Copyright © 2008, 1997, 1984, 1973, 1963, 1950, 1941, 1934 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Manufac...
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22-1
Section 22
Waste Management*
Louis Theodore, Eng.Sc.D. Professor of Chemical Engineering, Manhattan College;
Member, ...
Cooling Water Intake Regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17
Water Reuse . . . . . . . . ...
WASTE MANAGEMENT 22-3
3P Pollution prevention pays
ABS Alkyl benzene sulfonate
ACC Annualized capital costs
BACT Best avai...
GENERAL REFERENCES
1. United States EPA, Pollution Prevention Fact Sheet, Washington, DC,
March 1991.
2. Keoleian, G., and...
1990 expanded the program even more to the control of sulfur
oxides under Title IV. In effect, a commodities market on “cl...
UNITED STATES AIR QUALITY LEGISLATION
AND REGULATIONS
Although considerable federal legislation dealing with air pollution...
INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW 22-7
TABLE 22-2 New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) from 40 C...
22-8 WASTE MANAGEMENT
NAAQS. Continuous monitoring is also required for other CAA pol-
lutants for which the EPA or the st...
INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW 22-9
an enforcement order to achieve such compliance; (3) the app...
22-10 WASTE MANAGEMENT
changes to many aspects of the existing CAAA. The concepts of
NAAQS, NSPS, and PSD remain virtually...
INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW 22-11
CAS no. HAP
75070 Acetaldehyde
60355 Acetamide
75058 Aceton...
affected equipment, and detailed records must be maintained. Table
22-11 identifies common ODS compounds.
Regulatory Direc...
INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW 22-13
40 CFR 63 MACT Standard
Subpart F National Emission Standar...
22-14 WASTE MANAGEMENT
In 1965 the Water Quality Act established a new trend in water pollu-
tion control. It provided tha...
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22 waste management

  1. 1. Copyright © 2008, 1997, 1984, 1973, 1963, 1950, 1941, 1934 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Manufactured in the United States of America. Except as permitted under the United States Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher. 0-07-154229-9 The material in this eBook also appears in the print version of this title: 0-07-151145-8. All trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners. Rather than put a trademark symbol after every occurrence of a trademarked name, we use names in an editorial fashion only, and to the benefit of the trademark owner, with no intention of infringement of the trademark. Where such designations appear in this book, they have been printed with initial caps. McGraw-Hill eBooks are available at special quantity discounts to use as premiums and sales promotions, or for use in corporate training programs. For more information, please contact George Hoare, Special Sales, at george_hoare@mcgraw-hill.com or (212) 904-4069. TERMS OF USE This is a copyrighted work and The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. (“McGraw-Hill”) and its licensors reserve all rights in and to the work. Use of this work is subject to these terms. Except as permitted under the Copyright Act of 1976 and the right to store and retrieve one copy of the work, you may not decompile, disassemble, reverse engineer, reproduce, modify, create derivative works based upon, transmit, distribute, disseminate, sell, publish or sublicense the work or any part of it without McGraw-Hill’s prior consent. You may use the work for your own noncommercial and personal use; any other use of the work is strictly prohibited. Your right to use the work may be terminated if you fail to comply with these terms. THE WORK IS PROVIDED “AS IS.” McGRAW-HILL AND ITS LICENSORS MAKE NO GUARANTEES OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE ACCURACY, ADEQUACY OR COMPLETENESS OF OR RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED FROM USING THE WORK, INCLUDING ANY INFORMATION THAT CAN BE ACCESSED THROUGH THE WORK VIA HYPERLINK OR OTHERWISE, AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. McGraw-Hill and its licensors do not warrant or guarantee that the functions contained in the work will meet your requirements or that its operation will be uninterrupted or error free. Neither McGraw-Hill nor its licensors shall be liable to you or anyone else for any inaccuracy, error or omission, regardless of cause, in the work or for any damages resulting therefrom. McGraw-Hill has no responsibility for the content of any information accessed through the work. Under no circumstances shall McGraw-Hill and/or its licensors be liable for any indirect, incidental, special, punitive, consequential or similar damages that result from the use of or inability to use the work, even if any of them has been advised of the possibility of such damages. This limitation of liability shall apply to any claim or cause whatsoever whether such claim or cause arises in contract, tort or otherwise. DOI: 10.1036/0071511458
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  3. 3. 22-1 Section 22 Waste Management* Louis Theodore, Eng.Sc.D. Professor of Chemical Engineering, Manhattan College; Member, Air and Waste Management Association (Section Editor, Pollution Prevention) Kenneth N. Weiss, P.E., Diplomate AAEE Partner and North American Director of Compliance Assurance, ERM; Member, Air and Waste Management Association (Introduction to Waste Management and Regulatory Overview) John D. McKenna, Ph.D. President and Chairman, ETS International, Inc.; Member, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Air and Waste Management Association (Air-Pollution Management of Stationary Sources) (Francis) Lee Smith, Ph.D., M.Eng. Principal, Wilcrest Consulting Associates, Houston, Texas; Member, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Society of American Value Engineers, Water Environment Federation, Air and Waste Management Association (Biological APC Tech- nologies, Estimating Henry’s Law Constants) Robert R. Sharp, Ph.D., P.E. Professor of Environmental Engineering, Manhattan Col- lege; Environmental Consultant; Member, American Water Works Association; Water Environ- ment Federation Section Director (Wastewater Management) Joseph J. Santoleri, P.E. Senior Consultant, RMT Inc. & Santoleri Associates; Member, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Research Committee on Industrial and Municipal Waste), Air and Waste Management Association (Solid Waste Management) Thomas F. McGowan, P.E. President, TMTS Associates; Member, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Air and Waste Management Association (Solid Waste Management) INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW Multimedia Approach to Environmental Regulations in the United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-4 Plant Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-5 Corporate Strategic Planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-5 United States Air Quality Legislation and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-6 Clean Air Act of 1970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-6 Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-6 Nonattainment (NA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-8 Controlled-Trading Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-9 Clean Air Act of 1990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-9 Regulatory Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-12 United States Water Quality Legislation and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . 22-12 Federal Water Pollution Control Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-12 Source-Based Effluent Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-14 Clean Water Act of 1977 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-15 Control of Toxic Pollutants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-15 1987 CWA Amendments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-15 Biological Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-15 Metal Bioavailability and Toxicity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-16 Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-16 Water Quality Trading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-16 Bioterrorism Act of 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17 *The contributions of Dr. Anthony J. Buonicore to material from the seventh edition of this handbook are acknowledged. Copyright © 2008, 1997, 1984, 1973, 1963, 1950, 1941, 1934 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.
