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CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology:  Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges
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CAA2014 Community Archaeology and Technology: Developing 'Crowd and Community-fuelled Archaeological Research': methodological, technical and ethical challenges

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Chiara Bonacchi, Daniel Pett, Andrew Bevan and Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert …

Chiara Bonacchi, Daniel Pett, Andrew Bevan and Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert
Paper presented at Computer Applications in Archaeology Conference 2014, 22nd - 25th April 2014, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Paris as part of Session 12: Community Archaeology and Technology. Session organisers: Nicole Beale and Eleonora Gandolfi. Session blog: http://blog.soton.ac.uk/comarch/

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  • OpenLayers is a JavaScript library for building map applications on the web.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Developing MicroPasts CAA, 24 April 2014 Developing MicroPasts CAA, 24 April 2014 Chiara Bonacchi UCL Institute of Archaeology with Andrew Bevan (UCL) Daniel Pett (British Museum) Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert (UCL) Chiara Bonacchi UCL Institute of Archaeology with Andrew Bevan (UCL) Daniel Pett (British Museum) Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert (UCL)
    • 2. Crowd-sourcing in archaeology • Crowd-sourcing as – the practice of seeking information, services or funds in small chunks from large groups of people, over the internet (definitions discussed in Dunn and Hedges 2012) • Increasingly explored for supporting public audiences’ interaction with archaeology – Participation in research – Participation in micro-financing
    • 3. Crowd-sourcing projects • Diverse range: – Inspecting imagery for archaeological features – Transcribing papyri – Interrogating built architecture – Public recording of metal finds…
    • 4. Crowd-funding projects • Ranging from excavations to dissertations • Using existing or new dedicated platforms • Varying degrees of success
    • 5. Observations • Mainly contributory models • Little evaluation done ContributoryContributory CollaborativeCollaborative Co-creativeCo-creative HostedHosted Models for participation: Public Participation in Scientific Research Project, further elaborated on by Simon
    • 6. Introducing MicroPasts • A collaboration between UCL and the British Museum • Funded by the AHRC, Digital transformations in community research co-production
    • 7. Aim • To develop and test an online space where mixed groups of archaeological enthusiasts collaborate to: - produce innovative open datasets via crowd-sourcing (e.g. CC0, CC-BY) - develop new research projects into archaeology, history and heritage (sometimes involving crowd-sourcing) - micro-fund those new collaborative projects via crowd-funding
    • 8. April Launch Day! Launch Day!
    • 9. MicroPasts website micropasts.org
    • 10. Component 1: crowd-sourcing platform crowdsourced.micropasts.org
    • 11. Crowd-sourcing applications • 4 applications • Focused on British Prehistory
    • 12. Help cataloguing • 30,000 index cards of all known Bronze Age metal artefact finds in the UK from 1800 to 1983
    • 13. Transcription and geo-referencing
    • 14. Help creating 3D models • 3D SfM models of palstaves recorded in the British Museum Bronze Age Index (Photoscan)
    • 15. Image masking
    • 16. Component 2: community forum community.micropasts.org • Discourse (https://github.com/discourse/discourse) • For research and platform co-design
    • 17. Component 3: crowd-funding platform • Neighbor.ly (https://github.com/neighborly/neighborly) • Catarse (https://github.com/catarse/catarse) • Micro-funding of projects co- designed via the forum or externally • 3 seed projects initially – London’s Lost Waterway – Mapping waterway sites, and transcribing relevant documents
    • 18. Evaluation: aims • How do online communities of interest in the human past form and develop through the MicroPasts platforms? • How do different contributors engage with archaeology and the past via the MicroPasts platforms, through time, and what is the value of that engagement for community members including institutions? • What is the sustainability of the MicroPasts platforms, and the applicability of a similar model in other countries?
    • 19. Evaluation: methodology • Approach – Quantitative / qualitative – Focus on MP platforms and social media / ‘control cases’ amongst target audiences – Online / offline – Link info on: contributors’ profile, opinions, behaviour; data produced; their re-use – Taking time into account • Methods (at different stages) – Online surveys – Talks / meet-ups – Google analytics – Pybossa statistics – Diary study – Social media data analysis (cultural interests and practices) – Text analysis and SNA
    • 20. Coming from… • Entry survey on completion of first crowd-sourcing task – ‘Circles’, whether works with archaeology / history as part of main job, age, email • Forum, Google analytics, Pybossa statistics (Very!) initial data: 16-23 April
    • 21. Suggesting that… • Community building: – 195 registered members – UK and US focus – 55% of respondents not working in archaeology / history – 24% within our immediate network • Engagement: – Photo masking: prevalent ‘entry’ application – Transcription: fewer people, but the most dedicated ones • Number of tasks • Anonymous contributors: 23- 35% on transcription, 53% on masking – Need for more guidance / visualisation (Very!) initial data: 16-23 April
    • 22. Next steps • Guidance and purposiveness – [3D model viewer] – Information on the Bronze Age Index / British prehistory / 3D modelling – Development of badges • Tasks – Transcription of ‘discovery cards’ • Crowd-funding platform
    • 23. Challenges • Time in relation to the complexity of the platform – Long development times and little space for front-end evaluation – Need to co-design the platform as we go along / challenge of not losing users in the process • Planning an evaluation that – Does not disrupt people’s engagement – Is discrete but open and ethically compliant • Being ready to adapt the evaluation plan in response to people’s interaction while maintaining coherence • Adoption of new funding practices within a university environment (crowd-funding)
    • 24. Developing MicroPast Developing MicroPast Thank you! c.bonacchi@ucl.ac.uk Thank you! c.bonacchi@ucl.ac.uk

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