• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
L’effet du vieillissement de la population sur le prix du logement
 

L’effet du vieillissement de la population sur le prix du logement

on

  • 1,814 views

Ce projet vis à examiner l’incidence du vieillissement de la population sur les marchés du logement canadiens et provinciaux.

Ce projet vis à examiner l’incidence du vieillissement de la population sur les marchés du logement canadiens et provinciaux.

Mario Fortion, professeur
Université de Sherbrooke

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,814
Views on SlideShare
1,808
Embed Views
6

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 6

http://www.slideshare.net 4
http://nhrc-cnrl.ca 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Real price peaked in BC in 1994. After slowly receding for 7 years, is exploded after 2001 to reach the top value of 400 000$ in 2007. Alberta’s prices steadily declined after 1981 and took a serious upward momentum only in 2005 to pass beyond the Canadian average in 2006. Manitoba and Saskatchewan have since lowest and most stable prices. In 2007, prices in Saskatchewan have been growing very fastly. The Canadian average mimics the price behaviour of Ontario: peaks in 1988, virtually stable real prices until 2000, then a steady growth to reach the recent peak of almost 280 000$.
  • Newfoundland = Terre-Neuve Atlantic provinces = Provinces de l’Atlantique Quebec = Québec Ontario = Ontario - To proxy the demand/supply imbalance caused by aging, I calculated the ratio between population size in the age group 25-44 (prime age) and population size in the 65+ age group. In all regions the ratio was almost stable in the 80s but has started to decline between 1986 (Quebec) and 1990. - New Foundland had the youngest population in the 80s but is becoming the oldest place : the ratio falls rapidly. In Quebec, the ratio if falling almost as rapidly. It is now Ontario that has the youngest population in eastern and central Canada.
  • Canada = Canada Manitoba = Manitoba Saskatchewan = Saskatchewan Alberta = Alberta British Columbia = Colombie-Britannique Alberta has by far the most favourable demographic ratio of all Canadian provinces. The oldest province is Saskatchewan.
  • To adapt the formula to housing it is necessary to add, uncluding depreciation f such that the formula becomes (1+  )/(i +  + f -  )
  • Price = Prix Short run (inelastic)… = Courbe à court terme (fixe) de l’offre (dépend du stock de logements existants) Long run… = Courbe variable de l’offre à long terme The slope… = La pente de la courbe varie en fonction des coûts à long terme (présence de facteurs de production non reproductibles) Final… = Courbe de la demande finale Initial… = Courbe de la demande initiale Stock = Stock Point A is the initial long-run equilibrium. Following an increase in housing demand, caused by (for example) a rise in Y or a fall in r, the price jumps to B in the short run. High price increases the profit in home building and the supply starts moving to the right. The final equilibrium is at point C where price equals cost. There is a final short run vertical supply curve (not shown on the graph) that intersects the final demand curve a point C.
  • Terre Neuve = Terre-Neuve Altantic = Atlantique Quebec = Québec Ontario = Ontario Not surprisingly, the lowest addition to housing stock is in New Foundland and the faster is in Ontario.
  • Canada = Canada Manitoba = Manitoba Saskatchewan = Saskatchewan Alberta = Alberta British Columbia = Colombie-Britannique Addition to the housing stock has been much faster in western provinces, particularly in Alberta and British Columbia. Annual variations in BC were extremely wide between 1990 and 1998. Starting in 1998 and for 5 years, the annual growth was lower in BC than the Canadian average, but construction has since picked up. At the opposite, Manitoba and particularly Saskatchewan has had very low construction.
  • New Foundland = Terre-Neuve Altantic = Atlantique Quebec = Québec Ontario = Ontario The lowest price are observed in the Atlantic provinces and New Foundland and the highest is in Ontario Real price peaked in 1988 in Ontario and Quebec. It picked up again significantly only after 2000 in both provinces and have now exceeded the previous peak.
  • Canada = Canada Manitoba = Manitoba Saskatchewan = Saskatchewan Alberta = Alberta British Columbia = Colombie-Britannique Real price peaked in BC in 1994. After slowly receding for 7 years, is exploded after 2001 to reach the top value of 400 000$ in 2007. Alberta’s prices steadily declined after 1981 and took a serious upward momentum only in 2005 to pass beyond the Canadian average in 2006. Manitoba and Saskatchewan have since lowest and most stable prices. In 2007, prices in Saskatchewan have been growing very fastly. The Canadian average mimics the price behaviour of Ontario: peaks in 1988, virtually stable real prices until 2000, then a steady growth to reach the recent peak of almost 280 000$.
