Art of the Ancient Near East<br />Reading<br />Stokstad, 39-47<br />Range:<br />1500-330 BCE<br />Assyrian, Neo-Babylonian...
2-11, Reconstruction of the Citadel and Palace Complex of Sargon the II, DurSharrukin, Assyrian, 721-706 BCE
Pg. 41, Enemies Crossing the Euphrates to Escape Assyrian Archers from the Palace of Assurnasirpal II, 875-860 BCE
2-12, Lamassu Figures at Gate A of the Citadel of Sargon II, 721-706 BCE
2-14,  Ishtar Gate, Neo-Babylonian, 6th Century BCE
2-17, Apadana of Darius and Xerxes, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE
2-18, Darius and Xerxes Receiving Tribute, Achaemenid Persian, 491-486 BCE</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Stele of Naram Sin, A...
Nanna Ziggurat, Uruk, Iraq, Neo-Sumerian, 2100-2050 BCE<br />
<ul><li>Votive of Gudea, Neo-Sumerian, 2090 BCE</li></li></ul><li>
Old Babylonian: 1792-1750 BCE<br />
Head of Old Babylonian Ruler (Possibly Hammurabi), Old Babylonian, 1900-1700 BCE <br />
<ul><li>Stele of Hammurabi, Old Babylonian, 1792-1750 BCE</li></li></ul><li>
Timeline of the Ancient Near East<br />
Major Powers in the Near East<br /><ul><li>Old Sumerian: 3000-2340 BCE
Akkadian: 2340-2180 BCE
Neo-Sumerian: 2125-2025 BCE
Old Babylonian: 2025-1594 BCE
Assyrian: 1350-612 BCE
Neo-Babylonian: 612-539 BCE
Achaemenid Persian: 539-331 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Mesopotamia: “Land Between Two Rivers”<br />
Assyrian 1350-612 BCE<br />
<ul><li>2-11, Reconstruction of the Citadel and Palace Complex of Sargon the II, DurSharrukin, Assyrian, 721-706 BCE</li><...
<ul><li>2-10, Assurnasirpal II Killing Lions, Assyrian, 875-860 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Lion Hunt, from the throne room of A...
Lion Hunt, Palace of Assurbanipal, Assyrian, 647 BCE<br />
Dying Lion, Throne Room of Ashurbanipal, Nineveh, 647 BCE<br />
Dead Lion, Throne Room of Ashurbanipal, Nineveh, 647 BCE<br />
<ul><li>Pg. 41, Enemies Crossing the Euphrates to Escape Assyrian Archers from the Palace of Assurnasirpal II, 875-860 BCE...
Neo-Babylonian: 612-539 BCE<br />
<ul><li>2-14,  Ishtar Gate, Neo-Babylonian, 6th Century BCE</li></li></ul><li>
Achaemenid Persian: 539-331 BCE<br />
Reconstruction of Persepolis, c. 518-460 BCE <br />
<ul><li>2-17, Apadana of Darius and Xerxes, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Lion attacking an Antelope, ...
Stairs and Processional Friezes, Apadana, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE<br />
Stairs, Apadana, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE<br />
Processional Friezes, Apadana, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE<br />
Processional Friezes, Apadana, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE<br />
<ul><li>2-18, Darius and Xerxes Receiving Tribute, Achaemenid Persian, 491-486 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Alexander Mosaic, Hou...
Neo-Sumerian<br />Old Babylonian<br />Akkadian<br />Faces of Kings<br />
Size Matters<br />Akkadian, <br />2254-2218 BCE<br />Old Sumerian,<br />2900-2600 BCE<br />Old Babylonian,<br />1792-1750 ...
Material Matters<br />
Material Matters<br />
Power and City Planning<br />Assyrian, <br />721-706 BCE<br />Achemenid Persian,<br />518-460 BCE<br />Neo-Babylonian,<br ...
Kingly Deeds<br />
Critical Questions<br />How are animals used to convey power and powerlessness in Near Eastern art?<br />How does the art/...
Near eastern art part ii
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  • Nanna Ziggurat, UrukNeo-Sumerian,2100-2050 BCE
  • Due to the complex nature of power shifts in the ancient Near East, we will have to take a selective approach to the material covered. Keeping that in mind we will be looking a some of the major powers in this area from 3000-400 BCE: the Sumerian, the Old Babylonians,
  • Video Tours of Persepolishttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3fdJNjF0lcYhttp://www.persepolis3d.com/frameset.html
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3fdJNjF0lcY
  • Lion hunts were most common in throne rooms, which draws a line between the king’s power as a ruler and as a hunter. Most scenes reduce the hunt to the single most important moment of the kill. Lions were distinctly royal animals, and as such they were not allowed to killed by anyone but the king. Showing dominion over such a fierce and noble animal showed the kings dominion over the dangerous world of beasts from which the empire was formed. Attacks on enemy cities often accompanied these scenes, exhibiting the king’s dominion over the world of man.
  • Near eastern art part ii

    1. 1. Art of the Ancient Near East<br />Reading<br />Stokstad, 39-47<br />Range:<br />1500-330 BCE<br />Assyrian, Neo-Babylonian, and Persian<br />Terms/Concepts:<br />Mesopotamia, Apadana, Hieratic Scale, Lamassu, Bent Axis, Tribute, Bas Relief, <br />Monument List<br /><ul><li>2-10, Assurnasirpal II Killing Lions, Assyrian, 875-860 BCE.
