IBM MobileFirst: Defining a Digital Strategy Communicating to Understand

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IBM MobileFirst: Defining a Digital Strategy Communicating to Understand

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  • You’ve gotta love this industry. I mean, where else are you going to find this kind of energy and enthusiasm… such an endless ability to create… and throughout its entire history… the unending pursuit of “the next big thing.” We’ve had our share. Anyone here remember client-server… or how the world used to hold its breath right around this time of year… and wait in awe for whatever came out of Comdex Vegas? Those were the days. And between then and now… the industry hasn’t gotten shy about declaring the next revolution, inflection point… or telling the world how beautiful its babies are… very often… long before the baby is actually born.
     
    So now here we are. And I think that, perhaps for the first time… that pattern is being upended by these twin forces of mobility and social media. While I tend not to believe in “revolutions” in this industry… I believe we can agree with confidence today that we’re in the early days of the first major evolution in computing that will not be led by the IT industry. But instead… led by the decisions and actions of regular people… hundreds of millions of customers, citizens, voters, students, activists, Millennials, senior citizens, dog lovers, surfers and rock climbers.
    We’re entering a new era in the core model of computing… following two prior generations. This generation – of cognitive, deeply analytic, learning systems – is coming along at a really good time. Because in a world this massively instrumented and interconnected… with this much information… a lot of it exploding from the hands and devices of all these connected and empowered millions… The data being generated holds the potential to be the most important transformative force of our lifetimes.
    This demand for data proves to us the mobile need – which is to be able to connect with anyone, anytime anywhere. This is the business in motion imperative.
    It’s not simple to
    Engage with anyone especially if they own and control their own device
    Extend to anything – think about the volume of different types of smart mobile device platforms out there – not to mention other types of instrumented machines.
    Execute real business anywhere – full business transactions need to be enabled with low latency request/response characteristics 24x7 from anywhere in the world at anytime.
    What will this mean for your industry? For the products you deliver? For the way that you partner? How will you respond?
    Success today requires you develop exceptional experiences, delivered in the precise moment of need, while maximizing the value of each and every interaction. It requires a new approach to IT.
    And that is why we are here this week. We want to prepare you for the next set of actions that you will need to take to harness these forces for yourself in your industry.
    Over the next four days you will hear from industry leaders, IBMers and most importantly from your peers about the ways that they are leveraging integrated, open, secure technologies to meet the demands and out perform in their industries.
    Let’s spend a minute talking more about some of the market forces that are creating the requirement to act ...
  • Welcome everyone. Thanks so much for taking time today to join us and learn more about the mobile industry and our recent announcements around our IBM MobileFirst portfolio. I’m thrilled at the lineup of speakers we have for you today, including a distinguished customer, business partner and analyst. First though, I want to briefly paint a picture for you on the state of mobile.
     
    What a truly exciting time it is. We’re entering a new era in the core model of computing… following two prior generations. The first started in the late 19th century with the theory of basic tabulation seen in payroll or inventory information such as the census. Machines automated accounting and the back office began to transform. The second generation, starting in the 1950s brought about programmable computers. Machines that could be told what to do where they could perform multiple tasks, see relationships in data, and support transaction processing such as banking, airline reservations, ATMs and everything we know today as Enterprise Resource Planning. And while the form factors underwent radical changes … from mainframes to PCs to tablets … game devices … smart phones … they were all continuations of programmable computing. Coming next, and some argue has already arrived, are computing systems that go beyond what they are programmed to do. Systems that truly enable us to transact in motion.
     