  • Title = Taux de chef de ménage par groupe d’âge au Canada
  • Title = Taux de chef de ménage par groupe d’âge et par province en 2007 T.-N. ATL QUÉ ONT MAN SAS ALB C.-B. CAN
  • Taux de chef de ménage : centre et est du Canada CAN T.-N. ATL QUÉ ONT
  • Taux de chef de ménage : ouest du Canada MAN SAS ALB C.-B.
  • New Foundland = Terre-Neuve Atlantic = Atlantique Quebec = Québec Ontario = Ontario Alberta has by far the most favourable demographic ratio of all Canadian provinces. The oldest province is Saskatchewan.
  • Manitoba = Manitoba Saskatchewan = Saskatchewan Alberta = Alberta British Columbia = Colombie-Britannique Alberta has by far the most favourable demographic ratio of all Canadian provinces. The oldest province is Saskatchewan.
  • In the price equation : Change in real income has a positive impact (7%) while change in the interest rate a strong and highly significant impact on housing price : a one percentage point rise decreases housing price by 4.7%. Lag price is not significant but lagged real income, interest rate and stock are significant. In the stock equation : a 1% increase in real price increases by 0.0245% the change in the stock while the lagged stock has a coefficient of -0.045. In the Canadian system, population change has a positive but not significant impact on price.
  • In the price equation : Change in real income has a positive impact (7%) while change in the interest rate a strong and highly significant impact on housing price : a one percentage point rise decreases housing price by 4.7%. Lag price is not significant but lagged real income, interest rate and stock are significant. In the stock equation : a 1% increase in real price increases by 0.0245% the change in the stock while the lagged stock has a coefficient of -0.045. In the Canadian system, population change has a positive but not significant impact on price.
  • In the price equation : Change in real income has a positive impact (7%) while change in the interest rate a strong and highly significant impact on housing price : a one percentage point rise decreases housing price by 4.7%. Lag price is not significant but lagged real income, interest rate and stock are significant. In the stock equation : a 1% increase in real price increases by 0.0245% the change in the stock while the lagged stock has a coefficient of -0.045. In the Canadian system, population change has a positive but not significant impact on price.
  • In the price equation : Change in real income has a positive impact (7%) while change in the interest rate a strong and highly significant impact on housing price : a one percentage point rise decreases housing price by 4.7%. Lag price is not significant but lagged real income, interest rate and stock are significant. In the stock equation : a 1% increase in real price increases by 0.0245% the change in the stock while the lagged stock has a coefficient of -0.045. In the Canadian system, population change has a positive but not significant impact on price.
  • In the price equation : Change in real income has a positive impact (7%) while change in the interest rate a strong and highly significant impact on housing price : a one percentage point rise decreases housing price by 4.7%. Lag price is not significant but lagged real income, interest rate and stock are significant. In the stock equation : a 1% increase in real price increases by 0.0245% the change in the stock while the lagged stock has a coefficient of -0.045. In the Canadian system, population change has a positive but not significant impact on price.
  • In the price equation : Change in real income has a positive impact (7%) while change in the interest rate a strong and highly significant impact on housing price : a one percentage point rise decreases housing price by 4.7%. Lag price is not significant but lagged real income, interest rate and stock are significant. In the stock equation : a 1% increase in real price increases by 0.0245% the change in the stock while the lagged stock has a coefficient of -0.045. In the Canadian system, population change has a positive but not significant impact on price.
  • Alberta has by far the most favourable demographic ratio of all Canadian provinces. The oldest province is Saskatchewan.
  • Alberta has by far the most favourable demographic ratio of all Canadian provinces. The oldest province is Saskatchewan.
  • Alberta has by far the most favourable demographic ratio of all Canadian provinces. The oldest province is Saskatchewan.
  • New Foundland = Terre-Neuve Maritimes = Maritimes Quebec = Québec Ontario = Ontario Manitoba = Manitoba Saskatchewan = Saskatchewan Alberta = Alberta British Columbia = Colombie-Britannique

L’effet du vieillissement de la population sur le prix du logement L’effet du vieillissement de la population sur le prix du logement Presentation Transcript

