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Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief   31-01-13
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Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief 31-01-13

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Library of Bristol Integrated with Tate Bristol - design brief
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  • 1. Nicholas SocratesLibrary of Bristol integrated with Tate BristolDesign Brief
  • 2. 1 The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol 1.1 The Project 1.2 About the Design Brief 1.3 Current Buildings / Situation2 Vision 2.1 Simply Stated: ‘The Best Public Library Integrated with Art Gallery in the World’ 2.2 Build the Knowledge Economy 2.3 Invest in Children, Young People and Families 2.4 Promote Community Culture and Heritage 2.5 Learning Centre 2.6 Integration 2.7 Vision 2.8 Objectives3 Urban Environment 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Global city with a local heart 3.3 Site and surroundings 3.4 A dialogue with the city4 Key Technical Issues 4.1 Core Design Principles 4.2 Integration of New and Emerging Technologies 4.3 Collections Handling and Delivery 4.4 Join Together Words, Images and Sound 4.5 Staffing 4.6 Facilities Management 4.7 Utilities 4.8 Functional Challenges of Integrating the Library of Bristol with Tate Bristol 4.9 Access, Circulation, Ergonomics and Visitor Comfort 4.10 Security 4.11 24-hour use of the building 4.12 Health and Safety 4.13 Environmental Conditions 4.14 Regulations and Standards for Sustainability 4.15 Acoustics 4.16 Public Art Program
  • 3. 5 Functional Specifications (Occurring in both the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol) 5.1 General Areas 5.2 Functional Areas 5.3 Facilities Management6 TATE BRISTOL: Areas specific to Tate Bristol 6.1 Main Exhibition Spaces 6.2 Exhibition Preparation Space 6.3 Exhibition Storage Space 6.4 Tate Bristol Bar 6.5 Studio Spaces 6.6 Workshops 6.7 Staff Offices7 INTERGRATION: Integrated spaces between the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol 7.1 Integration 7.2 Catering facilities 7.3 Picnic Space 7.4 Learning Spaces 7.5 Chill out Zones 7.6 Library Park Plinth 7.7 Shared Parking Area8 THE LIBRARY OF BRISTOL: Areas specific to The Library of Bristol 8.1 Reader Services 8.2 Children’s Library 8.3 Business + Learning Zone 8.4 Archives and Heritage9 Strategies 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Sustainability 9.3 Structural & Civil 9.4 Inclusive Design 9.5 Fire Engineering 9.6 Building Services10 Innovative library and archives recommendations 10.1 Innovative library and archive services 10.2 In-depth study into ASRS system options
  • 4. 1 The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol
  • 5. 1 The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol1.1 The Project‘The Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol bring the written word and the art world together to inspire creativity and discovery’.Both the Library of Bristol, integrated with the Tate Bristol will not only be one of the best public libraries and art galleriesin the United Kingdom, but they will also aspire to be a major catalyst for the regeneration of the city of Bristol.1.2 About the Design BriefThe most appropriate time for major decisions in building projects is in the pre-design stage, at the very beginning of aproject. At this stage the range of options is still extensive and decisions and changes to requirements do not yet have costlyconsequences. It is recognised that at the early stages of the project a shortfall of information means that it can be difficult tomake lasting decisions. It is also important to underline that this can lead to delays well into the design and constructionstages. When design and construction begin, decision possibilities and changes become more restrictive, tend to be morecostly, also in terms of time, and can lead to unsatisfactory solutions.Establishing a comprehensive Design Brief in the pre-design stage helps to increase the level of information and knowledge,well before the commencement of the actual design work. The main purpose of this detailed Design Brief, is to map,describe and distil the ambitions and aspirations of the various stakeholders that form the Client body into a foundation forall further decision-making, design work and approvals.Essential project knowledge consists not merely of information supplied by me (the architect and project manager), but alsoknowledge held by the staff and designated users of the two future buildings. This information includes work styles,processes and the resulting spatial requirements. Staff knowledge of the day-to-day working processes is also an essentialcontribution to understanding the functional requirements. The Design Brief is a result of close cooperation with thoseindividuals, both at the existing Bristol Central Library and the existing Tate galleries around the UK (in London: TateModern and Tate Britain, Tate Liverpool and Tate ST Ives). Through a series of interviews and meetings I have acquireddetailed information about the project.At this stage, the Design Brief has identified various competing pressures and aspirations that will require further resolution.Under these conditions this Design Brief of February 2013 it cannot not be viewed as a definitive document, but rather as anon-going part of the design development. It therefore allows for small modifications and some additional elaboration withinthe stated framework. In order to reach the highest level of aspirations for this project it must be recognised that a level ofmanaged flexibility will be of key importance.1.2.1 Centre of DiversityThe design of The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol, must grow out of the multi-ethnic and cultural diversityof Bristol, promoting understanding and community confidence. The city will become a part of the Library of Bristol, andthe Library of Bristol a part of the city. The qualities of the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol should be self-evident foreveryone. The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol must represent the social heart of the Bristol citizens. TheLibrary of Bristol and Tate Bristol, should be advanced both technologically and functionally, they will offer maximumdiversity. The experience should be surprising and inspiring. This needs to be reflected in bi-monthly programming of boththe Tate Bristol and the library organisation. The building should be easily accessible for adults but especially for young
  • 6. people and children. The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will be egalitarian, fostering the inclusion of thewidest possible audience.1.3 Current Buildings / Situation1.3.1 IconThe existing Bristol Central library was designed in 1906. To meet the library standards of the time and as such a Grade 1listed building is not easily adaptable to the 21st century way of learning and experiencing a library. Libraries functiondifferently in today’s information and communication age and their physical form and interior layout must embrace thesechanges to provide technological and programmatic flexibility and attractiveness. The Bristol Central library’s Edwardianstyle of architecture has created a psychological barrier to the younger generation. The exterior may appear out-dated and‘uncool’, unable to attract new users, especially those targeted from younger groups.The new site for the Library of Bristol (integrated with Tate Bristol) on Spike Island will create a flow of visitors andprovide an open anchor, an interior public space and a meeting place for pedestrians and they will become the city’s newicons, whilst addressing deficiencies in accessibility, adaptability and lack of space for creative enterprise. The Library ofBristol integrated with Tate Bristol will become a creative and learning quarter for the city.1.3.2 Learning in the 21st Century And BeyondIssues including inflexibility to adapt to new technology, new patterns of use in learning, information and culture cannot besuccessfully addressed. This includes cabling and placement of public computers, natural daylight and ventilation, andflexible group learning environments and quiet area placements. The current library has limited natural daylight, poor levelsof artificial light, erratic temperature regulation and noise problems. Without this flexibility and adaptability to new andemerging technologies, the City of Bristol cannot become a new city of knowledge and creativity.1.3.3 Archives and HeritageBristol boasts significant heritage collections that are of great national importance including the reference and rare printedcollections, yet the level of access to these archives is currently poor, and many are unaware of their existence. The mainspecialisation of the library will be to house the UK’s largest collection of art, art related and artist’s books. This newcollection will be brought together from numerous existing art collection and private collections throughout the UK. Becauseof the Libraries positioning, in close proximity to Spike Island Arts, The Alnofini and of course the new Tate Bristol, thisnew collection of art, art related and artist’s books will be of immeasurable benefit to artists, students and scholars alike.These collections offer enormous potential in supporting regeneration, learning and social cohesion. Legislation governingnational standards for protecting these documents has come about in recognition of their importance to the citizens of Bristol.The book stock numbers over a third of a million titles reflecting the development of printing and publishing over at leastfive centuries.It is generally complementary to the stock held by the Lending Library, with major encyclopaedias, dictionaries, academictextbooks and monographs well represented. Collected works, published letters by literary figures, nineteenth century travelaccounts, books on slavery and theology are special strengths. Here you shall find everything from Newtons Principia to thecollected works of Sigmund Freud.A sharp rise in public interest in archives and local family history demands that the Archives and Heritage collections arestored, accessed and displayed with the respect and reverence they deserve. The Library of Bristol will have a dedicated and
  • 7. safe space for the display and an efficient retrieval of these collections in order to truly respect the city’s and the nation’sheritage.1.3.4 Physical ObstaclesThe existing Central Library does not provide easy access and it is physically challenging to move around the building. Thestairs are narrow and too few lifts. Accessibility for the disabled is also very limited and poor circulation and way-finding forvisitors creates confusion and a chaotic experience. The current layout prohibits interrelationships between areas, preventingshared knowledge, resources and ideas and casual social interactions. The separation of lending and reference is obsolete asis the arrangement of services and resources.1.3.5 Fulfilling FunctionsThe current entrance foyer does not meet today’s current demands. The entry does not afford any views to the interior spacesor services, so does not attract visitors inside. Meeting rooms and conference spaces cannot cope with increasing demandand are inadequate. Other facilities that are currently inadequate include:• Catering facilities• Exhibition and display areas• Toilet facilities• Cloakrooms (there are none)• Small loading bay with poor access• Moving materials out of archives storage to the public area on the top floor is precarious, risking damage to priceless materials• Access for the disabled is limited and does not include parking and so does not meet current requirements under the Disability Discrimination Act.1.3.6 Building MechanicsEnergy costs for the Central Library are very high and are difficult to manage and procure. It is important that the Library ofBristol is a building that is highly sustainable ecologically and endures the test of time, both aesthetically and physically.
  • 8. 2 Vision
  • 9. 2 Vision2.1 Simply Stated: ‘The Best Public Library Integrated with Art Gallery in the World’The Library of Bristol mission is to deliver the best public library in the UK. A library that will be an asset to the City ofBristol and attract visitors and users both locally and nationwide. To better form a centre of learning joined with creativity,information and culture, the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol will become integrated, physically and contextually.Bristol has had many identities in its lifetime and is currently re-charting its path to become a knowledge based, creativecity: one that brings together people from all over the UK to do business and to change lives by enriching them culturallyand economically. This knowledge-based economy will be fuelled by its own citizens, and as a result of Bristol ’sinvestment in providing the training and guidance necessary to enter the knowledge and creative workforce. The Library ofBristol integrated with Tate Bristol will be its catalyst.The Library of Bristol integrated with Tate Bristol will be the social and creative heart of the city, connecting people of allages, cultures and backgrounds. As a multifunctional service centre, it will appeal to a broad spectrum of people. Thebuildings will function as a core of information, art and culture centred on people and community life. It will be asupermarket of knowledge and art. The Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol will be a microcosm of Bristol itself, reflecting itseconomic strength and the multiple cultures of its citizens.The fundamental objectives of the Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will be to:• Build the knowledge and creative economy.• Invest in children, young people and families.• Promote community, culture and heritage.2.2 Build the Knowledge EconomyBristol aspires to become an entrepreneurial city by providing extensive and unimpeded provision for learning and business.The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will provide that platform. Through an emphasis on life-long learningand the development of individual skills, citizens will be better placed to take advantage of ever-changing employmentopportunities of the future. The effects of this will be felt throughout the broader community as personal success translatesinto a stronger economic success for the city and the wider city region.The combination of both a high quality reference facility and the provision of resources on demand will facilitate andpromote an environment conducive to learning. Study places in a variety of configurations suitable for private study andgroup work, both tutored and self-paced, will be available. The significant shift of resources to electronic media will openand aid collaboration with other information providers and partners. These types of resources will also make possible thetransformation of space from a traditional library setting to a more adaptable and flexible design where informal events andthe exchange of knowledge can take place.2.3 Invest in Children, Young People and FamiliesA core objective of the Library of Bristol integrated with Tate Bristol will be the necessity for the project to appeal tochildren, young people and families in every sense.The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will be designed to offer an adaptable service where children andyoung people can access resources as they make the transition to adulthood. The spaces must be designed to offer a flexibleand diverse choice of learning settings and styles that are safe, welcoming and stimulating. Interactive technology will bepervasive throughout, encouraging the opportunity to explore and learn by discovery and in different ways.
  • 10. The provision of informal learning environments will support parents and carers in helping their children to learn. TheChildren’s Library will cater to the specific needs of children and young people. Adjacent to this a dedicated area forteenagers, which will be designed to include both individual study spaces, areas for group working and discussion and aninformal seating environment where interactive and immersive technologies can stimulate and attract new users. The Libraryof Bristol will contain spaces for homework and study, where the progression from one stage of learning to the next isfacilitated will be important to the success of the project.Ultimately, the Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will play a unique role in enabling children and youngpeople to realise their full potential.2.4 Promote Community Culture and HeritageThe Library of Bristol integrated with Tate Bristol will be a major new meeting place, a focal point for citizen andcommunity activity. The design of the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol will be welcoming and inviting to all, where nobarriers (attitudinal, cultural, emotional, institutional, economical, intellectual, physical or sensory) to participation can exist.It will be fully accessible to people with mobility difficulties and to people with all forms of disability.The design of the Library of Bristol integrated with Tate Bristol must appeal to the citizens of Bristol by instilling a sense ofpride and ownership. As a significant and meaningful community space it should become a landmark that comes to defineBristol as a city. The Library of Bristol integrated with Tate Bristol must genuinely meet the needs of the city, and its manydiverse communities. The key to the future success lies in being inclusive, open and accessible. This must be a place whereeveryone feels they belong.Reaching beyond the city centre, also through the network of community libraries, will be crucial to reinforcing that thelibrary and its services are for all. Library collections such as the Family History Ancestry will support and promote anappreciation of the shared and separate heritage and cultures of Bristol. Major exhibition galleries (within the library) willallow people to view and experience the treasures of the Library of Bristol. Themed exhibitions each year will draw on themillions of items in the city’s archival, illustrative and rare book collections, for example works including Sigmund Freudand Isaac Newton.Exhibition’s taking place in Tate Bristol will include the Tate’s new interest to promote emerging artists. Many of theseemerging artists will be invited to take residence in the Tate Bristol’s studios. Their work will be exhibited and in thededicated Emerging Artists Galleries and they will continue to work on new pieces during their stay, which in turn will beexhibited again. The studio’s will be accessible to the public on specific days and will act as greater publicity for each artist.As well as Tate Bristol being dedicated to emerging talent it will also exhibit the Tate’s new and fast growing collection ofAsian and African contemporary art. Also exhibitions will be curated to connect with national, regional and local culturalevents.City events such as major festivals will be supplemented by these venues. The Library of Bristol integrated with Tate Bristolwill have shared spaces that will be jointly programmed distributing activity over the entire day - from morning to evening.The diversity of facilities, spaces and activities will draw a diverse audience, reflecting the diversity of Bristol itself.2.5.1 Learning CentreThe Library of Bristol will provide a major learning resource for children, young people and adults. The Library of Bristolshould seduce every citizen of Bristol to go to the Library of Bristol. It will be a place to meet and a place for exchange.
  • 11. The Government’s vision for a ‘learning and creative society’ is one in which everyone will have the opportunity to succeedand upgrade skills throughout their lives. The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will provide a vast array oflearning spaces that will permeate through all areas. The Experience of the Tate Bristol will extend and enhance the learningexperience. These spaces will allow learning and creativity to take place in many forms and at everyone’s own pace.2.5.2 Community ResourceThe Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will be the central point for citizen access and communityparticipation, with the specialised support necessary to help people to realise their personal and democratic rights andaspirations. The nature of a community space should be communicated where the people of Bristol can feel ownership andpride. For all to feel welcome in the Library of Bristol as well as Tate Bristol, unambiguous accessibility is important. Thebuildings will be family and children friendly throughout and it will welcome young people. There can be no barriers,physical or otherwise when entering the building. The removal of all barriers to access including attitudinal, economical,cultural, emotional, institutional, intellectual and physical should be of the highest priority in order to foster and ensure thewidest possible audience.Once inside, there will be clear and immediate different functions and places where one can sit, drink a cup of coffee, viewthe exhibitions, read a book, use the latest gaming technology, study for exams, hang out with friends from school.2.5.3 Centre for LiteratureThe Library of Bristol will need to showcase and provide open access to the rich experience of reading and online resources,which can also tie in with the Tate Bristol. This supports the constant desire to create, grow and liberate ideas. The Libraryof Bristol and Tate Bristol should both employ state of the art displays and lending technologies to entice people to discovernew knowledge, while changing media displays promotes new releases and art exhibitions and activities.The process of the digital revolution has provided the opportunity for the reinvention of the traditional library. It is necessaryto rethink the physical framework of the library and place greater emphasis on showcasing the broad range of resourcesavailable. The Library of Bristol should provide a high quality reference and enquiry services through imaginative andstimulating reader areas for fiction and information access and music in supporting leisure, cultural and learning needs.2.5.4 Memory Bank‘Without libraries what have we? We have no past and no future.’ Ray Bradbury.The Library of Bristol along with Tate Bristol will gather, preserve, present, exhibit and help to interpret the collectivememory and identity of the city and its communities and surroundings. The rich multi-media archive and heritage resourceswill be accentuated through the provision of the highest quality gallery and exhibition space.As well as exposing people to new ideas and opportunities, the Library of Bristol together with the Tate Bristol will creatememorable experiences. Through spaces that appeal to the senses, the facilities and services that the Library of Bristol andTate Bristol offer, memories will be created for generations of local people and visitors.2.5.5 Cyber-entry PointThe Library of Bristol integrated with Tate Bristol will be the entry point to an array of technologies in new media andcommunications, disseminating knowledge and ideas that will further fuel the education of the young and the entirecommunity at large. This will also prove that Bristol is a city on the cutting edge of technology. Technology has the potential
  • 12. to aid participation learning, which enhances the experience of individuals, encouraging greater self-knowledge andawareness. Touch-ability, interaction and inviting places to explore these technologies will integrate technology and humanexperience.2.5.6 Base for Enterprise, Innovation and RegenerationWorking with individuals and businesses in employment and enterprise, the Library of Bristol will support and inspire acreative and prosperous economy in the city and across the region. The Library of Bristol will provide support and anenabling environment for the earliest stages of business development, creating a solid foundation for sustainable business togrow. Support for business start-ups and creative industries in the city with a focus on developing the knowledge economywill mean that the Library of Bristol will act as a major contributor to economic growth and regeneration. By default it willbecome a strong base for innovation.2.5.7 Destination for Leisure and CultureThe diversity of resources and services presented in the Library of Bristol cannot be completely understood by the term‘library’. The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol is more than a library or art gallery alone. They will offervisitors a place for recreation and cultural expression. The diversity of services on offer means that everyone will be cateredfor. Tate Bristol and The Library of Bristol events will take place in a multitude of spaces both inside and outside thebuilding. The building will seamlessly merge with the urban fabric of the city. One should experience the Library of Bristoland Tate Bristol as a part of the urban promenade, a sequential walk, eventful and lengthy, but also with cross connectionsfor easy and direct use.2.5.8 Creator of Knowledge ResourcesThe Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol will generate new forms of information in digital formats, sharing its uniquecollections for learning, creativity and cultural expression in innovative and imaginative ways. The Library of Bristol andTate Bristol, with its rich diversity of spaces, will foster further engagement with the available resources. The diversity ofstimuli, venues and avenues for expression will mean less distinction between the consumer and producer of knowledge andcreativity. The Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol together will provide an unobstructed platform to facilitate this process.2.5.9 A Promoter of SustainabilityAs a city, Bristol is in an important position to demonstrate through The Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol the mosttechnologically advanced building systems and integrated sustainable principles available. Through the Library of Bristoland Tate Bristol’s own design, management and operations and through highlighting relevant global developments in itsinformation and learning services, the buildings will exhibit the latest in sustainable technologies. Natural lighting would beprovided for in both the main body of the Library of Bristol and for any spaces that line the building’s perimeter. For theTate Bristol, each studio and live-in studio, for the artist’s in residence, which surround the building’s parameter, willemploy natural day lighting. Operable windows at the exterior would benefit individual interior comfort by enabling naturalventilation.Eco-technological strategies work well with more passive measures to create a dramatic structure that is both a socialactivator and successful precedent of sustainable practice that can allow the form of the building to remain true to the drama
  • 13. of its concept. The best sustainable solutions should enhance aesthetic goals, limit resource consumption, improve buildingperformance, and promote health and productivity.2.5.10 Promoter of Bristol and the RegionThe buildings will be distinctively of Bristol, a statement of Bristol ’s global position and importance as the West ofEngland’s capital. The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will be a people’s palace: warm and welcoming yetwith a strong image and equally strong in functionality.The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will express the identity of Bristol through changing exhibitions aboutthe history of Bristol as well as multimedia displays of events in and around the city. It should be an interactive mediaexperience, enlightening, educating, entertaining and uniquely Bristol.2.5.11 The Interior Presented on the ExteriorThe Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol should become more of an environment than a building. The exterior should readthe interior. There should be clear sightlines from anywhere within the building.Both entrance halls offer a clear overview and functions as the information desk, with public functions, staircases andelevators, shops, café and toilets. From the entrance hall one is offered a view onto some of the functions located on upperand lower floors.The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol’s location on Spike Island presents an opportunity for the engagementwith the public domain. The park plinth should be part of the building. It should encourage people to read a book in the sun,take a break for lunch or meet a friend. The park must be green. The city, with its considerable brickwork and concretebuildings, can very well use that. Any softening – even of the acoustics in the city - seems to be welcome in this part of thecity, in materialisation as well as in scale.2.6 IntegrationOne of the major challenges of the design of The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol is to create a building(s)that embraces both organisations while reflecting their two distinct identities.The project requires the integration of two organisations each with strong individual brands. The Tate Bristol arguably needsno further comment: The Tate, after over one hundred years, has developed a strong brand with a sense of place and purpose.In this case Tate Bristol will specifically place its focus on promoting UK emerging artists with an emphasis on video anddigital art, whilst also housing the Tate’s new growing collection of Asian and African contemporary art (predominantlydrawings, paintings and sculptures). The concept of The Library of Bristol has been developed, albeit without the relatedbrand image.In the integration of these two distinct resources there will emerge two strong brand identities - that of the Library of Bristoland that of the Tate Bristol. This needs to be reflected externally as well as internally, so that two distinct buildings may bedistinctively perceived. Whilst there will be shared areas, including the foyers and related public facilities, it is critical to thesuccess of the scheme that visitors can quickly and easily orientate themselves and make a choice about visiting the TateBristol or the Library of Bristol, whilst being able to immediately appreciate which space they are in, and being able toeffortlessly move between the two.