  • Key Points:
    5 years ago we offered our vision for a smarter planet, saying in part it was becoming instrumented, interconnected and intelligent and we have evidence all around us that this is happening today
    The “Three I’s” are fueling dramatic growth in information and in connections between people
    Importantly, they are also fueling connections between billions of instrumented things which are setting the stage for new kinds of value creation
    Sources:
    2.4 Quintrillion bytes of new data created every dayo http://www-01.ibm.com/software/data/bigdata/ 96% of GenYers have joined a social networkhttp://fmwfchamber.com/blog/2012/04/03/impact-power-social-media/ • 22 billion connected devices by 2020 o http://www.techradar.com/us/news/internet/22-billion-web-connected-devices-by-2020-710843  
  • Mobile, social cloud, big data and the IoT are creating new opportunities for business
    How? The combined forces of the evolving IoT, social, cloud, big data and mobile are giving rise to new kinds of interactions between people, information and the physical world.
    -Mobile technology enables more immediate and more continuous connections with more people and more things
    -With big data and analytics we no longer have to make key decisions by instinct.
    -Social technology changes the fundamental nature of work and connections
    -Cloud technology enables the enterprise make connections between once disparate systems of record and engagement, between partners, services, etc
    These new interactions are leading to new kinds of insights, new ways of thinking and working, new industries and new markets that must be addressed in ways that preserve the trust and integrity of the enterprise
    Mobile – new opportunity for business: Mobile technology enables more immediate and more continuous connections with more people and more things in the IoT. It eliminates old constraints of place and time and creates the opportunity to deepen engagement with anyone, anything, anywhere at anytime
     
    Big Data – new opportunity for business: With big data and analytics we no longer have to make key decisions by instinct. Now we use analytics to turn the data from connected things in the IoT into the information, knowledge and ultimately the wisdom required to enter new markets and capture more share in existing markets
     
    Social– new opportunity for business: Social technology changes the fundamental nature of work. We used to amass knowledge. Now we impart it and we gather it from billions of people around the world who are connected by the IoT. These exchanges offer the opportunity to create better products and services, provide more immediate customer service and to build advocacy at every touchpoint.
     
    Cloud– new opportunity for business: Cloud technology enables the enterprise make connections between once disparate systems of record and engagement to get things done in the IoT. It is a tool to capture and analyze increasing amounts of data in the IoT, to deliver results to more users, and to respond faster to the ever changing needs of the business environment.
     
    All this new data, and our desire to integrate and leverage it all will add key security challenges. You will have new privacy requirements, new risk management processes, industry regulations and corporate governance challenges that need to be well managed.
    New kinds of interactions emerge. This leads to new kinds of insights, and then to new ways of thinking and working. Then to new industries. Then to new markets.
    Here we are today in the mobile mini main, so I want to dive deeper into the trends and opportunities surrounding mobile …
  • Change sor in gray, write inside cloud soe
  • MAIN POINT: Mobile has unique challenges that separate it from traditional IT projects.
    SPEAKER NOTES:
    While the opportunities mobile presents are significant and mobile has become an enterprise requirement, there are a number of challenges clients face.
    It’s not simple to
    Engage with anyone especially if they own and control their own device (cite 200 million BYOD proof point)
    Extend to anything – think about the volume of different types of smart mobile device platforms out there – not to mention other types of instrumented machines.
    Execute real business anywhere – full business transactions need to be enabled with low latency request/response characteristics 24x7 from anywhere in the world at anytime.
    And yet we must do each of these things in the context of some unique challenges:
    The app development lifecycle is more complicated. In addition to being faster and more iterative, you have to deal with multiple device platforms and development styles. You have to securely integrate into back-end enterprise services and cloud and be ready to scale appropriately – even when demand occurs in less predictable patterns. On top of all that you have unique mobile requirements like a user interface that has significant restrictions in terms of real-estate and dealing with handling being online and connected as well as the state when you don’t have a connection. Then there are questions about how do you effectively take advantage of unique capabilities mobile has to offer. Things like geo-location for instance.
    You also need to figure out how to protect your confidential information and the privacy of the participants – all while you are enabling connection through devices owned privately by the participants themselves and not controlled by the enterprise. You also have to figure out how to manage all the elements effectively from the device to the back-end platform.
  • So looking at the reasons on why our clients and enterprise will invest into mobility is broadly categorized into 3 areas:
     
    1.     To Monetize – Simply put, a Mobile application/platform will generate new revenues, and becomes strategic go to market strategy. Example  retail, cruise lines etc.
    Constituents – B2C and B2B in some cases.
     
