10.04.04 on historical sociology

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10.04.04 on historical sociology

  1. 1. What is Historical Sociology?<br />Nick Wilson—Berkeley Sociology<br />Soc 5—Evaluation of Evidence<br />April 13, 2010<br />1<br />
  2. 2. Roadmap<br />Introduction<br />Data<br />Substance<br />Analysis<br />Explanation<br />Coda<br />2<br />
  3. 3. Roadmap<br />Introduction<br />Data<br />Substance<br />Analysis<br />Explanation<br />Coda<br />3<br />
  4. 4. What is Historical Sociology?<br />Simple answer:<br /> The sub-discipline of sociology that attempts to mount social-scientific analysis of the human past<br />Begs the question<br />Why would you want to?<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Why Care?<br />All of the founders of the discipline were historical sociologists<br />Weber<br />Durkheim<br />Marx<br />5<br />
  6. 6. Max Weber (1864-1920)<br />6<br />
  7. 7. Emile Durkheim (1858-1917)<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Karl Marx (1818-1883)<br />8<br />
  9. 9. Karl Marx (1818-1883)<br />9<br />
  10. 10. Groucho Marx (1890-1977)<br />10<br />
  11. 11. Richard Marx (b. 1963)<br />11<br />
  12. 12. Karl Marx (1818-1883)<br />12<br />
  13. 13. Why Care?<br />All of the founders of the discipline were historical sociologists<br />Weber<br />Marx<br />Durkheim<br />Conservative count: 7 of the last 12 years of the ASA Best Book award have gone to historical sociology<br />13<br />
  14. 14. Lecture Themes<br />Complexity<br />Instead, family resemblance<br />What do things we call historical sociology share?<br />Hybridity<br />Science<br />Gathers generalizeable knowledge about the social world<br />Humanities<br />Uncovers the meaning of being human<br />Particularity/Generality<br />Particular events?<br />The American Revolution as a singular event<br />General patterns?<br />Revolutions in general, with the American Revolution as an example<br />14<br />
  15. 15. Roadmap<br />Introduction<br />Data<br />Substance<br />Analysis<br />Explanation<br />Coda<br />15<br />
  16. 16. Sources<br />Two major families<br />Primary Data<br />Produced by the historical actors or during the episode under study<br />16<br />
  17. 17. Magna Carta (1215 C. E.)<br />17<br />
  18. 18. East India Company Court of Director’s Patronage Ledger (19th Century, India Office Records, London)<br />18<br />
  19. 19. John Speed World Map (1626?)<br />19<br />
  20. 20. James Cape<br />20<br />
  21. 21. James Cape’s Slave Narrative, Transcribed during the Federal Writer’s Project, 1936-1938<br />21<br />
  22. 22. Sources<br />Two major families<br />Primary Data<br />Produced by the historical actors or during the episode under study<br />Usually found in archives<br />22<br />
  23. 23. 23<br />
  24. 24. Sources<br />Two major families<br />Primary Data<br />Produced by the historical actors or during the episode under study<br />Usually found in archives<br />Secondary Data<br />Produced after the historical episode by scholars.<br />Historical monographs<br />Specialized texts exploring an episode in great depth<br />Usually found in libraries<br />24<br />
  25. 25. How Are Sources Used?<br />Scholars read primary and secondary texts for information about the past<br />Judging what the text says and doesn’t say<br />Construct as accurate a picture of possible of past events<br />25<br />
  26. 26. 26<br />
  27. 27. Roadmap<br />Introduction<br />Data<br />Substance<br />Analysis<br />Explanation<br />Coda<br />27<br />
  28. 28. Substance (I): Focal Object<br />Western <br />Capitalist <br />Modernity<br />28<br />
  29. 29. Substance (II): Capitalism<br />29<br />
  30. 30. Substance (III): The State<br />30<br />
  31. 31. Substance (IV): Civil Society<br />31<br />
  32. 32. Substance (V): Science and Culture<br />32<br />
  33. 33. Substance (VI): Civility and the Self<br />33<br />
  34. 34. 34<br />
  35. 35. Roadmap<br />Introduction<br />Data<br />Substance<br />Analysis<br />Explanation<br />Coda<br />35<br />
  36. 36. Analysis: Time Matters!<br />The passage of time is analytically central <br />The past gives more data about rare events<br />Example: Revolutions<br />The past constrains the present<br />QWERTY keyboards<br />Events in the past constrain AND enable<br />The French revolution<br />36<br />
  37. 37. Roadmap<br />Introduction<br />Data<br />Substance<br />Analysis<br />Explanation<br />Coda<br />37<br />
  38. 38. Methods of Explanation<br />Causal Narrative<br />Teleology<br />Experimental-Comparative<br />Conjuncture<br />38<br />
  39. 39. Methods of Explanation<br />Causal Narrative<br />Teleology<br />Experimental-Comparative<br />Conjuncture<br />39<br />
  40. 40. Causal Narrative<br />Secondary Cause<br />Secondary Cause<br />Primary Cause<br />Historical Event<br />40<br />
  41. 41. Methods of Explanation<br />Causal Narrative<br />Teleology<br />Experimental-Comparative<br />Conjuncture<br />41<br />
  42. 42. Methods of Explanation<br />Causal Narrative<br />Teleology<br />Experimental-Comparative<br />Conjuncture<br />42<br />
  43. 43. Method of Agreement<br />[Cause 1, Cause 2, Cause 3] = Positive Outcome<br />[Cause 2, Cause 3, Cause 4] = Positive Outcome<br />43<br />
  44. 44. Method of Agreement<br />[Cause 1, Cause 2, Cause 3] = Positive Outcome<br />[Cause 2, Cause 3, Cause 4] = Positive Outcome<br />44<br />
  45. 45. Method of Agreement<br />Cause 2 + Cause 3 = Outcome<br />45<br />
  46. 46. Method of Difference<br />[Cause A, Cause B, Cause C] = Positive Outcome<br />[Cause A, Cause B, Cause D] = Negative Outcome<br />46<br />
  47. 47. Method of Difference<br />[Cause A, Cause B, Cause C] = Positive Outcome<br />[Cause A, Cause B, Cause D] = Negative Outcome<br />47<br />
  48. 48. Method of Difference<br />Cause C = Outcome<br />48<br />
  49. 49. Methods of Explanation<br />Causal Narrative<br />Teleology<br />Experimental-Comparative<br />Conjuncture<br />49<br />
  50. 50. Conjunctural Explanation<br />Cause<br />Cause<br />Cause<br />Historical Event<br />Causal Conjuncture<br />50<br />
  51. 51. Roadmap<br />Introduction<br />Data<br />Substance<br />Analysis<br />Explanation<br />Coda<br />51<br />
  52. 52. 52<br />

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