Leading Learning Behaviour and Attendance

  • 586 views
Uploaded on

Despite continued improvement in academic standards across most of the Asia Pacific Region, an unacceptable proportion of children become disaffected with school, resulting in poor learning behaviour, …

Despite continued improvement in academic standards across most of the Asia Pacific Region, an unacceptable proportion of children become disaffected with school, resulting in poor learning behaviour, lack of progress, declining attendance or lack of inclusion in school.

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
586
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Ask participants to explore the model using the questions on page 26

Transcript

  • 1. Leading Learning Behaviour andAttendance - the what, why and how Nick Burnett Asia Pacific Director of Northampton Centre for Learning Behaviour (NCfLB)– LinkedIn – Nick Burnett– Twitter – nick_burnett– Facebook – Nick Burnett CCP
  • 2. THE ‘WHY’ OF LEARNING BEHAVIOUR
  • 3. 3
  • 4. The importance of improving Learning Behaviour and Attendance•Despite continued improvement in academicstandards across most of the Asia Pacific Region,an unacceptable proportion of children becomedisaffected with school, resulting in poorlearning behaviour, lack of progress, decliningattendance or lack of inclusion in school.
  • 5. • Bullying and other anti-social and/or violent behaviours affect children’s well-being. They impact on their ability to learn and their inclusion in school.• There is a growing demand, amongst trainee and serving teachers, for training and support to improve the learning behaviour of children and to create a climate of harmony and wellbeing in their schools
  • 6. Latest research In Australian schools, both novice and experiencedteachers increasingly raise concerns that they are not able to teach effectively because of the recurrentincidence of disruptive behaviours of some students.Teachers state that managing children with behavior problems is a major source of stress to them. Thisresults in less work satisfaction and teachers leaving the profession. 6
  • 7. Latest research Research shows that improving the learning behaviour of children whose behaviour is challenging is one of the most effective ways of raising standards of attainment for all children in our schools. It also benefits society at large by helping children learn the social and emotional skills they need for citizenship and bypreventing behaviours that disrupt teaching from developing into behaviours that disrupt the lives of others and costsociety dearly (e.g. violence, vandalism, addiction and crime). 7
  • 8. THE ‘WHAT’ OF LEARNING BEHAVIOUR
  • 9. Effective lesson organisation results in improved Learning BehaviourSpecific planning/structuring of lessons that promotes LearningBehaviour relationships for all pupils involves paying attentionto three drivers linked to the three relationship domains of theBehaviour for Learning model:2.Emotional wellbeing (Relationship with self - Engagement)3.Social wellbeing (Relationship with others - Participation)4.Cognitive wellbeing (Relationship with the curriculum - Access) 10
  • 10. LEARNING BEHAVIOUR ENVIRONMENT RELATIONSHIP RELATIONSHIP FACILITATED WITH SELF BY LEARNING WITH PEOPLE BEHAVIOUREMOTIONAL SOCIALWELL BEING WELL BEING FACILITATED FACILITATED BY LEARNING BY LEARNING BEHAVIOUR BEHAVIOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH CURRICULUM COGNITIVE WELL BEING Burnett, Forlin, Gittins, Li 2011
  • 11. • The circle of Relationship with Self is undoubtedly the most important relationship for learning behaviour. It signifies the positive self identity of the child and a growing self reliance that will build steadily during the stages of transition from childhood to adulthood
  • 12. An appreciation of self is typified by the child’sgrowing:•self belief and self determination and confidenceto learn new things•self motivation and a thirst for learning andinterest in the process•understanding of personal strengths andweaknesses•resourcefulness, responsibility and willingness toadmit and correct mistakes•and most important of all - emotional wellbeingand happiness
  • 13. • The circle of Relationship with People is woven by the interactions between the child and others such as teachers, parents and peers. The interactions lead to the development of a range of interpersonal skills as the child becomes more socially and emotionally adept.
  • 14. Their learning is promoted as they learn the valueof and can express their growing:•empathy and respect for others and acceptanceand understanding of differences•friendship and harmony in the presence of othersand a feeling of belonging•participation, and willingness to join in activitiesand learning experiences•cooperation and collaborative working, recognizingthat learning behaviour involves workingharmoniously with others.•and most important of all - social wellbeing
  • 15. • The circle of Relationship with the Curriculum includes the way the child engages with learning and develops an interest in continuing and continuous education and a love for learning.
  • 16. Factors which promote this relationship betweenthe child and the formal and informal curriculumin the school include their growing:•access to a curriculum which is relevant and meetsthe developing needs of the child.•ability to focus and maintain attention on the taskof learning.•inspiration by inspiring teaching•ability to communicate and express interest.•and most important of all - cognitive wellbeing
  • 17. LEARNING BEHAVIOUR ENVIRONMENT RELATIONSHIP RELATIONSHIP FACILITATED WITH SELF BY LEARNING WITH PEOPLE BEHAVIOUREMOTIONAL SOCIALWELL BEING WELL BEING FACILITATED FACILITATED BY LEARNING BY LEARNING BEHAVIOUR BEHAVIOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH CURRICULUM COGNITIVE WELL BEING Burnett, Forlin, Gittins, Li 2011