  • L’incidence du vieillissement de la population sur les marchés de l’habitation des provinces du Canada Présentation à la SCHL Mario Fortin, Ph. D. Professeur Département d’économique 1 er avril 2009
  • Contexte
    • En 1989, Mankiw et Weil, estimant que la consommation de logements diminuait régulièrement passé l’âge de 40 ans, prévoyaient un déclin imminent des prix de l’habitation aux É.-U. dû au vieillissement des baby-boomers.
    • Les années suivantes, de nombreuses études ont conclu qu’en fait, la consommation de logements ne diminue pas à partir de 40 ans, mais reste constante jusqu’à l’âge de 70 ans.
    • De plus, les facteurs les plus déterminants des prix de l’habitation sont les taux d’intérêt et le revenu réel par habitant, et non la démographie, comme l’a prouvé la bulle immobilière d’après 2000.
    • 20 ans plus tard, la population vieillit toujours et l’effet négatif de ce phénomène sur les prix de l’habitation est une question qui garde toute sa pertinence.
  • Objectif du projet
    • Ce projet vise à mesurer les incidences du vieillissement de la population sur les marchés de l’habitation du Canada et des provinces canadiennes.
    • Une recherche bibliographique internationale a révélé que les variations du revenu disponible et des taux d’intérêt (nominaux ou réels) sont toujours désignés comme les principaux déterminants des fluctuations du prix de l’habitation.
    • La démographie est souvent, mais non systématiquement, désignée comme un déterminant. Lorsque mentionnée, la démographie est mesurée de diverses manières : flux migratoires, croissance démographique, importance relative des générations, etc.
    • D’autres variables, comme la richesse des ménages, sont parfois significatives.
  • Le vieillissement dans les provinces canadiennes
    • La croissance démographique varie considérablement d’une province à l’autre.
    • Ces dernières années, la population de Terre-Neuve, des Maritimes et de la Saskatchewan a diminué ou est demeurée stable. En revanche, l’Alberta, la C.-B. dans les années 1990 et, jusqu’à tout récemment, l’Ontario ont connu une croissance démographique supérieure à la moyenne nationale.
    • La dénatalité des années 1960 a causé un vieillissement de la population, mais son taux varie d’une province à l’autre en raison des migrations interprovinciales.
    • Au cours des 25 prochaines années, les écarts continueront de s’accentuer entre les provinces au chapitre de l’âge médian : on prévoit que le vieillissement touchera davantage l’Est du Canada.
  • Ratio entre les 25 à 44 ans et les 65 ans et + Est et centre du Canada 1,5 2,0 2,5 3,0 3,5 4,0 4,5 5,0 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 Terre-Neuve Provinces de l’Atlantique Québec Ontario
  • Ratio entre les 25 à 44 ans et les 65 ans et + Canada et provinces de l’Ouest 1,5 2,0 2,5 3,0 3,5 4,0 4,5 5,0 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 Canada Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta Colombie-Britannique
  • L’approche financière du prix de l’habitation
    • L’approche financière du prix de l’habitation est fondée sur le rapport prix-loyer, un concept semblable au coefficient de capitalisation des bénéfices utilisé dans les modèles d’évaluation des titres boursiers.
    • La juste évaluation d’une habitation est la valeur actuelle (VA) du rendement escompté multipliée par un taux d’actualisation ajusté au risque.
    • Cette approche est très difficile à appliquer car elle comporte 3 inconnues : 1. le taux de croissance futur des loyers et du prix de l’habitation; 2. la prime de risque requise pour détenir du capital immobilier; 3. le loyer actuel des habitations de propriétaires-occupants.
    • À cause de ces obstacles, cette approche n’est pas applicable au Canada.
  • L’approche structurelle du prix de l’habitation
    • La demande de logements dépend des déterminants décrits précédemment : le revenu réel par habitant, la démographie (taille et/ou âge) et un indicateur des coûts pour les utilisateurs.
    • À court terme, le prix de l’habitation est une fonction de l’interaction entre la demande de logements et l’offre de logements hérités de la période précédente.
    • Les constructeurs d’habitations à but lucratif accélèrent (ou ralentissent) la construction lorsque le prix de l’habitation est supérieur (ou inférieur) au prix coûtant. Par conséquent, le prix de l’habitation gravite autour du coût minimum à long terme.