  4. 4. Cooling Water Intake Regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17 Water Reuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17 Regulatory Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17 United States Solid Waste Legislation and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17 Rivers and Harbors Act, 1899 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17 Solid Waste Disposal Act, 1965 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17 National Environmental Policy Act, 1969 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17 Resource Recovery Act, 1970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, 1976 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-17 Toxic Substances Control Act, 1976 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-18 Regulatory Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-18 POLLUTION PREVENTION Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-19 Pollution-Prevention Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-20 Multimedia Analysis and Life-Cycle Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-21 Multimedia Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-21 Life-Cycle Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-21 Pollution-Prevention Assessment Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-22 Planning and Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-22 Assessment Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-22 Feasibility Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-22 Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-23 Sources of Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-23 Industry Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-23 Assessment Phase: Material Balance Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-23 Barriers and Incentives to Pollution Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-24 Barriers to Pollution Prevention (“The Dirty Dozen”) . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-24 Pollution-Prevention Incentives (“A Baker’s Dozen”) . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-24 Economic Considerations Associated with Pollution-Prevention Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-25 Pollution Prevention at the Domestic and Office Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-26 Ethical Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-27 Future Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-27 AIR-POLLUTION MANAGEMENT OF STATIONARY SOURCES Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-28 Gaseous Pollutants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-28 Particulate Pollutants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-29 Estimating Emissions from Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-31 Effects of Air Pollutants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-31 A Source-Control-Problem Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-35 Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-35 Factors in Control-Equipment Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-36 Dispersion From Stacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-37 Preliminary Design Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-37 Design Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-39 Miscellaneous Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-40 Control of Gaseous Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-41 Absorption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-41 Adsorption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-42 Combustion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-44 Condensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-47 Biological APC Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-48 Membrane Filtration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-51 Source Control of Particulate Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-53 Emissions Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-54 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-54 Sampling Methodology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-55 INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-58 United States Legislation, Regulations, and Government Agencies . . . . . 22-58 Federal Legislation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-58 Environmental Protection Agency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-60 State Water-Pollution-Control Offices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-60 Wastewater Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-60 Priority Pollutants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-60 Organics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-60 Inorganics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-62 pH and Alkalinity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-62 Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-62 Dissolved Oxygen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-62 Solids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-62 Nutrients and Eutrophication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-62 Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-63 Oil and Grease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-63 Wastewater Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-63 Pretreatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-63 Equalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-63 Neutralization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-63 Grease and Oil Removal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-64 Toxic Substances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-64 Primary Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-64 Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-64 Grit Chambers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-64 Gravity Sedimentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-64 Chemical Precipitation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-65 Secondary Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-65 Design of Biological Treatment Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-66 Reactor Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-67 Determination of Kinetic and Stoichiometric Pseudo Constants. . . . . 22-68 Activated Sludge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-69 Lagoons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-72 Fixed-Film Reactor Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-74 Trickling Filters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-74 Rotating Biological Contactors (RBCs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-74 Packed-Bed Fixed-Film Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-74 Biological Fluidized Beds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-75 Physical-Chemical Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-76 Adsorption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-76 Ion Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-77 Stripping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-77 Chemical Oxidation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-77 Advanced Oxidation Processes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-77 Membrane Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-78 Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-78 Industrial Reuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-78 Sludge Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-78 Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-78 Concentration: Thickening and Flotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-79 Stabilization (Anaerobic Digestion, Aerobic Digestion, High Lime Treatment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-79 Sludge Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-80 Incineration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-80 Sanitary Landfills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-80 Beneficial Reuse of Biosolids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-80 MANAGEMENT OF SOLID WASTES Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-81 Functional Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-81 United States Legislation, Regulations, and Government Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-82 Generation of Solid Wastes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-82 Types of Solid Waste. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-82 Hazardous Wastes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-83 Sources of Industrial Wastes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-84 Properties of Solid Wastes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-84 Quantities of Solid Wastes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-86 On-Site Handling, Storage, and Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-88 On-Site Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-89 On-Site Storage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-89 On-Site Processing of Solid Wastes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-90 Processing and Resource Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-90 Processing Techniques for Solid Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-90 Processing of Hazardous Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-91 Materials-Recovery Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-92 Recovery of Biological Conversion Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-92 Thermal Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-92 Concentration of WTE Incinerators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-96 Regulations Applicable to Municipal Waste Combustors . . . . . . . . . . . 22-96 Ultimate Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-98 Landfilling of Solid Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-98 Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-106 22-2 WASTE MANAGEMENT
  5. 5. WASTE MANAGEMENT 22-3 3P Pollution prevention pays ABS Alkyl benzene sulfonate ACC Annualized capital costs BACT Best available control technology BAT Best available technology BCOD Biodegradable chemical oxygen demand BCT Best conventional technology BOD Biochemical oxygen demand BSRT Biomass solids retention time BTEX Benzene, toluene, xylene CAA Clean Air Act CAAA Clean Air Act Amendments CCP Comprehensive costing procedures CFR Code of federal regulations CKD Cement kiln dust COD Chemical oxygen demand CPI Chemical process industries CRF Capital recovery factor CTDMPLUS Complex terrain dispersion model plus algorithms for unstable situations CWRT Center for Waste Reduction Technologies DCF Direct installation cost factor DO Dissolved oxygen DRE Destruction and removal efficiency EBCT Empty bed contact time EMAS Eco-management and audit scheme EMS Environmental management system EPA Environmental Protection Agency FML Flexible membrane liner GAX Granular activated carbon HAPS Hazardous air pollutants HAZWOPER Hazardous waste operators HCS Hauled-container systems HRT Reactor hydraulic retention time HSWA Hazardous and Solid Waste Act I-TEF International toxic equivalency factor ICF Indirect installation cost factor ISO International Organization for Standardization LCA Life cycle assessment LCC Life cycle costing LOX Liquid oxygen MACT Maximum achievable control technology MSDA Material safety data sheets MSW Municipal solid waste MWC Municipal waste combustors MWI Medical waste incinerators NBOD Nitrogenous biochemical oxygen demand NIMBY Not in my back yard NPDES National pollutant discharge elimination system NSPS New source performance standards PCB Polychlorinated biphenyl PIES Pollution prevention information exchange systems PM Particulate matter POTW Publicly owned treatment work PPIC Pollution prevention information clearinghouse PSD Prevention of significant deterioration RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act RDF Refuse-derived fuel SARA Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act SCR Selective catalytic reduction SCS Stationary-container systems SE Strength of the treated waste SMART Save money and reduce toxics SO Strength of the untreated waste SS Suspended solids TCC Total capital cost TCP Traditional costing procedures TGNMO Total gas nonmethane organics TOC Total organic carbon TSA Total systems approach TSCA Toxic Substances Control Act TSD Treatment, storage, and disposal UASB Upflow anerobic sludge blanket VOC Volatile organic compound VOST Volatile organic sampling train VSS Volatile suspended solids WRAP Waste reduction always pays WTE Waste-to-energy (systems) List of Abbreviations Abbreviation Definition Abbreviation Definition