  • 14. The benefits gained through the sharing of physical spaces such as, the foyers, meeting rooms, café and the shared exhibitionhall will be complemented and enhanced by collaboration and partnership working in the three key creative areas wherethere is already considerable synergy:1). New Art.2). Children, Young People and Families.3). Cultural Diversity.2.7 Vision - Summary • Reflects changing times and a new opportunity for cultural partnership with the Tate Bristol. • Reflects the aspirations of Bristol in relation to a knowledge economy. • Reflects the aspirations of the city to develop its heritage assets. • Retains a clear focus on people: the Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will achieve results for people, and will offer something for everyone, a truly universal service, • Creates a centre for learning, information arts and culture. • Becomes an enduring beacon for Bristol, raising the city’s international profile and achieving excellence with local communities. • Will be accessible and welcoming to all, reaching out to some of the city’s most disadvantaged citizens. • Will be a universal meeting place, a hub for the region, an engine for the knowledge and creative economies . • The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will link the people of Bristol to the world. It will bring the world to Bristol through written, printed, audio, visual and interactive resources and technologies.2.8 Objectives - SummaryThe Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will:• Build the knowledge economy.• Drive economic and social regeneration, enabling citizens to realise their full potential.• Promote networking and knowledge exchange, enabling people to come together and learn from one another, in a community space that is open and inclusive to all.• Be a hub for learning, creativity, skills development, business and enterprise through the exploitation of information and communications technology.• Support academic and design research, scholarship and study.• Be a model of sustainable design, responsive to technological, social and behavioural change in the information age.• Invest in children, young people and families.• Be physically child and family friendly.• Inspire children and young people as future participants in the world economy.• Promote a love of reading and a need for literacy.• Encourage children and young people to develop skills and gain qualifications.• Foster life-long learning.• Promote community culture and heritage.• Celebrate the city’s heritage to strengthen community cohesion, appealing to and inspiring the widest possible audience.• Be the heart of a regional, local and community library network.
  • 15. • Provide a focal point for community life, contributing to a high quality of life for local residents.• Celebrate culture through the visual, written, spoken word in print, multimedia, performance and other art forms.• Exhibit and interpret the Tate’s assets to provide inspiration for a learning culture.• Conserve the Library of Bristol’s as well as the Tate’s assets and collections for future generations.
  • 16. 3 Urban Environment
  • 17. 3 Urban Environment3.1 IntroductionIn a response to current cultural movements and developments in the city, the Library of Bristol, integrated with the TateBristol, represents an opportunity to use these contextual conditions as a fundamental basis for the design process.The Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol will become a vital organ in the public domain of the city, and will be required torespond to the dynamic and diverse audience that the Bristol inhabitants represent.A key consideration of the design will be how to translate the city’s context, both physically and socially, into the contentand appearance of the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol3.2 Global city with a local heart3.2.1 Bristol FabricThe structure of pedestrian, vehicle, boat and train connections has developed into a rich tapestry of squares, roads, rivers,bridges and tunnels. This urban fabric, clearly representing the city’s history, is one of the significant identities of the Bristolcity centre.Seen as a layered network, the upper most dominant layer of this network is the pedestrian route. The Library of Bristol andthe Tate Bristol presents an opportunity to reinforce this established network. The Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol,located on Spike Island will be a key landmark along this riverside pedestrian route - connecting central Bristol back toSpike Island by route and by a landmark on the skyline from across the river.3.2.2 Diversity of culturesThe global aspect of the local heart can be best appreciated when looking at the broad variety of cultures currently inhabitingBristol. It is by far one the most multicultural cities within the UK and therefore more than many places, connected to theoutside world. For the design of the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol, this would mean finding a way to represent all ofthese people into one/two single building(s). The starting point for this would be the understanding these cultures and theirspecific values.3.2.3 Historic developmentThe industrial revolution has been a major catalyst of physical and social development of the city. It has given an enormousboost in the explosive way the city has grown and is still an image with which the city is being identified.For the city of Bristol, the role of water has been a key factor, particularly in the way the city has improved its economicdevelopment. The expansion of the estuary structure around the industrial era provided the artery for the transportation ofgoods and people related to the city’s industries. The man made floating harbour now offers the opportunity to regenerateand enhance the leisure and cultural experiences of the city.3.3 Site and surroundingsOn the East side of Spike Island, the site for the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol will replace the existing surface carpark the M-shed. The only building on the site to be demolished will be a medium sized shed/warehouse to theWest/adjacent to M-shed. This will be to accommodate for Tate Bristol.
  • 18. 3.3.1 M-Shed, Library of Bristol, Tate Bristol Plaza.The location and function of the building(s) provides an ideal opportunity to merge an outdoor public space (presently asurface car park) with the building(s), creating a fundamental dialogue and connection between city and the building both inthe physical and metaphorical sense. Potentially being one of Bristol ’s most important public spaces, “Library Square” or“Library Park” is a vital part of the pedestrian route between Cumberland Road and central Bristol. It will become animportant arena for a variety of leisure purposes and events throughout the year.3.3.2 Integration of the Tate Bristol‘The Library of Bristol, integrated with the Tate Bristol’, clearly emphasises the priority within the Design Brief toinvestigate the best way in which the Tate Bristol will be integrated with the Library of Bristol.3.4.1 A dialogue with the city‘We define ‘Public Space’ as those places where an exchange between different social groups is possible and also occurs. Itis in essence a space that is freely accessible for everyone: public is the opposite of private. In philosophical discussions thepublic sphere is the place where society is formed, or at least the arena where the collective will is formed with regards to thefuture of society. But the public realm, as it is also called, also occupies a unique place in society: it is the sphere where weencounter the proverbial ‘other’ and where we must relate to other behaviour, other ideas and other preferences. This meansit is also a domain of surprise and reflection. The public realm is ‘the sphere of social relations’ going beyond our own circleof friendships, family and professional relations. The idea of the public realm is bound up with the ideas of expanding one’smental horizons of experiment, adventure, discovery and surprise.’‘In search of new public domain’ by Maarten Hajer & Arnold Reijndorp’.The library of today should not only be a place to read a book but rather a forum to interact with the city and the worldbeyond. Whilst our need for learning and exchange has remained the same for centuries, the place in which we do sohowever, has turned into a dynamic playground of modern communication and evolution. As a constantly evolving space,the library, owing to digital and cultural developments, is rather a space for content creation not simply access to content.Imagined as a city within the city, the multitude of cultures within the Bristol sphere should be represented by a collection ofidentities within the Library of Bristol. Simply stated: ‘one library, many identities’, in which the human experience formsthe key ingredients in creating the Library of Bristol. Each Bristol citizen will find a specific place of comfort andrecognition.Bristol has one of the youngest age profiles in the whole of Europe, as such the Library of Bristol should dedicate asignificant part of its domain to youth and youth activities. The renewed interpretation of the library’s image will play a vitalrole in involving young people to take full advantage of the current library. Together with the integration of the Tate Bristol,an opportunity will be created to connect a new group of visitors to the World of Art.3.4.2 The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol: the potentialsThe Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol is destined to be the impulse to future development on Spike Island. Ithas the potential to reconnect this area to the core of the city in a meaningful way, establishing important routes andsightlines between Spike Island and the other side of the harbour.
  • 19. The building has the potential to make Spike Island as a city destination. It will become an important node as a place todwell rather than a transition space as experienced today. The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol together willform an ensemble of buildings that will convey cohesion of the existing urban fabric by reinforcing established edges of theWhapping Wharf development. The ground plane will become a lively activated zone to the benefit of the urban realm. Theuse of good architecture and improvements to public space will give Whapping Wharf and by expansion Spike Islandrenewed importance, reigniting civic pride in its citizens.Given the current area requirements, the building(s) volume offers the potential for extending the public domain to anelevated location affording expansive views across the city. As a landmark, the building(s) will attract a new local, regionaland international audience. Raising the city’s profile but also having a significant impact on the local visitor economy.3.4.3 The best public library integrated with an art gallery in the worldStated to become ‘The best public library integrated with an art gallery in the world’, an important objective of the Libraryof Bristol is to take full advantage of Information Communication Technology (ICT). In this way, the Library of Bristol canexpand its role as a regional centre linked to community, universities and other libraries, extending the reach and benefits ofservices and resources into this network. The many visitors of the library will attract will supplement the amount of visitorsto Tate Bristol and vice versa.
  • 20. 4 Key Technical Issues
  • 21. 4. Key Technical Issues4.1 Core Design PrinciplesThere are six core principles that underpin the Design Brief:1. Flexibility2. Adaptability3. Sustainability4. Accessibility5. Physically connected and visible to the city6. FunctionalityThese principles are of equal importance and will be applied to the building(s) as a whole. In the following paragraphs, thekey technical issues related to these principles are reviewed.4.2 Integration of New and Emerging TechnologiesThe integration of new technologies is a fundamental part of the new library. The Library of Bristol will be both a physicalas well as a virtual place - where citizens will experience new media, expand their knowledge and meet with each other formany decades to come. There is no doubt that books will continue to be read, but it is clear that new media and technologywill demand its place in the new library:• In the way people acquire information.• In the way information is offered increasingly through multimedia.• In the way Library of Bristol ’s resources can be distributed regionally or nationally.• In new (futuristic) services the library can offer with technology.• By offering possibilities for visitors to create content and provide a place for supported access to networked learning from elsewhere, creating a truly shared learning environment.• The main demand for the new building is to provide room for the integration of continually developing technologies and ICT applications and allow for transformation of core facilities of the library.Furthermore, the building should provide:• 24 hour information – enabling access to information and ticket purchasing even when the library/ gallery is closed• Public access – including self-issue, bookings, payments, catalogue searches and requests.• ICT-enabled learning areas – portable/Wi-Fi technologies helping to create virtual learning environments and interaction with users’ own portable devices.• Interactive and immersive technologies – innovative ways to exhibit, display and enable interaction particularly with the Library of Bristol’s and Tate Bristol’s ‘treasures’, bringing them to life and offering an inspiring and stimulating learning environment.• Content creation – digitisation of resources, web development, image manipulation.• Intelligent building technologies - integration of management information systems to ensure operational sustainability targets are met.
  • 22. 4.3 Collections Handling and Delivery4.3.1 Storage ModelThe establishment of the Tate and the library goes hand in hand with the development of a design model for the storage, care,deployment and access to resources. The major objective, for both, is to increase efficiency, to cater for user needs, future-proofing and great presentation and accessibility of resources.This storage model will result in:• An efficient management of the stocks.• A good preservation of stocks, allowing staff to fulfil their new role, i.e. providing (active) service to the visitors.• Improved physical and virtual accessibility of the stocks.• Improved self-learning and guided support by presentation in themes and providing links between resources.4.3.2 Library Storage and Opening ResourcesThe library collectionsCharacteristics:• Available on open access shelves in the public areas and on non-public ‘stack’ areas, available on request.• 2 million items, including 150,000 on loan + 250,000 on publicly accessible shelves.• Steady dimension of collection.• Need for active stock management.Demand for Library of Bristol:• ‘Activation’ of reserve stacks by improving access to reserve stacks and increase in the visibility and retrieval/negotiated lending of the collections• Efficient storage.• Increased self-service retrieval facilities.• Intuitive and various layouts that enhance people’s experience and improve accessibility of resources.• Effective and efficient use of staff resources and speed of delivery of materials to the user. The study on automated storage has yet to be undertaken and may not necessarily be the best option for the Library of Bristol.The archive collectionsCharacteristics:• Valuable collection to be stored in environmentally controlled conditions.• Wide range of resources (rare books, manuscripts, illustrations, photographs, letters, diaries, etc).• Continuously expanding collection (200 new collections with a total of 40m3/year).Demand for Library of Bristol:• Improved access to collection for visitors (mainly by digital access technology).• Highest standards of storage and care.• Attention to high level of care and conservation, especially because of opening up accessibility to resources.Tate Bristol Storage and Opening ResourcesCharacteristics:• Available on open access shelves in the public areas and on non-public ‘stack’ areas, available on request.
  • 23. • 8,000 items of art. Including 1,000 on Display and 7,000 in the storage depository.• Need for active stock management.Demand for Library of Bristol:• Efficient storage which meets the need of the art whether it is size or sensitivity to light and temperature.• Effective and efficient use of staff resources and speed of delivery of materials to the exhibitions or other Tate Buildings.4.4 Join Together Words, Images and SoundAlong with the great opportunities for the use of new multi media technologies, the multilateral character of the Library ofBristol will be enhanced by:• The collaboration with the Tate Bristol: creating a shared learning environment.• Resources will be brought to life by exhibitions, events and activities, enabling users and visitors to experience and learn about culture. Formal and informal performance spaces will be particularly important in achieving this.• Showcasing the Tate’s image and sound collections in the Tate Bristol as well as in the Library of Bristol.• The Library its self, too will offer space for other kinds of uses such as galleries, sound booths, spaces for family, group work/learning.• Promote the various cultural content of the Tate Bristol / Library of Bristol externally, to the city, to the network of other libraries and learning environments across the city and region.4.5 Staffing• The main objectives for the new premises of the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol with the relation to staffing are:• An effective and efficient working environment to achieve excellent customer service with low amount of staff members.• An effective and efficient multifunctional foyer joining efficient logistics, providing overview and security, and opportunities for staff to interact with users.• Foster interaction between the staff of the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol.In addition:• Exhibitions and display management.• Events, activities and other promotions programming.• Commercial services.• Marketing and communications.• ICT and technical support, both organisational and for users.• Lifelong learning and support and guidance for learners to enable continued personal and skills development.• Access to content and content creation.• Archives and Heritage.• Building Management Services.The design will deliver the most efficient operating environment possible for both Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol.The Library of Bristol and The Tate Bristol will jointly work and share expertise to maximise the use of skills and theefficient deployment of staff. These opportunities are currently being explored and will inform the design.
  • 24. 4.6 Facilities ManagementThe Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will be a large and complex building. The design should enable thefacility to be occupied and operational 24 hours a day (which may become a reality in the future): it will operate as a singlebuilding. High standards of management and maintenance will be essential to the efficient operation and functionality of thebuilding. The building must be designed to be functional, flexible and practical to operate and manage. It must be designedto:• Recognise the specific operational needs and requirements of both the library and the gallery (including studios).• Be highly sustainable and cost effective to operate and maintain.• Be fully flexible and adaptable in terms of infrastructure, controls, plant and internal fabric to meet future needs.• Ensure ease of access to all plant and services for safe service and repair.• Enable effective zoning to enable areas of the building to be in operation while others are closed. The specific needs of both the library and the gallery (including studios) must be taken into account, including consideration of acoustic separation.• Enable easy replacement/maintenance of the fabric of the building to ensure consistently high aesthetic standards are maintained and not compromised.• Incorporate intelligent building technologies to enable the integration of management information systems to ensure operational sustainability targets are being met ideally from two central locations via two central Building Energy Management Systems. This will be required to meet Bristol City Council’s Energy management and Sustainability Section.The desirable degree of integration between Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol has identified several areas of FacilitiesManagement where it could be advantageous for both parties to collaborate. These areas will be explored in more detail and,where it makes sense operationally for both Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol and can be achieved within availableresources, integrated solutions will be put in place.4.7 Utilities4.7.1 New ConnectionsIt is currently unclear as to what the exact nature of the connection of the district energy generation plant will be. The extentof the connection to the district system and the performance of its associated energy generation plant (i.e. efficiency, carbonemissions etc.) will affect the building’s plant space requirements, the sustainability aspirations for the project. It is offundamental importance that this issue is resolved early in the design process to minimise risk to the program and cost planfor the project.The current understanding is that hot water and chilled water will be supplied to the building from the district systemsufficient to cover the base load (circa 75% of the annual demand) but there will be no electrical supply from the districtenergy system. Therefore, secondary heating and cooling systems will need to be located within the building(s) to deal withpeak heating and cooling loads and a separate electrical connection to the grid will be required. On this basis the buildingwould not be served by CHP plant, rather a district heating and cooling system. Further detailed evaluations of the variousoptions available will be carried out during the next design stage.Electrical supplies for certain Life Safety systems and potentially back up systems for the Art depository, galleries, archiveand ICT facilities may be sourced from another grid connection if possible or potentially from on site generation. Gasservices will be provided by the local gas network infrastructure to suit the building needs, such as kitchens within the
  • 25. catering facilities and a back up plant for critical services if required, Water and drainage connections will be served fromlocal infrastructure. Further analysis of the utilities infrastructure local to the building and the building’s likely energydemands will be carried out at the next design stage.4.8 Functional Challenges of Integrating the Library of Bristol with Tate Bristol4.8.1 Functional integrationThere are a number of complex functional challenges associated with the integration of the library with the art gallery(including live-in studios). In particular, the individual identities of the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol must beprotected and, indeed, promoted through the design of the integrated building. It is critical to the on-going viability of bothorganisations that the passer-by on Spike Island promenade, the new “library park”, Cumberland Road and from across theharbour should be immediately aware that the building(s) house(s) both the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol. Similarly,both organisations will have an on-going need to actively promote to the passer-by forthcoming shows, events andexhibitions through imaginative use of easily changeable large-scale advertising positions on the exterior of the buildingwhich can be accomplished through the use of ICT. Front of house, the shared foyer and catering areas will need to bedesigned to be welcoming, accessible and functional for all of the very different types of customers and visitors envisaged,offering opportunities for integration whilst ensuring that each person/group’s particular needs are met. For the back ofhouse design, it is essential to ensure that operations are smoothly integrated such that activities do not adversely impinge onone another.Finally, having entered the building(s) from any point, it must be clear to the visitor how they best access the facilities theyare seeking – the various Library areas, the archives, exhibitions, any of the galleries, the catering facilities, conference ormeeting rooms etc. Issues that will require particularly careful thought include:• Seamlessly joining the front of house and the back of house, and ensuring sufficient staff/public access between the two• Soundproofing measurements need to be taken among the various spaces including, but not limited to any carpentry/metalwork workshops, meeting rooms, library study areas, catering functions, education spaces.• Access to the building e.g. for coach parties, school groups, disabled parking.• Loading bay provision – ensuring the varying needs of the library and the Tate Bristol are both met.• Bar/Catering – providing the correct range of offers needed for different audiences, at different times of the day and evening.• Allowing for sharing and/or separation as appropriate of services such as heating, lighting, water, maintenance, cleaning and security between the library and the Tate Bristol• Maximising the efficiency of storage area requirements.4.8.2 Building ServicesTo facilitate the functional requirements of the integrated Library and Tate Bristol the services integration of services alsopresents a number of challenges to the project.Key elements to be considered are listed below:• Division of the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol services installations.• Integration of service management with the aspiration of one point of control for the Library/Tate Bristol building(s).• Sustainable design.