    • Étant donné que les courbes de l’offre à court et à long terme diffèrent, la dynamique occupe une place essentielle dans l’estimation.
  • Dynamique du prix de l’habitation Stock Courbe variable de l’offre à long terme Prix Courbe à court terme (fixe) de l’offre (dépend du stock de logements existants) Courbe de la demande initiale Courbe de la demande finale A C B La pente de la courbe varie en fonction des coûts à long terme (présence de facteurs de production non reproductibles)
  • Données nécessaires
    • Le modèle structurel porte sur la période 1980-2007, tandis que les projections portent sur la période 2008-2031.
    • Le prix des habitations est le prix moyen des transactions enregistré sur le réseau SIA. (Source : ACI)
    • Les taux d’intérêt, la population, l’IPC et le revenu personnel disponible sont tirés du CANSIM.
    • Les données sur le nombre d’unités de logement (stock de logements) sont tirées du CANSIM jusqu’en 2000. Pour la période de 2001 à 2007, le nombre d’unités a été calculé d’une manière se rapprochant des estimations antérieures de Statistique Canada.
    • Les données démographiques utilisées rendent compte de l’évolution du nombre de ménages plutôt que de celle de la population.
  • Évolution du stock Est et centre du Canada 0,00 0,01 0,02 0,03 0,04 0,05 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 Terre-Neuve Atlantique Québec Ontario
  • Évolution du stock Canada et provinces de l’Ouest 0,00 0,01 0,02 0,03 0,04 0,05 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 Canada Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta Colombie-Britannique
  • Prix réel de l’habitation Est et centre du Canada 100 000 200 000 300 000 400 000 80 85 90 95 00 05 Terre-Neuve Atlantique Québec Ontario
  • Prix réel de l’habitation Canada et provinces de l’Ouest 100 000 200 000 300 000 400 000 80 85 90 95 00 05 Canada Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta Colombie-Britannique
    • Comme aucune estimation annuelle du nombre de ménages n’est publiée, le nombre de ménages est estimé à l’aide des données de recensement.
    • Le taux de chef de ménage par groupe d’âge est le rapport entre le nombre de ménages dont le chef est une personne d’un certain groupe d’âge et la population de ce groupe d’âge.
    • Le taux global de chef de ménage est l’inverse de la taille moyenne des ménages.
    • Dans les 25 dernières années, on observe une diminution du taux de chef de ménage chez les moins de 45 ans et une autre, encore plus accentuée, chez les moins 30 ans. Par contre, ce taux augmente régulièrement chez les plus de 50 ans. Ces tendances se sont atténuées dernièrement.
    Évolution du taux de chef de ménage par groupe d’âge
  • 15-19 25-29 35-39 45-49 55-59 65-69 75+ 1981 2001 0 % 10 % 20 % 30 % 40 % 50 % 60 % 70 % Taux de chef de ménage par groupe d’âge au Canada 1981 1986 1991 1996 2001 2006
  • Taux de chef de ménage par groupe d’âge et par province
    • Les taux de chef de ménage les plus élevés chez les moins de 30 ans sont relevés en Saskatchewan et au Québec, mais les Québécois entre 35 et 70 ans ont le taux de chef le ménage le plus élevé. Cela pourrait être dû à une proportion plus élevée de ménages non familiaux.
    • À l’opposé, les taux de chef de ménage les plus bas par groupe d’âge sont relevés à Terre-Neuve, en Ontario et en C.-B.
    • Le taux de chef de ménage chez les aînés de plus de 75 ans diminue au Québec et à Terre-Neuve, tandis qu’il augmente encore avec l’âge dans toutes les autres provinces.
  • 15-19 25-29 35-39 45-49 55-59 65-69 75+ T.-N. Qc Man. Alb. Can. 0,0 % 10,0 % 20,0 % 30,0 % 40,0 % 50,0 % 60,0 % 70,0 % Taux de chef de ménage par groupe d’âge et par province en 2007 T.-N. Atl. Qc Ont. Man. Sask. Alb. C.-B. Can.
    • Comme le taux de chef de ménage augmente avec l’âge, il tend à augmenter dans une population vieillissante, même si le taux par groupe d’âge demeure stable.
    • Le vieillissement explique en grande partie la tendance à la hausse du taux global de chef de ménage au Canada, mais aussi en partie l’évolution du taux par groupe d’âge.
    • La tendance est plus marquée dans l’Est du Canada parce que sa population vieillit plus rapidement que dans l’Ouest. Terre-Neuve connaît la croissance la plus rapide du taux de chef de ménage.
