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Charity Lotteries and Deregulation / Public Perceptions of Executive Pay is and what it should be

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nfpSynergy's Driver of Ideas Joe Saxton looks first at how charity lotteries could raise even more for good causes and how deregulation could help this. He then looks at executive pay; what do people …

nfpSynergy's Driver of Ideas Joe Saxton looks first at how charity lotteries could raise even more for good causes and how deregulation could help this. He then looks at executive pay; what do people think charity chief executives are paid, what should they be paid and how does this compare to other jobs, from bankers to bus drivers?

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  • 1. Could lotteries raise moremoney for charities andother good causes?Joe SaxtonJuly 2012
  • 2. First: what do the peoplewho run lotteries thinkabout the currentsituation?
  • 3. Attitudes towards lotteries - part 1 Lotteries are more regulated than any other area of our fundraising -33% -5% 0% 29% 23% The current regulations for lotteries make it more difficult to generate -38% -2% -10% 20% 15% income from lotteries The need to account for every ticket involves extra costs for us -48% -1% -7% 20% 15% The need to account for every ticket distributed (when sending more than -38% -1% -10% 23% 9% £20 worth to cold prospects) and then returned involves extra… We find the limit on prize money/value restrictive -53% -1% -7% 16% 12% The current regulations for lotteries increase our costs -51% -4% -4% 16% 9% Not sure/Not relevant It is difficult to achieve the 20% minimum return to the beneficiary when -39% -6% -14% 17% 6% recruiting from cold prospects Disagree strongly We find it difficult to avoid infringing the Gambling Commission/ Local Disagree -34% -3% -19% 7% 11% Authority regulations Neither agree nor disagreeWe would like to be able to run an individual lottery larger than the current -47% -5% -17% 8% 6% £4m ceiling Agree It is difficult to keep to the £10m annual income ceiling -42% -13% -27% 3% 4% Agree strongly -100% -80% -60% -40% -20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% “How does lottery regulation and administration affect your charity? How does lottery regulation and administration affect your charity? ” Ranked by Agree strongly/AgreeBase: 181 participantsSource: Jun 11, nfpSynergy 3
  • 4. Attitudes towards lotteries - part 1 Lotteries are more regulated than any other area of our fundraising -33% -5% 0% 29% 23% The current regulations for lotteries make it more difficult to generate -38% -2% -10% 20% 15% income from lotteries The need to account for every ticket involves extra costs for us -48% -1% -7% 20% 15% The need to account for every ticket distributed (when sending more than -38% -1% -10% 23% 9% £20 worth to cold prospects) and then returned involves extra… We find the limit on prize money/value restrictive -53% -1% -7% 16% 12% The current regulations for lotteries increase our costs -51% -4% -4% 16% 9% Not sure/Not relevant It is difficult to achieve the 20% minimum return to the beneficiary when -39% -6% -14% 17% 6% recruiting from cold prospects Disagree strongly We find it difficult to avoid infringing the Gambling Commission/ Local Disagree -34% -3% -19% 7% 11% Authority regulations Neither agree nor disagreeWe would like to be able to run an individual lottery larger than the current -47% -5% -17% 8% 6% £4m ceiling Agree It is difficult to keep to the £10m annual income ceiling -42% -13% -27% 3% 4% Agree strongly -100% -80% -60% -40% -20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% “How does lottery regulation and administration affect your charity? How does lottery regulation and administration affect your charity? ” Ranked by Agree strongly/AgreeBase: 181 participantsSource: Jun 11, nfpSynergy 4