    2.     To make people productive – This includes ensue that employees in office and field, be is sales or oil rigs can do their job and add to efficiency factor.
     
    Constituents: B2E or B2F(ield)
     
    3.     To provide better customer service – This category, the enterprise may not be able to monetize or have direct impact on bottom line, but need to provide a channel that is in tune with times. This is simply cost of doing business. At times it is hard to put numbers behind goo customer service.
     
    Constituents: B2C or even B2E
    Matrix:
    Think of this as a matrix, where the Business drivers/constituents and technology can be chosen, there is not strict tie with technology choices. Which I think in many cases depends on the use cases.
  • Mobile is clearly an imperative for businesses today. At IBM, we are committed to helping organizations transform themselves into mobile first organizations. Why? Because it is absolutely a fundamental component of a successful business today.
    Let’s begin with the first key trend, that mobile is about transacting and all of the notions that make up a “transaction”. Let’s flesh that out a bit further, because with each trend comes opportunities that your enterprise should leverage. With mobile transactions, the opportunity is to drive new and additional revenue and productivity through mobile. This requires businesses to re-imagine every interaction in a Mobile First world.
    Moving to the second trend you highlighted around mobile insights – this brings with it an opportunity to deliver a contextually relevant experience to your employees, partners and customers. This enables you to harness deep insights to inform new mobile innovations.
    Thirdly, mobile is primary. We all know that already. So what does it mean to you and your business? Simply put, you deliver mobile apps that transform the value chain because you recognize the importance of prioritizing ‘mobile first’ since it is the way of the future.
    Moving along, let’s focus on this requirement that a user’s experience must be consistent across all channels. We must prioritize and leverage user imperatives to benefit the enterprise, meaning you can deepen relationships with consistent brand experience by integrating your front-end presence regardless of hardware or operating system it is presented on with your back-end, regardless if its locally or remotely hosted infrastructure. The ‘how’ doesn’t matter anymore – people expect it to work seamlessly.
    Lastly, let’s move beyond phones. Because ‘mobile’ really isn’t just about a phone, or a tablet. By broadening our scope of what we consider ‘mobile’ we capitalize on other opportunities for your business. Machine-to-machine is HUGE. Thus, why not leverage industry transformations driven by M2M through cloud technologies and whatever comes along next in order to capitalize on this 18 billion opportunity expected by the end of 2022.
    Up to this point we have largely talked about mobile as a medium used by individuals, but mobile is more than phones and tablets. Advances in technology are enabling machine to machine connections that are creating new revenue streams, operating models and opportunities to provide customer value.
    We are able to identify things, by tagging them and can then sense them in the environment. Advances in nanotechnology are helping us infuse intelligence and processing power into objects to create thinking things. And importantly, advances in power technology allow us to power things more efficiently and for longer periods of time and in more remote locations than ever before.
    These technological advances are enabling new business opportunities like remote monitoring of things like machines, homes and even an individual’s health, all of which once required face to face access. Context aware devices can proactively push promotions to people in proximity to a particular location and can help items like luggage speak to the systems that move them indicating their location and status. And items in remote locations like street lights can turn themselves off when they are not needed.
    Research conducted by the GSMA identified several leading M2M applications that we are likely to see by 2020. Of these the connected car seems to be the one that is closest on the horizon. Monitoring applications applied to health, security and assisted living are also estimated to provide substantial value. Finally, the sensors that are in cars are also predicted to provide new sources of revenue to the insurance industry in the form of pay as you drive auto insurance.
    To tap into this tremendous opportunity, your infrastructure needs reliable, low latency delivery messaging that scales to massive communities of concurrently connected end-points. So today we are announcing the first IBM MobileFirst branded offering – IBM MobileFirst MessagePoint, which can help you gain a competitive advantage by providing real-time connectivity from enterprise systems to millions of sensors and mobile devices.
    So what forces have shaped this shift and what does this mean to you?
     