  6. 6. GENERAL REFERENCES 1. United States EPA, Pollution Prevention Fact Sheet, Washington, DC, March 1991. 2. Keoleian, G., and D. Menerey, “Sustainable Development by Design: Review of Life Cycle Design and Related Approaches,” Air & Waste, 44, May 1994. 3. Theodore, L. Personal notes. 4. Dupont, R., L. Theodore, and K. Ganesan, Pollution Prevention: The Waste Management Approach for the 21st Century, Lewis Publishers, 2000. 5. World Wildlife Fund, Getting at the Source, 1991, p. 7. 6. United States EPA, 1987 National Biennial RCRA Hazardous Waste Report—Executive Summary, Washington, DC, GPO, 1991, p. 10. 7. ASTM, Philadelphia, PA. 8. Theodore, L., and R. Allen, Pollution Prevention: An ETS Theodore Tutor- ial, Roanoke, VA, ETS International, Inc., 1993. 9. United States EPA, The EPA Manual for Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessments, Cincinnati, OH, August 1988. 10. Santoleri, J., J. Reynolds, and L. Theodore, Introduction to Hazardous Waste Incineration, 2d ed., Wiley, 2000. 11. ICF Technology Incorporated, New York State Waste Reduction Guidance Manual, Alexandria, VA, 1989. 12. Details available from L. Theodore. 13. Neveril, R. B., Capital and Operating Costs of Selected Air Pollution Control Systems, EPA Report 450/5-80-002, Gard, Inc., Niles, IL, December 1978. 14. Vatavuk, W. M., and R. B. Neveril, “Factors for Estimating Capital and Operating Costs,” Chemical Engineering, November 3, 1980, pp. 157–162. 15. Vogel, G. A., and E. J. Martin, “Hazardous Waste Incineration,” Chemical Engineering, September 5, 1983, pp. 143–146 (part 1). 16. Vogel, G. A., and E. J. Martin, “Hazardous Waste Incineration,” Chemical Engineering, October 17, 1983, pp. 75–78 (part 2). 17. Vogel, G. A., and E. J. Martin, “Estimating Capital Costs of Facility Com- ponents,” Chemical Engineering, November 28, 1983, pp. 87–90. 18. Ulrich, G. D., A Guide to Chemical Engineering Process Design and Eco- nomics, Wiley-Interscience, New York, 1984. 19. California Department of Health Services, Economic Implications of Waste Reduction, Recycling, Treatment, and Disposal of Hazardous Wastes: The Fourth Biennial Report, California, 1988, p. 110. 20. Wilcox, J., and L. Theodore, Engineering and Environmental Ethics, Wiley, 1998. 21. Varga, A., On Being Human, Paulist Press, New York, 1978. 22. Theodore, L., “Dissolve the USEPA . . . Now,” Environmental Manager (AWMA publication), vol. 1, November 1995. 23. Theodore, L., and R. Kunz, Nanotechnology: Environmental Implications and Solutions, Wiley, 2005. 24. Yang, Y., and E. R. Allen, “Biofiltration Control of Hydrogen Sulfide. 2. Kinet- ics, Biofilter Performance, and Maintenance,” JAWA, vol. 44, p. 1315. 25. Mycock, J., and J. McKenna, Handbook of Air Pollution Control and Tech- nology, ETS, Inc., chap. 21. 26. Ottengraf, S. P. P., “Biological Systems for Waste Gas Elimination,” 1987. 27. Hubert, F. L., “Consider Membrane Pervaporation,” Chemical Engineering Progress, July 1992, p. 46. 28. Caruana, Claudia M., “Membranes Vie for Pollution Cleanup Role,” Chem- ical Engineering Progress, October 1993, p. 11. 29. Winston, W. S., and Kamalesh K. Sirkar, Membrane Handbook, Van Nos- trand Reinhold, NY, 1992, p. 78. 30. Tabak et al., “Biodegradability Studies with Organic Priority Pollutant Com- pounds,” USEPA, MERL, Cincinnati, Ohio, April 1980. 31. Levin, M. A., and M. A. Gealt, Biotreatment of Industrial and Hazardous Waste, McGraw-Hill Inc., 1993. 32. Sutton, P. M., and P. N. Mishra, “Biological Fluidized Beds for Water and Wastewater Treatment: A State-of-the-Art Review,” WPCF Conference, October 1990. 33. Envirex equipment bulletin FB. 200-R2 and private communication, Waukesha, WI, 1994. 34. Donavan, E. J., Jr., “Evaluation of Three Anaerobic Biological Systems Using Paper Mill Foul Condensate,” HydroQual, Inc., EPA, IERL contract 68-03-3074. 35. Mueller, J. A., K. Subburama, and E. J. Donavan, Proc. 39th Ind. Waste Conf., 599, Ann Arbor, 1984. 36. ASME Research Committee on Industrial and Municipal Waste—Keeping Society’s Options Open—MWCs, A Case Study on Environmental Regulation. 37. Chartwell Information, EBI, Inc., San Diego, June 2004. 38. Wilson, D. G. (ed.), Handbook of Solid Waste Management, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1997. 39. Wastes: Engineering Principles and Management Issues, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1977. 40. Montenay Montgomery LP, 2001. In this section, a number of references are made to laws and proce- dures that have been formulated in the United States with respect to waste management. An engineer handling waste-management prob- lems in another country would well be advised to know the specific laws and regulations of that country. Nevertheless, the treatment given here is believed to be useful as a general guide. MULTIMEDIA APPROACH TO ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES Among the most complex problems to be faced by industry during the 1990s is the proper control and use of the natural environment. In the 1970s the engineering profession became acutely aware of its respon- sibility to society, particularly for the protection of public health and welfare. The decade saw the formation and rapid growth of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the passage of federal and state laws governing virtually every aspect of the environment. The end of the decade, however, brought a realization that only the more simplistic problems had been addressed. A limited number of large sources had removed substantial percentages of a few readily definable air pollutants from their emissions. The incremental costs to improve the removal percentages would be significant and would involve increasing numbers of smaller sources, and the health hazards of a host of additional toxic pollutants remained to be quantified and control techniques developed. Moreover, in the 1970s, air, water, and waste were treated as sepa- rate problem areas to be governed by their own statutes and regula- tions. Toward the latter part of the decade, however, it became obvious that environmental problems were closely interwoven and should be treated in concert. The traditional type of regulation— command and control—had severely restricted compliance options. The 1980s began with EPA efforts redirected to take advantage of the case-specific knowledge, technical expertise, and imagination of those being regulated. Providing plant engineers with an incen- tive to find more efficient ways of abating pollution would greatly stimulate innovation in control technology. This is a principal objec- tive, for example, of EPA’s “controlled trading” air pollution pro- gram, established in the Offsets Policy Interpretative Ruling issued by the EPA in 1976, with statutory foundation given by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977. The Clean Air Act Amendments of INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW 22-4
  7. 7. 1990 expanded the program even more to the control of sulfur oxides under Title IV. In effect, a commodities market on “clean air” was developed. The rapidly expanding body of federal regulation presents an awe- some challenge to traditional practices of corporate decision-making, management, and long-range planning. Those responsible for new plants must take stock of the emerging requirements and construct a fresh approach. The full impact of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Resource Conser- vation and Recovery Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Respon- sibility, Compensation and Liability (Superfund) Act, and the Toxic Substances Control Act is still not generally appreciated. The combi- nation of all these requirements, sometimes imposing conflicting demands or establishing differing time schedules, makes the task of obtaining all regulatory approvals extremely complex. One of the dominant impacts of environmental regulations is that the lead time required for the planning and construction of new plants is substantially increased. When new plants generate major environmental complexities, the implications can be profound. Of course, the exact extent of additions to lead time will vary widely from one case to another, depending on which permit requirements apply and on what difficulties are encountered. For major expansions in any field of heavy industry, however, the delay resulting from federal requirements could conceivably add 2 to 3 years to total lead time. Moreover, there is always the possibility that regulatory approval will be denied. So, contingency plans for fulfilling production needs must be developed. The 1990s saw the emergence of environmental management sys- tems (EMSs) across the globe including the ISO 14001 environmental management system and the European Union’s Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS). Any EMS is a continual cycle of planning, implementing, reviewing, and improving the processes and actions that an organization undertakes to meet its business and environmental goals. EMSs are built on the “Plan, Do, Check, Act” model (Fig. 22-1) that leads to continual improvement. Planning includes identifying environmental aspects and establishing goals (plan); implementing includes training and operational controls (do); checking includes mon- itoring and corrective action (check); and reviewing includes progress review and acting to make needed changes to the EMS (act). Organiza- tions that have implemented an EMS often require all their suppliers to become EMS-certified as environmental programs become part of everyday business. Any company planning a major expansion must concentrate on envi- ronmental factors from the outset. Since many environmental approvals require a public hearing, the views of local elected officials and the com- munity at large are extremely important. To an unprecedented degree, the political acceptability of a project can now be crucial. PLANT STRATEGIES At the plant level, a number of things can be done to minimize the impact of environmental quality requirements. These include: 1. Maintaining an accurate source-emission inventory 2. Continually evaluating process operations to identify potential modifications that might reduce or eliminate environmental impacts 3. Ensuring that good housekeeping and strong preventive- maintenance programs exist and are followed 4. Investigating available and emerging pollution-control technologies 5. Keeping well informed of the regulations and the directions in which they are moving 6. Working closely with the appropriate regulatory agencies and maintaining open communications to discuss the effects that new reg- ulations may have 7. Keeping the public informed through a good public-relations program 8. Implementing an EMS It is unrealistic to expect that at any point in the foreseeable future Congress will reverse direction, reduce the effect of regulatory con- trols, or reestablish the preexisting legal situation in which private companies are free to construct major industrial facilities with little or no restraint by federal regulation. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PLANNING Contingency planning represents an essential component of sound environmental planning for a new plant. The environmental uncer- tainties surrounding a large capital project should be specified and related to other contingencies (such as marketing, competitive reac- tions, politics, foreign trade, etc.) and mapped out in the overall cor- porate strategy. Environmental factors should also be incorporated into a com- pany’s technical or research and development program. Since the planning horizons for new projects may now extend to 5 to 10 years, R&D programs can be designed for specific projects. These may include new process modifications or end-of-pipe control technologies. Another clear need is to integrate environmental factors into financial planning for major projects. It must be recognized that strategic environmental planning is as important to the long-range goal of the corporation as is financial planning. Trade-off decisions regarding financing may have to change as the project goes through successive stages of environmental planning and permit negotia- tions. For example, requirements for the use of more expensive pol- lution control technology may significantly increase total project costs; or a change from end-of-pipe to process modification tech- nology may preclude the use of industrial revenue bond financing under Internal Revenue Service (IRS) rules. Regulatory delays can affect assumptions as to both the rate of expenditure and inflation factors. Investment, production, environmental, and legal factors are all interrelated and can have a major impact on corporate cash flow. Most companies must learn to deal more creatively with local offi- cials and public opinion. The social responsibility of companies can become an extremely important issue. Companies should apply thoughtfulness and skill to the timing and conduct of public hearings. Management must recognize that local officials have views and con- stituencies that go beyond attracting new jobs. From all these factors, it is clear that the approval and construction of major new industrial plants or expansions is a far more complicated operation than it has been in the past, even the recent past. Stringent environmental restrictions are likely to preclude construction of cer- tain facilities at locations where they otherwise might have been built. In other cases, acquisition of required approvals may generate a heated technical and political debate that can drag out the regulatory process for several years. In many instances, new requirements may be imposed while a com- pany is seeking approval for a proposed new plant. Thus, companies intending to expand their basic production facilities should anticipate their needs far in advance, begin preparation to meet the regulatory challenge they will eventually confront, and select sites with careful consideration of environmental attributes. It is the objective of this section to assist the engineer in meeting this environmental regulatory challenge. INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW 22-5 PLAN DO CHECK ACT FIG. 22-1 “Plan, Do, Check, Act” model.