  • 26. 4.8.3 Consequential IntegrationThe contractual arrangements between the Tate Bristol and the Library of Bristol relating to the operation of the differentparts of the building are yet to be finalised in particular the arrangements for the shared entrance/foyer space.In order to satisfy the requirements of the Building Regulations in the most cost effective manner, it may be necessary forparts of the building to have clearly defined party walls, so they can be treated as separate buildings. It is likely to requirediscrete elements of the building(s) to be fire separated, thermally separated and with the ability to be individually serviced.Dialogue with Building Control will be required to determine the exact requirements.Although the building must meet all building regulations, it is important that this does not result in the imposition of anunsatisfactory design solution.4.9 Access, Circulation, Ergonomics and Visitor Comfort4.9.1. GeneralThe new premises of the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol are to be appealing, open, and aims to attract and serve visitors,from a broad spectrum of society including children, elderly, tourists, etc. It will set new standards of access for people withdisabilities enabling ease of access to all areas of the building.It is very important that the new Library is oriented towards the expected increase of footfall from 4,000 a day in the existingCentral Library to up to 10,000 a day. Integration with the Tate Bristol is likely to increase footfall still further.The Tate Bristol’s visitor footfall is predicted to be in the region of 1,000 per day, but again, with the intergration with theLibrary of Bristol it is likely to increase footfall still further.The building(s) must be designed to be highly legible and have simple, effective signage and guiding for intuitive wayfinding. Ease of circulation around the building(s) is paramount, offering a variety of means of getting around the building(s)to suit different user needs.The foyers and entrances will be vital elements of the building. They must be designed to fulfil a number of functions for arange of different audiences throughout the day and evening and able to accommodate the peaks and troughs of people-flowthroughout. The challenge will be to design foyers, which attract new visitors, works equally well for all visitors to pass byor to stay.4.9.2 Visitors & StaffFor staff an efficient access to the building is needed. Besides the main entrance there will be a second entrance with security24/7. This entrance will be open beyond Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol opening hours. From this entrance, an efficientroute to the various departments in the building without crossing the general areas will be required. This also applies for theentrances for the studios for the artists in residence.4.9.3 GoodsVertical access is to be provided via several decentralised cores (staircases, elevators). At least one core will be used fortransportation of goods per building. This elevator and connected spaces (corridors / rooms / doors) should be wide enoughfor the transportation of big items, for example: furniture or large art works. This elevator(s) is connected to the loading bayarea and is not accessible by visitors.
  • 27. 4.9.4 AccessibilityIt is very important that the new building provides an inclusive facility that is accessible for all users. Incorporating theprinciples of inclusive design will benefit the population at large particularly disabled people, older people and parents withchildren. Understanding and considering the access requirements of disabled people is imperative. In doing so, it is possibleto design an inclusive environment that reflects the diversity of people within society and breaks down unnecessary barriers.Key access issues to address in the design of the building include:Approach routes and arrival at the building.Way finding around the site.Main entrances.Reception areas.Vertical and horizontal circulation around the building.High quality places of communication including access to resources.Sanitary accommodation.Lighting.Acoustics.Signage.Emergency egress for disabled people.4.10 SecurityOne of the main conditions for the successful functioning of the Tate Bristol and the Library of Bristol is an appropriatesecurity system, offering excellent security for everyone, without being too perceptible or influencing the building’sattractiveness to visitors.Besides the specific security needs for the various functions in the building the security systems should follow theseprinciples:• Security has to be unobtrusive but effective.• ‘Natural ways’ of security: social control by staff as well by visitors, enabled by creating overview and sightlines Demarcation of areas by layout of areas or furnishing, rather then creating barriers• The security must meet the highest industry standards where needed.• The security system should be very flexible and adaptable.4.11 24-hour use of the buildingDue to the different opening hours of Tate Bristol and the Library of Bristol the building will need time related access andsafety zoning. The zoning should result in a safe and efficient building, with a minimum of safety regulations, security andphysical safety systems. Zoning must be an integral feature of the design, enabling different parts of the building to open atdifferent times of the day, whilst maintaining security in other areas that may be closed. It must be possible to shut downindividual areas both from an operational and a servicing point of view. Key spaces including the foyer, entrance hallmeeting rooms and catering facilities will operate outside the normal opening hours of the main library areas. Parts of thebuilding may need to be open 24 hours, for example loan returns and some study space. A 24-hour return and internet areashould at least be covered, well lit and located in such a way that people feel safe and secure. Of course 24-hour access to the
  • 28. live-in studios, for the artists in residence is necessary and this access must be separated from any routes connecting thepublic galleries for out-of-hours access.4.12 Health and SafetyThere is a stated intent of making health and safety an integral part of the building(s) and working ethos of the Library ofBristol and Tate Bristol. The strategy of Health and Safety is of major importance due to the mixture of uses in onebuilding(s) complex and the various types of users daily and occasional visitors.The building should provide a healthy environment for staff so accidents and ill-health are eliminated and work forms part ofa satisfying life for the benefit of both the individual and the organisation. Staff members need to be aware of theresponsibility that the conduct of work does not endanger anyone including members of the public.The building should be healthy and safe for visitors too. Safe access to the building and clear routing are the main points ofattention. In addition, information is to be clearly presented in case of emergency. Staff members should have a role increating a safe environment for visitors.As in any public building, there are a number of specific threats identified. Wherever possible the opportunity to reducethese threats and they must be taken into account and designed out of the environment so risks can be minimized.Identification of hazards, risk assessments, implementation of procedures, and provision of adequate resources is to be a partof the design. In cooperation with the client(s), a Health and Safety program is to be developed simultaneously with designdevelopment.4.13 Environmental ConditionsThe design of the building(s) and its installations should ensure that the indoor climate will be comfortable and healthy forall users of the building, for example in terms of temperature, air quality and daylight. The indoor climate should feel naturalin relation to the activities that take place within individual rooms.To achieve the desired internal environments within the various parts of the building, suitable strategies will be developedwith consideration of issues such as air quality, thermal comfort, acoustics, security and level of control and flexibilityrequired.The selection of external environmental design criteria has a significant effect on both the capital cost and operation ofcertain building services. The frequency of abnormal environmental conditions and the risk if internal conditions deviatefrom the desired set points must be reviewed to determine appropriate criteria. Where spaces are being conditioned to strictcriteria, i.e. to preserve archive, the Tate’s collection of art and the exhibition spaces, it is likely to be seen as critical that theplant serving these spaces can maintain the desired conditions at all times. However, in other areas it may be acceptableduring infrequent abnormal external conditions that the internal conditions deviate slightly. Therefore, as a guide thebuilding services systems serving the archive and exhibition areas could be designed with reference to the following externaltemperatures.Extreme seasonal temperature extents are:• Summer 32°C. This represents a 0.01 % occurrence over a 24 hour period.• Winter -7°C. This represents a 0.01% occurrence over a 24 hour period.While the building services serving all other areas of the building could be designed with reference to a different set ofcriteria such as the following, with the likely effect of reduced capital cost and improved efficiency of certain buildingservices.
  • 29. Acceptable season temperature extents are: • Summer 28°C This represents a 0.34% occurrence over a 24 hour period. • Winter -5°C This represents a 0.9% occurrence over a 24 hour period.The design of the building envelope(s) will be critical in maintaining a high quality indoor environment and limiting thebuilding energy consumption, and will be key consideration during the design process. The design of the building envelopewill reflect not only aesthetic considerations, but will also be configured for optimum thermal performance i.e. the façadedesign will aim to maximise daylight penetration, mitigate excessive solar gain and reduce heat loss.A range of different environmental conditions will be needed to protect the materials and exhibitions whilst allowing publicaccess, however storage areas will not be accessed by the publicThe key considerations are:• Temperature.• Humidity.• Light levels/UV control.• Air quality and dust/particle filtration.• Protection from physical damage.4.14 Regulations and Standards for Sustainability4.14.1 SustainabilityBoth the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol, as public and educational institutions, have a strong obligation to care forthe physical and social environment. The construction of the building(s) and the building themselves throughout theirlifespan should comply with the following:• Optimum use of natural resources and reduction in the environmental impact inline with the economical and social requirements.• Reduction of energy consumption in the operation of the building.• The sustainability approach is incorporated in the physical and technical layout of the building and should go beyond simply meeting standards and regulations where possible.Main subject of attention:• Physical building(s) layout in relation to compactness, flexibility and adaptability during its lifespan.• Specific needs of functions.• Use of natural resources.• Environmental aspects of construction method and materials.• Maintenance and lifespan aspects.• Minimising the energy demand for heating and cooling.4.14.2 BREEAMThe Design will aim to obtain a BREEAM rating of Excellent for both the new library building and the Tate Bristol andmeeting the Council’s target for renewable technologies and sustainability without undue increase in the cost of the works.The design must source the best sustainable solutions, using the process of consultation, collaboration and engagement withall the key stakeholders. These should enhance aesthetic goals, limit resource consumption, improve building performance
  • 30. and promote health and productivity. Bristol has a distinguished creative tradition: the Tate Bristol and the Library willreinforce this by employing elegant and innovative engineering.Achieving a BREEAM excellent rating alone will not necessarily achieve the sustainability targets and therefore theSustainability Strategy identified below will need to encompass a wide range of strategies and include the whole life cyclecosting and investment pay back options.4.14.3 Going for Green‘Sustainable development is about ensuring a better quality of life for everyone now and for generations to come by bringingtogether objectives around social, economic and environmental goals’The Bristol City Council is fully committed to the sustainable development of the City and a fundamental objective of this isthe protection and enhancement of the environment. Bristol City Council is also committed to procurement decisions thathave a direct influence on the Sustainability Strategy.4.14.4 Bristol Climate Change StrategyThe Bristol Climate Change Strategy aims to reduce Bristol ’s carbon emissions by 20% from 1990 levels by 2010, and 60%by 2026. The energy targets aim to “ensure that 15% of energy use in Bristol is from renewable sources and that 30% of it isgenerated locally by 2020”.The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol project will therefore form a key part of this strategy through both theon site application of integrated technologies and also by interfacing with the City’s wider approach to decentralised energysystems.4.14.5 Energy Performance Building DirectiveThe Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol will require compliance with the Energy Performance BuildingDirective. There are many factors associated with energy performance in buildings and in the course of the project: researchwill be taken to investigate different methods of building design.On completion of the project an Energy Performance Certificate will need to be produced (based on the theoretical CarbonDioxide emissions for the building) and displayed to comply with the new EU directive on Energy Performance in BuildingsAfter 12 months a Display Energy Certificate, which determines the actual Carbon Dioxide emissions based on meteredenergy readings, will need be produced and displayed. During the next design stage preliminary energy performancecalculations will be carried out to inform the design development of the energy efficiency of the proposed design.4.15 AcousticsAs the site is located on the East of Spike Island, the Library of Bristol can be exposed to a certain levels of noise. Thisshould be taken into account.Noise from cars and traffic in general and for example the occasional events taking place on the new “Library Park” or noisefrom the foyer can cause inconvenient noise or vibrations in the building. For the two main functions, the Tate Bristol andthe library, noise control is of great importance. To avoid this generally two measurements have to be taken:Separating structures.Zoning of sound-sensitive and sound producing areas.
  • 31. In the layout of the building, especially areas containing various functions, or areas with flexible use close attention toacoustic qualities is crucial. Rooms must be acoustically regulated (and comply to standards) to best suit the function of thisrooms and adjacent areas.Floors and slabs between levels must be designed so that impact noise will not spread to adjacent rooms and is not loud inthe room itself. Technical installations in the building should emit as little noise as possible so that they do not cause noisepollution inside or outside the building.4.16 Public Art ProgramThe future Tate Bristol integrated with Library of Bristol as an important public place to gather and to educate, also withregard to local and global issues concerning culture and arts. The wide collection of the Library of Bristol’s archivescontains many pieces worth seeing by the city and more specifically by the visitors to the library. The first task will be tomake a clear inventory of the current collection. Needless to say, that the Tate’s collection too is extensive and would be ofimmeasurable benefit to the citizens of Bristol. In this case, the Tate’s collection housed in Tate Bristol will ebb and flow –migrating to the other Tate Galleries around Britain. However there will be a dedicated depository for up to 10,000 pieces ofart, including the Tate’s collection of audio/visual archives to be permanently housed in the Tate BristolShowcases for these pieces, but also showcases for other pieces of art will be integrated within the design of the building andsite. The object, painting or other kind of pieces should contribute to the experience of the public area.Due to the size of the building and the size of the site, various types and sizes of pieces of art are conceivable, ranging from,for example, small objects in internal or external showcases to a collection of pieces that form a storyline through out the siteand building.The planning for exhibiting art should be in accordance with the Tate’s specific guidance.
  • 32. 5 Functional Specifications (Occurring in both the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol)
  • 33. 5. Functional Specifications (Occurring in both the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol)The functional specification states both the operational and aspirational requirements that will form the basis of the designphase tasks. Some of these items have conflicting requirements that must be reconciled and resolved during the next phasesin the design process. It contains detailed information concerning the amount, size and quality of spaces as well as therequired proximity of functions and spaces, requirements concerning the functional and essential technical requirements,image and appearance as well as other requirements specific to the project as known to date. The functional specificationdescribes the functional requirements all areas of the project, encompassing also general service areas and ‘back of house’zones.The Functional Specification can be seen in three main groupings: Library of Bristol only spaces, Tate Bristol only spacesand shared spaces. These are indicated in the colour chart adjoining this document.5.1 General Areas‘General areas’ refers specifically to those spaces that appear throughout the two buildings serving primarily as necessarysupportive function. These areas occur throughout the two buildings.5.1.0 Main Entrance and Foyer - IntroductionThe arrival areas of both the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol is to function as an extended public space. The locationand function of the building provide an ideal opportunity to merge an outdoor public space with the building creating afundamental dialogue and connection between city and the building(s), both in the physical and metaphorical sense.The arrival space(s) will be the ‘first impression’ of the Library of Bristol and of the Tate Bristol and will therefore be key inensuring an unforgettable experience that will live long in local, regional and international collective memory.The nature of a community space should be communicated where the people of Bristol can feel ownership and pride. Theremoval of all barriers to access including attitudinal, economical, cultural, emotional, institutional, intellectual and physicalshould be of the highest priority in order to foster and ensure the widest possible audience.5.1.1 Main FoyersCore Function:The foyer(s) should be the place from which the flow of arriving people is spread out into the rest of the building. It shouldoffer a number of experiences catering to the diversity of visitor requirements.The foyer space(s) plays a key role in representing the main values and mission of both the Library of Bristol and TateBristol and in expressing the synergies between the two whilst at the same time supporting the distinct brandingrequirements of the two individual organisations.The foyer will become the space where visitors will receive the first information about the activities in the buildings and theoptions available to them. This space should provide and communicate to visitors their customer access choices, service andinformation as well as circulation and navigation information of both the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol.For the library foyer there will also be a requirement to provide a self-service facility for book return.Generally, the requirement is to provide a highly accessible environment for both specific and diverse target groups. Someusers attend individually, some in small groups and some, in particular school student groups, attend in large numbers. Allshould feel equally at home in this space.Accessibility in every sense of the word is a key consideration.
  • 34. Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to main entrances.Space Requirements:Design Capacity requirements: The foyer should be able to accommodate an agreed peak or range of visitor capacity basedon 24/7/365 facilities access and a predicted daily footfall of 10,000. In addition, the Tate Bristol will expect a peak capacity(during Christmas and Summer) of 2,500 people per day.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Accessibility is a core requirement in the design of this space.5.1.2 Main EntranceCore Function:Of key consideration is the legibility and accessibility of the main entrance(s) whilst providing an immediate sense of arrival.Although there may be multiple entrances to the building(s) there should be two main entrances (per building) providingaccess to the shared foyer areas. The values of the two organisations must be communicated and the status of the ‘whole’should be integral to and lead naturally into the main foyer.Relationship + Connections:For both buildings, one entrance must access the promenade to the North, the other to the new “Library Park” to the South.Both should directly access their central foyer space housing their central reception facility. Other entrances (required formaximum occupancy and/or fire safety) should be sited in discreet appropriate areas.Close proximity to blue-badge parking facilities, coach and car drop-off points, public parking, taxi bays, bicycle racks andthe closest public transport will be vital. The city’s transport plan and new bus route must be considered in this context toensure that access, business and navigation needs are satisfied in the location and design of the entrances.The entrance should also be a close to ATM, toilets, service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: The entrance area should be able to accommodate an agreed peak or range of visitorcapacity based on 24/7/365 facilities access and a predicted daily footfall of 10,000 for the Library of Bristol and in addition,the Tate Bristol will expect a peak capacity during Christmas and Summer of 2,500 people per day.Remarks (Specific Requirements):The entrance doors should be intelligent and part of the security system and capable of resisting significant attempts atintrusion. Highly robust finishes to be applied to these spaces.5.1.3 Reception and Customer ServicesCore Function:This is where people should have fast and easily accessible information about the Library of Bristol and with the Tate Bristol.The reception area should clearly show that this is the interface between visitors and its respective building. It must behighly visible and capture the attention of people entering the building. It must be absolutely clear that this is a place wherevisitors can get help.This area will link the visitor to the purpose, functions, services, events and facilities of the entire building. As such the areamust communicate openness and accessibility. This area may also provide a tourist information centre and other suchfacilities and will provide an information outlet for the many community partnerships with which each organisation engages.
  • 35. The area will be supported by self-service information and navigation of the building therefore allowing staff to focus onindividual requirements. Consideration of a modular/ adjustable counter system may facilitate adaptation to various visitordemands.Relationship + Connections:This area needs to be central to the main ground foyer(s). It should be close to public facilities such as toilets, cloakroomsand upper level access – i.e stairs, escalators, lifts to all parts of the building. Adequate and accessible storage will be vital inmaintaining a tidy and clean environment. This area must link to a secure office/non-public space where cash collection,counting and balancing can take place securely.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: The entrance area should be able to accommodate an agreed peak or range of visitorcapacity based on 24/7/365 facilities access and a predicted daily footfall of 10,000. In addition, the Tate Bristol will expecta peak capacity during Christmas and summer of 2,500 people per day.Remarks (Specific Requirements):A queue management system is to be provided. It should be clear that this area is ‘neutral territory’.5.1.4 Circulation Foyer(s)Core Function:Flowing from the main foyer, the circulation foyers should direct visitors accessing specific parts of the building i.e. Libraryof Bristol and Tate Bristol. In essence, the two circulation foyers act as a threshold between the main foyer and the specificfunctions of each organisation i.e. Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol. These areas may need to be zoned off and securedaccording to operational requirements.The circulation foyers should reflect the very different and specific individual requirements of the Library of Bristol andTate Bristol. Each foyer needs to consider a generally more constant customer flow with seasonal peaks and the ambition forthem to become a 24/7 operation over time. The Tate Bristol foyers are required on at least two floors: one to the Northpromenade and one to the South “Library Park” on plinth (upper ground) levelEach foyer in the Tate Bristol need to be able to operate independently as customer numbers fluctuate. To maximise use ofeach area for activities independent of exhibitions, the ability to easily zone areas e.g. for meeting spaces, private receptionareas, lecture spaces etc would be advantageous. Effective lighting and acoustic management of the area is key in this regard.Relationship + Connections:The Tate Bristol foyers need to be adjacent to the major exhibition spaces via stairs, escalators, lifts. Both foyers shouldcontain toilets and accessible toilets and provide easy security monitoring. The Library of Bristol foyer should link to theLibrary of Bristol exhibition gallery. Both foyers should flow naturally from the main reception foyer. The Tate Bristol foyerparticularly, must comply with all licensing, health and safety and fire evacuation requirements. They will be close to ATM,toilets and accessible toilets, service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.
