B mariam attia_euro_call_presentation_260510[1]

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Mariam Attia
Situated Teacher Cognition and ICT

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B mariam attia_euro_call_presentation_260510[1]

  1. 1. Situated Teacher Cognition and ICT<br />Mariam Attia<br />University of Manchester<br />EuroCALL Teacher Education Workshop May 26th, 2010 <br />© TemplatesWise.com<br />
  2. 2. Purpose of Study<br />Explore Arabic language teachers’ beliefs about the use ICT (as a precondition for effective technology integration)<br />“.. if our efforts to extend the educational applications of technology are to be successful, it is important to understand how such visions and beliefs are both formed and transformed” (Albion & Ertmer, 2002)<br />
  3. 3. How & Why?<br />The research is situated in the Arabic Language Institute (ALI) at the American University in Cairo, Egypt<br />Funding was largely allocated to installing the latest technologies<br />However, ICT adoption remained minimal<br />
  4. 4. Factors for Adoption<br /> The literature on ICT and teaching identifies various factors associated with teachers’ adoption of technology. They are as follows:<br />
  5. 5. Factors for Adoption<br />
  6. 6. Factors for Adoption<br /><ul><li>Certain studies (e.g. Veen, 1993; Lam, 2000; Mumtaz, 2000; Ertmer, 2005, Guven et al, 2009) have identified teachers’ beliefs and attitudes as central to ICT integration.
  7. 7. My study focuses specifically on this factor for technology adoption.</li></li></ul><li>Definition of Terms<br />Teacher Cognition:<br />Different terms have been used to explain aspects of teachers’ mental lives, such as beliefs (Pajares, 1992), maxims (Richards, 1996), personal practical knowledge (Golombek, 1998) and conceptions of practice (Freeman 2003). <br />Due to the difficulty of drawing clear lines between such concepts, the term “teacher cognition” will follow the work of Woods (1996), Johnson (2006) and Borg (2003; 2006), referring to teachers’ knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs as interwoven concepts. <br />
  8. 8. Theoretical Framework<br />Professional Coursework<br />Schooling<br />Language Teacher Cognition<br />About teaching, teachers, learners, learning, subject matter, activities, curriculum, etc<br />Contextual<br />Factors<br />Classroom Practice<br />Elements and processes in language teacher cognition - Borg (2006)<br />
  9. 9. Research Questions<br />
  10. 10. Methods of Data Collection<br />
  11. 11. Data Analysis - Maxqda<br />
  12. 12. Theoretical Framework<br />Professional Coursework<br />Schooling<br />Language Teacher Cognition<br />About teaching, teachers, learners, learning, subject matter, activities, curriculum, etc<br />Contextual<br />Factors<br />Classroom Practice<br />Elements and processes in language teacher cognition - Borg (2006)<br />
  13. 13. Theoretical Framework<br />Professional Coursework<br />Early Experiences<br />Language Teacher Cognition<br />About teaching, teachers, learners, learning, subject matter, activities, curriculum, etc<br />ICT<br />Contextual<br />Factors<br />Classroom Practice<br />Elements and processes in language teacher cognition - Borg (2006)<br />
  14. 14. Meet My Teachers!<br />Dalal<br />22 years of experience in teaching Arabic as a foreign language<br />MA in TAFL<br />PhD in Teaching Methodology<br />
  15. 15. Meet My Teachers!<br />Heba<br />13 years of experience in teaching Arabic as a foreign language <br />MA in TAFL<br />
  16. 16. Meet My Teachers!<br />Laila<br />30 years of experience in teaching Arabic as a foreign language<br />MA in TAFL <br />
  17. 17. Teacher Cognition & Practice<br />Cognitions about ICT integration <br />How these cognitions are reflected or not reflected in practice – Match or mismatch between espoused theory and theory-in-action (Argyris & Schön, 1974)<br />
  18. 18. Dalal<br />
  19. 19. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />Imagine, the very beeeautiful poems of the past, that we might not fully understand because of their difficult words.. If you see them as images, it will make a huge difference, and you will learn them fast. This might actually help Egyptian youth appreciate the own language <br />(Technological Reflections, 23.04.2008)<br />
  20. 20. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />I feel that I should be versed in so many things related to technology, which would assist me in my teaching, facilitate things for me and for the students.. However, I feel impotent in the face of this. The problem is that I am busy with many other things and don’t have the time to learn or practice<br /> (Technological Reflections, 23.04.2008)<br />