  8. 8. UNITED STATES AIR QUALITY LEGISLATION AND REGULATIONS Although considerable federal legislation dealing with air pollution has been enacted since the 1950s, the basic statutory framework now in effect was established by the Clean Air Act of 1970; amended in 1974 to deal with energy-related issues; amended in 1977, when a number of amendments containing particularly important provisions associated with the approval of new industrial plants were adopted; and amended in 1990 to address toxic air pollutants and ozone nonat- tainment areas. Clean Air Act of 1970 The Clean Air Act of 1970 was founded on the concept of attaining National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Data were accumulated and analyzed to establish the qual- ity of the air, identify sources of pollution, determine how pollutants disperse and interact in the ambient air, and define reductions and controls necessary to achieve air-quality objectives. EPA promulgated the basic set of current ambient air-quality stan- dards in April 1971. The specific regulated pollutants were particu- lates, sulfur dioxide, photochemical oxidants, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides. In 1978, lead was added. Table 22-1 enumerates the present standards. To provide basic geographic units for the air-pollution control pro- gram, the United States was divided into 247 air quality control regions (AQCRs). By a standard rollback approach, the total quantity of pollution in a region was estimated, the quantity of pollution that could be tolerated without exceeding standards was then calculated, and the degree of reduction called for was determined. States were required by EPA to develop state implementation plans (SIPs) to achieve compliance. The act also directed EPA to set new source performance standards (NSPS) for specific industrial categories. New plants were required to use the best system of emission reduction available. EPA gradually issued these standards, which now cover a number of basic industrial categories (as listed in Table 22-2). The 1977 amendments to the Clean Air Act directed EPA to accelerate the NSPS program and included a regulatory program to prevent significant deterioration in those areas of the country where the NAAQS were being attained. Finally, Sec. 112 of the Clean Air Act required that EPA promul- gate National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs). Between 1970 and 1989, standards were promulgated for asbestos, beryllium, mercury, vinyl chloride, benzene, arsenic, radionuclides, and coke-oven emissions. Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Of all the fed- eral laws placing environmental controls on industry (and, in particu- lar, on new plants), perhaps the most confusing and restrictive are the limits imposed for the prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) of air quality. These limits apply to areas of the country that are already cleaner than required by ambient air-quality standards. This regula- tory framework evolved from judicial and administrative action under the 1970 Clean Air Act and subsequently was given full statutory foun- dation by the 1977 Clean Air Act Amendments. EPA established an area classification scheme to be applied in all such regions. The basic idea was to allow a moderate amount of indus- trial development but not enough to degrade air quality to a point at which it barely complied with standards. In addition, states were to designate certain areas where pristine air quality was especially desir- able. All air-quality areas were categorized as Class I, Class II, or Class III. Class I areas were pristine areas subject to the tightest control. Permanently designated Class I areas included international parks, national wilderness areas, memorial parks exceeding 5000 acres, and national parks exceeding 6000 acres. Although the nature of these areas is such that industrial projects would not be located within them, their Class I status could affect projects in neighboring areas where meteorological conditions might result in the transport of emissions into them. Class II areas were areas of moderate industrial growth. Class III areas were areas of major industrialization. Under EPA reg- ulations promulgated in December 1974, all areas were initially cate- gorized as Class II. States were authorized to reclassify specified areas as Class I or Class III. The EPA regulations also established another critical concept known as the increment. This was the numerical definition of the amount of additional pollution that may be allowed through the com- bined effects of all new growth in a particular locality (see Table 22-3). To assure that the increments would not be used up hastily, EPA spec- ified that each major new plant must install best available control technology (BACT) to limit emissions. BACT is determined based on a case-by-case engineering analysis and is more stringent than NSPS. To implement these controls, EPA requires that every new source undergo preconstruction review. The regulations prohibited a company 22-6 WASTE MANAGEMENT TABLE 22-1 National Ambient Air Quality Standards Pollutant Primary stds. Averaging times Secondary stds. Carbon monoxide 9 ppm (10 mg/m3 ) 8-ha None 35 ppm (40 mg/m3 ) 1-ha None Lead 1.5 µg/m3 Quarterly average Same as primary Nitrogen dioxide 0.053 ppm (100 µg/m3 ) Annual (arithmetic mean) Same as primary Particulate matter (PM10) 50 µg/m3 Annualb (arithmetic mean) Same as primary 150 µg/m3 24-ha Particulate matter (PM2.5) 15.0 µg/m3 Annualc (arithmetic mean) Same as primary 65 µg/m3 24-hd Ozone 0.08 ppm 8-he Same as primary 0.12 ppm 1-hf Same as primary Sulfur oxides 0.03 ppm Annual (arithmetic mean) — 0.14 ppm 24-ha — — 3-ha 0.5 ppm (1300 µg/m3 ) a Not to be exceeded more than once per year. b To attain this standard, the expected annual arithmetic mean PM10 concentration at each monitor within an area must not exceed 50 µg/m3 . c To attain this standard, the 3-year average of the annual arithmetic mean PM2.5 concentrations from single or multiple com- munity-oriented monitors must not exceed 15.0 µg/m3 . d To attain this standard, the 3-year average of the 98th percentile of 24-h concentrations at each population-oriented mon- itor within an area must not exceed 65 µg/m3 . e To attain this standard, the 3-year average of the fourth-highest daily maximum 8-h average ozone concentrations measured at each monitor within an area over each year must not exceed 0.08 ppm. f (1) The standard is attained when the expected number of days per calendar year with maximum hourly average concen- trations above 0.12 ppm is ≤ 1. (2) The 1-h NAAQS will no longer apply to an area 1 year after the effective date of the designation of that area for the 8-h ozone NAAQS. The effective designation date for most areas is June 15, 2004. [40 CFR 50.9; see Federal Register of April 30, 2004 (69 FR 23996)].
  9. 9. INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW 22-7 TABLE 22-2 New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) from 40 CFR Part 60 as of June 2004 40 CFR 60 NSPS Subpart C Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times Subpart Ca (Reserved) Subpart Cb Emissions Guidelines and Compliance Times for Large Municipal Waste Combustors That Are Constructed On or Before September 20, 1994 Subpart Cc Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Subpart Cd Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Sulfuric Acid Production Units Subpart Ce Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Subpart D Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired Steam Generators for Which Construction is Commenced After August 17, 1971 Subpart Da Standards of Performance for Electric Utility Steam Generating Units for Which Construction Is Commenced After September 18, 1978 Subpart Db Standards of Performance for Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units Subpart Dc Standards of Performance for Small Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units Subpart E Standards of Performance for Incinerators Subpart Ea Standards of Performance for Municipal Waste Combustors for which Construction is Commenced after December 20, 1989 and on or before September 20, 1994 Subpart Eb Standards of Performance for Large Municipal Waste Combustors for Which Construction is Commenced after September 20, 1994 or for which Modification of Reconstruction is Commenced after June 19, 1996 Subpart Ec Standards of Performance for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators for which Construction Is Commenced after June 20, 1996 Subpart F Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants Subpart G Standards of Performance for Nitric Acid Plants Subpart H Standards of Performance for Sulfuric Acid Plants Subpart I Standards of Performance for Hot Mix Asphalt Facilities Subpart J Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries Subpart K Standards of Performance for Storage Vessels for Petroleum Liquids Constructed After June 11, 1973 and Prior to May 19, 1978 Subpart Ka Standards of Performance for Storage Vessels for Petroleum Liquids for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 Subpart Kb Standards of Performance for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced after July 23, 1984 Subpart L Standards of Performance for Secondary Lead Smelters Subpart M Standards of Performance for Secondary Brass and Bronze Production Plants Subpart N Standards of Performance for Primary Emissions from Basic Oxygen Process Furnaces for Which Construction Is Commenced After June 11, 1973 Subpart Na Standards of Performance for Secondary Emissions From Basic Oxygen Process Steelmaking Facilities for Which Construction Is Commenced After January 20, 1983 Subpart O Standards of Performance for Sewage Treatment Plants Subpart P Standards of Performance for Primary Copper Smelters Subpart Q Standards of Performance for Primary Zinc Smelters Subpart R Standards of Performance for Primary Lead Smelters Subpart S Standards of Performance for Primary Aluminum Reduction Plants Subpart T Standards of Performance for the Phosphate Fertilizer Industry: Wet-Process Phosphoric Acid Plants Subpart U Standards of Performance for the Phosphate Fertilizer Industry: Superphosphoric Acid Plants Subpart V Standards of Performance for the Phosphate Fertilizer Industry: Diammonium Phosphate Plants Subpart W Standards of Performance for the Phosphate Fertilizer Industry: Triple Superphosphate Plants Subpart X Standards of Performance for the Phosphate Fertilizer Industry: Granular Triple Superphosphate Storage Facilities Subpart Y Standards of Performance for Coal Preparation Plants Subpart Z Standards of Performance for Ferroalloy Production Facilities Subpart AA Standards of Performance for Steel Plants: Electric Arc Furnaces Constructed After October 21, 1974, and On