  • 36. 5.1.5 Cloakroom and Locker FacilitiesCore Function:All visitors to the building(s) should easily access these facilities.This is an area where personal items such as bags and coats can be left. The area may only be staffed at certain timestherefore the space should be designed to retain its function as a self-service cloakroom. These facilities could also becompletely self-service.These could be in a less ‘central location’ but would require an increased security system.The gallery visitors can demand up to 150 ‘coat spaces’ plus up to 50 bags/suitcases/shopping items, at any one time, duringChristmas and summer months. They Library of Bristol demand will be lower but more constant throughout the year.Relationship + Connections:The area needs to be central to each entrance(s). It must be close to toilets, reception and under surveillance of the securitysystems.Space Requirements:Amount: 2 areas (one per building).Dimensions: to be determined.Size: approx. 25m2 gross floor area.Total area: 50m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Heighten security risk.5.2.1a Public Toilet FacilitiesCore Function:These facilities will service customers and visitors to the foyer areas. This means that potentially a broad public will usethese facilities. Given the diverse groups of people visiting the building, the facilities should therefore reflect this diversity ofrequirements and include adequate provision for children and parents as well as disabled visitors. Facilities may vary indimension in order to address these needs specifically.Consideration should also be given to the way in which facilities will be used throughout the day. Moments of intense useoccur during lunchtimes and also coincide with both Tate Bristol and the Library of Bristol events. Events taking place in thenew “Library Park” will also place high demands on these facilities.Further, sustainable use of water and cleaning products should be prioritised. This subject is detailed as part of thesustainability strategy.Focus should be placed on the ease of use and robustness. In addition, given the high public usage envisaged for the building,all fixtures, fittings and surfaces selected should be of adequate and appropriate quality to reflect this imperative. Naturally,provision of good light and ventilation are essential.Relationship + Connections:Public toilet facilities should be in close proximity to exhibiting gallery’s entrances and general reception areas, proximity tocleaning services and general maintenance access is also a priority. Catering and bar facilities will also require specific toiletprovision.Space Requirements:Dimensions: 0.90 x 1.50 m per toilet cubicle minimum.
  • 37. Size: 4m2 gross area per toilet cubicle minimum (includes entrance area).Remarks (Specific Requirements):Allow for effective, deep and high standard cleaning. Allow for self-cleaning functions where possible.Attention to the prevention of misuse and vandalism including the use of anti-graffiti surfaces. Incorporate environmentallyefficient disposal of sanitary waste.Fittings and fixtures to possibly provide for particular cultural needs of users.5.1.1b Staff Toilet FacilitiesCore Function:These facilities will service staff of the Tate Bristol and the Library of Bristol.Similar to the public toilets functional requirements, staff toilets should reflect the diversity of staff requirements includingprovision for disabled staff.For operational purposes these facilities may be located in close proximity to staff areas. Further, sustainable use of waterand cleaning products should be prioritised. This subject is detailed as part of the Sustainability strategy.Focus should be placed on the ease of use and robustness. In addition, all fixtures, fittings and surfaces selected should be ofadequate and appropriate quality. Naturally, provision of good light and ventilation are essential.Relationship + Connections:Catering and bar facilities will also require specific toilet provision.Staff toilet facilities will need to be located close to other staff areas such as staff offices and facilities.Space Requirements:Dimensions: 0.90 x 1.50 m per toilet cubicle minimum.Size: 4m2 gross area per toilet cubicle minimum (includes entrance area).Remarks (Specific Requirements):Allow for effective, deep and high standard cleaning. Allow for self-cleaning functions where possible.Attention to the prevention of misuse and vandalism including the use of anti-graffiti surfaces. Incorporate environmentallyefficient disposal of sanitary waste.Fittings and fixtures to possibly provide for particular cultural needs of users.5.1.2 Accessible ToiletsCore Function:Provision must be made to serve wheelchair, EMV and other mobility impaired users and their caregivers with facilities.Accessible toilets must be of equal standard to other toilets.Thought must be given to robustness, as well as the ease and modesty of ingress and egress. These facilities must beaccessibility compliant and exceed DDA requirements. One accessible toilet should be a full personal care suite and be ableto accommodate a mobile bed and/or allow an EMV, large wheelchair, a hoist, its user and caregivers with comfortableaccess and space to use the facilities with ease. Furthermore, these facilities shall be linked to the emergency responsesystem with easy access for staff to respond.Naturally, provision of good light and ventilation are essential. In addition, given the high public usage envisaged for thebuilding, all fixtures, fittings and surfaces selected should be of adequate and appropriate quality to reflect this imperative.
  • 38. Further, sustainable use of water and cleaning products should be prioritised. This subject is detailed as part of theSustainability strategy. The provision of at least one facility on every floor of the library building is also required.Relationship + Connections:All facilities should be directly accessible from the exhibition galleries, bar, catered areas and general reception area. Wherea priority is needed, these toilets should be nearer to the service area in question than those for non-disabled customers.Preference is given to locate these facilities close to cleaning services and general maintenance access. Obvious, direct andeasy access to main entrance and exit doors is also required.Space Requirements:Dimensions: 1.60 x 2.80 m per toilet cubicle minimum.Size: 8m2 gross floor area per toilet cubicle minimum (includes entrance area).Remarks (Specific Requirements):Allowance must be made for effective, deep and high standard of cleaning. Where possible self-cleaning functions should beincluded. Attention to the prevention of misuse and vandalism including the use of anti-graffiti surfaces should beincorporated.5.1.3 Cleaner’s Room + StoresCore Function:Cleaner’s rooms and associated store should provide space for all necessary general and specialist equipment and cleaningmaterials, including all necessary sinks, drainage and waste systems to cope with the range of cleaning needs. The provisionof four low level sinks with hoses, a sluice/incinerator or similar waste disposal system for solid matter, two large lockablecupboards for storage of cleaning materials and chemicals, shelves for stocks of sanitary materials, space for spare wastebins, sanitary bins and other equipment, racks for storage of cleaning equipment such as vacuum cleaners and mop buckets,a washing machine and dryer and a domestic sink unit is to be included within this area.It is essential that the space provides a safe and healthy working environment for all users, with specific consideration forthose who will be using chemicals, hot water, steam and other hazardous materials.Relationship + Connections:The space should be accessible to all aspects of the customer service functions with particular focus on exhibition areas andbar/cafe areas. It must have good service lift access to support safe and efficient operations and ease of waste disposal.Access for cleaning staff to the staff briefing/rest room will be required to support necessary meetings and breakrequirements.Space Requirements:Amount: 20.Dimensions: To be determined.Size: 4m2 gross floor area minimum.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Highly robust finishes to be applied to spaces.
  • 39. 5.1.4 General Staff Offices + FacilitiesCore Function:A particular part of both buildings should be determined to accommodate staff, relating specifically to the operationalmanagement of both the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol related activities. Bearing in mind the need for a durable,adaptable office environment, a maximum amount of flexibility should be integrated within its design. The possibility tocreate multiple variations of floor layouts with regards to furniture is part of that demand. Necessary spaces to house lockersand kitchen areas are required for these functions.Relationship + Connections:As the offices with their necessary functional spaces should be considered a unity, they should be located in close proximityto each other as they provide interdependent services. If adjacent to the cleaner’s room, the staff briefing and rest roomscould accommodate cleaning staff also.Furthermore, this unit will need to be near to the toilets, service lifts and stair/lifts/escalators.Space Requirements:Schedule of accommodation: To be determined.Design Capacity requirements: To be determined.1,500m2 will adequately cover a minimum capacity of 100 workstations.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Office spaces need to be flexible and adaptable to changing user requirements. They must be accessible for disabled staffand visitors.5.2 Buggy + EMV ParkCore Function:The users of the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol should be provided with adequate space to safely park buggies andEMVs.These areas could be accommodated close to the outside of the entrances rather than inside the foyer as self-service lock-ups,assuming secure and appropriate locations and ease of access to foyer.This space needs to be very accessible, user-friendly and adaptable to accommodate demand.Consideration of door openings and corridors leading to this area should be sufficiently wide for ease of access andmovement.Relationship + Connections:For the library, proximity to the Children’s Library is required. These areas should also be close to entrance(s) and toilets.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 25m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: The area should accommodate up to 30 buggies and 10 EMVs.Remarks (Specific Requirements):It should be under the surveillance of security systems.
  • 40. 5.2.1 Parents/Carers RoomCore Function:This area should be suitable for parents and carers visiting the Library of Bristol or Tate Bristol to comfortably feed andchange babies, toddlers and younger children. This needs to be a unisex environment.For reasons of discretion, private lockable cubicles for breastfeeding mothers should be provided.Facilities in these areas should include bottle heating facilities, hand wash basins, changing tables, individual toilets withchanging facilities and washbasins, adequate and environmentally efficient food and sanitary waste system: potable watersupply, fixed microwaves, and highchairs.Relationship + Connections:This area should service the general foyer space and the Children’s Library section for the Library of Bristol. It needs to beaccessible for cleaning and close to security surveillance. The buggy park should be as close as possible.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):The safety and security of children is to be of paramount importance.The allowance for clear and multi-lingual facility information is also necessary.5.2.2 First Aid/Changing RoomsCore Function:These spaces are an essential requirement of the building. A comprehensive first aid service must be provided for both staffand visitors. First Aid rooms should house a bed, locked supply cabinet, toilet and washbasin, adequate and appropriatewaste disposal system (i.e. bodily fluids) and room for patient, first aider and patient’s attendants.Changing facilities are required for adults and carers who may require this facility in relation to accessible toilet facilities.Staff changing facilities for motor/cyclists will need to be made available elsewhere as a separate facility with lockablechanging rooms including shower facilities to provide adequate space for individuals to change their clothing includingspace for mirror and chair. Particular attention to the health and safety of users and ease of cleaning (surgical and general)are also important. Pairs of rooms should be able to break down into one larger room.Relationship + Connections:Accessible from public foyer area and close to entrance(s) and both Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol. Accessible byparamedic team/ambulance or other vehicles. Close to security surveillance. Close to ATM, toilets and accessible toilets,exhibition galleries, service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.
  • 41. 5.2.3 Meeting PointCore Function:The meeting point is a designated area where people can meet each other. It should be clearly defined, legible and visible.This area should not be considered a room but rather a zone with a distinctive space and character. The area should be ableto accommodate large groups of people with comfortable seating, internet accessible computers and reading materials. Itshould be designed to deter anti-social ‘grouping’ and be close to the reception support with low-key supervision. This spacewill be a part of the integration between the two organizations.Relationship + Connections:This area should be central to the main entrances and reception areas, toilets and public services. Close to ATM, toilets andaccessible toilets, service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Seating should be fixed yet demountable to allow the space to be used for other purposes if required. Fixtures andfurnishings must be easy to clean and robust.5.2.4 Storage SpacesCore Function:This staff-only accessed area will provide a storage facility for programmes and scripts, merchandise and retail items, ticketstock (for the Tate Bristol), stationery items, publicity, first aid stock, display boards and third party equipment and stock forboth organisations etc. For aesthetic and operational reasons storage stock will be limited in the reception area, therefore afacility that sufficiently caters to this need will be required for both organisations.This facility should allow for access by couriers and delivery services to either load in directly from the street or fromservice lift provision from the loading bays. The area must be secure and safe, with appropriate racking, shelving, access andretrieval equipment to minimise any health and safety risks for staff.This space should be easily and safely accessible for staff and be under security surveillance.Relationship + Connections:This area does not need to be central to the foyer, but should be reasonably close to reception, service lift and unloading baysprovision for ease of operation.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross area.5.2.5 Self service Information + Sales, ATMs, post-box, public phones, Internet ‘café’, Wi-Fi provisionCore Function:Provision for a variety of ‘self service’ functions such as points for self-service building navigation and information systemsand self-service ticketing booths and self service book returns should be made in the foyer. These services should allow foradaptation to new technology, including changing spatial requirements. Adequate space and support infrastructure is vital inensuring the smooth operation of such facilities.The zone could be designed and equipped in a way that facilitates co-service where visitors can be taught to servethemselves. These facilities should also allow for low-key security surveillance for personal and equipment safety.
  • 42. An appropriate and comfortable queuing/waiting system and area for internet café and Wi-Fi usage needs to beaccommodated without disturbing the major flow of visitors to other parts of the building.Of particularly high demand is the Internet and Wi-Fi area which therefore should accommodate a large number of dailyusers with adequate seating. Fixtures and furnishings should be easy to clean and robust, designed for high volume usage. ITequipment should be extremely secure and provision should be made for disabled users. User information should beaccessible and simple. ATMs and public phones should be situated for safe and discreet usage by customers and secure forstaff when replacing cash. All systems must have easy access for maintenance, repair and replacement or upgrading.Relationship + Connections:All services need to be close to security and maintenance systems and reception and must allow access for specialistcleaning. The post box must be easily accessible and safe for collections by postal staff. Close to ATM, toilets and accessibletoilets, service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Provide adequate electrical infrastructure to this area. Allow for expansion of Internet café over time.5.2.6 Staff Briefing / Rest RoomsCore Function:The staff briefing/rest room should adequately accommodate up to twenty-five staff. This area will also serve toaccommodate ancillary staff members such as firemen, ushers and catering/bar staff.This area should also include secure lockers and a kitchen area. The staff rest room could be adjacent to the cleaner’s roomto accommodate cleaning staff as well.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: The area should accommodate up to 25 staff.Remarks (Specific Requirements):In accordance with statutory requirements offices need to be accessible for disabled staff and visitors.5.3 Facilities Management (Occurring in both the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol5.3.0 Security Operations IntroductionThe diverse nature of this building(s) will require a clear understanding and management strategy that will deal with theunique operational aspects of the building. Some parts of the building(s) are to be open when others will be closed, inparticular, the Conference Rooms, Restaurants and Bar, exhibition areas and various zones of the Library of Bristol willhave implications on the design in terms of restricted circulation and security. Systems should be designed so that areas canoperate discreetly: this includes the security of these areas. The security system should emphasise balance through theappropriate use of staff and technology. Security should be unobtrusive yet effective.Clear site lines, no dead legs both inside and out, and well-defined security lines will facilitate a balanced approach tosecurity. As in any public building, there are a number of threats identified. The theft of stock and equipment, intellectualproperty theft, opportunistic crime, disruptive behaviour, anti social behaviour, violent visitors, visitors with mental healthissues and terrorism.
  • 43. The foyer will play a key role in establishing the system of security to be implemented. It is envisaged that there will besecurity presence in the foyer in the form of meet and greet and concierge personnel.Stock will need to be protected and detection devices incorporated behind the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol securityline discreetly, but with an ability for a member of staff to challenge if the device is activated.Specific areas such as Archives and Heritage (for the library) and the Galleries and storage areas (for the Tate Bristol) willrequire an individual approach for a high level of specialist security. Also, there is a specific requirement for the safety ofchildren throughout the Library of Bristol and the Tate Birstol but particularly in the children’s library area.The security systems must be capable of being modified and added to satisfy future requirements. The security for theLibrary of Bristol and Tate Bristol must meet the highest industry standards.The library building will form part of Bristol City Council’s wider portfolio of buildings that it owns, manages and operates.Core Function:Fully integrated CCTV office covering monitoring facilities to the complex, Linked back to the BCC and Police ControlOffice. It will house the BMS/Fire/ Intruder/ Personal Attack/ Flood and Tannoy System.Relationship + Connections:This area should be next to the Services reception(s) and foyer(s).Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Total size each: approx. 40m2 gross floor area.5.3.1 Security Interview RoomCore Function:This room needs to be front of house, in a discreet area near to the foyer. The use will be for customers who are detained andpolice interviews.Relationship + Connections:This area should be next to the Services reception and foyer.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: To be determined.Total size each: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.5.3.2 Secure Storage AreaCore Function:A secure storage area for small deliveries/packages will be a function of this area. Staff will bank monies: there will be arequirement for a safe so the office area must be secure.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Security Control room.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.
  • 44. 5.3.3 Building Management Services OfficeCore Function:The space will be used by the Facilities Team. These include spaces for the Finance and Administration and someManagement functions for the building. It will include the Facilities Help Desk/Services Reception/Conference RoomBooking Team on site base for contractors, including BMS functions and Controls for the building, Van Drivers, SecurityManager and Onsite Maintenance.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to: Staff Entrance, Loading Bay, Security Control, Goods lift, ICT workshop and store, bib services. Stores, staffchanging rooms, showers for staff, cycle store and Loading Bay Records Management.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Total size: approx. 120m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: There would be approx. 8 permanent staff/contractors and 4 hot desk spaces. An officefor back of house visitors for approx. 14 people.5.3.4 Services Reception/FacilitiesCore Function:This is an area for a helpdesk and management office. The area is designed to be multi-functional in order to carry out anumber of duties whilst servicing reception.Waiting area will also need to be incorporated.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to the main back of house entrance area.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 30m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: Should support minimal permanent staff.5.3.5 Staff Entrance Area and Ancillary SpacesCore Function:These areas will be the main back of house entrance(s), they should be able to be standalone so they can be opened when theLibrary of Bristol /Tate Bristol are closed. This area will service the staff and visitor entrance and as such it must be durablefor operations with high traffic. The main controls for BMS/Fire Panels/ Security are to be housed in this area and repeatedin an adjacent security control room.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Security Control room.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: to be determinedTotal size: approx. 100m2 gross floor area
  • 45. Remarks (Specific Requirements):ICT and Power supply must be maintained at all times with a UPS back up.5.3.6 Conference CentreCore Function:Note: This function requires detailed resolution and forms part of on-going investigation.Relationship + Connections:Investigation on-going.Space Requirements:Amount: To be determined.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 910m2 gross floor area, including 560m2, which will be commercially operated.5.3.7 Facilities Management StorageCore Function:The Facilities Management store will be the centralised storage area for the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol. Anextensive list will be produced through dialogue to produce a definitive list of items to be stored Storage will need toaccommodate cloakrooms, furniture storage and chairs, publication material and internal stationery.An area will be nominated for skips and recycling bins.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 300m2 gross floor area.5.3.8 Commercial RetailCore Function:Note: This function requires detailed resolution and forms part of an on-going investigation.Relationship + Connections:Investigation on-going.Space Requirements:Amount: To be determined.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 227m2 gross floor area.5.3.9 Tate Bristol and Library of Bristol salesCore Function:This area provides the opportunity for independently operated retail. It also provides a possible income stream from TateBristol and Library of Bristol sales.Resolution is required for the retail concept through on-going investigation by the client body.Relationship + Connections:
  • 46. Catering areas will need to be adjacent and accessible to the Picnic Area.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 per building (2).Dimensions: To be determined.Size: approx. 227m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Metered service connections will be provided to suit the retail offer requirements. Connection to Fire Alarm, drainage willalso be provided as required.Size: approx. 875m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Metered service connections will be provided to suit the retail offer requirements. Connection to Fire Alarm, drainage willalso be provided as required. The requirements for specialist Kitchen Extract systems will also be considered dependant onthe retail on offer.
  • 47. 6 TATE BRISTOL: Areas specific to Tate Bristol
  • 48. 6. TATE BRISTOL: Areas specific to Tate Bristol6.0 Exhibition Galleries - IntroductionThe Exhibition Galleries are key in expanding the audience of the Tate Bristol and the Library of Bristol. The exhibitionswill focus on showcasing the Tate’s collections to visitors. The exhibition space should be stimulating and will incorporate alevel of interactively to wholly engage with the viewer both intellectually and spiritually.Tate Bristol’s focus will be placed on UK contemporary emerging artists, audio visual installations and also showcasing theTate new and fast growing collection of Asian and African contemporary artTechnical and environmental conditions should be of the highest quality whilst allowing for creative and flexible layout forvarious exhibitions types.6.1 Main Exhibition SpacesCore Function:This space will be considered as a destination space providing a multi-sensory experience and be used for a programme ofthematic and format based exhibitions. It should appeal to a broad audience and therefore allow for many types ofexhibitions of varying media. The gallery should incorporate a modular approach to spatial configurations – capable of beingconverted into more than one space or a smaller space(s).Relationship + Connections:Most important adjacencies are digital lab, the art depository/ storage, loading bay and main building entrance. The Galleriesneed not be on the same floor as these areas, although should be on an adjacent floor at least. Service routes should avoidpassing through this area.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 6000m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):The internal environment of the Main Exhibition Space is to be designed to American Standard for Heating Refrigerationand Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Class of Control AA. ASHRAE standards have been selected as there iscurrently no relevant Chartered Institute of Building Services (CIBSE) standard. This should provide a suitable compromisebetween the internal conditions required for exhibits and visitors to the gallery. It is proposed that exhibits that requiredifferent environmental conditions would be stored within conditioned display cases with inbuilt temperature and humiditycontrol as per recommendations in BS5454. To comply with the National Heritage Act 1980 the relative humidity,temperature and light levels will be monitored.