    There is a lot of compelling data in the marketplace, but we have identified five key trends or observations – supported by market data and by customer successes – that we believe have strong implications for the future of mobile.
     
    [1] Mobile is the universal sensor. It is with most of us 100% of the time and is the primary means we use to interact with our employers, our customers, our family and our friends. [2] As they interact they are creating vast streams of data that, with the right analytics, can teach us things about their behavior and their preferences that we could not learn in any other way. [3] These interactions inherently become transactions. Whether shopping, purchasing, searching for or providing information, collaborating or seeking service, mobile enabled people and objects are seeking not simply to connect, but to complete tasks when, where and how they wish. [4] Thus, the mobile experience must transcend any single device to accommodate multiple screens and touchpoints. [5] Finally, as we think about mobile, we can’t confine our thinking to devices like phones and tablets. The ability to tag things, sense things, power things and shrink things has extended mobility beyond people to nearly every other type of object on the planet. As we have said since the start of smarter planet things are becoming more instrumented, interconnected and intelligent than ever before, and mobile is right at the center of that story and will fundamentally change the way the world works.
     
    Add Process to “Transform the value chain”
  • You need a new kind of system to take advantage of opportunities presented by the IoT and Nexus of forces
    The intersection of systems of record, systems of engagement and the internet of things
    A shift to ‘as a service’ across all IT delivery
    Transforming insight into rich, pattern-based interactions, transactions, and processes.
  • Senior managers from hundreds of enterprises around the globe, in multiple industries, with a range of titles, were asked about their mobile strategies and current level of success. From this survey, only the top 14% were ranked as leaders.The complete IBV study will share with you the use of mobile by industry and highlight what the leaders have done to rise to the top. Among the topics discussed:
    How mobile capabilities are fundamentally changing the way they do business
    Measurable ROI from mobile initiatives
    Experiencing faster response time to customers
    Analyzing mobile data to improve customer offers and contacts
    Integrating mobile applications with existing systems
    The security of data, devices, and connections
     