    • Depuis 1991, le Québec a le taux global de chef de ménage le plus élevé. Mais, même si la population du Québec vieillit plus vite que celle du reste du Canada, on observe que le Québec conserve le taux le plus élevé par groupe d’âge.
    Évolution historique du taux de chef de ménage
  • Taux de chef de ménage centre et Est du Canada 20 % 22 % 24 % 26 % 28 % 30 % 32 % 34 % 36 % 38 % 40 % 1981 1986 1991 1996 2001 2006 Can. T.-N. Atl. Qc Ont.
  • Taux de chef de ménage Ouest du Canada 20 % 22 % 24 % 26 % 28 % 30 % 32 % 34 % 36 % 38 % 40 % 1981 1986 1991 1996 2001 2006 Man. Sask. Alb. C.-B.
  • Méthode d’estimation du nombre de ménages
    • 1. Le taux de chef de ménage par groupe d’âge de chaque province a été calculé par interpolation linéaire entre les recensements. P. ex., si le taux est de 20 % en 1981 et de 21 % en 1986, il augmente annuellement de 0,2 % entre les deux recensements.
    • 2. La population d’un groupe d’âge donné et d’une année donnée est multipliée par le taux de chef de ménage de ce groupe d’âge pour obtenir le nombre de ménages dans le groupe d’âge. La somme des ménages de tous les groupes d’âges correspond au nombre total de ménages.
    • 3. Pour projeter le nombre de ménages après 2006, la variation annuelle moyenne entre 1986 et 2006 (une période de 20 ans) du taux de chef de ménage par groupe d’âge est extrapolé linéairement pour les années subséquentes.
  • Le nombre de ménages excède le nombre de logements
    • En 2007, le nombre de ménages dépassait de 14 % le stock de logements (5 % en 81-82), et cet excédent variait beaucoup d’une province à l’autre. Un Point en recherche de la SCHL (série socio-économique 08-004) explique la tendance temporelle essentiellement par la popularité des résidences secondaires chez les baby-boomers.
    • Terre-Neuve et la Saskatchewan présentent les excédents les plus élevés (près de 20 %) et l’Alberta, le plus faible excédent (9 %).
    • Dans les provinces où la population vieillit davantage, la croissance plus lente de la population tire le prix des habitations vers le bas. Mais, par ailleurs, le rapport entre le stock de logements et le nombre de ménages est plus élevé.
  • Excédent des logements par rapport au nombre de ménages 0,00 0,05 0,10 0,15 0,20 0,25 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 Terre-Neuve Atlantique Québec Ontario
  • Excédent des logements par rapport au nombre de ménages 0,00 0,05 0,10 0,15 0,20 0,25 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta Colombie-Britannique
  • Description générale du modèle
    • Le modèle comprend 2 équations estimées simultanément pour 8 modèles provinciaux, soit un total de 16 équations.
    • Le modèle est conçu pour traiter différemment les ajustements à court terme et à long terme du stock et du prix.
    • Le modèle permet une rétroaction dynamique entre le prix et le stock.
    • Le ratio décalé du stock de logements/nombre de ménages a un impact négatif sur le prix. D’autre part, le prix actuel a un impact positif sur le stock de logements.
    • Les résultats confirment le rôle central du taux d’intérêt nominal et du revenu réel sur le prix des logements.
  • Coefficients provinciaux
    • À quelques exceptions près, le marché de l’habitation fonctionne de la même manière dans toutes les provinces.
    • La principale exception est le terme LOG(STO(-1))/HOU(-1)), qui varie dans l’équation du prix et le terme D(LOG(HOU)), qui est deux fois plus élevé dans l’équation de la construction en C.-B. et de presque zéro dans la région de l’Atlantique.
    • Le stock réagit au prix des habitations. Tout changement dans le stock amène une réaction graduelle du prix, car le rapport entre le stock de logements et le nombre de ménages change à son tour.
  • Hausse continue de 1 % du taux d'intérêt -8,00 % -7,00 % -6,00 % -5,00 % -4,00 % -3,00 % -2,00 % -1,00 % 0,00 % 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020 Pt ΔSt
  • Hausse continue de 1 % du revenu des ménages 0,00 % 0,50 % 1,00 % 1,50 % 2,00 % 2,50 % 3,00 % 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020 Pt ΔSt
  • L’incidence de la démographie
    • La démographie intervient à deux endroits.
    • La variation actuelle du nombre de ménages a une incidence sur la variation du stock de logements. Une hausse de 1 % du taux de croissance du nombre de ménages induit une hausse de 0,293 % du stock de logements la même année. La hausse est de 0,527 en C.-B. mais de seulement 0,029 dans la région de l’Atlantique.
