the near future of tourism services based on digital traces
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the near future of tourism services based on digital traces

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Digital objects used by tourists such as mobile phones and cameras leave a large amount of traces. The phone can indeed be geolocated through cell-phone antennas or GPS and digital cameras take ...

Digital objects used by tourists such as mobile phones and cameras leave a large amount of traces. The phone can indeed be geolocated through cell-phone antennas or GPS and digital cameras take pictures that people can upload on web sharing platforms such as Flickr. All of this enable new application that allow to count tourists or provide them with new sorts of services. Based on existing experiments, the presentation will describe how the tourism industry can benefit from these digital traces to obtain new representations of tourists activities and to build up new services based on them

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the near future of tourism services based on digital traces the near future of tourism services based on digital traces Presentation Transcript

  • the near future of tourism services based on digital traces nicolas nova 21.10.2010 | Swiss e-Tourism Forum Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Hello, my name is Nicolas Nova. I am a researcher at Liftlab, a research agency based in Geneva. In this talk today, I will show you how digital traces produced by digital devices (mobile telephone, cameraphones, location-based services, etc.) can be seen as an opportunity to design innovative services for tourism
  • Wednesday, October 21, 2009 For the record, I wrote two books about location-based services, mobile applications and the issues at stake when designing them.
  • 3D graphics Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Historically, in the last few years, we’ve seen lots of innovation, which may have an influence on tourism/touristic services. 3d rendering played for instance an important role to allow people to prepare their visits.
  • Location-based services Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Location-based services such as Loopt (https://app.loopt.com but there are plenty of others) also received lots of attention. At the most basic level, they allow to improve navigation (think about car GPS devices) but mobile application also enable people to get information about where there friends/contacts are located, where to find specific shops and services, etc.
  • Augmented Reality Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Obviously Augmented reality is the new grail for lots of people. See for example Layar (http://layar.com/), an innovative Augmented Reality application that acts as a local search engine which displays the results as a visual overlay on top of reality.
  • Augmented Reality Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Metro Paris Subway (http://www.metroparisiphone.com), an augmented reality application that it shows bus and subway routes, locates nearby travel stations, and highlights points of interest along the way, such as restaurants and hotels.
  • driving force: “data is the new intel inside” (Tim oʼreilly) Wednesday, October 21, 2009 All these projects are interesting, it’s been 15-20 years research labs are working on prototypes along these vectors. They do have plus and minuses but the problem I see is that they’re based on a limited focus. Indeed, they are mostly input/output interfaces. Another way to look into things would be to start from the DATA and adopt a bottom-up approach about what do with them. Let’s have a look at the kind of data that could be employed.
  • Social practice: “personal informatics” Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Personal informatics like the Nike+iPod Sports Kit: device which measures and records the distance and walk pace on your iPod/iPod Touch/iPhone 3GS. It allows you to view the walk or run history.
  • Social practice: “personal informatics” Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Personal informatics is not only for people with iPhone but kids also use it with Nintendo DS. See for example Walk with Me by Nintendo, a little keyfob electronic pedometer to track up your walkabouts and uploads them in the console to see your walking routines.
  • Social practice: “personal informatics” Wednesday, October 21, 2009 It’s not only physical movements... also software usage, music on itunes, books checked on Amazon could be tracked and employed
  • Social practice: user-generated content Wednesday, October 21, 2009 The picture one put on the Web too
  • Social practice: user-generated content Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Your upcoming travels can also be shared through platforms such as Dopplr or WAYN
  • Technological change: sensors Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Data can additionally come from sensors
  • Technological change: sensors Wednesday, October 21, 2009 And your (smart)phone is of course a sensor
  • Policies: open GIS, open data Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Finally, policies are changing now and more and more public data are shared (open GIS, open data initiative). This is also an important material.
  • Public data Urban sensors Flickr pictures Spatial coordinates Phone (GPS/ Movements cell-id, camera, ... mp3, web browsing...) Wednesday, October 21, 2009 So end up with plenty of data sources: public database (sensor, weather, pollution), personal objects that report about their status, “traces” generated by people activity (intentional traces: photo on flickr, background information: the music people listen to on itunes, the books checked on Amazon...)
  • some examples Wednesday, October 21, 2009
  • Real Time Rome (Sensable City Lab) Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Real-time Rome aggregated data from cell phones to better understand urban dynamics in real time. By revealing the pulse of the city, the project aims to show how technology can help individuals make more informed decisions about their environment. In the visualizations of Real Time Rome we synthesize data from various real-time networks to understand patterns of daily life and special events in Rome. MIT SENSEable City Lab, Real-Time Rome: http://senseable.mit.edu/realtimerome/
  • Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Vélib, fête de la musique 2008, made by Fabien Girardin out of data from the paris bike rental system
  • Barcelona on Flickr (Fabien Girardin) Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Visualisation of pictures taken by people, geotagged, and uploaded on Flickr... and mapped onto the city: http://www.girardin.org/fabien/tracing/
  • Barcelona on Flickr (Fabien Girardin) Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Visualisation of pictures taken by people, geotagged, and uploaded on Flickr... and mapped onto the city: http://www.girardin.org/fabien/tracing/
  • Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Visualisation of pictures taken by people, geotagged, and uploaded on Flickr... and mapped onto the country: http://senseable.mit.edu/worldseyes/
  • Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Visualisation of pictures taken by people, geotagged, and uploaded on Flickr... and mapped onto the country: Switzerland. The visualizations of Flickr pictures allows evaluating the potential of using people-generated geotagged information to contribute urban understanding.
  • what’s the point? Wednesday, October 21, 2009 This is all nice and sexy but what’s the point? how is this pertinent for the tourism industry?
  • 1. Reveal the invisible + improve statistics Wednesday, October 21, 2009 The first goal is certainly representational: as every map, it could be pertinent to make visible and explicit phenomena that are invisible. The analysis reveals new elements, either hidden in databases or new data-source
  • 2. Make people participate Wednesday, October 21, 2009 In addition, it can enable to engage people differently in their environment (WikiCity, MIT Sensable City lab:http:// senseable.mit.edu/wikicity/rome/): by showing them these new phenomena some researchers hypothesize that city inhabitants may be influenced. The question they would like to explore are the following: 'How do people react towards this new perspective upon their own city while they are determining the city's very own dynamic?' and 'How does having access to real time data in the context of possible action alter the process of decision making in how to go about different activities?'
  • 3. Evaluate urban strategy (Sensable City Lab) Wednesday, October 21, 2009 These maps can also be useful to evaluate urban strategies. The MIT Sensable City Lab worked on the evaluation of the Waterfall project in NYC
  • 3. Evaluate urban strategy (Sensable City Lab) Wednesday, October 21, 2009 The project allowed to characterize visitor’s dynamic based on picture shared by people on Flickr (explicitly disclosed) and records of mobile phone network usage (implicitly-generated) to map the spatial distribution of locals and visitors to evaluate the impact of the New York City Waterfalls on the attractiveness of the  waterfront. This new sort of data enable to develop attractiveness indicators to evaluate strategies
  • 3. Evaluate urban strategy (Sensable City Lab) Wednesday, October 21, 2009
  • 4. Improve the infrastructure? Image courtesy of Sense Networks Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Fabien Girardin’s work about Bicing in Barcelona + other people are working on these datasets too: Aleix Ruiz de Villa has developed an algorithm to improve the distribution of the bikes http://www.lavanguardia.es/ciudadanos/noticias/ 20090314/53659920153/un-joven-barcelones-idea-un-algoritmo-para-mejorar-el-bicing.html
  • 4. Improve the infrastructure? Image courtesy of Sense Networks Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Fabien Girardin’s work + other people are working on these datasets too: Aleix Ruiz de Villa has developed an algorithm to improve the distribution of the bikes http://www.lavanguardia.es/ciudadanos/noticias/20090314/53659920153/un-joven- barcelones-idea-un-algoritmo-para-mejorar-el-bicing.html
  • Citysense shows you how active locations are right now and which ones are abnormally active. It sees cities “from above and puts the top live hotspots in your hand” by crunching vast amounts of data emanating from thousands of cell- phones, GPS-equipped cabs and other data devices to paint live pictures of where people are gathering. 5. New forms of (real-time) services Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Beyond these usages, the data can also be employed to create new forms of real-time services such as Citysense (http:// www.citysense.com)
  • Image courtesy of Sense Networks Wednesday, October 21, 2009
  • 5. Allow people to make informed decisions Wednesday, October 21, 2009 EveryBlock (http://www.everyblock.com) filters an assortment of local news by location so you can keep track of what’s happening on your block, in your neighborhood and all over your city.
  • 6. Dynamic signage Image courtesy of Sense Networks Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Dash is a service that combines traditional GPS navigation to the collection of contextualized, aggregated and geolocalized traces of other users. It therefore approaches traffic in an original way – by collecting it from other people driving real commute routes, during real commute times. Each Dash Express anonymously and automatically sends its position and speed back to servers at the Dash Network Operations Center. The Dash servers then update all other Dash devices in the area with current road speeds. That way, members of the Dash Driver Network always have the best, most up-to-date traffic information available.
  • problems? Wednesday, October 21, 2009 What are the issues at stake
  • privacy Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Privacy is a sensitive issue (quite logical) Who owns the data? Who takes care of the data?
  • infrastructure problems Wednesday, October 21, 2009
  • technological flaws Wednesday, October 21, 2009
  • uncertainty, accuracy troubles Wednesday, October 21, 2009
  • conclusion • Hybridization of the digital and the physical • Records of people interactions (intentional or implicit) enable to quantify our behaviors and create new indicators • These traces lead to lots of opportunities: detailed analysis of touristsʼ experience (marketing+evaluation tool) + create tourist activity/infrastructures accordingly + design real-time information applications for tourists • Both for tourists AND services providers + public bodies Wednesday, October 21, 2009
  • merci nicolas@liftlab.com Wednesday, October 21, 2009