    Backed by these findings, and our experience with helping thousands of companies become mobile enterprises, we have identified a 4 part strategic approach for how we will talk to companies about putting their businesses in motion.
    We have identified primary audiences that we will target as we develop messaging and assets that support this new entry point model, though I should mention that there are many buyer and influencer audiences who participate in making purchase decisions in each of these 4 areas.
    In the next few charts, I’ll share with you some of the top line messaging that we have developed for each entry point, the connections that each entry point has to our marketecture and portfolio and will briefly highlight how you will see our 2H launch announcmenets, customer stories, and market provocations align.
    The Mobile First enterprise disrupts traditional business models, redesigns processes and harnesses new sources of data and insight
    The Mobile First enterprise reinvents customer interactions enabling employees, partners and customers themselves with anywhere, anytime information and the ability to take action
    The Mobile First enterprise provides mobile apps that securely unlock core business function with high quality apps that can be cost effectively developed and maintained
    The mobile first enterprise anticipates and responds to new requirements from BYOD, organizational demands for mobile applications, smarter commerce
    Backed by these findings, and our experience with helping thousands of companies become mobile enterprises, we have identified a 4 part strategic approach for how to put your business in motion: The Mobile Enterprise Agenda
    Transform the business: For our customers, mobile has to start with a business opportunity, and in many cases these business opportunities are leading to industry disruption. One example, Daimler’s Cars2Go service is challenging the notion of what it means to rent a car. Once people had to go to a rental counter and commit to renting cars for days at a time. Now they can find a car parked on the street in a location that is nearest to them and use it for as long – or as short – a time as they need to.
    Engage the customer: One of the near universal business opportunities that mobile presents is to deepen customer engagement. Mobile is ubiquitous. And people are using their devices in ways that can be turned into advantage for the enterprise - 71% of smartphone users that see a captivating TV advertisement will immediately do a mobile search. But mobile users are discerning - 61% of customers who visit a mobile unfriendly site are likely to go to a competitor's site. And CMO’s recognize this problem. 57% of them say that designing experiences for tablet/mobile apps as a key priority to drive customer loyalty. Leaders are not only providing better, more differentiated service to their end customers, they are enabling their employees with mobile so that they can provide faster and better service wherever they are.
    Build the App: Providing mobile experience generally starts with an engaging application or mobile web experience. But mobile app development brings with it a host of unique challenges.
    Faster development cycles
    More devices to support, each with its own set of capabilities, OS and UI behaviors
    More development approaches
    Unique management, security and lifecycle considerations
    Unlocking core business knowledge from backend systems and making it available to new mobile front end technologies
    Optimize the Infrastructure: And then there are all of the other infrastructure components that companies need to be concerned about – whether it is networking, security, device management, application management, expense management. All of these elements need to be planed for, integrated and optimized so that the enterprise and its workforce can take advantage of new mobile opportunities
  • The idea behind this slide is to Make sure that we discuss this with client and this resonates with their current phase.
  • This slide provide details on activities in each Phase and the characteristics defined in previous slide, now are better defined with Implementation level details.
  • Green diamonds indicate likely Dojo2 options
  • IBM MobileFirst: Defining a Digital Strategy Communicating to Understand

