indigenous history and urbanisation in Australia from different cultural and social perspectives. Casino Canberra - located on Binara Street, Glebe Park in the central business district. This popular venue is the only gaming venue where the lucky can win the $100,000 Canberra Poker prize. Their Grill Brasserie Restaurant is often visited by former politicians and celebrities and boasts a world-class dining experience National Indigenous Art Triennial - will be shown in the National Gallery of Australia from October 13 until February 10. The exhibition will showcase contemporary Indigenous paintings, textiles, sculptures, photography, and installations from thirty Australian artists and as it is the largest exhibition of Indigenous art at the National Gallery in nearly two decades, it would be a must see event for art enthusiasts Australian National Botanic Gardens - located at the foot of Black Mountain and is the best collection of native plants from all climate areas of Australia with nearly seven thousand species. Marked walking tracks allow visitors to explore areas including the Rainforest Gully, the Rock Garden, the Eucalypt Lawn and the Mallee Shrublands Black Mountain Tower ( formerly known as Telstra Tower) grants visitors a wonderful full-circle view of Canberra and surrounding areas nearly two hundred metres above the top of Black Mountain. The Alto Restaurant and Making Connections exhibition are popular attractions inside the tower which is open day and night Brindabella Wine Tours - offer an educational experience for a minimum of six wine enthusiasts per tour by professional guides. Taste testings and meet-and-greets with winemakers are included in winery tours shopping - facilities in Australia’s capital are extensive. Popular areas include the city centre, Manuka, Kingston, Lonsdale Street in Braddon, the Hall Showground Hall Markets, and more. Luxury and vintage items, gourmet dishes, and second-hand items are just examples of the wares that can be discovered in the boutiques, markets, malls and department stores in Canberra
  • Opportunities come in the form of social trends and increasing interest in art and culture. The exhibition’s success will not only just include increased tourism revenue for Canberra and Australia, but also extensive interest and research leading to more cultural, social and political understanding and knowledge. However weaknesses are likely occur in the form of negative political debate or cultural misunderstandings if the debate gets too controversial, as all social issues do when they get to the forefront of current affairs.
  • Transcript of "Meeting Place Event Pitch"

    1. 1. Meeting Place The Canberra IndigenousAustralian Art Exhibition 2007
    2. 2. Canberra
    3. 3. Canberra Old Parliament House Parliament House Australian War Memorial Questacon Australian Institute of Sport National Portrait Gallery National Film and Sound Archive National Gallery National Archives National Museum National Library
    4. 4. Meeting Place: The Exhibition 7 pm Friday 5th December 5 pm Sunday 7th December Tickets will come in One Day, Full and Group Tickets ranging $10 to $40
    5. 5. Featured Artists Jim Williams Danie Mellor Duncan Smith
    6. 6. ACT Indigenous Textile Artists Group (ITAG) Jenni Kemarre Martiniello Lyndy Delian Renee Smith Kerry Reed-Gilbert Judy Hammond Sarah Fahey Noelene Morrison
    7. 7. Market Research Results Interested in  Indigenous cultures  Australian culture  Fine art – artists, buyers Mostly 30-60 years of age Semi-formal events favoured $10-$50 a day was expected
    8. 8. Rydges Lakeside Hotel
    9. 9. Accommodation 200 rooms City or lakeside views Museum Discovery Deal - $155  Overnight accommodation  Buffet breakfast for two  Guided tour of the National Museum for two
    10. 10. Additional Services Kemarre Arts Canberra Theatre Centre Privileges Card  70% Urban  Casino Canberra  National Indigenous Art Triennial  Australian National Botanic Gardens  Black Mountain Tower  Brindabella Wine Tours  shopping
    11. 11. Opportunities & Outcomes Canberra as  Educational recognised cultural  Increased research capital  Increased knowledge Social trends  Political debate Increased interest in  Social issues Indigenous Australia  Fraud and deception in Indigenous art Media coverage Ultimately, a rise in cultural awareness and understanding

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