  • 18. THE ‘HOW’ OF LEARNING BEHAVIOUR
  • 19. The importance of Leading Learning Behaviour and Attendance•Challenging behaviour and poor attendance arethe single biggest factors affecting theattainment of our children in Australian schools.•The evidence is unequivocal that effectiveschool leadership is the most influential factor ingenerating change.
  • 20. • There is a growing body of knowledge and experience, validated by research, in leading effective whole school approaches to improving learning behaviour and attendance.• The factors influencing learning behaviour and regular attendance are almost identical
  • 21. • The solutions require the same skilful leadership and organisation in schools to achieve the necessary conditions where pro- social learning behaviour and willing attendance are promoted through the engagement, participation and access of all pupils to the curriculum.
  • 22. Leading Learning Behaviour and Attendance The LLB&A Program – a partnership between ACEL and NCfLB
  • 23. The LLB&A program is based on a fusion of:•the Burnett, Forlin, Gittins and Li conceptualmodel of building learning behaviourrelationships•a whole school model for promoting learningbehaviour and attendance•a range of study topics, developed from triedand tested behaviour and attendance leadershiptraining materials that have been successful ingenerating change and improvement in schools
  • 24. Promoting learning behaviour and attendance : A whole school model Communication Motivation Correction Organisation Vision, values and Feedback (verbal Verbal and non CurriculumPrinciples and beliefs, and non-verbal, verbal feedback, Learning and expectations of written, praise, consequences and teaching approaches Policy social time behaviour of all reward) sanctions supervisor members of the parental involvement Monitoring, Evaluation and Problem Solving systems community Behaviour policy Group/ Group/ Seating plansGroup or group/ Department/ Department/ Room layoutDepartment Department/ Age phase Age phase/ Curriculumpractice Age phase/ rules Motivational Motivation Presentation and routines systems systems Groupings at all of these levelsStaff support All the above areas are underpinned by support and professional learning for staff Individual Individually Individually IndividualSupport for education plans. differentiated differentiated organisationalindividual IBP, PSP targets motivational sanctions changeschildren Personalised strategies and learning rewards Referral Referral to Support Counsellor/Psychologist Referral to OrganisedReferral/suppor by to senior outside pastoralt systems staff teaching Referral to LSU agencies for time is part and specialist of the pastoral Referral to learning mentor or support 26 school day other support person staff
  • 25. Based on effective learning model1. Acquisition of knowledge2. Modelling of good practice3. Practice application4. Feedback and reflection Coaching5. Embedding the experience
  • 26. The LLB&A offers:• an opportunity for emerging and middle leaders to develop and enhance their leadership skills within the context of learning behaviour and attendance improvement, building on a distributed leadership model.• support for ongoing professional development in a longer term learning community.• an opportunity to gain qualifications and to extend learning from the program into further accreditation routes.
  • 27. LLB&A Learning Outcomes• An increased understanding of the leadership styles, qualities and skills required for the effective leadership of learning behaviour and attendance improvement in schools.• Practice in leading the whole school approaches which are explored in the program and are drivers for change.• Enhanced skills in organising and implementing interventions to improve learning behaviour and attendance.
  • 28. The full program outline• Program takes place over a period of 6 months minimum• 3 x 2 day group workshops – activity based learning using a modular program of study materials• In between the tutored sessions participants can select from a range of practical work-based activities to carry out in-school supported by: • On-line tutorials • Study materials including background reading • Behaviour scenarios – self tutored interactive on-line sessions • Learning Behaviour DVD and other video materials • Webinar and web-site access • Optional coaching sessions
  • 29. Additional Options:•If you are still not sure whether to commit to thesix month program we can run: – A one day introductory session where participants: • can explore some of the underlying rationale of the program in relation to fundamental issues for their school • experience the training methodology we use, and; • help us respond to their needs when tailoring the program for an interested group in their region
  • 30. Teaching Behaviour?“If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.”“If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.”“If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach.”“If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.”“If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we……..... ……….teach? ………punish?”“Why can’t we finish the last sentence asautomatically as we do the others?” Tom Herner (American Federation Teachers’ President, Counterpoint 1998, p.2)
  • 31. • Please leave your email on the sheets: – for a copy of the PowerPoint – further info on the current LLB&A programs – to discuss the possibility of running an individualised LLB&A program for your area• Stay in touch through: – LinkedIn – Nick Burnett – Twitter – nick_burnett – Facebook – Nick Burnett CCP