    1. 1. IBM MobileFirst: Defining a Digital Strategy Communicating to Understand Nitin Gaur – MobileFirst Solution Architect 1 #IBMMobile © 2014 IBM Corporation
    2. 2. Business with anyone, anytime, anywhere is… …Business. In Motion. 2 #IBMMobile © 2014 IBM Corporation
    3. 3. A new Mobile Era, We Have Moved From… Single transactions to Millions of PCs to Structured data to personalized engagement billions of mobile devices massive amounts of unstructured data Static applications to dynamic compos-able services Rigid infrastructure to an elastic cloud infrastructure Reactive security 3 Intelligent, proactive protection #IBMMobile © 2014 IBM Corporation
    4. 4. The planet is getting smarter 2.5 Quintillion 96% of GenYers 9.6 Billion Internet of information Internet of engagement Internet of “things” bytes of new data generated daily 4 have joined a social network #IBMMobile connected devices © 2014 IBM Corporation
    5. 5. New technologies present opportunities for business Cloud Big Data Business Customers  Partners  Employees Mobile Social Internet of Things 5 #IBMMobile © 2014 IBM Corporation
    6. 6. Do YOU have a Digital Strategy?  An IT strategy does not equate to a digital strategy.  Why? − Because most IT strategies treat technology in isolation. − Think about it — your company may be working on a cloud strategy, social strategy, or mobile strategy. − ALL customer-facing solutions rely on pervasive digital connections in which the individual technologies (Cloud, Social, Mobile, Big data/Analytics, etc.) merge to deliver an experience that looks and feels an awful lot like our natural behavior. − More connections between people, places, information, and things (aka digital density), the more customers can interact with companies and each other in a seamless and satisfying way. − Does your strategy capitalize on that? 6 #IBMMobile © 2014 IBM Corporation
    7. 7. Mobile introduces new workloads that require a new delivery platform – a Systems of Engagement Legacy Three-tier Model Systems of Record HTTP Web Browser Application Server CRM MQTT, WebSockets, HTTP Notification Data sync 7 HR Legacy DB ERP Scalable Delivery Infrastructure Systems of Engagement Continuous Client Experience Storage Engagement Capabilities Social and Collaboration Cross-endpoint Support Personalization Contextualization Systems of Record Scalable Delivery Infrastructure Background Activity & Monitoring Data Synchronization Service Composition Metadata Repository User and services security #IBMMobile © 2014 IBM Corporation
    8. 8. This new system enables businesses to successfully … • Transform strategy and operations • Build and deploy multi-platform mobile applications • Optimize mobile experience to build loyalty • Leverage analytics to turn information into insights • Extend enterprise to mobile with data, service, and application integration • Manage and optimize mobile devices, data, and expenses • Support BYOD and a smarter workforce • Oversee security, risk and compliance 8 #IBMMobile © 2014 IBM Corporation
    9. 9. Understand Why Our Clients Invest in Mobile?  Monetize  Enhance People Productivity  Better Customer Service  Others.. Cost of doing business/stay relevant etc. Matrix: The Business drivers/constituents and Technology 9 #IBMMobile © 2014 IBM Corporation
    10. 10. Five mobile trends with significant implications for the enterprise Mobile enables the Mobile enables the Internet of Things Internet of Things Mobile is primary Mobile is primary 91% of mobile users keep 91% of mobile users keep their device within arm’s their device within arm’s reach 100% of the time reach 100% of the time Global Machine-to-machine Global Machine-to-machine connections will increase connections will increase from 22billion in 2011 to 18 from billion in 2011 to 18 billion at the end of 2022 billion at the end of 2022 Mobile must create aa Mobile must create continuous brand continuous brand experience experience Insights from mobile Insights from mobile data provide new data provide new opportunities opportunities 90% of users use multiple 90% of users use multiple screens as channels come screens as channels come together to create together to create integrated experiences integrated experiences 75% of mobile shoppers 75% of mobile shoppers take action after receiving aa take action after receiving location based messages location based messages Mobile is about transacting Mobile is about transacting 10 96% year to year increase in mobile cyber 96% year to year increase in mobile cyber Monday sales between 2012 and 2011 Monday sales between 2012 and 2011 #IBMMobile © 2014 IBM Corporation
    11. 11. A Sound Mobile Strategy Comprehensively Mitigates Risk Po rta Device Security bili ty Analytics Notification User Experience Device Manage e Ti m 11 t r ke a to M App Manage App Security Integration Mobile Strategy Business Function B2E & B2C App Dev #IBMMobile S y urit ec Scalability Support Co sts © 2014 IBM Corporation
    12. 12. A new kind of system is required Systems of Interaction Systems of Engagement Systems of Record CRM DB Continuous client experience Cloud-based Services HR ERP Partner value chain Internet of Things 12 #IBMMobile © 2014 IBM Corporation