  • 49. 6.2 Exhibition Preparation SpaceCore Function:This space will be used for preparing materials for exhibitions and will need to be immediately adjacent and have access tothe main exhibition spaces and their associated storage space. The space should be a regular shape and flexible with poweravailability throughout and with access capable of taking large to extremely large objects.Relationship + Connections:(See main exhibition space).Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 275m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):As this space will be used for the preparation of exhibits, which require specific environmental conditions, it is proposed thatthe temperature and humidity are controlled in a similar manner to the Main Exhibition space. This will reduce the need foracclimatization when materials are moved between the two spaces. However, as certain materials may be without displaycases in this area, the temperature band would be reduced to 20degC ±1degC. To comply with the National Heritage Act1980 the relative humidity, temperature and light levels will be monitored.6.3 Exhibition Storage SpaceCore Function:This space will be used for storing exhibition equipment such as frames, vitrines, lights etc and will need to be immediatelyadjacent and have access to the Main exhibition space and associated preparation space. The space should be a regular shapeand flexible with power availability. The space will need to be able to store moveable display modules, frames and displaycases. The frame store will need an efficient racking system.Relationship + Connections:Immediately adjacent to main exhibition space and exhibition preparation space.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 275m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Full climatic control where necessary, adjustable lighting conditions. High level of security required.6.4 Tate Bristol BarCore Function:The bar forms a key facility for the Tate Bristol. In this area provision should be made for alcohol, beverages, confectionaryand snacks to any visitor to the building, but in particular for servicing the gallery visitors. The bar should also providemeeting spaces, hospitality and private party areas with the flexibility to support conference activity during the daytime. Thebar must be large and well organised, allowing for optimum service during the peak ‘pinch-points’ for serving up to 400people.
  • 50. Users will be a very diverse group. Acoustic management and in particular enhancement systems for deaf or hard of hearingcustomers will be needed. Layout, sight lines and security systems need to accommodate the need for effective managementof anti-social behaviour. Stock and equipment must be easy to lock-down and open, clean and maintain. Given the diversityof the customer base these areas should be egalitarian allowing for a range of styles/lighting/colours/layouts.There should be provision of an alcohol-free bar area to service children, families and customers whose religion proscribesalcohol.Relationship + Connections:The bar needs to be in close proximity to the toilets, service lifts and primary catered facilities/kitchens. They should beconnected to the main foyer and/or a part of the circulation foyers for the exhibition spaces. The bar must be an integratedpart of a stock control system. There must be adequate provision for the secure handling of floats, till management and cash-ups. Such a secure area with a day safe could be a shared facility with reception and tickets sales to the featured exhibitions.Personal security of staff and customers is important so surveillance and ease of access for security staff is important. Thebar must support easy access for daily cleaning and high standard cleaning. Signage to other parts of the building and inparticular the exhibitions must be clear and accessible.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: The area should accommodate up to 250 people comfortably.6.5 Studio SpacesCore Function:Tate Bristol provisions of new studio spaces where a wide variety of artists, designers and makers can work in residenceincreasing the potential for greater participation and collaboration and attracting new audiences. The new studio spaces willbe designed to ensure maximum flexibility in terms of differing working needs of the artists and designers, whilst alsoallowing for personal adaptation in every aspect of its operation. All studios will have a live-in function, allow the artists toimmerse themselves in their work.Relationship + Connections:The studios will wrap around the outside of the Tate Bristol. As the exhibition galleries themselves do not need natural light,but the live-in studios do then the studios will be located on the outer circumference of the building and the galleries on theinner.Amount: 60Total size: approx. 25-30m2 each.Remarks (Specific Requirements):All studios will have access to water, a sink, self-contained bathroom units and a small kitchenette. All units must be fittedwith fire alarms and smoke detectors. All studios to allow for a bed on maisonette floor, therefore the ceiling height must beat least 4.2 metres.
  • 51. 6.6.1 WorkshopsCore Function:The workshop area is used for construction, assembly and finishing of all in house produced items for the Tate Bristol. Theartists in residences will have supervised access to these facilities.Relationship + Connections:The workshop should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, exhibition galleries and studios.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Total size: approx. 376m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Each working area to have environmental controls. Space must have a minimum height of 6m.Sound baffles should be included in machine areas. Provision is also needed for adequate ventilation and extract systemsfrom woodworking/metalworking machines.6.6.2 Workshop OfficeCore Function:The workshop office is required for staff working in the workshop area.Relationship + Connections:The workshop office should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, workshop, exhibition galleries and artiststudios.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Total size: approx. 11m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Each working area to have own environmental controls.6.6.3 Workshop Tea roomCore Function:The tea-room is a staff facility equipped with a kitchen and basic food preparation facilities. The tea-room is principally usedby staff working in the workshop.Relationship + Connections:The workshop tea-room should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, workshop and exhibition galleries.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Total size: approx. 15m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Each working area to have own environmental controls.
  • 52. 6.6.4 Design OfficeCore Function:Staff accommodation. Provision for workstation to be made.Relationship + Connections:The design office should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, workshop and exhibition galleries.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Total size: approx. 28m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Each working area to have own environmental controls.6.6.5 Metal workshopCore Function:The metal workshop area is used for construction, assembly and finishing of all steel in house produced items for the TateBristol. The artists in residences will have supervised access to these facilities.Relationship + Connections:The workshop should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, and studio spaces.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Total size: approx. 109m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Each working area to have own environmental controls. Space must have a minimum height of 5.5m.Sound baffles should be included in machine areas. Provision is also needed for adequate ventilation and extract systemsfrom woodworking/metalworking machines.6.6.6 Wood storeCore Function:This space will store all wood and woodwork related items.Relationship + Connections:The wood store should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, workshop, particularly the wood workshop,exhibition galleries and studio spaces.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Total size: approx. 69m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Each working area to have own environmental controls.Sound baffles should be included in machine areas.
  • 53. 6.6.7 Wood workshopCore Function:The wood workshop area is used for construction, assembly and finishing of all wood in house produced items for the TateBristol.Relationship + Connections:The workshop should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, wood store, exhibition galleries and studio spaces.Space Requirements:Amount: 1Total size: approx. 68m2 gross floor areaRemarks (Specific Requirements):Each working area to have individual environmental controls. Space must have a minimum height of 5.5m. Sound bafflesshould be included in machine areas. Provision is also needed for adequate ventilation and extract systems fromwoodworking/metalworking machines.6.6.8 StorageCore Function:The storage area is used as necessary support space for the construction, assembly and finishing of all in house produceditems for the Tate Bristol. These are produced mainly in steel and wood. This space should be insulated and lockable.Relationship + Connections:The storage area should be adjacent to staff facilities, goods lift, loading bay, exhibition galleries, workshop, and studiospaces.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Total size: approx. 210m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Each working area to have own environmental controls.6.6.9 Changing areas and LockersCore Function:These facilities with service the staff employed throughout the workshop areas.Relationship + Connections:The change areas and lockers should be adjacent to staff facilities and workshop.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Each area to have own environmental controls.
  • 54. 6.7.1 Staff Offices - Tate BristolCore Function:This staff area relates specifically to those functions dealing with the art gallery house management. A total of five officespaces are required. Three of these offices will accommodate a maximum of eight staff, workstations, desks, filing andmiscellany in each will be required. Of the five offices, the Tate Bristol also requires two multi-purpose offices, which canbe used for visitors, conference organisers and internal meetings.All staff areas need to be ergonomic and adaptable with good light and ventilation. All need to provide security for staff andequipment.Relationship + Connections:Ideally all the offices would be in close proximity to each other as they provide interdependent services. They must belocated to efficiently support the functions of the staff concerned. The sales manager office could be located next to theticket office/sales function (for the featured exhibitions). There is less need for the two other visitor offices to have a specificlocation.Space Requirements:Amount: 5.Dimensions: To be determined.Size: approx. 10m2 gross floor area.Total area: 50m2 gross floor area.6.7.2 Tate Bristol Delivery BaysCore Function:The Loading bay area will be required to serve the Tate Bristol. The function is the safe delivery and dispatch of materialsand parking of vehicles. The space should be designed to enable the safe and efficient loading and unloading, reducing theneed for manual handling so minimising the risk. The area needs to be well lit, ventilated and secure. There will be dedicatedTate Bristol staff to deal with deliveries, a small secure office area is required for these staff, which must have a clear line ofsite for the entire area including the entrance, which must have a security barrier. The Loading Bay should be able to operateon a standalone basis so it can be operated when the Tate Bristol is closed.Relationship + Connections:The loading bay needs to have first line security, so a security presence must be accommodated, this could be incorporatedwithin the security control function or staff offices. These should be adjacent to Goods Lift, Tate Bristol Workshop, TateBristol Storage/Depository Areas, Exhibition Galleries and Catering StorageStorage Area.Space Requirements:Amount: 2 articulated lorries.Dimensions: To be determined.Size: approx. 300m2 gross floor area.
  • 55. 6.7.3 Cataloguing AreaCore Function:The Cataloguing Area is used for the cataloguing of (precious) art works. The area will need to be flexible and adaptablemeeting the future developments in technology. The area should be quiet and comfortable for concentrated working patterns.Specification of area layout:• Office desks (large)/ computer workstations.• Work area (large benches).• Storage.• Secure storage (sensitive archival).• Wide passageways.Relationship + Connections:Immediately adjacent to Sorting AreaEasy access to the Loading Bay Area, and Interim and Isolation storageSpace Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 300m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: up to 8 persons.6.7.4 Interim Storage (Clean Room)Core Function:Storage room for clean incoming artwork prior to cataloguing, digitisation or storage treatment. Users of the storage arepermanent staff members of the Tate.Specification of area layout:• Open area with shelving.• Wide passageways.Relationship + Connections:Easy access to Loading Bay Area (lift), Cataloguing Area, Digital Lab, Photography Office, Cataloguing Area and StorageAreas.Space Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determinedTotal size: approx. 50m2 gross floor areaRemarks (Specific Requirements):It is proposed that this area meets the recommendations for environmental conditions for BS 5454 for paper and parchment.All non-essential building services equipment should be located outside of the storage spaces and services routes should notpass through storage areas
  • 56. 6.7.5 Interim Storage (Isolation Room)Core Function:Storage room for contaminated incoming artwork.Used by Archives and Heritage staff only.Specification of area layout:• Open area with shelving.• Wide passageways.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Sorting AreaEasy access Loading Bay Area, Interim storage (clean room), Storage Area and Conservation AreaSpace Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determinedTotal size: approx. 50m2 gross floor areaRemarks (Specific Requirements):It is proposed that this area meets the recommendations for environmental conditions for BS 5454 for paper and parchment.This room should be located at the end of the air-flow to avoid spreading impurities to clean rooms.All non-essential building services equipment should be located outside of the storage spaces and services routes should notpass through storage areas.6.7.8 Sorting SpaceCore Function:Room for sorting the small to medium sized artwork prior to cataloguing or digitisation. The area should be quiet andcomfortable for concentrated working patterns.Specification of area layout:• Office desks (large)/ computer workstations.• Work area (large benches).• Storage.• Wide passageways.Relationship + Connections:• Immediately adjacent to Cataloguing Area.• Easy access Loading Bay Area, Storage area, Interim and isolation storage.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 50m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: 3 persons.
  • 57. 6.7.9 Staff Offices and WorkroomsCore Function:This is the general working area for Tate staff – mainly public service. Office rooms and works rooms for various kinds ofactivities. The area needs to be flexible and adaptable meeting future changes in organization and developments intechnology. The area should be quiet and comfortable for concentrated working patterns.Specification of area layout:• Office desks (large)/ computer workstations.• Work area (large benches).• Rest area.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Reception Area, Open Research Area and Supervised Search Room.Space Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 110m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: up to 20 people.6.7.10 Photographic Office and Cataloguing RoomCore Function:The Photographic office area is used for the management cataloguing the incoming and outgoing artwork to insure thecondition of the art has not changed since being at the Tate Bristol. The office operates as a facilitator to curatorial projects,cataloguing, packing and unpacking the incoming and outgoing artwork and the Tate’s collections.The office will need to be flexible and adaptable meeting the growth and future developments in technology. The areashould be quiet and comfortable for concentrated working patterns.Specification of area layout:• Spacious room with: 6 Office desks (large)/ computer workstations / washing area / bookshelves [min. 4m x 2m] / fixed and portable light boxes / projection facilities.• Office with 6 computer workstations (separate room).• Room for ICT / printing room.• Cataloguing workroom (large benches, 9 x 5m).• Storage (shelving at least at least 10m x 2m x 1m).Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Cataloguing areaEasy access Loading Bay Area, Interim and isolation storage and exhibition galleries.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 150m2 gross floor area.
  • 58. 7 INTERGRATION: Integrated spaces between the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol
  • 59. 7. INTERGRATION: Integrated spaces between the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol.7.1 IntegrationOne of the major challenges of the design of The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol is to create a building(s)that embraces both organisations while reflecting their two distinct identities.The project requires the integration of two organisations each with strong individual brands. The Tate Bristol arguably needsno further comment: The Tate, after over one hundred years, has developed a strong brand with a sense of place and purpose.In this case Tate Bristol will specifically place its focus on promoting UK emerging artists with an emphasis on video anddigital art, whilst also housing the Tate’s new growing collection of Asian and African contemporary art (predominantlydrawings, paintings and sculptures). The concept of The Library of Bristol has been developed, albeit without the relatedbrand image.In the integration of these two distinct resources there will emerge two strong brand identities - that of the Library of Bristoland that of the Tate Bristol. This needs to be reflected externally as well as internally, so that two distinct buildings may bedistinctively perceived. Whilst there will be shared areas, including the foyers and related public facilities, it is critical to thesuccess of the scheme that visitors can quickly and easily orientate themselves and make a choice about visiting the TateBristol or the Library of Bristol, whilst being able to immediately appreciate which space they are in, and being able toeffortlessly move between the two.The benefits gained through the sharing of physical spaces such as, the foyers, meeting rooms, café and the shared exhibitionhall will be complemented and enhanced by collaboration and partnership working in the three key creative areas wherethere is already considerable synergy:1). New Art.2). Children, Young People and Families.3). Cultural Diversity.7.2 Catering facilitiesThe details for this requirement will be informed by the outcome of consultancy studies currently underway. This functionrequires detailed resolution and forms part of on-going investigation.Core Function:This area consists of restaurant type facilities, kitchen and its associated storage as well as retail ancillary space. The detailsfor this requirement will be informed by the outcome of consultancy studies currently underway. This function requiresdetailed resolution and forms part of on-going investigation.Relationship + Connections:Catering areas will need to be adjacent and accessible to the Picnic Area, bar and conferencing facilities.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.7.3 Picnic SpaceCore Function:The picnic space should be a spacious area allowing for multi-functional use. It should invite and provide visitors with anopportunity to bring and consume their own food and beverages. It should be large enough to accommodate groups andindividuals with varied types of furniture and furniture arrangements. The space should have the possibility of offering a
  • 60. space reservation basis only for groups, and some on an ad hoc drop in basis. The former could therefore be used for otheractivities when available.Particular attention must be paid to the ease of cleaning and also provision for adequate food and rubbish disposal. The spaceshould have vending and water facilities, sinks and hand dryers. They should be fully accessible, but with secure exits forsafely accommodating groups of young children. The space should not be specifically designed for children, howeveranticipation of high child use means that it should accommodate their behaviour and needs.Relationship + Connections:It should be located within easy access of the Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol services and in particular the Children’sLibrary and Archives and Heritage. The space should also be as close as possible to the entrances for ease of access tocoaches and other transport. Accessible toilets should be within easy reach and should be close to ATM, exhibition galleries,service lifts and stairs/lifts/escalators.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):The space and its layout should be able to handle noisy groups, as such special consideration should be given to acousticcontrol. It is essential that the space has access to a music installation system. Furniture must be easy to move.7.4 Learning SpacesCore Function:Libraries are about learning. The Library of Bristol will provide a vast array of learning spaces that will permeate through allareas, integrated with the Tate Bristol, which will extend and enhance the learning experience.The various types of learning spaces should give visitors choice and freedom to use the services as they prefer: in groups oras individuals. Associated ambience should direct and communicate the appropriate behaviour for particular spaces such asquiet study areas. Both formal and informal learning should occur throughout the Library of Bristol.These can be accommodated by:• Silent study.• Small group study.• Seminars.• Tutor-led discussion.• Workshops.• Classroom sized spaces for groups.• Lectures.• Learning an instrument.• Dance.• Exams.• Art.• Break out groups.• One to one discussions which may need to be confidential scenario planning, problem solving, creativity development• Outside space for learning/performance.• Lunchtime learners – bite size courses possibly in the foyer.
  • 61. Relationship + Connections:The study areas will be pervasive throughout the Library of Bristol, however some key adjacencies should be created withsimple and direct access to:• Resources for study including book stock and other materials.• Toilets.• Coat and bags lockers.• Chill out area with vending facilities.• Workstations with printers and photocopiers.• Catering - a café/restaurant and a space for customers bringing their own food.Remarks (Specific Requirements):There is a broad spectrum of facilities, therefore requirements will vary greatly. The following lists some of theserequirements:• Reconfigurable space - to increase/decrease the amount of room available.• Flexible lighting levels.• Self regulating environments so that learners can create their own preferred learning environment.• Wifi enabled seating.• A range of formal/informal seating, which does not remind learners of school - easy to move and store.• Ability to black out the space.• Provision of video streaming and data projection.• Provision of interactive whiteboards.• Good acoustics but soundproofing necessary – discussions or activities involving music and technology should not disturb others.• Provision of water and sinks in some spaces.• Provision of sprung flooring and mirrored walls in at least one space to accommodate dance or other physical activity.7.5 Chill out ZonesCore Function:This space should be a designated and identifiable area within the library with no specifically programmed use. It shouldallow for occupation by any number of library users from individuals to groups. Given the flexibility of use of this space,consideration should be given as to how to navigate conflicting requirements of accommodating all whilst making anallowance for the needs of specific users.Provision should be made for both low and high technology areas, accommodating both lively and quiet users. The areasshould include some food and beverage vending machines.The areas should have comfortable soft furnishings that are easy to clean, maintain and move for maximum flexibility.Relationship + Connections:These areas should be available on each floor, close to catering facilities as well as toilet facilities.Space Requirements:Amount: Space allocation will be required per floor.Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):
  • 62. The space should respond to preferred customer usage as they emerge. An emphasis on varied types of furnishings forhighest flexibility is essential.7.6 Library Park PlinthIntroduction:The Library of Bristol integrated with the Tate Bristol’s location on Spike Island presents an opportunity for the engagementwith the public domain. The park plinth should be part of the building. It should encourage people to read a book in the sun,take a break for lunch or meet a friend. The park must be green. The city, with its considerable brickwork and concretebuildings, can very well use that. Any softening – even of the acoustics in the city - seems to be welcome in this part of thecity, in materialisation as well as in scale.Core Function:Potentially being one of Bristol ’s most important public spaces, “Library Square” or “Library Park” is a vital part of thepedestrian route between Cumberland Road and central Bristol. It will become an important arena for a variety of leisurepurposes and events throughout the year.Space Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 1000m27.7 Shared Parking AreaCore Function:As well as the Library, 5 bays in the loading, which includes overnight parking for 5 Library vans or general delivery vanswith dock levellers and the Tate Bristol’s 2 bays for articulated lorries which can also be used for 4 general delivery vans:there will be ample parking (100) for visiting contractors and general visitors in the public car park situated adjacent to the 2buildings beneath the ‘Library Park’ plinth.Relationship + Connections:Beneath the ‘Library Park’ plinth, adjacent to loading bays.Space Requirements:Amount: 100.
