Interpersonal Self-disclose and Feedback

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Interpersonal Self-disclose and Feedback

  1. 1. Interpersonal Self-Disclosure and Feedback
  2. 2. <ul><li>Self-disclosure </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing biographical data, personal ideas and feelings that are unknown to the other person </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal and physical responses to people and/or their messages </li></ul>
  3. 3. Appropriate Self-disclosure <ul><li>Self-disclose the kind of information you want others to disclose to you. </li></ul><ul><li>Self-disclose more intimate information only when you believe the disclosure represents an acceptable risk. </li></ul><ul><li>Move self-disclosure to deeper levels gradually. </li></ul><ul><li>Reserve intimate or very personal self-disclosure for ongoing relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Continue intimate self-disclosure only if it is reciprocated. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Reciprocal self-disclosure has the greatest positive effects.
  5. 5. Women tend to engage in “rapport talk” to share experiences and establish bonds. Microsoft Photo
  6. 6. Men tend to engage in “report talk” to share information, negotiate, and preserve independence. Microsoft Photo
  7. 7. <ul><li>Masking Feelings </li></ul><ul><li>Concealing verbal or nonverbal cues that would enable others to understand how a person is feeling </li></ul><ul><li>Displaying Feelings </li></ul><ul><li>Expressing feelings through facial reactions, body responses, or paralinguistic reactions </li></ul>
  8. 8. Describing Feelings <ul><li>Describing feelings is the skill of naming the emotions you are feeling without judging them </li></ul><ul><li>Increases the likelihood of having a positive interaction and decreases the chances of creating defensiveness </li></ul><ul><li>BUT…many people don’t describe their feelings regularly. Why? </li></ul>
  9. 9. Why Don’t We Describe Feelings? <ul><li>People believe that when they say “I feel” they are evaluating others. </li></ul><ul><li>No active vocabulary for describing feelings </li></ul><ul><li>Afraid that describing feelings makes you vulnerable </li></ul><ul><li>Afraid that if you describe your feelings you will be judged </li></ul><ul><li>Afraid to harm relationship </li></ul><ul><li>Some cultures encourage members to mask their feelings </li></ul>
  10. 10. Personal Feedback Praise Highlights positive behaviors and accomplishments Constructive Criticism Identifies negative harmful behaviors
  11. 11. Giving Constructive Criticism <ul><li>Describe the behavior by accurately recounting precisely what was said or done, without labeling the behavior good or bad, right or wrong. </li></ul><ul><li>Preface a negative statement with a positive one whenever possible. </li></ul><ul><li>Be as specific as possible. </li></ul><ul><li>When appropriate, suggest how the person can change the behavior. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Asking for Criticism <ul><li>Think of criticism as being in your best interest. </li></ul><ul><li>Before you ask, make sure that you are ready for an honest response. </li></ul><ul><li>If you take the initiative to ask for criticism, you will avoid surprises. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Guidelines to Improve Feedback <ul><li>Specify the kind of criticism you are seeking. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to avoid negative verbal or nonverbal reactions to the criticism. </li></ul><ul><li>Paraphrase what you hear. </li></ul><ul><li>Give reinforcement to those who take your requests for criticism as honest requests. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Describe how a person can know that trusting another person with confidential information is appropriate?

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