    • La démographie intervient également en ce sens que le rapport décalé entre le nombre de logements et le nombre de ménages a un effet négatif sur le prix des habitations.
  • Hausse continue de 1 % du nombre de ménages 0,00 % 0,50 % 1,00 % 1,50 % 2,00 % 2,50 % 3,00 % 3,50 % 4,00 % 4,50 % 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020 Pt St
  • Projections de la population et des ménages
    • StatCan publie 13 scénarios démographiques selon trois hypothèses : croissance faible, moyenne et élevée. Chaque scénario diffère en fonction de la combinaison des tendances des migrations interprovinciales ou internationales et de la fécondité (faible ou élevée).
    • Pour la simulation, les scénarios 1 (faible croissance), 3 (fécondité et migration moyennes) et 6 (croissance élevée) ont été retenus.
    • Comme la population réelle est connue jusqu’en 2007 alors que les projections commencent à l’année 2006, chaque projection a été multipliée par le rapport entre la population de 2007 et la projection de 2007. Cet ajustement a été apporté à tous les groupes d’âge (15-19, 20-24, etc.) et à toutes les provinces.
    • Le nombre de ménages a été obtenu à partir de la population de chaque province et groupe d’âge a été transformée en en la multipliant par le taux de chef de ménage du groupe d’âge correspondant.
  • Autres hypothèses économiques
    • On suppose que le taux de croissance annuel du revenu réel par ménage est demeuré égal à la moyenne entre 1981 et 2007, soit 0,509 %.
    • On a estimé que le taux d’intérêt nominal était le même que le taux hypothécaire fixe de 5 ans, soit 7,07 %.
    • Seules ces hypothèses de base sont présentées ici. Cependant, les projections sont conçues de manière à ce que l’utilisateur puisse modifier les hypothèses sous-jacentes aux projections.
  • Croissance projetée du nombre de ménages -0.010 -0.005 0.000 0.005 0.010 0.015 0.020 08 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 Terre-Neuve Maritimes Québec Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta Colombie-Britannique
  • Nombre de ménages et d’unités de logement 11 000 000 12 000 000 13 000 000 14 000 000 15 000 000 16 000 000 17 000 000 08 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 Stock (croiss. faible) Stock (croiss. moyenne) Stock (croiss. forte) Ménages (croiss. faible) Ménages (croiss. moyenne) Ménages (croiss. forte)
  • Projection du prix moyen des habitations au Canada 200 000 250 000 300 000 350 000 400 000 450 000 500 000 08 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 Croissance faible Croissance moyenne Croissance forte
  • Projections du prix des habitations dans les provinces (scénario 2) 100 000 200 000 300 000 400 000 500 000 600 000 700 000 08 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 Terre-Neuve Maritimes Québec Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta Colombie-Britannique
  • Conclusion
    • Le vieillissement n’affectera pas le prix des habitations de manière importante avant 2020. Même alors, le prix réel des habitations atteindra probablement un plateau dans la deuxième moitié de la décennie 2020, lorsque le nombre de ménages aura cessé d’augmenter. Selon le scénario, le prix réel des habitations devrait se situer entre 380 000 $ et 450 000 $ en 2027.
    • Le modèle prédit un écart grandissant entre le stock de logements et le nombre de ménages durant les années 2020, selon un scénario semblable à la situation observée dans les provinces de l’Atlantique depuis 20 ans.
    • Voilà pourquoi le stock de logements devrait continuer de croître même après que le nombre de ménages aura plafonné.
  • Conclusion (suite)
    • À l’échelle régionale, la Colombie-Britannique et l’Alberta seront les provinces où le logement sera le plus cher; avec son fort taux de croissance, l’Alberta pourrait être la province affichant le prix moyen le plus élevé.
    • Le prix moyen en Ontario demeurera supérieur à la moyenne canadienne, tandis que toutes les autres provinces devraient afficher un prix moyen de l’habitation inférieur à la moyenne nationale.
    • Les prix suivront une tendance similaire au Québec, au Manitoba et en Saskatchewan, tandis que les provinces de l’Atlantique devraient encore afficher les prix les plus bas.