    13. 13. Learn more at: www.ibm.com/mobilefirst © Copyright IBM Corporation 2013. All rights reserved. The information contained in these materials is provided for informational purposes only, and is provided AS IS without warranty of any kind, express or implied. IBM shall not be responsible for any damages arising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, these materials. Nothing contained in these materials is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, creating any warranties or representations from IBM or its suppliers or licensors, or altering the terms and conditions of the applicable license agreement governing the use of IBM software. References in these materials to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply that they will be available in all countries in which IBM operates. Product release dates and/or capabilities referenced in these materials may change at any time at IBM’s sole discretion based on market opportunities or other factors, and are not intended to be a commitment to future product or feature availability in any way. IBM, the IBM logo, Rational, the Rational logo, Telelogic, the Telelogic logo, and other IBM products and services are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation, in the United States, other countries or both. Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. 13 #IBMMobile © 2013 IBM Corporation
    14. 14. 14 #IBMMobile © 2013 IBM Corporation
    15. 15. Legal Disclaimer • © IBM Corporation 2013. All Rights Reserved. • The information contained in this publication is provided for informational purposes only. While efforts were made to verify the completeness and accuracy of the information contained in this publication, it is provided AS IS without warranty of any kind, express or implied. In addition, this information is based on IBM’s current product plans and strategy, which are subject to change by IBM without notice. IBM shall not be responsible for any damages arising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, this publication or any other materials. Nothing contained in this publication is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, creating any warranties or representations from IBM or its suppliers or licensors, or altering the terms and conditions of the applicable license agreement governing the use of IBM software. • References in this presentation to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply that they will be available in all countries in which IBM operates. Product release dates and/or capabilities referenced in this presentation may change at any time at IBM’s sole discretion based on market opportunities or other factors, and are not intended to be a commitment to future product or feature availability in any way. Nothing contained in these materials is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, stating or implying that any activities undertaken by you will result in any specific sales, revenue growth or other results. • If the text contains performance statistics or references to benchmarks, insert the following language; otherwise delete: Performance is based on measurements and projections using standard IBM benchmarks in a controlled environment. The actual throughput or performance that any user will experience will vary depending upon many factors, including considerations such as the amount of multiprogramming in the user's job stream, the I/O configuration, the storage configuration, and the workload processed. Therefore, no assurance can be given that an individual user will achieve results similar to those stated here. • If the text includes any customer examples, please confirm we have prior written approval from such customer and insert the following language; otherwise delete: All customer examples described are presented as illustrations of how those customers have used IBM products and the results they may have achieved. Actual environmental costs and performance characteristics may vary by customer. • Please review text for proper trademark attribution of IBM products. At first use, each product name must be the full name and include appropriate trademark symbols (e.g., IBM Lotus® Sametime® Unyte™). Subsequent references can drop “IBM” but should include the proper branding (e.g., Lotus Sametime Gateway, or WebSphere Application Server). Please refer to http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml for guidance on which trademarks require the ® or ™ symbol. 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Unyte is a trademark of WebDialogs, Inc., in the United States, other countries, or both. • If you reference Adobe® in the text, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: Adobe, the Adobe logo, PostScript, and the PostScript logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States, and/or other countries. • If you reference Java™ in the text, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: Java and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both. • If you reference Microsoft® and/or Windows® in the text, please mark the first use and include the following, as applicable; otherwise delete: Microsoft and Windows are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. • If you reference Intel® and/or any of the following Intel products in the text, please mark the first use and include those that you use as follows; otherwise delete: Intel, Intel Centrino, Celeron, Intel Xeon, Intel SpeedStep, Itanium, and Pentium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. • If you reference UNIX® in the text, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries. • If you reference Linux® in your presentation, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both. Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. • If the text/graphics include screenshots, no actual IBM employee names may be used (even your own), if your screenshots include fictitious company names (e.g., Renovations, Zeta Bank, Acme) please update and insert the following; otherwise delete: All references to [insert fictitious company name] refer to a fictitious company and are used for illustration purposes only. 15 #IBMMobile © 2013 IBM Corporation