or Before August 17, 1983 Subpart AAa Standards of Performance for Steel Plants: Electric Arc Furnaces and Argon-Oxygen Decarburization Vessels Constructed After August 17, 1983 Subpart BB Standards of Performance for Kraft Pulp Mills Subpart CC Standards of Performance for Glass Manufacturing Plants Subpart DD Standards of Performance for Grain Elevators Subpart EE Standards of Performance for Surface Coating of Metal Furniture Subpart FF (Reserved) Subpart GG Standards of Performance for Stationary Gas Turbines Subpart HH Standards of Performance for Lime Manufacturing Plants Subpart KK Standards of Performance for Lead-Acid Battery Manufacturing Plants Subpart LL Standards of Performance for Metallic Mineral Processing Plants Subpart MM Standards of Performance for Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations Subpart NN Standards of Performance for Phosphate Rock Plants Subpart PP Standards of Performance for Ammonium Sulfate Manufacture Subpart QQ Standards of Performance for the Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing Subpart RR Standards of Performance for Pressure Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations Subpart SS Standards of Performance for Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances Subpart TT Standards of Performance for Metal Coil Surface Coating Subpart UU Standards of Performance for Asphalt Processing and Asphalt Roofing Manufacture Subpart VV Standards of Performance for Equipment Leaks of VOC in the Synthetic Organic Chemicals Manufacturing Industry Subpart WW Standards of Performance for the Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry Subpart XX Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals Subpart AAA Standards of Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters
  10. 10. 22-8 WASTE MANAGEMENT NAAQS. Continuous monitoring is also required for other CAA pol- lutants for which the EPA or the state determines that monitoring is necessary. The EPA or the state may exempt any CAA pollutant from these monitoring requirements if the maximum air-quality impact of the emissions increase is less than the values in Table 22-6 or if present concentrations of the pollutant in the area that the new source would affect are less than the Table 22-6 values. The EPA or the state may accept representative existing monitoring data col- lected within 3 years of the permit application to satisfy monitoring requirements. EPA regulations provide exemption from BACT and ambient air- impact analysis if the modification that would increase emissions is accompanied by other changes within the plant that would net a zero increase in total emissions. This exemption is referred to as the “no net increase” exemption. A full PSD review would include a case-by-case determination of the controls required by BACT, an ambient air-impact analysis to determine whether the source might violate applicable increments or air-quality standards; an assessment of the effect on visibility, soils, and vegetation; submission of monitoring data; and full public review. Nonattainment (NA) Those areas of the United States failing to attain compliance with ambient air-quality standards are consid- ered nonattainment areas. New plants could be constructed in nonattainment areas only if stringent conditions are met. Emissions have to be controlled to the greatest degree possible, and more than equivalent offsetting emission reductions have to be obtained from other sources to assure progress toward achievement of the ambient air-quality standards. Specifically, (1) the new source must be equipped with pollution controls to assure lowest achievable emis- sion rate (LAER), which in no case can be less stringent than any applicable NSPS; (2) all existing sources owned by an applicant in the same region must be in compliance with applicable state imple- mentation plan requirements or be under an approved schedule or from commencing construction on a new source until the review had been completed and provided that, as part of the review procedure, public notice should be given and an opportunity provided for a pub- lic hearing on any disputed questions. Sources Subject to Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Sources subject to PSD regulations (40 CFR, Sec. 52.21) are major stationary sources and major modifications located in attainment areas and unclassified areas. A major stationary source was defined as any source listed in Table 22-4 with the potential to emit 100 tons per year or more of any pollutant regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) or any other source with the potential to emit 250 tons per year or more of any CAA pollutant. The “potential to emit” is defined as the maximum capacity to emit the pollutant under applicable emis- sion standards and permit conditions (after application of any air pol- lution control equipment) excluding secondary emissions. A “major modification” is defined as any physical or operational change of a major stationary source producing a “significant net emissions increase” of any CAA pollutant (see Table 22-5). Ambient monitoring is required of all CAA pollutants with emis- sions greater than or equal to Table 22-5 values for which there are TABLE 22-3 PSD Air Quality Increments (␮/m3 ) Class I area Class II area Class III area Sulfur dioxide Annual 2 20 40 24-h 5 91 182 3-h 25 512 700 PM10 Annual 4 17 34 24-h 8 30 60 Nitrogen dioxide Annual 2.5 25 50 TABLE 22-2 New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) from 40 CFR Part 60 as of June 2004 (Concluded) 40 CFR 60 NSPS Subpart BBB Standards of Performance for the Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry Subpart CCC (Reserved) Subpart DDD Standards of Performance for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry Subpart EEE (Reserved) Subpart FFF Standards of Performance for Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing Subpart GGG Standards of Performance for Equipment Leaks of VOC in Petroleum Refineries Subpart HHH Standards of Performance for Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities Subpart III Standards of Performance for Volatile Organic Compound Emissions From the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) Air Oxidation Unit Processes Subpart JJJ Standards of Performance for Petroleum Dry Cleaners Subpart KKK Standards of Performance for Equipment Leaks of VOC From Onshore Natural Gas Processing Plants Subpart LLL Standards of Performance for Onshore Natural Gas Processing: SO(2) Emissions Subpart MMM (Reserved) Subpart NNN Standards of Performance for Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Distillation Operations Subpart OOO Standards of Performance for Nonmetallic Mineral Processing Plants Subpart PPP Standard of Performance for Wool Fiberglass Insulation Manufacturing Plants Subpart QQQ Standards of Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems Subpart RRR Standards of Performance for Volatile Organic Compound Emissions From Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) Reactor Processes Subpart SSS Standards of Performance for Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities Subpart TTT Standards of Performance for Industrial Surface Coating: Coating of Plastic Parts for Business Machines Subpart UUU Standards of Performance for Calciners and Dryers in Mineral Industries Subpart VVV Standards of Performance for Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities Subpart WWW Standards of Performance for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Subpart AAAA Standards of Performance for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units for Which Construction Is Commenced After August 30, 1999 or for Which Modification or Reconstruction Is Commenced After June 6, 2001 Subpart BBBB Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed On or Before August 30, 1999 Subpart CCCC Standards of Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units for Which Construction Is Commenced After November 30, 1999 or for Which Modification or Reconstruction Is Commenced on or After June 1 , 2001 Subpart DDDD Emissions Guidelines and Compliance Times for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units that Commenced Construction On or Before November 30, 1999
  11. 11. INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW 22-9 an enforcement order to achieve such compliance; (3) the applicant must have sufficient offsets to more than make up for the emissions to be generated by the new source (after application of LAER); and (4) the emission offsets must provide “a positive net air quality ben- efit in the affected area.” LAER was deliberately a technology-forcing standard of control. The statute stated that LAER must reflect (1) the most stringent emission limitation contained in the implementation plan of any state for such category of sources unless the applicant can demon- strate that such a limitation is not achievable, or (2) the most strin- gent limitation achievable in practice within the industrial category, whichever is more stringent. In no event could LAER be less strin- gent than any applicable NSPS. While the statutory language defin- ing BACT directed that “energy, environmental, and economic impacts and other costs” be taken into account, the comparable provision on LAER provided no instruction that economics be con- sidered. For existing sources emitting pollutants for which the area is nonat- tainment, reasonable available control technology (RACT) would be required. EPA defines RACT by industrial category. Minor Source Preconstruction Permits Commonly after the application of air pollution controls the emissions associated with new facilities or modifications of existing facilities will be less than the emissions thresholds necessary to trigger PSD or nonattainment new source review. In such instances, a minor source preconstruction per- mit is required from the state permitting authority and new source performance standards (NSPS) apply. Controlled-Trading Program The legislation enacted under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 provided the foundation for EPA’s controlled-trading program, the essential elements of which include: • No-net-increase provisions of PSD • Offsets policy (under nonattainment) • Banking and brokerage (under nonattainment) While these different policies vary broadly in form, their objective is essentially the same: to substitute flexible economic-incentive sys- tems for the current rigid, technology-based regulations that specify exactly how companies must comply. These market mechanisms have made regulating easier for EPA and less burdensome and costly for industry. PSD No-Net-Increase Provisions Under the PSD program, the affected source is the entire plant. This source definition allows a company to determine the most cost-effective means to control pollu- tion any time a plant is modified. Emission increases associated with a new process or production line may be compensated for by emission increases at other parts of the plant. As long as the entire site net emis- sions increase is maintained below the levels identified in Table 22-5, a PSD review is not required. Offsets Policy Offsets were EPA’s first application of the concept that one source could meet its environmental protection obligations by getting another source to assume additional control actions. In nonattainment areas, pollution from a proposed new source, even one that controls its emissions to the lowest possible level, would aggravate existing violations of ambient air-quality standards and trigger the statutory prohibition. The offsets policy provided these new sources with an alternative. The source could proceed with construction plans, provided that: 1. The source would control emissions to the lowest achievable level. 