New Contexts for Museum Information

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Presentation to the Renaissance London 'Information & Records Management Symposium', at the Museum of London, Docklands on the 29th February 2012

Presentation to the Renaissance London 'Information & Records Management Symposium', at the Museum of London, Docklands on the 29th February 2012

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  • 1. New Contexts for MuseumInformation29th February 2012Museum of London, Docklands
  • 2. New White Paper New Contextsfor Museum Informationpublished today on CollectionsLink to support this discussion.Please read/circulate andcomment!www.collectionslink.org.uk(‘Manage Information’)
  • 3. Key points• New contexts for museums, archives and libraries• The changing face of culture• The way we think about information• Treating knowledge as an asset• The role of trust and authority• A look ahead
  • 4. Collections TrustThe leading international voice for Collections Management ingalleries, libraries, archives and museums• Helping individuals build leadership & expertise in Collections Management• Working with organisations to define & achieve excellence• Supporting organisations to share their Collections online safely & sustainably• Helping commercial partners build profile & share knowledge and expertise with the sector
  • 5. New contexts for our organisationsThe single most significant strategic challenge for museums, archives andlibraries today is relevance – helping people to understand how what we doadds meaning, value, depth & enjoyment in a complex & connected worldFrom relevance stems resilience, growth, profile and audienceAchieving relevance demands:• Coherence and authenticity• Flexibility• Reach• ResponsivenessMeeting the challenge of relevance is fundamentally a question of information
  • 6. The changing face of culture…What a cultural organisation is and does, the range of inputs it is expected tomanage, and the range of uses it is expected to support have expandeddramatically in the past 10 years….
  • 7. The changing face of culture…Physical artefactsOral historyEphemeraTime-based mediaBorn-digital artBorn-digital everythingSocial mediaIce core samplesBoatsBuildings‘The Olympics’Ugly Renaissance Babies…Culture is everywhere, and everything…
  • 8. The BFI Collecting policy…Collecting activity is focussed on British production, as defined in appendix B.We aim to collect all British films certified for cinema exhibition . We will also collect a selection of otherfiction, factual and documentary films, television programmes and other materials that exemplify the artof filmmaking (broadly defined), its history – including both use and form – and its impact on andrelationship to the people of the UK.We collect film on physical media of all types, and in digital file formats that are independent of physicalmedia. We will not exclude material by production type, medium, distribution channel or platform:television, amateur films, corporate material, material on the internet, born-digital material, DVD andcomputer games may all be considered.We collect objects and records related to the creative process of filmmaking and to the promotion,distribution and consumption of film in the UK. These include personal papers of key individuals in theindustry, scripts, designs, stills, posters and other ephemera, especially where these relate to the movingimage collections.We collect books, periodicals and other information resources that support research into the art, historyand impact of filmWe create records and knowledge resources around the subject. The key priorities are the documentationof the collections and the creation of knowledge resources supporting the BFI’s cultural programme. Theserecords feed into a developing UK filmography, covering British production intended for public distribution.
  • 9. The changing nature of informationThe nature, types, formats and scope of information in galleries, libraries,archives and museums have continued to adapt to reflect the changing natureof what we do…
  • 10. CONSERVATION EXHIBITION DONOR IPR RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT DATACATALOGUE DIGITAL SURROGATE DIGITISATION LOCATION PERSONNEL LOAN USER EDUCATION GENERATED PACK CONTENT COMMUNITY WEB CONTENT RESPONSES ESTATES FINANCE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
  • 11. Many different types of information CATALOGUE LOAN IPR DIGITAL SURROGATE DONOR COLLECTIONS INFORMATION CONSERVATION DIGITISATION EXHIBITION ENVIRONMENT LOCATION ‘MUSEOLOGICAL’ DATA INFORMATION USER GENERATED COMMUNITY RESPONSES EDUCATION PACK WEB CONTENT RESEARCH INTERPRETIVE CONTENT INFORMATION FINANCE PERSONNEL PERFORMANCE ESTATES MARKETING BUSINESS INDICATORS MATERIAL INFORMATION
