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Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
Our literate environment
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Our literate environment

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There are certain things that make learning to read becoming and literate better for our students. Look at the slide show to learn what some of them are.

There are certain things that make learning to read becoming and literate better for our students. Look at the slide show to learn what some of them are.

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  • The Elements of a Learning Environment Should Include:
  • Transcript

    • 1. WHAT DOES A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT LOOK LIKE?
      A good variety of Books
      Fully engaged , Happy students
      Fully Engaged and Happy Teacher
      Many and Varied
      Opportunities to Learn
      Parent Participation
    • 2. The Elements of a LiterateEnvironment
      KNOWING OUR LITERACY LEARNERS
      SELECTING TEXTS
      PERSPECTIVES
      INTERACTIVE
      CRITICAL
      RESPONSE
    • 3. Assessment
      Non Cognitive
      Observation in pairs activities, small and large group
      Attitude
      Motivation
      Conversation
      Behaviors during reading (following along with the finger, fidgeting, nervousness…)
      Cognitive
      Reading skills
      Vocabulary
      Phonemic Awareness
      Phonics
      Fluency
      Comprehension
      Writing
    • 4. Reading Readiness Activities
      Dr. Donald Bear suggests:
      Teach a ditty:
      Sam, Sam the baker man, washed his face in a frying pan. (or one like it).
      Memorize it
      Students follow along and read words as teachers repeats it
      Students show that they know where they are!
      (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010)
      Success in this activity indicates that the student is ready to progress.
    • 5. Selecting Texts
      Literacy Matrix
      Dr. Douglas Hartman taught us to chart text characteristics and compare students abilities to the text characteristics.
      I can chart characteristics of books-
      In a continuum that shows:
      Linguistic (word oriented) to Semiotic (Picture oriented)
      Narrative (story) – Informational (Subject Text)
      Difficulty level
      (Laureate Education, Inc. 2010).
    • 6. LITERACY PERSPECTIVES
    • 7. INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE
      Characteristics of the Interactive Perspective Include:
      Age and ability of the students
      Working on word skills
      Vocabulary
      Spelling
      Phonics
      Sight Words – Word Bank/ Word Wall
    • 8. Other Interactive Activities:
      Read Aloud
      Shared Reading
      Emphasis on the Five Pillars
      Teacher Models reading behaviors
      Emphasis on words
      Emphasis on sentence making sense
    • 9. Shared Reading
      Word plays
      Alphabet Books
      Predictable Texts
      Rhymes
      Good Reader Behaviors
      Activate Prior Knowledge
      Review Cover
      Make Predictions based on the title of the book
      Dr. Katherine Stahl, (Laureate Education Inc., 2010).
    • 10. CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE
    • 11. Critical Perspective
      Ask Questions –
      Who created the text?
      What perspective might the author have?
      Was the author male or female?
      What is the race, ethnicity or social status of the author?
    • 12. RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE
      METHODS OF RESPONDING TO TEXT
      Journaling
      Dramatic Response
      Artistic Response
      Multi sensory Response
      Provide quiet time to respond.
      Use multisensory experiences.
      Dr. Janice Almasi (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010)
    • 13. Change the approach to change the perspective!
      Consider our students when choosing a perspective to focus on.
    • 14. MY GOALS
      MY GOAL FOR MY STUDENTS IS THAT THEY WILL:
      * Develop the ability to use reading and writing for enjoyment and to learn and remember information.
      *SEE THEMSELVES AS SUCCESSFUL LIFELONG LEARNERS AND READERS

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