  • 5. Attitudes towards lotteries - part 1 Lotteries are more regulated than any other area of our fundraising -33% -5% 0% 29% 23% The current regulations for lotteries make it more difficult to generate -38% -2% -10% 20% 15% income from lotteries The need to account for every ticket involves extra costs for us -48% -1% -7% 20% 15% The need to account for every ticket distributed (when sending more than -38% -1% -10% 23% 9% £20 worth to cold prospects) and then returned involves extra… We find the limit on prize money/value restrictive -53% -1% -7% 16% 12% The current regulations for lotteries increase our costs -51% -4% -4% 16% 9% Not sure/Not relevant It is difficult to achieve the 20% minimum return to the beneficiary when -39% -6% -14% 17% 6% recruiting from cold prospects Disagree strongly We find it difficult to avoid infringing the Gambling Commission/ Local Disagree -34% -3% -19% 7% 11% Authority regulations Neither agree nor disagreeWe would like to be able to run an individual lottery larger than the current -47% -5% -17% 8% 6% £4m ceiling Agree It is difficult to keep to the £10m annual income ceiling -42% -13% -27% 3% 4% Agree strongly -100% -80% -60% -40% -20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% “How does lottery regulation and administration affect your charity? How does lottery regulation and administration affect your charity? ” Ranked by Agree strongly/AgreeBase: 181 participantsSource: Jun 11, nfpSynergy 5
  • 6. Attitudes towards lotteries - part 1 Lotteries are more regulated than any other area of our fundraising -33% -5% 0% 29% 23% The current regulations for lotteries make it more difficult to generate -38% -2% -10% 20% 15% income from lotteries The need to account for every ticket involves extra costs for us -48% -1% -7% 20% 15% The need to account for every ticket distributed (when sending more than -38% -1% -10% 23% 9% £20 worth to cold prospects) and then returned involves extra… We find the limit on prize money/value restrictive -53% -1% -7% 16% 12% The current regulations for lotteries increase our costs -51% -4% -4% 16% 9% Not sure/Not relevant It is difficult to achieve the 20% minimum return to the beneficiary when -39% -6% -14% 17% 6% recruiting from cold prospects Disagree strongly We find it difficult to avoid infringing the Gambling Commission/ Local Disagree -34% -3% -19% 7% 11% Authority regulations Neither agree nor disagreeWe would like to be able to run an individual lottery larger than the current -47% -5% -17% 8% 6% £4m ceiling Agree It is difficult to keep to the £10m annual income ceiling -42% -13% -27% 3% 4% Agree strongly -100% -80% -60% -40% -20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% “How does lottery regulation and administration affect your charity? How does lottery regulation and administration affect your charity? ” Ranked by Agree strongly/AgreeBase: 181 participantsSource: Jun 11, nfpSynergy 6
  • 7. Attitudes towards lotteries - part 2 Not sure/Not relevant Disagree strongly Disagree Neither agree nor disagree Agree Agree strongly We find that lotteries appeal to a certain kind of donor -40% -1% -1% 38% 8% Our income from lotteries has increased over the last two -33% -3% -8% 35% 6% yearsWe would be interested in exploring being part of a coalition -43% -1% -6% 28% 4% to run larger lotteries with bigger prizes We expect our income from lotteries to increase over the -46% -1% -4% 29% 3% next two years We have found that lottery income has held up well during -41% -2% -12% 24% 7% the recessionWe find lottery ticket buyers tend to give in a variety of other -36% -7%-15% 22% 7% ways as well We have found online lotteries very successful -69% -2% -7% 5% 1% -100 -80% -60% -40% -20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% % “Please state to what degree you agree/disagree with the statements below ” Ranked by Agree strongly/AgreeBase: 181 participantsSource: Jun 11, nfpSynergy 7
  • 8. Attitudes towards lotteries - part 2 Not sure/Not relevant Disagree strongly Disagree Neither agree nor disagree Agree Agree strongly We find that lotteries appeal to a certain kind of donor -40% -1% -1% 38% 8% Our income from lotteries has increased over the last two -33% -3% -8% 35% 6% yearsWe would be interested in exploring being part of a coalition -43% -1% -6% 28% 4% to run larger lotteries with bigger prizes We expect our income from lotteries to increase over the -46% -1% -4% 29% 3% next two years We have found that lottery income has held up well during -41% -2% -12% 24% 7% the recessionWe find lottery ticket buyers tend to give in a variety of other -36% -7%-15% 22% 7% ways as well We have found online lotteries very successful -69% -2% -7% 5% 1% -100 -80% -60% -40% -20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% % “Please state to what degree you agree/disagree with the statements below ” Ranked by Agree strongly/AgreeBase: 181 participantsSource: Jun 11, nfpSynergy 8