    2. 2. 2-11, Reconstruction of the Citadel and Palace Complex of Sargon the II, DurSharrukin, Assyrian, 721-706 BCE
    3. 3. Pg. 41, Enemies Crossing the Euphrates to Escape Assyrian Archers from the Palace of Assurnasirpal II, 875-860 BCE
    4. 4. 2-12, Lamassu Figures at Gate A of the Citadel of Sargon II, 721-706 BCE
    5. 5. 2-14, Ishtar Gate, Neo-Babylonian, 6th Century BCE
    6. 6. 2-17, Apadana of Darius and Xerxes, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE
    7. 7. 2-18, Darius and Xerxes Receiving Tribute, Achaemenid Persian, 491-486 BCE</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Stele of Naram Sin, Akkadian, 2254-2218 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Cylinder Seal with Weather God, Akkadian, 2334-2154 BCE<br /><ul><li>Stele of Naram Sin, Akkadian, 2254-2218 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Neo Sumerian: 2200-2100 BCE<br />
    8. 8. Nanna Ziggurat, Uruk, Iraq, Neo-Sumerian, 2100-2050 BCE<br />
    9. 9. <ul><li>Votive of Gudea, Neo-Sumerian, 2090 BCE</li></li></ul><li>
    10. 10. Old Babylonian: 1792-1750 BCE<br />
    11. 11. Head of Old Babylonian Ruler (Possibly Hammurabi), Old Babylonian, 1900-1700 BCE <br />
    12. 12. <ul><li>Stele of Hammurabi, Old Babylonian, 1792-1750 BCE</li></li></ul><li>
    13. 13. Timeline of the Ancient Near East<br />
    14. 14. Major Powers in the Near East<br /><ul><li>Old Sumerian: 3000-2340 BCE
    15. 15. Akkadian: 2340-2180 BCE
    16. 16. Neo-Sumerian: 2125-2025 BCE
    17. 17. Old Babylonian: 2025-1594 BCE
    18. 18. Assyrian: 1350-612 BCE
    19. 19. Neo-Babylonian: 612-539 BCE
    20. 20. Achaemenid Persian: 539-331 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Mesopotamia: “Land Between Two Rivers”<br />
    21. 21. Assyrian 1350-612 BCE<br />
    22. 22. <ul><li>2-11, Reconstruction of the Citadel and Palace Complex of Sargon the II, DurSharrukin, Assyrian, 721-706 BCE</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>2-12, Lamassu Figures at Gate A of the Citadel of Sargon II, 721-706 BCE</li></li></ul><li>
    23. 23. <ul><li>2-10, Assurnasirpal II Killing Lions, Assyrian, 875-860 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Lion Hunt, from the throne room of Assurbanipal, Nineveh, 647 BCE<br />
    24. 24. Lion Hunt, Palace of Assurbanipal, Assyrian, 647 BCE<br />
    25. 25. Dying Lion, Throne Room of Ashurbanipal, Nineveh, 647 BCE<br />
    26. 26. Dead Lion, Throne Room of Ashurbanipal, Nineveh, 647 BCE<br />
    27. 27. <ul><li>Pg. 41, Enemies Crossing the Euphrates to Escape Assyrian Archers from the Palace of Assurnasirpal II, 875-860 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Assurbanipal and his Queen in the Garden, Palace at Nineveh, 647 BCE<br />
    28. 28. Neo-Babylonian: 612-539 BCE<br />
    29. 29.
    30. 30. <ul><li>2-14, Ishtar Gate, Neo-Babylonian, 6th Century BCE</li></li></ul><li>
    31. 31.
    32. 32.
    33. 33. Achaemenid Persian: 539-331 BCE<br />
    34. 34. Reconstruction of Persepolis, c. 518-460 BCE <br />
    35. 35. <ul><li>2-17, Apadana of Darius and Xerxes, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Lion attacking an Antelope, Apadana, Persepolis, Apadana, 518-460 BCE <br />
    36. 36. Stairs and Processional Friezes, Apadana, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE<br />
    37. 37. Stairs, Apadana, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE<br />
    38. 38. Processional Friezes, Apadana, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE<br />
    39. 39. Processional Friezes, Apadana, Achaemenid Persian, 518-460 BCE<br />
    40. 40. <ul><li>2-18, Darius and Xerxes Receiving Tribute, Achaemenid Persian, 491-486 BCE</li></li></ul><li>Alexander Mosaic, House of the Faun, Pompeii, c. 2nd Century BCE<br />
    41. 41. Neo-Sumerian<br />Old Babylonian<br />Akkadian<br />Faces of Kings<br />
    42. 42. Size Matters<br />Akkadian, <br />2254-2218 BCE<br />Old Sumerian,<br />2900-2600 BCE<br />Old Babylonian,<br />1792-1750 BCE<br />Neo-Sumerian,<br />2100-2050 BCE<br />
    43. 43. Material Matters<br />
    44. 44. Material Matters<br />
    45. 45. Power and City Planning<br />Assyrian, <br />721-706 BCE<br />Achemenid Persian,<br />518-460 BCE<br />Neo-Babylonian,<br />575 BCE<br />
    46. 46. Kingly Deeds<br />
    47. 47. Critical Questions<br />How are animals used to convey power and powerlessness in Near Eastern art?<br />How does the art/architecture of Assyrian palaces differ from the Apadana in Persepolis? What does this say about their respective cultures.<br />What is the function of the ziggurat in ancient Near Eastern religion?<br />What kind of image do the kings of the Near Eastern world cultivate? Think of both their physical representations and the representations of their lives.<br />What are some common artistic themes that link the art of the Near Eastern cultures?<br />

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