    16. 16. Why IBM Worklight?  Build "native" , hybrid, or mobile web because the real value is in the platform, administration, up-keep, security, adapters, and integration layer we provide better than anyone else. – Integration  Mobile Middleware provides a layer of indirection, which allows for the back end services to be shifted without affecting the end point. - Flexibility  Ability to surgically enable and disable Application specific to a platform, administratively provide platform specific messages - Control.  Arms the enterprise to adapt and fit into to current Enterprise Security platform ( authentication, authorization and security policy enforcement etc) – Security  Avenue to exploit existing services ( SOA Model) and since these services were design for Web Application, Mobile middleware allows for filtering and altering the content, prior to sending the response back to end use. - Flexibility, control and reuse and Optimization of existing enterprise services.  Mobile Specific Services - Unified push notification, SMS and devices specific notifications etc, provide an avenue to address these via platform. and more…. 16 #IBMMobile © 2013 IBM Corporation
    17. 17. Mobile security – more than just the device At the Device Over the Network and Enterprise For the Mobile App Manage device Secure Access Secure Application Set appropriate security policies • Register • Compliance • Wipe • Lock Properly identify mobile users and devices • Allow or deny access • Connectivity Utilize secure coding practices • Identify application vulnerabilities • Update applications Secure Data Monitor & Protect Integrate Securely Data separation • Leakage • Encryption Identify and stop mobile threats • Log network access, events, and anomalies Secure connectivity to enterprise applications and services Secure Connectivity Manage applications and enterprise app store Application Security Offline authentication • Application level controls Secure Connectivity from devices Enterprise Intranet Internet 17 Manage Applications #IBMMobile © 2013 IBM Corporation
    18. 18. The market includes a diverse set of buyers, buying occasions, and needs (CxO, LOB Exec) Drive revenue and productivity through mobile Transform the value chain with mobile Create new value at the moment of awareness (CMO) (CIO, IT Exec, CSO) Create deeper engagement by delivering contextually relevant experiences Manage and Secure the mobile enterprise Enable our employees to work anytime and anywhere Discover new opportunities using mobile information Ensure trusted mobile interactions Secure & Manage the Connect with customers in context mobile infrastructure to optimize performance (VP Apps, Developer) 18 Develop and run applications Deliver differentiated mobile apps that run on any device quickly and iterate often #IBMMobile Unlock back office capabilities to create better front office engagement © 2013 IBM Corporation
    19. 19. Characteristics of Mobile Enterprise Progressive Capability Model 19 #IBMMobile © 2013 IBM Corporation
    20. 20. Mobile Enterprise Progressive Capability Model 20 #IBMMobile © 2013 IBM Corporation
    21. 21. Do YOU have a Digital Strategy?  Everyone thinks they have a digital strategy these days. But while your company may have a business or IT strategy that incorporates digital technology, an IT strategy does not equal a digital strategy.  Why? − Because most IT strategies treat technology in isolation. − Think about it — your company may be working on a cloud strategy, social strategy, or mobile strategy. − But today’s hottest customer-facing solutions rely on pervasive digital connections in which the individual technologies (cloud, near field communications, mobile, big data, etc.) merge to deliver an experience that looks and feels an awful lot like our natural behavior. − In other words, the more connections between people, places, information, and things (aka digital density), the more customers can interact with companies and each other in a seamless and satisfying way. − Does your strategy capitalize on that? 21 #IBMMobile © 2013 IBM Corporation
    22. 22. What application questions do we tackle?  What style of development? – Native vs. Hybrid vs. Mobile Web vs. Multi-channel Web  What type of app am I building? – Multi-channel vs. targeted app. – Responsive Design, Adaptive Web, Mobile Framework.  Which Toolkit should I use? – Dojo Mobile/jQuery Mobile/Sencha Touch – Backbone, Handlebars, Bootstrap, Angular, etc… – Evolving web ecosystem…  Client Side Architecture for Single Page Apps/Web 2.0/etc… – Model View Controller – Best Practices/Performance/etc…  Thin Server Application Architecture – Adapters vs. REST – Notifications (WL Push Notifications vs. MQtt) 22 22 November 18, 2013 #IBMMobile IBM Confidential © 2013 IBM Corporation
    23. 23. Modern JavaScript Ecosystem Packages & Modules jQuery Modernizr Dojo Core Dojo Desktop D3 RaphaelJS jQuery Mobile Mustache Dojo UI Dojo GFX Dojo Gauges Handlebars Backbone UnderscoreJS Dojo Mobile Dojo Charts AppFirst … Module Loaders nano LABjs Module Formats jQuery Plugins AMD $script.js UMD YepNope CommonJS curl NodeJS ECMAScript6 Modules (future) Package Managers Runtime Environments Browser-based Native JavaScript Runtimes MS Trident, Moz Gecko, Webkit 23 Mozilla Rhino (JavaScript on Java JRE) Non-browser Native JavaScript Runtime #IBMMobile © 2013 IBM Corporation

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