  • 9. Attitudes towards lotteries - part 2 Not sure/Not relevant Disagree strongly Disagree Neither agree nor disagree Agree Agree strongly We find that lotteries appeal to a certain kind of donor -40% -1% -1% 38% 8% Our income from lotteries has increased over the last two -33% -3% -8% 35% 6% yearsWe would be interested in exploring being part of a coalition -43% -1% -6% 28% 4% to run larger lotteries with bigger prizes We expect our income from lotteries to increase over the -46% -1% -4% 29% 3% next two years We have found that lottery income has held up well during -41% -2% -12% 24% 7% the recessionWe find lottery ticket buyers tend to give in a variety of other -36% -7%-15% 22% 7% ways as well We have found online lotteries very successful -69% -2% -7% 5% 1% -100 -80% -60% -40% -20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% % “Please state to what degree you agree/disagree with the statements below ” Ranked by Agree strongly/AgreeBase: 181 participants 9Source: Jun 11, nfpSynergy
  • 10. How much money did participants raise from lotteries 54% 11% 12% 9% 6% 4% 4% £0-50k £51-100k £101-250k £251-1000k £1001-4000k £4001k + Dont know How much annual income do you get from lottery ticket sales?Base: 157 participantsSource: Jun 11, nfpSynergy 10
  • 11. How much donated income did respondents raise from lotteries 62% 17% 6% 7% 3% 3% 2% £0-25k £26-50k £51-100k £101-250k £251-500k £501k + Dont know How much annual income do you get from donations with lottery ticket sales?Base: 155 participantsSource: Jun 11, nfpSynergy 11
  • 12. How many people took part in respondents’ lotteries 69% 15% 6% 5% 4% 1% 0-10k 10-25k 26-50k 51-100k 101-200k 201k + Approximately how many individuals buy lottery tickets from your organisation every year?Base: 148 participantsSource: Jun 11, nfpSynergy 12
  • 13. How many lotteries did respondents run a year 57% 20% 15% 3% 4% 1% 1 to 2 3 to 5 6 to 10 11 to 15 16 to 25 26+ Please indicate how many lotteries you run each year?Base: 109 participantsSource: Jun 11, nfpSynergy 13
  • 14. What do the general public think about lotteries?
  • 15. Key statistics 57% think lotteries run 46% by charities should be able to compete Opposed to with the National capping the size of Lottery and the charity lotteries Health Lottery 12% played Health Lottery in last 54% played National month 61% Lottery in last Opposed to laws month and regulations which stop any 68% other lotteries from Opposed to capping raising as much the number of tickets money as the charity lotteries can National Lottery 21% sell played a charity lottery in last month 15
  • 16. Demographics of lottery players 100% 90% National Lottery Other lottery or raffle (eg school, charity, etc) Health Lottery 80% 70% 70% 60% 60% 60% 57% 58% 58% 54% 53% 51% 51% 52% 49% 50% 40% 31% 30% 24% 25% 23% 23% 23% 23% 21% 20% 20% 21% 20% 20% 18% 18% 18% 18% 12% 13% 12% 13% 10% 11% 11% 10% 11% 10% 6% 6% 0% Total Male Female AB C1 C2 DE 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ “Have you bought a ticket from the National Lottery/Health Lottery/any other lottery or raffle (e.g. school, charity, etc) in the last month?” YesBase: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 16
  • 17. “Do you think that lotteries run by charities should be able to compete with the National Lottery and the Health Lottery?” 100% 90% 18% 24% 26% 25% 25% 27% 33% 28% 26% 26% 26% 29% 28% 35% 31% 80% 17% Not sure 70% 14% 14% 16% 15% 16% 20% 19% 12% 16% 16% 13% 24% 60% 15% 19% No 50% 40% Yes 65% 30% 61% 60% 58% 60% 60% 57% 56% 56% 55% 56% 56% 50% 50% 49% 20% 10% 0% Total Male Female AB C1 C2 DE 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Recent Non charity donor donorBase: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 17