2. Other sources owned by the applicant were in compliance or on an approved compliance schedule. 3. Existing sources were persuaded to reduce emissions by an amount at least equal to the pollution that the new source would add. Banking and Brokerage Policy EPA’s banking policy is aimed at providing companies with incentives to find more offsets. Under the original offset policy, a firm shutting down or modifying a facility could apply the reduction in emissions to new construction elsewhere in the region only if the changes were made simultaneously. However, with banking a company can “deposit” the reduction for later use or sale. Such a policy will clearly establish that clean air (or the right to use it) has direct economic value. Clean Air Act of 1990 In November 1990, Congress adopted the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, providing substantial TABLE 22-4 Sources Subject to PSD Regulation If Their Potential to Emit Equals or Exceeds 100 Tons per Year Fossil-fuel-fired steam electric plants of more than 250 million Btu/h heat input Coal-cleaning plants (with thermal dryers) Kraft-pulp mills Portland-cement plants Primary zinc smelters Iron and steel mill plants Primary aluminum-ore-reduction plants Primary copper smelters Municipal incinerators capable of charging more than 250 tons of refuse per day Hydrofluoric, sulfuric, and nitric acid plants Petroleum refineries Lime plants Phosphate-rock-processing plants Coke-oven batteries Sulfur-recovery plants Carbon-black plants (furnace process) Primary lead smelters Fuel-conversion plants Sintering plants Secondary metal-production plants Chemical-process plants Fossil-fuel boilers (or combinations thereof) totaling more than 250 million Btu/h heat input Petroleum-storage and -transfer units with total storage capacity exceeding 300,000 bbl Taconite-ore-processing plants Glass-fiber-processing plants Charcoal-production plants TABLE 22-5 Significant Net Emissions Increase Pollutant Tons/yr PM10 15 SO2 40 NOx 40 VOC 40 CO 100 Lead 0.6 PM 25 Fluorides 3 Sulfuric acid mist 7 Hydrogen sulfide 10 Total reduced sulfur 10 Municipal waste combustor Acid gases 40 Metals 15 Organics 3.5 × 10−6 CFCs (11, 12, 113, 114 & 115) Any increase Halons (1211, 1301, 2402) Any increase Any emissions increase resulting in a >1 µ/m3 24-h impact in a Class I area TABLE 22-6 Concentration Impacts below Which Ambient Monitoring May Not Be Required µg/m3 Average time CO 575 8-h maximum NO2 14 Annual PM10 10 24-h maximum SO2 13 24-h maximum Lead 0.1 3-month Fluorides 0.25 24-h maximum Total reduced sulfur 10 1-h maximum H2S 0.2 1-h maximum Reduced-sulfur compounds 10 1-h maximum
  12. 12. 22-10 WASTE MANAGEMENT changes to many aspects of the existing CAAA. The concepts of NAAQS, NSPS, and PSD remain virtually unchanged. However, sig- nificant changes have occurred in several areas that directly affect industrial facilities and electric utilities and air-pollution control at these facilities. These include changes and additions in the following major areas: Title I Nonattainment areas Title III Hazardous air pollutants Title IV Acid deposition control Title V Operating permits Title VI Stratospheric ozone protection Title I: Nonattainment Areas The existing regulations for nonattainment areas were made more stringent in several areas. The CAAA of 1990 requires the development of comprehensive emission inventory-tracking for all nonattainment areas and establishes a classi- fication scheme that defined nonattainment areas into levels of sever- ity. For example, ozone nonattainment areas were designated as marginal, moderate, serious, severe (two levels), and extreme, with compliance deadlines of 3, 6, 9, 15–17, and 20 years, respectively, with each classification having more stringent requirements regarding strategies for compliance (see Table 22-7). Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions reductions of 15 percent were required in moderate areas by 1996 and 3 percent a year thereafter for severe or extreme areas until compliance was achieved. In addition, the definition of a major source of ozone precursors (previously 100 tons per year of NOx, CO, or VOC emissions) was redefined to as little as 10 tons per year in the extreme classification, with increased offset requirements of 1.5 to 1 for new and modified sources. In 2004, EPA adopted a new 8-h ozone ambient air quality standard. Ultimately the 8-h standard will replace the 1-h standard although both standards apply during a several year transition period. The new standard adopted the same regulatory approach as previously existed for the 1-h standard. New extended deadlines for compliance are being adopted based on the same marginal to extreme area approach previously described with the new deadlines identified in Table 22-8. These requirements place major constraints on affected industries in these nonattainment areas. A similar approach is being taken in PM10 and CO nonattainment areas. Title III: Hazardous Air Pollutants The Title III provisions on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) represent a major departure from the previous approach of developing NESHAPs. While only eight HAPs were designated in the 20 years since enactment of the CAAA of 1970, the new CAAA of 1990 designated 189 pollutants as HAPs requiring regulation. The state allows EPA to list additional HAPs or to delist any HAP. As of 2004 there were 188 HAPs identified in Table 22-9. Major sources are defined as any source (new or existing) that emits (after control) 10 tons a year or more of any regulated HAP or 25 tons a year or more of any combination of HAPs. A major source of HAPs must comply with emissions standards known as MACT standards that EPA has been adopting since 1992. Table 22-10 provides a list of MACT standards as of 2004 that affect all named existing and new major HAP sources. If a proposed new source is not of a type identi- fied in Table 22-10, then the new source must undergo a case-by-case MACT evaluation to identify the appropriate level of control which is generally the most stringent achieved in practice. For existing sources, MACT is defined as a stringency equivalent to the average of the best 12 percent of the sources in the category. For new sources, MACT is defined as the best controlled system. New sources are required to meet MACT immediately, while existing sources have three years from the date of promulgation of the appro- priate MACT standard. Title IV: Acid Deposition Control The Acid Deposition Con- trol Program is designed to reduce emissions of SO2 in the United States by 10 million tons per year, resulting in a net yearly emission of 8.9 million tons by the year 2000. Phase I of the program requires 111 existing uncontrolled coal-fired power plants (≥ 100 MW) to reduce emissions to 2.5 pounds of SO2 per 106 Btu by 1995 (1997 if scrubbers are used to reduce emissions by at least 90 percent). The reduction is to be accomplished by issuing all affected units emission “allowances” equivalent to what their annual average SO2 emissions would have been in the years 1985–1987 based on 2.5 pounds SO2 per 106 Btu coal. The regulations represent a significant departure from previous regulations where specified SO2 removal efficiencies were mandated; rather, the utilities will be allowed the flexibility of choosing which strategies will be used (e.g., coal washing, low-sulfur coal, flue gas desulfurization, etc.) and which units will be controlled, as long as the overall “allowances” are not exceeded. Any excess reduction in SO2 by a utility will create “banked” emissions that can be sold or used at another unit. Phase II of Title IV limits the majority of plants ≥ 20 MW and all plants ≥ 75 MW to maximum emissions of 1.2 pounds of SO2 per 106 Btu after the year 2000. In general, new plants would have to acquire banked emission allowances in order to be built. Emission allowances will be traded through a combination of sell/purchase with other util- ities, EPA auctions and direct sales. Control of NOx under the CAAA of 1990 will be accomplished through the issuance of a revised NSPS in 1994, with the objective of reducing emissions by 2 million tons a year from 1980 emission levels. The technology being considered is the use of low-NOx burners (LNBs). The new emission standards will not apply to cyclone and wet bottom boilers, unless alternative technologies are found, as these cannot be retrofitted with existing LNB technologies. Title V: Operating Permits Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments established a new operating permit program to be administered by state agencies in accordance with federal guidelines. The program basically requires a source to obtain a permit that covers TABLE 22-7 Ozone Nonattainment Area Classifications and Associated Requirements One-hour ozone Major source Nonattainment concentration threshold level, Offset ratio for area classification design value, ppm Attainment date tons VOCs/yr new/modified sources Marginal 0.121–0.138 Nov. 15, 1993 100 1.1 to 1 Moderate 0.138–0.160 Nov. 15, 1996 100 1.15 to 1 Serious 0.160–0.180 Nov. 15, 1999 50 1.2 to 1 Severe 0.180–0.190 Nov. 15, 2005 25 1.3 to 1 0.190–0.280 Nov. 15, 2007 25 1.3 to 1 Extreme 0.280 and up Nov. 15, 2010 10 1.5 to 1 TABLE 22-8 The 8-h Ozone NAAQS Classifications and Attainment Dates* 8-h ozone concentration, Area classification† ppm Attainment date† Marginal 0.081–0.092 2007 Moderate 0.092–0.107 2010 Serious 0.107–0.120 2013 Severe-15 0.120–0.127 2019 Severe-17 0.127–0.187 2021 Extreme 0.187 and up 2024 *Areas newly designated as nonattainment under the 8-h standard which were never previously nonattainment must comply with the standard within 5 years of being designated nonattainment or generally in 2009. † These classifications and attainment dates apply to areas previously designated nonattainment under the 1-h ozone NAAQS.