  • 12. The changing forms of interactionInformation flow is not one-way – it emerges across multiple contexts, bothinternal and external. Our approach to information is expected to supportmultiple forms of interaction:• Management reporting• Direct online use• Aggregation and syndication in controlled contexts• Federated/3rd party reuse in uncontrolled contexts• Internal, inter-departmental use• Loans, transfers, exchanges of knowledge• Research and interpretation
  • 13. The ‘vertical’ organisationEducation Management Retail Collections EstatesEach ‘vertical’ activity develops programmes, systems, competencies andinformation specific to its function
  • 14. ‘Vertical’ systems Collections Web Content Digital Asset Resource BuildingManagement Management Management Management Management System System System System System A ‘stovepipe’ model evolves which satisfies immediate needs & reflects funding priorities, but which ultimately militates against information flow
  • 15. The future demands integration… Visitor experience Source Management material Systems PeopleIntegration is key to enabling information to flow across multiple contexts toachieve both efficiency and authenticity
  • 16. Enterprise Knowledge ManagementWhat we’re talking about is a move away from organisational silos andtowards enterprise Knowledge Management.Knowledge management is fundamentally not about systems or processes,it’s about people. It depends on several key elements:• Promoting a culture of communication across the whole organisation• Understanding that the flow of information is a flow of value• Recognising that knowledge is incremental – it grows through use – and behaviours or systems which inhibit this growth directly obstruct our cultural purpose
  • 17. Why KM fails in cultural organisationsThere seem to be at least 4 reasons why Knowledge Management has failedin libraries, galleries, archives and museums:• The sporadic, staccato nature of funding & development• The control of knowledge as an artefact of identity and status• Lack of management/strategic engagement• ‘It’s hard, and we can’t be bothered’All of these inhibitors stem from a common cause – the need to articulate thebenefit of knowledge, information &records management in terms which willbe understood and valued by the people who can help or hinder them
  • 18. Learning from Business Intelligence systemsBusiness Intelligence describes systems which draw both qualitative andquantitative information from multiple sources and assemble them intosimple interfaces to support:• Better management decision-making• Long-term strategic planning• Ongoing operational efficiencyThese systems demonstrate their own value by allowing the organisation tobenefit not just from the information, but from understanding its meaning,value, impact and implication.What can your Collections Management System tell your line-manager thathelps them do their job (and not just how much more money you need forcataloguing…)
  • 19. Some emerging themesSome of the key themes of the new information management landscape arealready emerging:• Understanding & managing knowledge & information as assets• Systems which draw information from multiple sources (ResearchSpace)• Trust, authenticity, credibility & provenance as digital currency• Integrated or modular systems which adapt to different uses• From databases to ‘workflow engines’• Less ‘standard’ and more ‘self-assembly’
  • 20. BSI Standard for Collections ManagementJoint Collections Trust/BSI Code of Practice for Collections Management (BSI PAS197:2011) is a vision of strategic collections management in which physical, digitaland information are managed under a common framework.• Every activity and decision about collections and information should be connected to an organisational mission that delivers value for an end-user (i.e. that collections management should always be for someone, and never regarded as an end in itself);• That every activity relating to collections and information (care, learning, development and use) ought to be regarded as integral parts of the same process, and not as separate functions;• That to be effective, knowledge and information must flow freely across all of these activities;• That to maximise its impact for the museum, Collections Management must be an ongoing process of review and improvement, rather than a set of finite states.
  • 21. SPECTRUM 4.0Connecting people,processes, systems andinformation into acoherent framework….
  • 22. Continue the conversation atOpenCulture 2012, 26th & 27thJune at the Oval, LondonFind out more athttp://www.collectionslink.org.ukFollow us:@collectiontrust@NickPoole1Thank you!