  • 18. 61% opposed to laws and regulations stopping any other lotteries raising as much as the National Lottery 100% 90% 21% 27% 25% 25% 26% 26% 23% 23% 25% 26% 28% 32% 30% 29% 33% 80% Not sure 70% 60% No 50% 64% 61% 60% 63% 61% 64% 56% 63% 62% 59% 64% 61% 61% 40% 58% 60% Yes 30% 20% 10% 15% 15% 12% 13% 16% 12% 10% 11% 14% 12% 12% 11% 12% 11% 7% 0% Total Male Female AB C1 C2 DE 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Recent Non charity donor donor “Do you think that there should be laws and regulations which stop any other lotteries from raising as much money as the National Lottery does?”Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 18
  • 19. Balance of opinion against charity lottery prizes being capped 100% 21% 17% 19% 16% 14% 19% 90% 24% 20% 21% 22% 20% 21% 24% 28% 27% 80% Not sure 70% 38% 36% 44% 60% 46% 49% 45% 46% 49% 46% No 43% 50% 50% 50% 50% 51% 48% 40% Yes 30% 48% 44% 20% 40% 34% 34% 33% 33% 36% 29% 32% 32% 28% 26% 10% 22% 25% 0% Total Male Female AB C1 C2 DE 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Recent Non charity donor donor “Do you think that the size of the prizes in charity lotteries should be capped?”Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 19
  • 20. Very few think the number of tickets sold by an individual charity lottery should be capped 100% 16% 18% 90% 19% 23% 20% 19% 22% 19% 18% 22% 18% 16% 18% 23% 25% 80% Not sure 70% 60% No 50% 72% 68% 67% 68% 68% 65% 68% 69% 71% 66% 72% 63% 71% 67% 70% 40% Yes 30% 20% 10% 16% 12% 13% 12% 12% 13% 12% 12% 9% 12% 11% 11% 14% 14% 8% 0% Total Male Female AB C1 C2 DE 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Recent Non charity donor donor “Do you think the size (i.e. number of tickets sold) of an individual charity lottery should be capped?”Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 20
  • 21. What changes are wesuggesting to lotteryregulation?
  • 22. The campaign: to deregulate lotteries to reducecosts and allow more money to be raised• Organisations involved: The Lotteries Council, Institute of Fundraising, CAF, nfpSynergy, People Postcode Lottery, Brightsource, 121 Fundraising, The Woods Group, and Rogavi.• The aim: to allow charities raise more money at lower cost with less hassle than currently• The timing: Consultation now open and ends on May 28th• Our aim: to get as many organisations as possible to sign up to our aims and then use that support to lobby government and the Gambling Commission 22
  • 23. Changing the 80:20 rule• The issue: Lottery regulations state that 20% of the proceeds should go to the beneficiary• The problem: its very difficult to build up new lotteries from „cold‟ and keep to this regulation• The solution: make the 80:20 rule apply over time and across all a charities‟ lotteries• But – should we have the 80:20 rule at all 23
  • 24. Remove age verification for 16 and 17 yearolds• The issue: Online lotteries need to provide age verification for anyone buying tickets by debit card in case they are under age• The problem: its very expensive to age verify online negating any income from debit card purchasers• The solution: carry out random „spot checks‟ for debit card users rather than blanket verification 24
  • 25. Dual registration for remote and non-remotelotteries• The issue: the same lottery carried out online/telephone and via paper must be separately registered• The problem: its makes dual lotteries twice the hassle for no obvious reason• The solution: assimilate remote and non-remote licences into one registration based on the standards of non-remote licences 25
  • 26. Allow cloak-room tickets in exempt lotteries• The issue: The legislation requires confirmation for ticket purchasers in exempt lotteries• The problem: this technically makes the use of cloakroom tickets in exempt lotteries illegal• The solution: permit the use of standard pre-printed “cloakroom” tickets in exempt lotteries 26