  • 63. 8 THE LIBRARY OF BRISTOL: Areas specific to The Library of Bristol
  • 64. 8. THE LIBRARY OF BRISTOL: Areas specific to The Library of Bristol8.1 Reader Services - IntroductionThis area of the Library of Bristol will see the most significant changes to its traditional use in terms of access to reading andinformation resources. Reader Services lie at the heart of the Library of Bristol.The Library of Bristol will enhance these core services whilst also hosting a number of other services that will encourageand support the desire to learn and experience new things.The process of the digital revolution has provided the opportunity for reinvention of this area. It is necessary to rethink thephysical framework of the library and place greater emphasis on showcasing the broad range of resources available. TheLibrary of Bristol should provide high quality reference and enquiry services along with imaginative and stimulating readerareas for fiction, information and music in supporting leisure, cultural and learning needs.Reader Services will shed the ‘departmental’ arrangement for a more connective approach where users would movenaturally between subjects, bringing together related information and ideas.The envisaged Readers service will play a key role in the knowledge society.These areas should not be considered as separate rooms but rather allow for a much more flexible use of the space. Thecombination and adjacency of these zones should stimulate one another.Space Requirements:Design Capacity requirements: Up to 7-8000 people per day, with seasonal pre-exam period high levels of students.A. Reference/Information Services (Hub)Core Function:The ‘reference library’ will facilitate information and enquiry services by exposing the range of resources that have beenkept in closed access storage for retrieval by Library of Bristol staff on customer request. Visitors will require quick andeasy browsing access in order to exploit the potential of the service.The reference library will seamlessly link to the lending library so that visitors can browse and access resources in a relaxedand social environment.Relationship + Connections:Lending library, Foyer and Children’s Library.B. Lending Library Services (Hub)Core Function:An essential focus of this area is the promotion of reading through a number of creative forms. The space should allow andfacilitate areas for browsing, reading and discussion or simply relaxation and contemplation. It will require a mix of spacesranging from quiet reading and reflection to social and group discussion and discovery.Emphasis will be on self-service including a 24/7 facility with staff present providing reader development and serving aprimary supportive role. Facilities should include spaces for quick access as well more slow paced browsing. These facilitiesshould also showcase the whole building providing clues for the other Hubs/Zones.This area should also accommodate such diverse space as a bibliotherapy space/quiet zone but also an informal performancespace to promote reader activity.Relationship + Connections:
  • 65. These spaces should be adjacent to the Foyer with very strong links to the Children’s Library and Music Zone, links to anybespoke learning centre and business facilities.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Need for freethinking – away from the traditional ‘departmental/institutional’ approach.Flexible in the use of space to deal with seasonal adjustments. Allow for 24/7 access facilities.C. Science and Innovation ZoneD. Health, Citizenship and Community ZoneE. Arts and Creativity ZoneScience and Innovation Zone, Health, Citizenship and Community Zone, Arts and Creativity Zone.Core Function:These spaces will support customer services through easy and flexible access. Services should be interactive where skilledstaff can guide and assist visitors with enquiries. Emphasis will be on customer support.These spaces should provide opportunities for presenting the resources available through various imaginative display andexhibition facilities. These zones should also be able to accommodate community and interest groups.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.F. Music ZoneCore Function:The music zone is a key area of the Lending Library with a potential to attract visitors who would not normally describethemselves as users of the Library of Bristol or Tate Bristol, particularly young people. The music zone should creativelyshowcase the largest public music library in the country. The emphasis will be on sound and creativity.The music zone holds the potential as a significant place to support the city’s musical life. It should be a place to experienceand sample the world of music.The Music zone will require facilities for performing, sound control, practice, composing and rehearsal, interactivity.Soundproofed facilities for playing instruments and recording, including spaces where live and recorded music can be heard.There should also be a space allocated for confidential music business advice.The music zone should be a flexible environment or multiple small environments within the zone to compliment differentgenres and types of activity – from quiet reflection to small performance.Relationship + Connections:The nature of this space suggests links to the Tate Bristol foyer through the shared meeting space. The music zone shouldhave clear connections to the Lending Library and Children’s Library.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Acoustic considerations are paramount in order to enable multiple use without disturbing other Library of Bristol users.
  • 66. G. Lending Library including Music Resources (open sequences)Core Function:This area will showcase all resources available to visitors. Music will be available in a number of formats. Clear informativedisplay furniture should be available in order to maximise the promotion of the libraries contents. Furniture layout should beflexible and easy to use.RFID intelligence is preferable to enable quick searching and less reliance on fixed sequences, allowing an opportunity tomake Dewey system sequences more meaningful for users and bringing together component elements of subjects, which arecurrently separated across the Dewey sequence. There should be intuitive layouts that enhance people’s experience andincrease opportunities for discovery.Remarks (Specific Requirements): Creative use and state of the art displays.H. Information Services Resources (open sequences)Core Function:This area will showcase all resources available to visitors for browsing and direct retrieval. Clear informative displayfurniture should be available in order to maximise the promotion of the library’s contents. Furniture layout should be flexibleand easy to use.RFID intelligence is preferable to enable quick searching and less reliance on fixed sequences, allowing an opportunity toabandon the Dewey system, and where appropriate alphabetical sequences. There should be intuitive layouts that enhancepeople’s experience and increase opportunities for discovery.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Creative use and state of the art displays.I. Help PointsCore Function:Areas away from the interactive zones will require help points for staff to support customers with quick enquiries/issues.Issues of adaptability should be considered in order to respond to customer demand and organisational needs. These could beunobtrusive facilities available for brief enquiries.Help points should be child friendly and of a suitable scale.J. Quiet Individual Study AreasCore Function:Although these types of spaces should be pervasive throughout the building, availability of quiet spaces are required withinthe Readers Services area. These are places that present a clear message to not disturb people’s concentration. The individualspaces can be with or without computer connections in order to enable the use of either Library of Bristol resources or ownmaterials/laptops. Desk space with built in catalogue access via a help screen, enabling requests for closed access itemswithout having to leave the place of study would be advantageous.Relationship + Connections:Consider adjacencies to potentially noisy areas.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.
  • 67. K. Group Study AreasCore Function:Although these types of spaces should be pervasive throughout the building, group study will be encouraged and a series ofspaces conducive to small groups will be provided enabling social interaction for purposeful activity.The spatial configuration should define the difference between group study and the quiet areas, but still suggest an informallearning environment. The areas should have a mix of computer access, with scope for interactive technology in support ofcreative learning.Relationship + Connections:Consider adjacencies to potentially noisy areas.Space Requirements: Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.L. Social Study and Chill Out AreasCore Function:This space should have an informal character accommodating a social approach to study. This area should facilitatecommunication and allow for mobile phone use.The areas should have comfortable soft furnishings that are easy to clean, maintain and move for maximum flexibility. Thearea should include a level of security that ensures a balanced use of the space without compromising the needs of visitorsrequiring quieter areas.Relationship + Connections:Links with Music Zone. Also links with catering and small performance spaces. Email and Internet surfing facilities. Closeto toilet facilities.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.M. Access FacilitiesCore Function:Facilities should be of the highest standards in order to facilitate communication excellence for people with special needs toaccess printed and other resources. Equipment and aids should make provision for people with disabilities and/or learningdifficulties to access physical resources. Many issues raised by accessibility can be potentially addressed by a variety ofsoftware. Virtual solutions in the interactive zones will also enhance the experience for everyone. This equipment shouldalso allow adaptability to individual requirements providing maximum flexibility. Staff will also be present to ensureequality of access to all resources.
  • 68. N. Self-Service Interactive FacilitiesCore Function:Although these types of facilities should be pervasive throughout the building, the Readers Services will also be equippedwith kiosks / facilities for borrowing and return of items, consulting personal library loan records and accounts and bookingcomputer sessions. Self-service points throughout the building will enable quick loans of fiction or popular titles related tothemed areas.Attention to self-service facilities being child friendly and of suitable scale is necessary.O. Display and Interactive AreasCore Function:The allocation of display to showcase services and resources will be present in Readers Services and also throughout theLibrary of Bristol.Imaginative digital and freestanding displays should be provided for images and script including facilities to secure exhibits /art / objects. These display areas will be designed for small-scale displays and community based work. Together withLibrary of Bristol service themes displays will be presented at key times of the annual calendar. These areas also providecapacity for display of independent work.P. 24/7 Access SpaceCore Function:Reader Services will incorporate 24/7 access. This space will enable ‘out of opening hours’ borrowing and return of items. Itshould also offer access to the internet and databases for information, in fact a virtual Library of Bristol. It would bereasonable to expect a secure self-service area adjacent to the foyer or public realm. These areas would require some level ofsecurity surveillance.Relationship + Connections:Clear links with Foyer.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Access technology to be considered such as Smart Cards etc.Q. Lending Library Informal SeatingCore Function:The use of the Library of Bristol will have a strong emphasis on flexibility and adaptability. Spaces and seating should allowfor occupation by any number of Library of Bristol users from individuals to groups for reading and relaxation.The areas should have comfortable soft furnishings that are easy to clean, maintain and move for maximum flexibility. Thespace should respond to preferred customer usage as they emerge. Varied types of furnishings will offer a high degree offlexibility. These areas of the Library of Bristol should invite and provide visitors with an opportunity to rearrange thefurniture layout as preferred.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.
  • 69. R. Activity and Performance SpacesCore Function:Throughout the Library of Bristol a series of informal performance and activity spaces should be made available.Flexibility and adaptability is of key consideration in order to maximise use. The space needs to be identifiable yet flexible,easily deconstructed or redefined.A less formal approach to this space is appropriate, as the area should accommodate the possibility for impromptuperformances. Performers and performances will be varied and could range from professionals to children and communitymembers.The space should maintain high visibility to other visitors passing by, rather than enclosed activity: as such the space mayincorporate a small demountable stage.Relationship + Connections:Not adjacent to quiet study areas.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Provision of adequate supporting infrastructure such as digital media, power, lighting etcS. Group Visit AreasCore Function:Groups should be adequately accommodated throughout the Library of Bristol. Spaces for these groups should incorporatecomfortable furniture that supports initial briefings and short presentations. Capacity for small refreshments and technologyis also preferred. These areas shall be located within Hubs for more detailed activities with visiting groups to enablepresentations, showcasing or focussed work using Library of Bristol resources.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: Groups of up to 25 people.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Access to technology and presentation facilities should be provided.T. Self-Service LockersCore Function:Throughout the Library of Bristol secure facilities for personal items should be incorporated. These facilities serve peoplestudying or visiting for long periods who need to leave study space for breaks.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Some level of security surveillance should be provided.
  • 70. 8.1.2 Closed access storage areas + Reserve Book Storage related to Reader ServicesCore Function:One of the key objectives for the future Library of Bristol is to increase the awareness and availability of the Library ofBristol resources in all its sense. This means that the current arrangement, where a large body of the Library of Bristol ’scollection is not publicly accessible, will dramatically change.Currently there are approximately 1 million items, of which some 150,000 are available for loan and a further 250,000reference items are on publicly accessible shelves. These collections are largely kept in ‘steady state’ by means of an activestock management policy. The collection is made up of a variety of media including, but not limited to, reference books,lending stock, journals, directories, annual publications, patents, pamphlets, newspapers and music scores. The valuable butless well-used resources are referred to as the ‘legacy collections’ and these are stored in the non-public ‘stack’ areas and arereadily available on request.It is envisaged that increased use and interest in the closed resources can be stimulated by significantly increasing visibilityof the collection. This will be the significant challenge for this area of the Library of Bristol whilst recognising that theymust be efficiently stored. In this regard careful consideration should be given to the care and conservation of the items withparticular attention to the more valuable items. The potential for incorporating technology such as a virtual Library of Bristoland RFID technology, development of digital catalogue records, and flexible guiding within storage areas may offersolutions.In order to provide the highest quality service for Library of Bristol users and visitors, consideration of staff efficient servicewill be important. Solutions must be found to ensure materials requested can be retrieved from store efficiently and within anacceptable time frame for the user.Space Requirements:Total size: approx. 2700m2 gross floor area.8.2 Children’s Library8.2.0 IntroductionCirculation areas and help points in the Children’s Library will need to be identified where children can self issue and returnitems and have enquiries answered. The current stock size is approximately 89,000 items (approximately half in stack, halfin library or on loan) 18,000 items are on loan at any time giving a total of 107,000 items.The Children’s Library will encourage a love of reading by offering an inspiring range of resources, an ever-changing arrayof enjoyable reading related experiences, and by responding to the learning needs of children and young people. Particularlythose with learning difficulties.The Children’s Library must be a place where children can be children, with all their varying needs. This expressed ideashould be communicated clearly in the design in order for children to intuitively understand that they are welcome andbelong in these spaces. Security and access are a priority. Spaces should also communicate expected behaviours in suchspaces as quiet areas in this way librarians avoid unnecessary supervision and having to say no!Of importance to the Children’s Library is it’s ‘place’ in the Reading Journey. The Children’s library can be seen to be thefirst stage of the ‘path’ through to the other services offered by the Library of Bristol for children as they grow to adulthood.Although catering specifically to the requirements of children and young people, consideration should also be give to parentsand carers who will visit the service.
  • 71. The Children’s library will also hope to maintain and foster the existing strong partnerships with outside organisations andservices.8.2.1 Children’s LibraryA. Under 5’s and FamiliesCore Function:Unimpeded access to this space from the Library of Bristol entrance is essential. The arrangement of the spaces musttherefore comply and facilitate accessibility for all. This space will be used by families and parents as well as groups ofunder 5’s from nurseries and playgroups. The space should contain comfortable seating and furnishings, with appropriateresources, including toys and games, both real and online available to visitors.It should be a clearly defined space in the Library of Bristol that allows for small children to crawl and move around in asafe environment. Furnishings and flooring will therefore need to be safe, hardwearing and easy to clean. This shouldinclude: storytelling area, soft-play area, interactive/sensory wall with movement activated equipment and child friendlycomputers with large keyboards and mice.Relationship + Connections:It should sit adjacent to the 6-11 area, contain or be close to the Family Information Point, close to toilets, baby changingand feeding facilities and located away from entrance doors.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 area.Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Provision of children specific furniture. An obvious parents collection area is required within the Children’s Library,although it does not specifically need to relate to this area.B. 6-10 Year Olds and their FamiliesCore Function:This is a distinct target group with their own needs and requirements. This space should be clearly defined as an area for thisage group. A diverse range of activities and information will be available in this area including: book storage, outsideplay/reading area, gaming area, parent and family information and ICT areas.A variety of spaces that stimulate various types of learning should cater for both quite and noisy areas. Importantly, studyspaces should also be provided in this area- support for homework is to be considered. These should include PCs for workand be adaptable for both group and individual work environments.Relationship + Connections:Study spaces should be adjacent quiet areas.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 area.Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Provision of children specific furniture. An obvious parents collection area is required within the Children’s Library,although it does not specifically need to relate to this area.
  • 72. C. Teenage/Young People’s Area 11-18Core Function:Teens are a specific group of users in a transitional stage between the children’s area and the facilities for adults. Theproximity to the Children’s Library is important so children of this age can move between both services, however it shouldhave its own entrance and identity separate from the younger children. Whilst an independent identity is required for thisarea it remains supervised and should not become completely detached from the rest of the Children’s Library.The layout of the space should appeal to teens and their interests, including digital media, music, film and technology.Furniture and furnishings should allow various informal uses and attract individuals or groups. This area should be versatileand adaptable allowing for more formal meetings/events as well as meeting friends informally. Study spaces are alsorequired. Refreshments should be incorporated into this area, such as vending machines.Relationship + Connections:Close to Children’s library, Information Point for Young People and to the Learning Centre.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 area.Occupancy capacity requirements: to be determined.D. Performance SpacesCore Function:Within the Children’s Library a performance space is required. This multi-purpose area should be able to accommodatemany kinds of performances. It should be capable of adapting to spontaneous use. Flexibility is a key consideration in orderto maximise use. During events the performance space should not impede circulation or the use of facilities such ascomputers.The space needs to be identifiable yet flexible, easily deconstructed or redefined where impromptu performance andaudiences can quickly gather. Currently, shelves are moved in order to accommodate any large gatherings. This is bothlabour intensive and time consuming and therefore undesirable.Relationship + Connections:Because this is an informal performance space access to storage areas will be required. This also applies for lighting rigs etc.Adjacent or integrated in chill out space.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 areaOccupancy capacity requirements: floor area for seating up to 150 children.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Supporting services such as lighting rigs and simple PA should be able to be hidden from view and should not requireextensive staff resources. The space should have access to a pull down screen and projection equipment. The space shouldalso be free of permanent structures.E. Display /Exhibition spaceCore Function:The allocation of displays to showcase and promote services and resources will be present in the Children’s library and alsothroughout the Library of Bristol.
  • 73. Imaginative and ample digital and freestanding displays should be provided for images and script including facilities tosecure exhibits / art / objects, designed for small scale displays and community based work, together with Library of Bristolservice themes at key times of the annual calendar. These areas also provide capacity for display of independent work.The display space should be immediately visible, close to the entry area in order to maximise interest and attract visitors.Display spaces should not impede circulation.Space Requirements:Amount: 1 area.Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Allow adequate infrastructural provision for the latest technology such as digital screens.F. Multi sensory areasCore Function:The activity of learning occurs through many types of stimuli. Although the whole Children’s Library should provide a multisensory experience the Children’s Library should also incorporate a specific multi sensory room or area with panels to bewall mounted for children with special needs and very small children. The space should be a padded play area to ensure theutmost safety standards are maintained. The space should creatively integrate various types of listening points for differentsounds and music.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: to be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Allow adequate infrastructural provision for the latest technology.G. Meeting/Activity RoomsCore Function:The Children’s Library should also incorporate a series of spaces for meetings and activities. The current configurationwhere a large room can be divided into 2 for smaller activities is favoured.These rooms should be adequately supported by ICT presentation facilities to maximise use. These areas should also be wetareas so sinks, washing facilities and appropriate surfaces are required. Inbuilt storage will further enhance space efficiency.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: 50 children.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Use of wet area surfaces.H. Magical SpacesCore Function:Whilst the Children’s Library should provide flexible fixtures in order to maximise the possibility for changingconfigurations, magical spaces should be pervasive throughout. These spaces should respond to and stimulate a child’simagination, this will ensure that the Library of Bristol’s experience is kept fresh, new and exciting. The use of coloured
  • 74. lighting effects could successfully communicate an exciting and flexible environment. Of key consideration is that the spaceshould carefully relate to the scale of children.The space should be exciting and arouse curiosity in children. Multiple furniture and furnishing arrangements should bepossible by children.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.I. Parent and Family Information PointCore Function:This space is envisaged as a service point or counter type area where staff may be able to provide confidential services.The definition of this area is ongoing.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: to be determined8.2.1 Reading/Relaxing/Chill Out/Picnic SpacesCore Function:These are flexible type spaces that allow for a myriad of informal use. These spaces are user-centric so as such should adaptquickly and easily to individuals or group needs. The space should also be capable of transformation for larger activities orperformances. These spaces should combine various types of furniture and layouts to maximise use.This space presents an opportunity to incorporate outdoor space or the feeling of outdoor space.Relationship + Connections:Away from study spaces.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.8.2.2 Study SpaceCore Function:Although these types of spaces should be pervasive throughout the building, availability of study spaces are required withinthe Children’s library. Study spaces for group study will be encouraged by providing a series of spaces conducive to smallgroups, enabling social interaction for purposeful activity. Individual study spaces are also required but could be provideddistinctly.These areas should accommodate work places with PCs, workstations and books.Relationship + Connections:Away from noisy areas, e.g. under 5’s.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.
  • 75. 8.2.3 CloakroomCore Function:Should the main cloakroom facility be located away from the Children’s Library then a secondary cloakroom will berequired. This cloakroom would service the needs of large groups of school children visiting the Children’s Libraryspecifically. This cloakroom should be designed for the scale of the child. This area needs to be visible to staff andcustomers but at the same time secure so that customers feel safe leaving their personal belongings there.Relationship + Connections:Proximity to buggy area.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):Robust finishes.8.2.4 Toilets, Unisex ToiletsCore Function:The facilities should be designed for both adults and children. Facilities should include fixtures for when children aretraining. Consideration must be given to the high demand on these services at peak periods.Relationship + Connections:Proximity to baby change / feeding facilities.Space Requirements:Amount: 2 minimum – more preferred.Dimensions: 0.90 x 1.50 m.Size: approx. 6m2 gross floor area.Total area: 12m2 gross floor area.8.2.5 Baby Changing / Feeding FacilitiesCore Function:This area should be suitable for parents and carers visiting the Children’s Library to comfortably feed and change babies,toddlers and younger children. This needs to be a unisex environment.For reasons of discretion, private lockable cubicles for breastfeeding mothers should be provided.Facilities in these areas should include bottle heating facilities, hand wash basins, changing tables, individual toilets withchanging facilities and washbasins, adequate and environmentally efficient food and sanitary waste system: potable watersupply, fixed microwaves, and highchairs.Relationship + Connections:It needs to be accessible for cleaning and close to security surveillance. The buggy park should be as close as possible.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Total size: approx. 8m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.Remarks (Specific Requirements):
  • 76. The safety and security of children is to be of paramount importance.Allow for clear and multi-lingual facility information.8.2.6 Break Out AreasCore Function:This is an alternative space where parents of children with disabilities and children with learning difficulties can take ‘timeout’. This space should be flexible so that is can be used for multiple purposes (e.g. school group eating their packed lunches,evening reception, informal meeting space).Relationship + Connections:Proximity to multi-sensory space, and chill out areas.Space Requirements:Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.8.2.7 Storage + Staff Preparation AreaCore Function:An adequate centralised storage facility should be provided as the Children’s Library has specific needs. A range of differenttypes of storage-shelving cupboards, clothes rails for costumes and hooks etc. should be incorporated in this area.Sufficient space for staff within the Children’s Library to prepare for activities and events is essential.These should incorporate adequate levels of lighting.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to washing facilities.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.8.2.8 Manager’s OfficeCore Function:This area will provide adequate space for one manager. The space should make provision for a PC, workstation and furniture.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to the main library spaces for practical service delivery.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 12m2 gross floor area.8.2.9 Staff Office / Work RoomCore Function:These are spaces specifically provided for Children’s services operational staff. Workrooms should make provision foradequate workstations and equipment. These spaces should also include the capacity to be screened off providing privacy.
