• Like
Abi icrisat-dst
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Abi icrisat-dst

  • 474 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
474
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2

Actions

Shares
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Key features of India agricultural sector Significant productivity advances in main food staple, but accompanied by large food surplus in recent years – 29 million tones for rice alone Agricultural production characterized by predominately small holder production system. Couple with a large rural population of approximately 750,000 million people most of who are dependant on agriculture production and employment. One of the largest concentrations of agricultural and food scientists in the world, including in advanced scientific areas. Complementary scientific and management expertise held in a large number of world class organization in India A large domestic market for agricultural produce and following liberalization, opportunities for produce export. Agricultural sector well integrated in market economic. High demand for purchased inputs- seed, pest management inputs. A well advanced economic liberalization programme with very attractive opportunities emerging for the private sector in both input and output markets. A emergent vertically integrated food industry offering the opportunity to more efficiently link primary producers to consumers via private industry. Related food habit changes in urban sector towards proceed convenience foods. A well established private seed industry, with many large companies investing in R&D. A nascent private biotechnology industry in the health and agricultural sectors. Complementary capacities in information technology provide a potential comparative advantage in bio-informatics.
  • -R&D in the public sector has tended not to interface with private enterprise and so is disconnected from the broader market developments and demands. Underlying assumption that research, technology development, technology transfer, and technology use were a sequential tasks, has limited the emergence of more iterative relationships between science, the market, and technology users. WTO means that Indian agricultural and the agro-based industries must become more competitive, both in terms of price, but also in terms of quality. In many sectors a quality reputation is yet to be built. Indian wheat prices for example are significantly higher than international prices due to policy distortions in India. Entry into global markets and international competition requires rapid technical change in both production and post-harvest arenas. Existing institutional arrangements make this difficult, particularly so where scientific expertise cuts across exiting organizational boundaries and where partnership between public and private sectors are required. New, flexible and evolving multi-agency groupings are required. Environmental degradation and loss of biodiversity are emerging as major threats to the sustainability of current agricultural development strategies. Science needs to provide new strategic opportunities that go beyond ameliorating existing constrains, and contribute to an new development paradigm that will prove sustainable in the long run. Rural poverty remains, with more than 450 million people surviving on less than a dollar a day. Agricultural development must address this problem through technological and institutional changes, that draw on the creativity of science, the public and private sectors in ways that genuinely enfranchise the poor.
  • It is important to test transgenics under totally safe conditions for which we have recently commissioned a transgenic greenhouse. ICRISAT follows all the guidelines of the Government of India in this regard. Once we prove that all transgenics with which we are dealing are safe, we will be very keen to work with scientists of the programs to test them under field conditions so that farmers can receive benefits as quickly as possible.
  • It is important to test transgenics under totally safe conditions for which we have recently commissioned a transgenic greenhouse. ICRISAT follows all the guidelines of the Government of India in this regard. Once we prove that all transgenics with which we are dealing are safe, we will be very keen to work with scientists of the programs to test them under field conditions so that farmers can receive benefits as quickly as possible.