  • 27. Give charity lotteries proportionateregulation to the gambling risk they pose• The issue: Charities lotteries are regulated as if they were casinos• The problem: Charities get the heavy hand of regulation despite the fact there is no evidence that charity lotteries cause any problem gambling• The solution: create a dedicated charity team and processes at the Gambling Commission, raise the threshold for GC regulation to £1 million and create a central stop list of people who wish to be exempt from lottery mailing 27
  • 28. Remove the turnover limits on charitylotteries• The issue: charity lotteries are capped both in terms of their turnover and their prize money• The problem: this makes it harder for charities to „go large‟ in terms of their lottery fundraising• The solution: remove the turnover limits altogether for charity lotteries 28
  • 29. What next?• We have completed the consultation and are now analysing the response.• Once we are clear that we have the support of the body of charity lottery operators we will go to the Gambling Commission and DCMS to make our case• Any questions? 29
  • 30. What should charity CEOs be paid?Perceptions of acceptable and actualsalariesJoe SaxtonJuly 2012
  • 31. Perceptions of acceptablesalaries
  • 32. Perceived acceptable salaries for different professions Chief executive of a large company (annual turnover over £10m) 1%4% 11% 19% 21% 16% Bank Chief Executive 3% 8% 19% 21% 18% 10% Chief executive of a medium sizedcompany (annual turnover £1m- £10m) 1% 9% 21% 26% 19% 5% Hospital Chief Executive 2% 9% 22% 26% 19% 5% GP0% 8% 26% 30% 20% 3% Member of Parliament 7% 17% 25% 26% 12% 2% Chief executive of a small company (annual turnover under £1m) 3% 19% 33% 21% 11% 1% Charity Chief Executive 8% 26% 28% 18% 9% 1% Nurse 3% 56% 26% 6% 2%1% Social Worker 9% 57% 22% 5% 1% 0% Bus driver 24% 63% 6% 1% 0% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Under £20,000 £20,001 - £40,000 £40,001 - £60,000 £60,001 - £80,000 £80,001 - £100,000 £100, 001 - £120,000 £120,000 - £140,000 Over £140,000 Not sure “How much do you think each of the following should be paid?”Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 32
  • 33. Mean acceptable salaries for different professions £100,000 £90,107 £90,000 Mean score- Nov 09 Mean score- Mar 12 £78,183 £80,000 £73,245 £72,113 £69,376 £70,000 £58,025 £58,903 £60,000 £51,826 £50,000 £40,941 £40,000 £36,453 £30,000 £27,350 £20,000 £10,000 £0 Bus driver Social Nurse Charity Chief Member of GP Hospital Chief Bank Chief Chief Worker Chief executive Parliament Chief executive Executive executive Executive of a small Executive of a of a large company medium company (annual sized (annual turnover company turnover under (annual over £1m) turnover £10m*) £1m- £10m) “How much do you think each of the following should be paid?” * Turnover not specified in Nov 09Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 33
  • 34. Mean acceptable salaries for chief executives of different size charities £80,000 £69,376 £70,000 £62,352 £58,025 £58,903 £60,000 £51,269 £50,000 £40,941 £40,000 £38,414 £30,000 £27,350 £20,000 £10,000 £0 Bus driver Chief executive Nurse Chief executive Chief executive Member of Chief executive GP of a small of a medium of a small Parliament of a large charity (annual sized charity company charity (annual turnover under (annual (annual turnover over £1m) turnover £1m- turnover under £10m) £10m) £1m) “Thinking about chief executives of different types of charities, how much do you think each of the following should be paid?”Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain. 34Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy
  • 35. Perceptions of how much different professions are actually paid £140,000 Mean score- Mar 12 £117,524 £120,000 £112,632 £98,932 £100,000 £91,609 £85,787 £81,807 £80,000 £74,674 £75,636 £60,000 £40,000 £29,850 £32,135 £24,452 £20,000 £0 Bus driver Nurse Social Chief Charity GP Member of Chief Hospital Chief Bank Chief Worker executive Chief Parliament executive Chief executive Executive of a small Executive of a Executive of a large company medium company (annual sized (annual turnover company turnover under (annual over £10m) £1m) turnover £1m- £10m) “How much do you think each of the following are paid on average?”Base: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 35