  13. 13. INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW 22-11 CAS no. HAP 75070 Acetaldehyde 60355 Acetamide 75058 Acetonitrile 98862 Acetophenone 53963 Acetylaminofluorene 107028 Acrolein 79061 Acrylamide 79107 Acrylic acid 107131 Acrylonitrile 107051 Allyl chloride 92671 4-Aminobiphenyl 62533 Aniline 90040 o-Anisidine 1332214 Asbestos 71432 Benzene (including benzene from gasoline) 92875 Benzidine 98077 Benzotrichloride 100447 Benzyl chloride 92524 Biphenyl 117817 Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) 54288 Bis(chloromethyl)ether 75252 Bromoform 106990 1,3-Butadiene 156627 Calcium cyanamide 133062 Captan 63252 Carbaryl 75150 Carbon disulfide 56235 Carbon tetrachloride 463581 Carbonyl sulfide 120809 Catechol 133904 Chloramben 57749 Chlordane 7782505 Chlorine 79118 Chloroacetic acid 532274 2-Chloroacetophenone 108907 Chlorobenzene 510156 Chlorobenzilate 67663 Chloroform 107302 Chloromethyl methyl ether 126998 Chloroprene 1319773 Cresols/Cresylic acid (isomers and mixture) 95487 o-Cresol 108394 m-Cresol 106445 p-Cresol 98828 Cumene 94757 2,4-D, salts and esters 3547044 DDE 334883 Diazomethane 132649 Dibenzofurans 96128 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane 84742 Dibutylphthalate 106467 1,4-Dichlorobenzene(p) 91941 3,3-Dichlorobenzidene 111444 Dichloroethyl ether (Bis (2-chloroethyl)ether) 76448 Heptachlor 118741 Hexachlorobenzene 87683 Hexachlorobutadiene 77474 Hexachlorocyclopentadiene 67721 Hexachloroethane 822060 Hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate 680319 Hexamethylphosphoramide 110543 Hexane 302012 Hydrazine 7647010 Hydrochloric acid 7664393 Hydrogen fluoride (Hydrofluoric acid) 123319 Hydroquinone 78591 Isophorone 58899 Lindane (all isomers) 108316 Maleic anhydride 67561 Methanol 72435 Methoxychlor 74839 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74873 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 71556 Methyl chloroform (1,1,1-Trichloroethane) 78933 Methyl ethyl ketone (2-Butanone) 60344 Methyl hydrazine 74884 Methly iodide (lodomethane) CAS no. HAP 108101 Methyl isobutyl ketone (Hexone) 624839 Methyl isocyanate 80626 Methyl methacrylate 1634044 Methyl tert butyl ether 101144 4,4-Methyiene bis(2-chloroaniline) 75092 Methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) 101688 Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) 101779 4,4-Methylenedianiline 91203 Naphthalene 98953 Nitrobenzene 92933 4-Nitrobiphenyl 100027 4-Nitrophenol 79469 2-Nitropropane 684935 N-Nitroso-N-methylurea 62759 N-Nitrosodimethylamine 59892 N-Nitrosomorpholine 56382 Parathion 82688 Pentachloronitrobenzene (Quintobenzene) 87865 Pentachlorophenol 108952 Phenol 106503 p-Phenylenediamine 75445 Phosgene 7803512 Phosphine 7723140 Phosphorus 85449 Phthalic anhydride 1336363 Polychlorinated biphenyls (Aroclors) 1120714 1,3-Propane sultone 57578 beta-Propiolactone 123386 Propionaldehyde 114261 Propoxur (Baygon) 78875 Propylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloropropane) 542756 1,3-Dichloropropene 62737 Dichlorvos 111422 Diethanolamine 121697 N,N-Diethyl aniline (N,N-Dimethylaniline) 64675 Diethyl sulfate 119904 3,3-Dimethoxybenzidine 60117 Dimethyl aminoazobenzene 119937 3,3′-Dimethyl benzidine 79447 Dimethyl carbamoyl chloride 68122 Dimethyl formamide 57147 1,1-Dimethyl hydrazine 131113 Dimethyl phthalate 77781 Dimethyl sulfate 534521 4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol, and salts 51285 2,4-Dinitrophenol 121142 2,4-Dinitrotoluene 123911 1,4-Dioxane (1,4-Diethyleneoxide) 122667 1,2-Diphenylhydrazine 106898 Epichlorohydrin (I-Chloro-2,3-epoxypropane) 106887 1,2-Epoxybutane 140885 Ethyl acrylate 100414 Ethyl benzene 51796 Ethyl carbamate (Urethane) 75003 Ethyl chloride (Chloroethane) 106934 Ethylene dibromide (Dibromoethane) 107062 Ethylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloroethane) 107211 Ethylene glycol 151564 Ethylene imine (Aziridine) 75218 Ethylene oxide 96457 Ethylene thiourea 75343 Ethylidene dichloride (1,1-Dichloroethane) 50000 Formaldehyde 75569 Propylene oxide 75558 1,2-Propylenimine (2-Methyl aziridine) 91225 Quinoline 106514 Quinone 100425 Styrene 96093 Styrene oxide 1746016 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin 79345 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane 127184 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 7550450 Titanium tetrachloride 108883 Toluene 95807 2,4-Toluene diamine 584849 2,4-Toluene diisocyanate 95534 o-Toluidine TABLE 22-9 Regulated Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) from 40 CFR Part 63 as of June 2004
  14. 14. affected equipment, and detailed records must be maintained. Table 22-11 identifies common ODS compounds. Regulatory Direction The current direction of regulations and air-pollution control efforts is clearly toward significantly reducing the emissions to the environment of a broad range of compounds, including: 1. Volatile organic compounds and other ozone precursors (CO and NOx) 2. Hazardous air pollutants, including carcinogenic organic emis- sions and heavy metal emissions 3. Acid rain precursors, including SOx and NOx In addition, the PM2.5 NAAQS will continue to place emphasis on quan- tifying and reducing particulate emissions in the less than 2.5 µm parti- cle-size range. Particle size-specific emission factors have been developed for many sources, and size-specific emission standards have been developed in a number of states. These standards are addressing concerns related to nitrates and suitable condesates in the atmosphere. Although it is not possible to predict the future, it is possible to pre- pare for it and influence it. It is highly recommended that maximum flexibility be designed into new air-pollution control systems to allow for increasingly more stringent emission standards for both particu- lates and gases. Further, it is everyone’s responsibility to provide a thorough review of existing and proposed new processes and to make every attempt to identify economical process modifications and/or material substitutions that reduce or, in some cases, eliminate both the emissions to the environment and the overdependency on retro- fitted or new end-of-pipe control systems. UNITED STATES WATER QUALITY LEGISLATION AND REGULATIONS Federal Water Pollution Control Act In 1948, the original Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) was passed. This act and its various amendments are often referred to as the Clean Water Act (CWA). It provided loans for treatment plant construction and temporary authority for federal control of interstate water pollution. The enforcement powers were so heavily dependent on the states as to make the act almost unworkable. In 1956, several amendments to the FWPCA were passed that made federal enforcement procedures less cumbersome. The provision for state consent was removed by amend- ments passed in 1961, which also extended federal authority to include navigable waters in the United States. 22-12 WASTE MANAGEMENT each and every requirement applicable to the source under the Clean Air Act. A major impact of the Title V program is that sources are required to implement measures to demonstrate routinely that they are operating in compliance with permit terms. This represents a dra- matic shift from previous practices where, to bring an enforcement action, regulatory authorities were required to demonstrate that a source was in noncompliance. Initially, all “major” sources of air pollution are required to obtain an operating permit. However, any state permitting authority may extend the applicability of the operating permit to minor sources as well. Once a source is subject to the permit program as a major source for any one pollutant, emissions of every regulated air pollutant must be addressed in the permit application. The operating permit must outline specifically how and when a source will be allowed to operate over the five-year term of the permit. The permit the state develops from an application becomes the prin- cipal mechanism for enforcement of all air-quality regulations. As such, it is critically important to submit an application that allows max- imum operating flexibility. Sources must also include in their permit applications monitoring protocols sufficient to document compliance with each permit term and condition. The Title V operating permit requires the submission of at least five types of reports: 1. The initial compliance report 2. The annual compliance certification 3. Monitoring reports submitted at least every six months 4. Progress reports for sources not in compliance when the appli- cation is submitted 5. Prompt reports on any deviations from the permit terms Permit fees are a mandatory element of the Title V program. In most cases, fees are assessed for emissions on a dollars-per-ton- emitted basis. Title VI: Stratospheric Ozone Protection Title VI of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments established a program to implement the provisions of the Montreal Protocol, a worldwide agreement to reduce the use and emission of ozone-depleting substances. EPA’s regulations adopted in response to Title VI outline a series of requirements for facilities that use equipment containing ODS compounds. Facilities must be certain that they handle and manage ODS compounds as pre- scribed in the rules. Only certified technicians and staff may maintain CAS no. HAP 8001352 Toxaphene (chlorinated camphene) 120821 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene 79005 1,1,2-Trichloroethane 79016 Trichloroethylene 95954 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol 88062 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol 121448 Triethylamine 1582098 Trifluralin 540841 2,2,4-Trimethylpentane 108054 Vinyl acetate 593602 Vinyl bromide 75014 Vinyl chloride 75354 Vinylidene chloride (1,1-Dichloroethylene) 1330207 Xylenes (isomers and mixture) 95476 o-Xylenes 108383 m-Xylenes 106423 p-Xylenes CAS no. HAP — Antimony compounds — Arsenic compounds (inorganic including arsine) — Beryllium compounds — Cadmium compounds — Chromium compounds — Cobalt compounds — Coke oven emissions — Cyanide compounds1 — Glycol ethers2 — Lead compounds — Manganese compounds — Mercury compounds — Fine mineral fibers3 — Nickel compounds — Polycylic organic matter4 — Radionuclides (including radon)5 — Selenium compounds TABLE 22-9 Regulated Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) from 40 CFR Part 63 as of June 2004 (Concluded) NOTE: For all listings above which contain the word “compounds” and for glycol ethers, the following applies: Unless otherwise specified, these listings are defined as including any unique chemical substance that contains the named chemical (i.e., antimony, arsenic, etc.) as part of that chemical’s infrastructure. 1 X′CN where X = H′ or any other group where a formal dissociation may occur, for example, KCN or Ca (CN)2. 2 Includes mono- and di-ethers of ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and triethylene glycol R-(OCH2CH2)n-OR′ where n = 1, 2, or 3; R = alkyl or aryl groups; R′ = R, H, or groups which, when removed, yield glycol ethers with the structure R-(OCH2CH)n-OH. Polymers are excluded from the glycol category. 3 Includes mineral fiber emissions from facilities manufacturing or processing glass, rock, or slag fibers (or other mineral derived fibers) of average diameter 1 micrometer or less. 4 Includes organic compounds with more than one benzene ring, and which have a boiling point greater than or equal to 100°C. 5 A type of atom which spontaneously undergoes radioactive decay.