  • 77. Space Requirements:Amount: 12.Dimensions: To be determined.Size: approx. 12m2 gross floor area.Total area: 144m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: To be determined.8.3 Business + Learning Zone8.3.0 IntroductionThe Business and Learning Zone will complement the diverse learning facilities of the Library of Bristol by providing aplatform for enterprise, innovation and creativity. Learning and discovery are at the core of this library’s services. With anemphasis on life-long learning and the development of individual skills, the Business and Learning zone will support andassist customers to be better placed to take advantage of ever-changing employment opportunities in the future.The Business and Learning zone will provide support and an enabling environment for the earliest stages of businessdevelopment, with the objective of creating a solid foundation for sustainable businesses to grow. Support for business start-ups and creative industries with a focus on developing the knowledge economy will mean that the Business and Learningzone will form the base point as a major contributor to economic growth and regeneration.The Business and Learning zone will facilitate partnerships with other organisations to promote networking and knowledgeexchange, enabling people to come together and learn from one another in a community space that is open and inclusive toall.The combination of both a high quality reference facility and the provision of resources on request will facilitate andpromote non-threatening environments conducive to learning, particularly for those adults whose previous learningexperiences have been negative. Study places in a variety of configurations suitable for private study and group work, bothtutored and self-paced, will be available. The Business and Learning zone will also offer an ‘accredited’ learning facilitythrough the Learning Centre.8.3.1 Reception AreaCore Function:The reception area serves the Business and Learning services with a staffed information and advice point. It should feelwelcoming and professional. The area should be open with a clearly visible information point for visitors to approach staff,wait for appointments and retrieve information material. A display area and adequate bookshelves should be provided.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Meeting Rooms.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.
  • 78. 8.3.2 Study AreasCore Function:This study area will contain study places with workstations. These should be arranged in clusters with adequate space for acomputer and reference books or papers.The Study area is central to the Business and Learning zone. It should provide adequate space for two distinct activities:1. Supported learning, with assistance from a Learning Support Officer/ self study.2. Business related research, with assistance from a Business Support Officer.Study facilities should cater for prolonged stays and privacy. They should contain adequate space for bookshelves.The layout should allow for various types of furniture and a flexible layout of desks for individuals as well as group study.Space Requirements:Amount: 2.Dimensions: To be determined.Size: approx.25m2 gross floor area.Total area: 50m2 gross floor area.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to reception. Central allocation within the Business and Learning zone.8.3.3 Interview RoomsCore Function:These rooms are used by staff to meet, interview and discuss the learning needs of customers and will also be used to discussand record a degree of confidential and personal information.The rooms should be bright and identical, allowing pairs of rooms to combine, providing maximum flexibility. Acousticswill be an important consideration for recording and privacy.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Learning area / Business Development Area/ Meeting rooms.Space Requirements:Amount: 8.Dimensions: To be determined.Size: approx. 15m2 gross floor area.Total area: 120m2 gross floor area.8.3.4 Meeting RoomsCore Function:These rooms will be used for meetings and group work, including group training and as an overflow for interview rooms.The rooms will need to be equipped and laid out appropriately to facilitate presentations. The rooms should allow for pairsof rooms to combine, providing maximum flexibility.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Interview Rooms.Space Requirements:Amount: 4.
  • 79. Dimensions: To be determined.Size: approx. 30m2 gross floor area.Total area: 120m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: 20 people per room.8.3.5 Call Centre FacilitiesCore Function:This space accommodates the telephone information service. The Call centre will include call centre facilities, desks,workstations, print facilities. It should cater for prolonged stays, and discreet conversation. The layout of the room should beflexible.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to reception.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 30m2 gross floor area.8.3.6 Enterprise Centre/Innovation HubCore Function:A multifunctional room to be used by groups for discussions, presentations and for facilitating problem solving andcreativity. The room will need to be equipped and laid out appropriately to facilitate presentations including all necessaryequipment. It should allow for flexible arrangements of furniture.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent/access to interview and meeting spaces.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 30m2 gross floor area.8.3.7 Business Incubation and Support CentreCore Function:The centre houses several facilities for support for starting entrepreneurs. A wide range of (partly free) services are providedsuch as management training and business planning. Most services are individual related, some (training) in groups.The centre also provides business facilities:• Small office suite for hire (to be confirmed, including size, requires ongoing investigation).• Business services such as photocopying, fax, printing etc.• Business support space: flexible, fully equipped space where start up businesses can be supported.Relationship + Connections:Allow for access beyond opening hours of Library of Bristol is important. Adjacent to reception.Space Requirements:
  • 80. Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 30m2 gross floor area.8.3.8 Business ShowcaseCore Function:A space for businesses supported by the Library of Bristol to display and promote their products/services – providing anopportunity to share ideas and facilitate partnerships. This should provide space for informal networking.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Innovation Hub within the Business + Learning Zone.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.8.3.9 Staff and Office AreaCore Function:Work rooms (privacy required) for various kinds of activities, for all operational staff for this area. Separate office forService Manager will be provided. The area needs to be flexible and adaptable meeting future changes in organisation anddevelopments in technology.Relationship + Connections:Centrally locatedSpace Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determinedTotal size: approx. 30m2 gross floor area.8.4 Archives and Heritage8.4.0 IntroductionThe Archive & Heritage centre contains a nationally unique and wide ranging collection. The Library of Bristol willshowcase the Archive and Heritage collection as a sub-brand that is distinctively Bristol .The storage and preservation of the collections with accessibility to a wide and diverse range of users will be the highestpriority. Archival, printed and photographic heritage material will be made available to promote and develop personal andcommunity identity through learning. Conditions for the availability of materials will be in line with the best practice offeredin terms of security and environmental control (minimum BS5454).The public space will also meet the highest standards. Given the range of users and interest groups an equally diverse rangeof spaces should be provided. Study environments should be flexible and informal for group work, staff rooms and roomsfor working with local community groups. Quiet areas for family and local history research will also be offered. All spacesmust be secure.
  • 81. Archives and Heritage collections should be located adjacent to the Study Areas, and also to the Loading Bay where newarchive material and conservation supplies will come into the building.8.4.1-8.4.2 Storage Area and Expansion Storage AreaCore Function:The storage area will hold the City Archives, the Bristol Collection and associated material, the photographic and illustrativecollections, and all the rare print collections requiring BS5454 storage. The storage area should allow for an expansion areacapable of accommodating approximately 40m3 per year for archive and photographic collections over a 25 years period.This is advantageous to facilitate security and phasing potential.The space will be divided into ‘vaults’ in order to allow for different storage conditions for different materials and to preventthe spread of fire and other disasters. The acclimatisation of spaces must comply with the BS5454. The storage should bedivided in separated vaults to comply with required storage conditions of various document/ work conditions and to ensurefire safety. The climate in vaults should be adaptable to future change of climate requirements.Storage vaults should be located next to each other and for efficiency be close as possible to the plant maintaining theenvironmental controls in the vaults. Flexibility will not be required as this space serves one purpose, however the potentialto vary environmental conditions is important.Staff will enter the storage to add/ retrieve material or inspect and occasionally work on the stored materials.Access:• The layout, storage system and access to staff should be as efficient as possible.• Passageways, including doors should be wide enough for transport large items to related areas (e.g. gallery, loading bay).• The storage should comply with the security demands outlined in BS5454, preventing unauthorised access and allowing differential levels of access for staff.Relationship + Connections:Storage needs to be adjacent to the secure search room. Other important adjacencies include the cataloguing area, theConservation Lab, Photographic Office, Cataloguing Room and Digital Lab. Easy access to Loading Bay Area.Space Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determinedSize: approx. 4,000m2 gross floor area + 850 m2 gross floor area expansion area (for expansion for approx. 25 years, 40m3per year)Occupancy capacity requirements: 10-15 staff members/hourRemarks (Specific Requirements):Storage requirements: storage should comply with BS5454 outlined in the National Archives Standard for RecordRepositories and the unique demands of stored items. All non-essential building services equipment should be locatedoutside of the storage spaces and services routes should not pass through storage areas. Electrics and lighting will beactivated when someone is in the individual storage area and will turn off automatically on exit.
  • 82. 8.4.3. A Open Research AreaCore Function:The Open Research Area provides space for visitors to study and consult resources of the Archives that do not requireconsultation in the supervised search area. Resources are provided on open shelves such as books, pamphlet boxes, andaudio material and by ICT access. The wide range of resources calls for various types and flexible layout of desks and studyfacilities. This includes areas for group work such as flexible rooms for staff to work with school and community groups anda spacious and quiet area for family and local history research.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Secure Research Area and Reception AreaSpace Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determinedTotal size: approx. 700m2 gross floor area8.4.3.B Supervised Search RoomCore Function:The Supervised Room provides space for visitors to study and consult archival material. This room should be welcoming yethighly secure with a single controlled entrance for the public. Supervision by staff should be assured, as one of the naturalsecurity methods. Study facilities should cater to prolonged stay.The room accommodates a counter that flows between this area, the open research area and the reception. There will need tobe a small photographic carrel and lightbox available and two small rooms for private consultation or confidential discussion.A small storage area should be provided behind the counter where material awaiting serving or return can be kept.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Open Research Area and Storage AreaSpace Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determinedTotal size: approx. 300m2 gross floor areaOccupancy capacity requirements: 50-60 seated people8.4.3.C Learning SpacesCore Function:Multifunctional room for groups to study and consult resources of the Archives and Heritage. Used by outreach staff andothers with school and community groups of a variety of sizes (5-30 people) in a variety of learning situations. These spacesshould be secured so that original archive material can be used if required. The space should be easily supervised by staff.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Open Research Area and outreach to staff offices.Space Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determined
  • 83. Total size: approx. 60m2 gross floor area8.4.4 Conservation LabCore Function:The Conservation Lab is the main preservation area where the Conservation team staff carry out preservation work,conservation treatments and packaging and repackaging material.The layout of the lab should be flexible and adaptable for:• Objects of conservation that have a wide variety in sizes and fragility.• Several appliances used for conservation, equipment and chemicals.• Ways of conservation might change in future.• Regular working hours are daytime Monday to Friday, but occasionally in the night and weekend - access 24/7 should be assured. Natural day lighting is vital with any windows facing preferably North.Specification of Lab layout:• Conservation work area (large tables and benches / wide shelving for storing items being worked on).• Separate equipment room (sound proofed, heavy equipment).• Storage room house a plan chests for storage of paper, tissue).• Wash area (large sinks, wash tanks and industrial plumbing for speedy drainage.• Fume cupboards with venting to level above 10m).• Office desks (large)/ computer workstations.• Separate room for the office head of Conservation.• Lockable double doors•.• Wide passageways.• Access to authorised persons only.• Environmental management.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Storage Area. Easy access to Loading Bay area via goods lift and Exhibition GallerySpace Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determinedTotal size: approx. 350m2 gross floor areaOccupancy capacity requirements: 5-12 persons (incl. min. 5 members Conservation staff) depending on projectRemarks (Specific Requirements):Chemical waste disposal facility.8.4.5 Digital LabCore Function:This area is used by staff and volunteers involved in creating and managing the Library of Bristol ’s digital assets and invitedand accompanied researchers and other users. Users will be creating and managing digitisation equipment including scannersof various sizes, mounting presses, audio and video editing equipment, printers and computer workstations. The space willalso need to accommodate servers and other mass digital storage devices. The Lab will need to be flexible and adaptable
  • 84. meeting the growth and future developments in digitization technology. The activities to be carried out call for a quiet andefficient work environment.Specification of Lab layout:• Office desks (large) and computer workstations (8 people at one time).• Digitisation equipment suite.• Storage (material to digitise).• Printing Room.• Work area (large benches).• Wide passageways.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to outreach team-work area. Easy access to Storage Area, Loading Bay Area and GallerySpace Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 300m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: 3-10 persons.8.4.6 Outreach Team Work AreaCore Function:This is an office area for the outreach staff working with school and community groups including representatives of thosegroups. Space for small groups and individuals to deliver outreach programmes should also be provided. Users of this spacewill be working at computer workstations, holding small meetings and working with invited members of the public andvolunteers.On regular basis invited persons will visit or work in the office, so the area should be representative and welcoming tooutsiders.Specification of area layout:• Office desks / computer workstations.• Meeting space.• Attention to soundproofing because of use of AV material.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to public areas, including Learning Spaces and the Digital labSpace Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 75m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: 2-10 persons.
  • 85. 8.4.7 Cataloguing AreaCore Function:The Cataloguing Area is used for the cataloguing of (precious) archival material. The area will need to be flexible andadaptable meeting the future developments in technology. The area should be quiet and comfortable for concentratedworking patterns.Specification of area layout:• Office desks (large)/ computer workstations.• Work area (large benches).• Storage.• Secure storage (sensitive archival).• Wide passageways.Relationship + Connections:Immediately adjacent to Sorting AreaEasy access to the Loading Bay Area, and Interim and Isolation storageSpace Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 300m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: up to 15 persons.8.4.8 Interim Storage (Clean Room)Core Function:Storage room for clean incoming archival materials prior to cataloguing, conservation, digitisation or storage treatment.Users of the storage are permanent staff members of Archives and Heritage.Specification of area layout:• Open area with shelving.• Wide passageways.Relationship + Connections:Easy access to Loading Bay Area (lift), Cataloguing Area, Conservation Lab, Digital Lab, Photography Office, CataloguingArea and Storage Areas.Space Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determinedTotal size: approx. 50m2 gross floor areaRemarks (Specific Requirements):It is proposed that this area meets the recommendations for environmental conditions for BS 5454 for paper and parchment.All non-essential building services equipment should be located outside of the storage spaces and services routes should notpass through storage areas
  • 86. 8.4.9 Interim Storage (Isolation Room)Core Function:Storage room for contaminated incoming archival materials prior to conservation treatment.Used by Archives and Heritage staff only.Specification of area layout:• Open area with shelving.• Wide passageways.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Sorting AreaEasy access Loading Bay Area, Interim storage (clean room), Storage Area and Conservation AreaSpace Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determinedTotal size: approx. 50m2 gross floor areaRemarks (Specific Requirements):It is proposed that this area meets the recommendations for environmental conditions for BS 5454 for paper and parchment.This room should be located at the end of the air-flow to avoid spreading impurities to clean rooms.All non essential building services equipment should be located outside of the storage spaces and services routes should notpass through storage areas.8.4.10 Sorting SpaceCore Function:Room for sorting archival material prior to cataloguing or digitisation. The area should be quiet and comfortable forconcentrated working patterns.Specification of area layout:• Office desks (large)/ computer workstations.• Work area (large benches).• Storage.• Wide passageways.Relationship + Connections:• Immediately adjacent to Cataloguing Area.• Easy access Loading Bay Area, Storage area, Interim and isolation storage.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 50m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: 3 persons.
  • 87. 8.4.11 Post RoomCore Function:A postal service will be the main function of this area. Library of Bristol staff will bank monies however, there will be arequirement for a safe so the office area must be secure.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Security Control room.Space Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: To be determined.Total size: approx. 20m2 gross floor area.8.4.12 Staff Offices and WorkroomsCore Function:This is the general working area for Archives and Heritage staff – mainly public service. Office rooms and works rooms forvarious kinds of activities. The area needs to be flexible and adaptable meeting future changes in organization anddevelopments in technology. The area should be quiet and comfortable for concentrated working patterns.Specification of area layout:• Office desks (large)/ computer workstations.• Work area (large benches).• Rest area.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Reception Area, Open Research Area and Supervised Search Room.Space Requirements:Amount: 1Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 120m2 gross floor area.Occupancy capacity requirements: up to 30 people,8.4.13 Photographic Office and Cataloguing RoomCore Function:The Photographic office area is used for the management of photographic materials, preservation and cataloguing. The officeoperates as a research centre for the history of photography in the City and is facilitating curatorial projects, cleaningcataloguing and packing photographic items and collections.The office will need to be flexible and adaptable meeting the growth and future developments in technology. The areashould be quiet and comfortable for concentrated working patterns.Specification of area layout:• Spacious room with: 6 Office desks (large)/ computer workstations / washing area / bookshelves [min. 4m x 2m] / fixed and portable light boxes / projection facilities.• Office with 6 computer workstations (separate room).• Room for ICT / printing room.
  • 88. • Cataloguing workroom (large benches, 9 x 5m).• Storage (shelving at least at least 10m x 2m x 1m).• Meeting area for visitors.Relationship + Connections:Adjacent to Cataloguing areaEasy access Loading Bay Area, Interim and isolation storage, Conservation area and GallerySpace Requirements:Amount: 1.Dimensions: to be determined.Total size: approx. 150m2 gross floor area.8.4.14 Library of Bristol and Delivery BaysCore Function:The Loading bay area will be required to serve the Library of Bristol. The function is the safe delivery and dispatch ofmaterials and the parking of vehicles. The space should be designed to enable the safe and efficient loading and unloading,reducing the need for manual handling so minimising the risk. The area needs to be well lit, ventilated and secure. There willbe dedicated the Library of Bristol staff to deal with deliveries, a small secure office area is required for these staff, whichmust have a clear line of site for the entire area including the entrance, which must have a security barrier. The Loading Bayshould be able to operate on a standalone basis so it can be operated when the Library of Bristol is closed.Relationship + Connections:The loading bay needs to have first line security, so a security presence must be accommodated, this could be incorporatedwithin the security control function or staff offices. These should be adjacent to Goods Lift, Library General Storage,Security Control, Services Reception, Bib Services, Catering Storage, Waste Storage and Library Holding and the Archivesand Heritage areasStorage Area.Space Requirements:Amount: 5 library vans.Dimensions: To be determined.Size: approx. 300m2 gross floor area.
  • 89. 9 Strategies
  • 90. 9 Strategies9.1 IntroductionThe technical design of the building will be a response to the challenges defined within this brief and resolved within theconstraints stated within these strategies.The biggest design issue will be anticipating the future needs of a technologically advanced building that will not becompleted until May 2013. The building will accommodate a wide range of diverse functions that will operate at differenttimes around the clock.9.2 Sustainability9.2.1 GeneralThe environmental performance of the Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol will be inherent in the design.The design must establish the key sustainability targets for the project have highlighted that sustainability is a priority forboth clients and for the City of Bristol as a whole. This is reflected in the requirement for the Library of Bristol and the TateBristol to undergo a BREEAM Assessment to demonstrate its sustainability credentials through a nationally recognisedindicator of environmental building performance.After gaining a high level appreciation of the client’s sustainability aspirations, it is proposed to develop and integrate theseinto the design using the approach outlined below.9.2.2 The ProcessThe next step in the process will be to establish detailed sustainability objectives specific to the development.The outcome of these initial workshops will establish the sustainability aspirations for the developments, which will form a‘sustainability framework’. The framework records the targets for the project, which will be updated as the project develops.This tool manages the process and communicates the sustainability targets across all aspects of the design and development.The framework will set out the project’s aims in terms of performance but not how these aims will be achieved by specifictechnologies. The framework will be based around key topics, as well as the City’s sustainable development objectives,established by Bristol City Council, and national guidelines. These are:• Energy and CO2 Emissions.• Sustainable Construction.• Water.• Pollution.• Materials.• Waste.• Land Use.• Ecology.• Social.• Health and Wellbeing.• Transport.• Innovation in Design.• Management and Operation.• Local Planning Policies/ Regulations.