  • 36. Gap between perceived actual and acceptable salaries £140,000 Actual Acceptable £117,524 £120,000 £112,632 £98,932 £100,000 £91,609 £90,107 £85,787 £81,807 £80,000 £74,674 £75,636 £73,245 £72,113 £78,183 £69,376 £58,025 £58,903 £60,000 £51,826 £40,941 £36,453 £40,000 £32,135 £27,350 £29,850 £24,452 £20,000 £0 Bus driver Nurse Social Chief Charity GP Member of Chief Hospital Chief Bank Chief Worker executive of Chief Parliament executive of Chief executive of Executive a small Executive a medium Executive a large company sized company (annual company (annual turnover (annual turnover under £1m) turnover over £10m) £1m- £10m) “How much do you think each of the following should be paid?” Mean “How much do you think each of the following are paid on average?” MeanBase: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 36
  • 37. Ratio between perceived actual and acceptable salaries £2 Ratio 1.46 1.46 1.50 1.37 £1 1.29 1.25 1.25 1.18 £1 £1 0.88 0.89 £1 0.73 £1 £0 £0 £0 Nurse Social Bus driver GP Chief Chief Chief Hospital Member of Charity Bank Chief Worker executive of executive of executive of Chief Parliament Chief Executive a large a medium a small Executive Executive company sized company (annual company (annual turnover (annual turnover over £10m) turnover under £1m) £1m- £10m) “How much do you think each of the following should be paid?” Mean “How much do you think each of the following are paid on average?” MeanBase: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 37
  • 38. Gap between perceived actual and acceptable salaries for charity chief executives £100,000 £89,603 £90,000 Actual Acceptable £80,000 £72,698 £70,000 £62,352 £60,000 £54,861 £51,269 £50,000 £40,000 £38,414 £30,000 £20,000 £10,000 £0 Chief executive of a small charity (annual Chief executive of a medium sized charity Chief executive of a large charity (annual income under £1m) (annual income £1m- £10m) income over £10m) “How much do you think each of the following should be paid?” Mean “How much do you think each of the following are paid on average?” MeanBase: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 38
  • 39. What does all this mean?• We are quite a socialist nation at heart!• We think bus drivers, nurses and social workers are underpaid• Everyone else is has an actual salary higher than their ideal.• Charity CEOs are nestled between bank chief executives and MPs in terms of the ratio of being seen as overpaid• So although charities actually salaries of CEOs are not as high as some others, the acceptable salaries are that much lower• We need to do some communications work for the sector to show why CEOs are great value for money and worth what they are paid. 39
  • 40. MethodologyDates 23rd March – 2nd April 2012Sample A nationally representative sample of 1,000 adults, 16+ in BritainMethodology Online surveyFieldwork Fieldwork carried out for nfpSynergy by Research Now 40
  • 41. Basic demographics of respondents 100% South West and •The socio-economic classification 90% 65+, 19% Wales, 14% system we use consists of six social AB, 26% grades which classify the household 80% South East, 14% social status based on the occupation Female, 52% 55-64, 14% of the Chief Income Earner (so if a 70% casual worker lives with a parent or Scotland, 9% spouse who is a doctor theyll be an A 60% C1, 30% rather than an E); 45-54, 16% North West, 12% 50% -AB - higher (A) or intermediate (B) North East, Yorkshire and managerial, administrative or 40% 35-44, 19% Humberside, professional 13% -C1 - supervisory or clerical, and C2, 20% 30% junior managerial, administrative or Midlands, 17% professional Male, 48% 25-34, 14% 20% -C2 - skilled manual workers London, 10% -DE - semi-skilled and unskilled DE, 24% workers (D) & state pensioners, casual 10% 16-24, 17% East of England, or lowest grade workers (E) 10% 0% Gender Age Social grade RegionBase: 1,000 adults 16+, Britain.Source: Charity Awareness Monitor, Mar 12, nfpSynergy 41
  • 42. www.nfpsynergy.net2-6 Tenter GroundSpitalfieldsLondon E1 7NH 020 7426 8888insight@nfpsynergy.netwww.twitter.com/nfpsynergywww.linkedin.com/company/nfpsynergyRegistered office: 2-6 Tenter Ground Spitalfields London E1 7NH. Registered in England No. 04387900. VAT Registration 839 8186 72