  15. 15. INTRODUCTION TO WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REGULATORY OVERVIEW 22-13 40 CFR 63 MACT Standard Subpart F National Emission Standards for Organic Haz- ardous Air Pollutants from the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Subpart G National Emission Standards for Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants From Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Subpart H National Emission Standards for Organic Haz- ardous Air Pollutants for Equipment Leaks Subpart I National Emission Standards for Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants for Certain Processes Subject to the Negotiated Regulation for Equipment Leaks Subpart J National Emission Standards for Organic Haz- ardous Air Pollutants for Polyvinyl Chloride and Copolymers Production Subpart K (Reserved) Subpart L National Emission Standards for Coke Oven Batteries Subpart M National Perchloroethylene Air Emission Stan- dards for Dry Cleaning Facilities Subpart N National Emission Standards for Chromium Emis- sions from Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks Subpart O Ethylene Oxide Emissions Standards for Steriliza- tion Facilities Subpart Q National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial Process Cooling Towers Subpart R National Emission Standards for Gasoline Distrib- ution Facilities (Bulk Gasoline Terminals and Pipeline Breakout Stations) Subpart S National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from the Pulp and Paper Industry Subpart T National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning Subpart U National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pol- lutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins Subpart W National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Epoxy Resins Production and Non- Nylon Polyamides Production Subpart X National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Secondary Lead Smelting Subpart Y National Emission Standards for Marine Tank Ves- sel Tank Loading Operations Subpart AA National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Subpart BB National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphate Fertilizers Production Plants Subpart CC National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries Subpart DD National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Off-Site Waste and Recovery Operations Subpart EE National Emission Standards for Magnetic Tape Manufacturing Operations Subpart GG National Emission Standards for Aerospace Manu- facturing and Rework Facilities Subpart HH National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Oil and Natural Gas Production Facilities Subpart II National Emission Standards for Shipbuilding and Ship Repair (Surface Coating) Subpart JJ National Emission Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations Subpart KK National Emission Standards for the Printing and Publishing Industry Subpart LL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pol- lutants for Primary Aluminum Reduction Plants Subpart MM National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Chemical Recovery Combustion Source at Kraft, Soda, Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemcial Pulp Mills Subpart OO National Emission Standards for Tanks—Level 1 Subpart PP National Emission Standards for Containers Subpart QQ National Emission Standards for Surface Impoundments 40 CFR 63 MACT Standard Subpart RR National Emission Standards for Individual Drain Systems Subpart SS National Emission Standards for Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process Subpart TT National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks—Control Level 1 Subpart UU National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks—Control Level 2 Standards Subpart VV National Emission Standards for Oil-Water Separa- tors and Organic-Water Separators Subpart WW National Emission Standards for Storage Vessels (Tanks)—Control Level 2 Subpart XX National Emission Standards for Ethylene Manu- facturing Process Units: Heat Exchange Systems and Waste Operations Subpart YY National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Categories: Generic Maxi- mum Achievable Control Technology Standards Subpart CCC National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Steel Pickling—HCI Process Facil- ities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants Subpart DDD National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Mineral Wool Production Subpart EEE National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Hazardous Waste Combustors Subpart GGG National Emission Standards for Pharmaceuticals Production Subpart HHH National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Natural Gas Transmission and Storage Facilities Subpart III National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pol- lutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Subpart JJJ National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pol- lutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins Subpart LLL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufac- turing Industry Subpart MMM National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pol- lutants for Pesticide Active Ingredient Production Subpart NNN National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Wool Fiberglass Manufacturing Subpart OOO National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Manufacture of Amino/Phe- nolic Resins Subpart PPP National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Pro- duction Subpart QQQ National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Copper Smelting Subpart RRR National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Secondary Aluminum Production Subpart TTT National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Lead Smelting Subpart UUU National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Subpart VVV National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Publicly Owned Treatment Works Subpart XXX National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Ferroalloys Production: Ferroman- ganese and Silicomanganese Subpart AAAA National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Subpart CCCC National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Manufacturing of Nutritional Yeast Subpart EEEE National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Organic Liquids Distribution (Non- Gasoline) Subpart FFFF National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Miscellaneous Organic Chemical Manufacturing Subpart GGGG National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Solvent Extraction for Vegetable Oil Production TABLE 22-10 Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Standards from 40 CFR Part 63 as of June 2004
  16. 16. 22-14 WASTE MANAGEMENT In 1965 the Water Quality Act established a new trend in water pollu- tion control. It provided that the states set water quality standards in accordance with federal guidelines. If the states failed to do so, the fed- eral government, subject to a review hearing, would set the standards. In 1966, the Clean Water Restoration Act transferred the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare to the Department of the Interior. It also gave the Interior Department the responsibility for the Oil Pollution Act. After the creation of EPA in 1970, the EPA was given the responsi- bility previously held by the Department of the Interior with respect to water pollution control. In subsequent amendments to the FWPCA in 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, and 1977, additional federal programs were established. The goals of these programs were to make waterways of the United States fishable and swimmable by 1983 and to achieve zero discharge of pollutants by 1985. The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) was established as the basic regulatory mechanism for water pollution control. Under this program, the states TABLE 22-10 Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Standards from 40 CFR Part 63 as of June 2004 (Concluded) TABLE 22-11 Common ODS Compounds Class I-CFCs Class II-HCFCs CFC-11 HCFC-22 CFC-12 HCFC-123 CFC-13 HCFC-124 CFC-111 HCFC-141 CFC-112 HCFC-142 CFC-113 CFC-114 CFC-115 Halons Others Halon-1211 Carbon tetrachloride Halon-1301 Methyl chloroform Halon-1202 Methyl bromide 40 CFR 63 MACT Standard Subpart HHHH National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Wet-Formed Fiberglass Mat Pro- duction Subpart JJJJ National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Paper and Other Web Coating Subpart KKKK National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Surface Coating of Metal Cans Subpart MMMM National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Surface Coating of Miscellaneous Subpart NNNN National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Surface Coating of Large Appliances Subpart OOOO National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Printing, Coating, and Dyeing of Fab- rics and Other Textiles Subpart QQQQ National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Surface Coating of Wood Building Products Subpart RRRR National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Surface Coating of Metal Furniture Subpart SSSS National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Surface Coating of Metal Coil Subpart TTTT National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Subpart UUUU National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Cellulose Products Manufacturing Subpart VVVV National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing Subpart WWWW National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pol- lutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Subpart XXXX National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Subpart YYYY National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Combustion Turbines Subpart AAAAA National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Lime Manufacturing Plants Subpart BBBBB National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Semiconductor Manufacturing 40 CFR 63 MACT Standard Subpart CCCCC National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks Subpart FFFFF National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Integrated Iron and Steel Manufac- turing Facilities Subpart GGGGG National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Subpart HHHHH National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Miscellaneous Coating Manufacturing Subpart IIIII National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions from Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Subpart JJJJJ National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Brick and Structural Clay Products Manufacturing Subpart KKKKK National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing Subpart LLLLL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Asphalt Processing and Asphalt Roof- ing Manufacturing Subpart MMMMM National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Flexible Polyurethane Foam Fabrica- tion Operations Subpart NNNNN National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Hydrochloric Acid Production Subpart PPPPP National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Engine Test Cells/Stands Subpart QQQQQ National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Friction Materials Manufacturing Facilities Subpart RRRRR National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Taconite Iron Ore Processing Subpart SSSSS National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Refractory Products Manufacturing Subpart TTTTT National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Magnesium Refining were given the authority to issue permits to “point-source” dischargers provided the dischargers gave assurance that the following standards would be met: 1. Source-specific effluent limitations [including new source perfor- mance standards (NSPS)] 2. Toxic pollutant regulations (for specific substances regardless of source) 3. Regulations applicable to oil and hazardous substance liability To achieve that stated water quality goal of fishable and swimmable waters by 1983, each state was required by EPA to adopt water quality standards that met or exceeded the federal water quality criteria. After each state submitted its own water quality standards, which were sub- sequently approved by EPA, the federal criteria were removed from the Code of Federal Regulations. The state water quality standards are used as the basis for establishing both point-source-based effluent lim- itations and toxic pollutant limitations used in issuing NPDES permits to point-source discharges. Source-Based Effluent Limitations Under the FWPCA, EPA was responsible for establishing point-source effluent limitations for municipal dischargers, industrial dischargers, industrial users of municipal treatment works, and effluent limitations for toxic sub- stances (applicable to all dischargers). Standards promulgated or proposed by EPA under 40 CFR, Parts 402 through 699, prescribe effluent limitation guidelines for existing sources, standards of performance for new sources, and pretreat- ment standards for new and existing sources. Effluent limitations and new source performance standards apply to discharges made directly into receiving bodies of water. The new standards require best-available technology (BAT) and are to be used by the states when issuing NPDES permits for all sources 18 months after EPA makes them final. Pretreatment standards apply to waste streams from industrial sources that are sent to publicly owned treatment works (POTW) for final treatment. These regulations are meant to

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