  • 91. 9.2.3 The ComponentsThe sustainability framework will comprise key headings and components, as follows:9.2.4 Energy and CO2 EmissionsBristol City Council has stated that one of the key aims of the development is to minimise carbon emissions as far aspossible within the constraints of the project. This will primarily be achieved by incorporating passive design concepts(Lean), efficient building services (Mean) and where appropriate, utilising renewable and low carbon technologies to furtherreduce emissions (Green). Feasibility studies will be undertaken to review possible renewable and low and zero carbontechnologies that can be implemented on the site.Examples of some of the technologies that will be considered are:• Ground Source Heat Pumps – Open loop and closed loop, dependant on ground conditions and suitable aquifer.• Linking into existing city-wide CHP/district heating network.• Solar thermal.• Photo Voltaic Panels.9.2.5 Sustainable ConstructionOpportunities for sustainable construction and operation will be identified and agreed with the client. This will includeadvice on design and detailing for the construction and registering the project under the ‘Considerate Constructors Scheme’.These go significantly beyond best practice site management principles.WaterOpportunities for potable water use reduction, water recycling and reuse will be highlighted and assessed for thedevelopment. Particular attention will be given to the water usage in toilets given the large people flow expected in the newbuilding.MaterialsIdentify opportunities for the use of materials, which are recycled, rapidly renewable, durable, low maintenance, responsiblysourced and low in embodied energy. Applicable materials will be suggested and investigated.WasteA Waste Management Plan that covers waste minimisation, reuse and recycling at all stages of the development will beproduced. The plan will reference procurement policy and the Government’s draft waste management strategy, which setstargets for recycling or composting of 25% of domestic waste by 2005, 30% by 2010 and 35% by 2015
  • 92. 9.2.6 Realization of StrategyThe concept design Tate report will detail how the objectives and aims of the sustainability strategy can be achieved.Following establishment of the sustainability framework, a series of sustainability concepts will be developed to guide andinform scheme design development to ensure the objectives of the charter are met.The strategies included would generally involve the following key steps: • Analysis of the project specific conditions and constraints. • Assessment of likely impacts of project. • Assessment of potential options for achieving the objectives. • Assessment of costs, risk and benefits of each approach. • Recommendations of most appropriate approach(es).9.2.7 Environment Assessment MethodThe project’s sustainable credentials will be measured using the Building Research Establishment’s EnvironmentalAssessment Method (BREEAM). Under this assessment process, the new library building and the Tate Bristol are aiming toachieve a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ rating.During the Design Stage the following process will be undertaken:• Register assessment with British Research Establishment (BRE).• Agree assessment methodology.• Highlight opportunities for additional BREEAM Innovation credits (opportunity to add an additional 10% onto the final BREEAM score).• Advise on progress towards achieving the ‘Excellent’ BREEAM rating.• Collate information from the project team and prepare initial BREEAM assessment report setting out the route to achieving the ‘Excellent’ BREEAM rating for the new build element of the development.• During the design process, provide advice on how to maintain the ‘Excellent’ BREEAM rating when design changes are proposed that affect the rating.• Collate final information and prepare formal BREEAM ‘design stage’ interim report for submission to Clients and ultimately BRE.• Submit interim report to the BRE.9.3 Structural & Civil9.3.1 Structural EngineeringGeneralThe criteria for the design and specification of the structure including structural loadings, analysis, tolerances, materials, fireresistance, quality control, testing and workmanship shall be as described in the current British Standards, Codes of Practiceand Building Regulations, modified where necessary by specific project requirements.The design life shall be 50 years as defined in BS 7543.Superimposed loading requirementsEach part of the structure shall be designed for superimposed loading suitable for its intended use. No allowance shall bemade for increased loading from change of use, unless specifically noted in the brief.
  • 93. Wind and snow loadingThe design wind and snow loads shall be derived from the Codes of Practice current at the time of design. In the absence ofbest practice guidance on the effect of climate change on future wind and snow loads, no specific increased allowanceshould be made beyond that in current Codes of Practice and Building Regulations.Corrosion protection of structural elementsConcrete structures should be designed with appropriate mix design and cover to give a design life at least that of thebuilding.Steel structures should be designed to have corrosion protection systems appropriate to their location and ease ofmaintainability. In general, no structural steelwork should have a life to first maintenance of less than 15 years.Structures in other materials shall be designed with durability suitable for their location and ease of maintenance.Movement jointsStructural movement joints shall be kept to a minimum. Where necessary to provide an economic and serviceable structure,they should be designed and located so that inspection, maintenance and repair is possible during the life of the structure.OperationalThe Building Contract shall require that a structural maintenance manual is produced, which shall include the requirementsfor structural inspection and maintenance works over the life of the building.9.3.2 Civil EngineeringDrainageDrainage shall be designed to carry surface and foul water from the development to the nearby existing sewage system.Drainage systems shall be designed in accordance with current British Standards and Codes of Practice, and shall includesufficient access points to facilitate rodding and jetting from easily accessible locations. The proposed drainage systems shallmeet the requirements of the planning authority, the relevant water authorities and the Environment Agency.Roads and Hard standingsRoads and hard standings within the site shall be designed to accommodate the anticipated traffic and maintenance vehicleuse. Access from the public highway shall comply with the requirements of the local authority.9.4 Inclusive DesignGeneral Inclusive Design parameters9.4.1 The Disability Discrimination ActsThe Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (DDA) brought in measures to prevent discrimination against disabled people. ThisAct was amended, most recently by the Disability Discrimination Act 2005, with further measures introduced to preventdiscrimination against disabled people.The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) requires that employers, service providers, educational bodies, Public Authoritiesin carrying out their functions and transport providers do not discriminate against disabled people.DDA 2005 introduces the Disability Equality Duty, the aim of which is to ensure public authorities are proactive in respectof disability equality issues. The intent is that public authorities build in equality between disabled and non-disabled peoplefrom the outset.
  • 94. 9.4.2 Planning Policy Statement 1: delivering sustainable development (PPS1)The Government released ‘Planning Policy Statement 1: delivering sustainable development’ (PPS1) in 2005 to address theland-use planning aspects of sustainable development through the planning system, and to deliver on the SustainableCommunities initiative.The statement clearly elevates the importance of high quality and inclusive design, placing it at the centre of thedevelopment process and requiring it to be the objective of all stakeholders.9.4.3 Involvement of user-groupsThere should be on-going and structured consultation with and the involvement of disabled people to inform the design ofthe Library of Bristol and the Tate Bristol, as required by the Disability Equality Duty and Bristol’s own Disability EqualityScheme.It is good practice and will be of great benefit for the project to involve user groups fully reflecting the diversity of the targetaudience, in the development of Library of Bristol and Tate Bristol.Consultation should focus on both specific facilities to enable an equitable service as well as the ’culture’ of the building andhow people want it to make them feel.Inclusive Design will support the on-going and structured consultation and involvement of disabled people throughout theproject delivery and ensure that the issues arising are clearly met.Issues to consider include:• Using existing networks and contacts of Bristol City Council including local access panel and those consulted during the development of the Bristol City Council’s Disability Equality Scheme.• Ensuring that the diversity of the target audience is fully represented in all consultation including hard to reach groups such as asylum seekers and refugees, people in care and disabled people from Black Minority Ethnic communities and other groups of disabled people.• Ensuring that consultation is fully inclusive of everyone and takes account of their diverse needs. This is particularly important for disabled people and for people who do not have English as a first language and who are often excluded from consultation and opportunities to participate.9.4.4 Security Design DriversFrom the “Functional Specification” the security operational stance is indicated. In addition, a number of locations/activitiesrequiring enhanced security, or particular measures, are identified. There will need to be a security threat risk assessment(threat, vulnerability, likelihood and impact) undertaken for the project. However, in advance of this a number of issues canbe assumed (list not exhaustive) that are likely to impact on and influence the security design (in addition to programme,budget and operability considerations):Civil contingency – including emergency response.Incident response, crisis management and business recovery/continuity.Liaison with emergency services and local authority emergency planners.Crime reduction strategy – surveillance, control of access and exclusion of ‘nuisance’.Protection of children and vulnerable persons – probably including consideration of the Office for Standards in Educationrequirements.Loss prevention and prevention of recurrence – including requirements of insurers.
  • 95. Event management and security treatment for VIP and special occasions held within the Library and Tate Bristol.Management of the complex and concept of operations – including security operations.Planning – including preparation of the ‘Design and Access’ statement.Coordination with other disciplines – notably: Fire Engineering, Inclusive Design, People Movement in addition toStructures and MEP.9.4.5 Security DesignIn developing the security design particular attention should be given to:SBD (security by design)– the Home Office Initiative, which aims to achieve security by introducing appropriate designfeatures, that enable ‘natural surveillance and minimise features that provide opportunity for criminal activity (includingterrorism). These features include: secure vehicle parking, adequate lighting of common areas, control of access toindividual and common areas, defensible space, and a landscaping and lighting scheme, which when combined, enhancesnatural surveillance and safety and creates clear areas of ownership and responsibility. Embedding security in design in sucha manner also enables security to become ‘transparent’, with mitigation being provided by the building design and layout:rather than the deployment of obvious security features.The MLA publication (Security in Museums, Archives and Libraries – A practical Guide 2003). This gives clear guidance asto the generic security issues and also gives general and specific guidance for the following:• Physical defences.• Intruder alarms.• Displays & exhibitions - including asset tagging and tracking.• Security staffing & CCTV.• Operating procedures.• Personal security.• Children & vulnerable persons.9.5 Fire Engineering9.5.1 IntroductionThe fire strategy for the entire project must fulfil all statutory life safety requirements as well as the requirements of BristolCity Council relation to property protection, contents protection and business continuity.The fire strategy should include appropriate measures to protect:• Life safety of occupants (Staff and visitors):• Life safety of fire service personnel during any rescue and fire fighting operations within the building.• Property.• Contents.• Business continuity.9.5.2 Functional Intentions & Acceptance CriteriaThe fire strategy must be developed in order to:• Minimise the likelihood of a fire occurring.• Ensure that if a fire does occur in any location that it is detected at the earliest opportunity.
  • 96. • Ensure that clear and concise directions and warning are given to occupants in the event of a fire.• Ensure upon fire detection and warning, all occupants within the building are provided with the ability to evacuate quickly to a place of safety removed from the fire.• Ensure upon fire detection, response time for the fire service is minimised.• Ensure upon detection the early activation of installed fire suppression systems.• Ensure that fire and smoke spread throughout the facility is controlled to acceptable levels.This should:• Minimise the risk to occupants.• Minimise the risk of fire and smoke spreading throughout the building.• Minimise the damage caused by a fire, or the resultant fire fighting water applied by the fire service.• Minimise the cost.• Limit business interruption, or down time caused by any fire.9.5.3 Reference DocumentsThe fire strategy for the entire project must meet the functional requirements of the Building Regulations 2000, or anysubsequent revisions that may come into force prior to submission for statutory approvals.In the preparation of the fire strategy the following documents should be referred to and the recommendations followed forthe relevant and specific areas of the project:• Approved Document B Volume 2 – Buildings Other than Dwelling houses 2006 Edition or subsequent revisions.• BS 5454: 2000 Recommendations for the Storage & Exhibition of Archival Documents.• BS5588-4: 1998 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Code of Practice for Smoke Control using Pressure Differentials.• BS 5588-5: 2004 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Access & facilities for the Fire Service.• BS 5588-6: 1991 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Code of Practice for Places of Assembly.• BS 5588-7: 1997 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Code of Practice for the Incorporation of Atria in Buildings.• BS 5588-8: 1999 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Code of Practice for Means of Escape for Disabled People.• BS 5588-9: 1999 Fire Precautions in Design Construction & Use of Buildings Code of Practice for Ventilation & Air Conditioning Ductwork.• BS 9999: 2008 Code of Practice for Fire Safety in the Design, Construction & Use of Buildings.• BS 7346-4: 2003 Components of Smoke and Heat Control Systems. Functional Requirements & Calculation Methods for Smoke and Heat Exhaust Systems.• BS 7346-5: 2005 Components of Smoke and Heat Control Systems. Functional Requirements & Calculation Methods for Smoke and Heat Exhaust Systems.• The Fire Protection Association Design Guide for the Protection of Buildings.• Pace Crown Fire Standards – Fire Standards F1-F7.• Model National Standard Conditions for P laces of Entertainment and Associated Guidance.• Guide to Security and Environmental Conditions under the Government Indemnity Scheme, National Heritage Act 1980, Section 16.
  • 97. 9.5.4 Fire Safety EngineeringA fire safety engineering approach offers an acceptable alternative approach to the recommendations of the documents statedif this is deemed to be appropriate. In preparation of a fire safety engineering approach BS 7974: 2001, or suitable equivalentshould be followed and used.Where fire safety engineering is to be used the acceptance criteria must be agreed by all key stakeholders at the outset. Thefire engineering approach must meet the agreed acceptance criteria to be deemed suitable for use in the project concerned.9.5.6 Fire Strategy DocumentationThe design Fire Strategy should take the form of a Tate report with all necessary and relevant drawings, illustrations andcalculations. The Tate report and drawings should document the passive and active systems that together form the entire firestrategy.Upon completion of the construction stage and prior to handover an “as built” fire strategy report should be compiled andhanded over to the clients for record purposes.9.5.7 Fire Safety Team & ConsultationThe Fire Strategy design for the project should be compiled by a professionally qualified fire safety engineer consultant whois registered with the Institute of Fire Engineers in the UK, or an equivalent international organisation.A multi disciplinary fire safety teamwork approach should be adopted for the development of the fire safety strategy. This isrecommended to ensure that most effective fire protection measures are applied which are appropriate to this specific project.Early consultation with the main stakeholders is therefore essential.Key stakeholders in this case include:• Client representatives.• Client fire safety advisor.• Authority having jurisdiction.• Building insurers.• An appropriately qualified fire safety-engineering consultant.• The National Archive.It is expected that the Fire Safety engineering consultant will chair the fire safety team.9.5.8 Operational Fire Safety Management & Regulatory Reform OrderThe Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 imposes a general legal duty on the building owners to carry out a fire riskassessment of the premises upon completion of this project.In order for the building owners to do this, the design for this project must provide an accurate as built record of the firestrategy and its related systems. This should also contain all of the necessary operations and maintenance requirements forthe particular systems.9.5.9 Additional Basic RequirementsThe following requirements set out the basic additional requirements to the Building Regulations that must be implementedin the design of the project
  • 98. 9.5.10 Fire Separation between the Library of Bristol and Tate BristolThe Library and Tate Bristol building must be separated by fire resisting construction to prevent fire and smoke spreadingbetween both these areas.The Archive art storage and exhibition galleries must be separated from other areas by appropriately rated fire resistingconstruction.9.5.11 Places of High Fire RiskThe following rooms should be enclosed in 30 minute fire resisting construction as a minimum:• Stores.• Cleaners Rooms.• Workshops.• Lift Motor Rooms.• Kitchens.• Staff Changing & Locker Rooms.• Plant Rooms.• Refuse Storage Areas.• Fire Control Room.Where the recommendations of relevant statutory documentation suggest a higher period of fire resistance, then this shouldbe adopted for the areas concerned.9.5.12 Active Fire Protection SystemsFire Detection• A full coverage, early warning, automatic, analogue addressable fire detection system must be installed throughout the building in accordance with BS 5839-1: 2001.• The type of fire detectors used should be chosen to be specific to the risks present. A combination of smoke and heat detectors should be used in appropriate locations throughout the building.• The fire detection system must be interlinked with an autodial facility for alerting the fire service in the event of fire.• The cause and effect schedule and evacuation procedure to be adopted requires to be agreed with the building owners and users.Fire Warning Systems• A live and directive public address voice alarm system in accordance with BS 5389-8: 1998 should be installed throughout the new building.• Flashing warning beacons should be installed throughout the building for warning of occupants with hearing difficulty.• Informative fire warning and directional signage should be installed between the differing areas of the building.Fire Suppression• The building should be protected with an appropriate form(s) of automatic fire suppression in accordance with BS EN 12845: 2004 and other relevant standards. The choice of fire suppression system used in each area of the building should be tailored to the use and contents of the spaces concerned.• The fire suppression measures within the Archive must comply with BS 5454 or be shown to be equivalent.
  • 99. Fire Control Room• A fire control room should be provided to house the control and monitoring equipment for all of the active fire safety systems.• It is expected that the control room will be sited on an external wall with direct communication to outside.• Where appropriate it would be acceptable to integrate the fire control room with the security control room.• The fire control room should be enclosed in FR120 construction.Evacuation Lifts• Evacuation lifts must be installed throughout the building as the primary means of vertical evacuation for disabled occupants.• Evacuation lifts must comply with the requirements of BS 5588-8: 1999.Disabled Refuge Two Way Communication SystemsAn electronic system of 2 way communication in emergency conditions must be provided in every escape stair throughoutthe building. The location of the system within the staircase should be confirmed by the designers.Fire Fighting RequirementsFire fighting access and facilities should be installed as per the requirements of Approved Document B and BS 9999: 2008.Secondary Power SystemsAll active fire safety systems must be provided with a suitable emergency back up power supply in case of failure of theprimary supply.First Aid Fire Fighting MeasuresPortable fire extinguishers should be installed throughout the building in accordance with BS 5306-Part 8 to tackle smallincipient fires. A range of extinguisher types should be installed to cover the various types of fire risks present within thepremises e.g. water, CO2, dry powder, and fire blankets should be grouped at fire points in conspicuous locations sitedalongside escape routes. All extinguishers should comply with BS EN3. Fire points should be located such that they may bereached in 30m travel from any point within the building. In conjunction with this fire equipment, signage should beinstalled to give general instruction / direction on the use of the various fire extinguishers.In accordance with BS 7937: 2000 Class F portable extinguishers should be located within Kitchens.9.6 Building ServicesServices within the Tate Bristol and Library are generally comprised of the following and in accordance with the Coreprinciples provide a flexible solution for the client wherever possible:• Heating (including warm air, underfloor heating, radiators, etc.).• Cooling (including cool air, chilled beams, underfloor cooling, etc.).• Ventilation (including natural ventilation , Air Handling Units, smoke ventilation, localised extract ventilation, etc.)• Power.• Data/Comunications (cabling and containment only).• Lighting (including General & Emergency, Decorative, Scene Setting, etc.).• Security (CCTV, Intruder Alarm, Access Control, etc.).• Public Health (including sanitary, plumbing and drainage installations).
  • 100. With continued emphasis on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, and with new Energy Performance Certificates required for allnon-domestic buildings from 1 October 2008, it will be important to ensure that all new systems and services beingintroduced to the Library and Tate Bristol are designed, installed and maintained with this in mind.The Heating, Cooling and Ventilation installations shall be zoned where practical in order to provide greater control inindividual areas throughout the building. Natural Ventilation shall also be exploited where possible.A new Building Energy Management System (BEMS) shall be used to help setup, adjust and maintain design parameters forall of the above systems, and shall assist the end user in monitoring overall energy use. The BEMS shall also perform faultindication and diagnostic functions for certain items of plant. This should help reduce maintenance and plant down-time andwill ultimately save energy, time and money. All power distribution boards, control panels and large items of plant will beseparately metered. These meters will be linked to the BEMS from which they can each be scrutinised to gain usefulinformation on power usage. Sub-metering will be designed in accordance with guidance in Chartered Institute of BuildingServices (CIBSE) TM39. Consideration will be given to the integration of a new BEMS with the existing software protocolsused by Bristol City Council.Lighting control will be optimised by the use of daylight linking the presence detection switching to reduce energyconsumption.In storage and exhibition areas with rigid environmental control requirements high thermal mass and reduced air infiltrationshall be utilised to promote environmental stability and minimise energy consumption. The use of materials with highthermal and hygroscopic capacity will be considered in these areas where possible. However, it is unlikely that passivemeasures alone will be able to achieve the environment conditions recommended in BS 5454, so these areas will likely beheavily serviced.The requirements for some archive material to be stored at relatively low temperatures (some as low as -5ºC) under therecommendations or BS 5454, will require an alternative method of cooling to the district CHP scheme proposed.The internal environment of the Gallery Space shall be designed to American Society for Heating, Refirgeration and AirConditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Class of Control AA. This will provide a suitable compromise between the integralconditions required for exhibits and visitors. It is proposed that exhibits that require different environmental conditionswould be stored within conditioned display cases with inbuilt humidity, with temperature and light levels monitored.The requirement for any resilience in the building services serving these areas is to be confirmed. The main considerationsarising when adding resilience are capital cost, maintenance, plant space requirements and risk.
  • 101. 10 Innovative library and archives recommendations
  • 102. 10 Innovative library and archives recommendations10.1 Innovative library and archive servicesThe overall objective is to design a smart building, enabling the library to provide world-class and innovative services to itsusers inside and outside the building. The design of the building will need to optimise the interaction between:• The collections (open access, legacy, archives), storage (space dimensions, flow of documents, floor loads) and supporting installations (transport, shelves, climate).• The interior design of the public spaces, in particular for Reader Services and Archives (actual usage of the public spaces, innovative services inside the building).• ICT (digitization, RFID, virtual shelving).The Library will have a significant long-term impact on the local and regional economy, making a vital contribution to theeconomic and social well-being of citizens. It will give Bristol and the facilities it needs to release the full potential of libraryand archives services, creating a purpose-designed centre for life-long learning, skills development and culture and ashowcase for the city’s heritage and world-class collections.10.2 In-depth study into ASRS system optionsAlthough still uncommon, an increasing number of libraries use an automated storage and retrieval system (ASRS) for theclosed access parts of their collections.The report on study carried out by compact storage subgroup between October 2006 and March 2007 concludes that anautomated storage and retrieval system will not bring savings in space or cost. In addition, it advises that the Archive andHeritage collections are not suitable for automated storage.

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