  21. 21. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />.. and my fear that things will go wrong.. This is the thing that influences me the most.. Though we always joke about it [technical failure] and I ask them: “Who is the engineer here? Would you please come forward and fix this for us?” and so. But, of course, I feel very embarrassed <br />(Technological Reflections, 23.04.2008)<br />
  22. 22. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />Colleagues are of major importance because I always resort to them when I want to learn something, and they ask me too. Everyone knows bits and pieces that we assist each other with..<br />(Technological Reflections, 23.04.2008) <br />
  23. 23. Dalal’s Cognitions at a Glance<br />Fear of failure <br />Reveals the beauty of Arabic <br />Colleagues<br />Time<br />Bigger institutional role<br />Better safe than sorry! <br />Situated learning<br />Image<br />
  24. 24. A Visit to Dalal’s Classroom<br />
  25. 25. A Visit to Dalal’s Classroom<br />
  26. 26. A Visit to Dalal’s Classroom<br />
  27. 27. A Visit to Dalal’s Classroom<br />
  28. 28. Heba<br />
  29. 29. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />There is no way for teaching the Arabic language except moving in this direction.. that we teach with the use of technology <br />(Technological Reflections, 17.03.2008)<br />
  30. 30. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />It’s a matter of somebody being a bit adventurous. Somebody sitting in front of a machine, a computer for example, for a long time, playing with it, trying this and tying that<br />(Technological Reflections, 17.03.2008)<br />
  31. 31. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />This is one of the areas where Waheed [one of her colleagues] always gave me support. I used to have fears. Honestly, I am much better now. He used to encourage me a lot [by saying]: “We make it. It does not make us.. We operate it. It does not operate us”. With time, the fears I had for the machines disappeared<br />(Interview, 25.02.2008) <br />
  32. 32. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />This idea that I always want to treat it [Arabic] in a special way, to develop special criteria for it, to treat it as if I was treating persons with special needs. I don’t want this. No, what applies there [to other languages] will apply here. We are no different. <br />(Technological Reflections, 17.03.2008)<br />
  33. 33. Heba’s Cognitions at a Glance<br />Time<br />determination<br />Responsibility<br />Autonomy<br />Resourcefulness<br />Colleagues<br />Experimentation <br />
  34. 34. A Visit to Heba’s Classroom<br />
  35. 35. A Visit to Heba’s Classroom<br />
  36. 36. A Visit to Heba’s Classroom<br />
  37. 37. A Visit to Heba’s Classroom<br />
  38. 38. Laila<br />
  39. 39. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />Regardless of any technology-related frustrations that take place due to many factors, I don’t think I can do without its tools now, after arriving at them, and experiencing their benefits and the pleasure of using them. Clock hands never move backwards and neither will my journey <br />(Technological Reflections)<br />
  40. 40. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />Students are more enthusiastic about the subject matter.” We will watch a movie” [they say referring to her PowerPoint Presentations]. We switch off the lights. I feel happy when I see grammar becoming something attractive..[It] has always been something boring and monotonous.. So, when it becomes a source of motivation for students, that is really beautiful<br />(Interview, 24.01.08)<br />
  41. 41. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />There is a beautiful spirit and great closeness on a personal level. This is reflected professionally as well. <br />(Interview, 29.05.08)<br />
  42. 42. Understanding Cognitions in Context<br />I used to teach using audio tapes. [At the beginning of the semester] I told the students, as I have always done for the past twenty years: “Please bring in four empty audio-tapes each, so I can record the homework for you”. They responded: “We don’t have tape recorders”. I asked: “Why not?”. [They told me] “.. No one uses these things..”I asked: “You don’t use them?”. They said:”Never.. We are a generation that does not use tapes”(laugh). I wondered what to do. I was puzzled.<br />(Interview, 06.12.09) <br />
  43. 43. Laila’s Cognitions at a Glance<br />Colleagues<br />Determination<br />Time<br />Positive pressure<br />Motivation <br />Responsiveness<br />Image<br />
  44. 44. A Visit to Laila’s Classroom<br />
  45. 45. A Visit to Laila’s Classroom<br />
  46. 46. A Visit to Laila’s Classroom<br />
  47. 47. A Visit to Laila’s Classroom<br />
  48. 48. .. Coming Next<br />..So, how does all this add to our understanding of teacher cognition and ICT?.. to be shared at the next EuroCALL Teacher Education workshop ..Stay tuned!<br />
  49. 49. Thank you<br />

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