NSLS 2010

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Presentation for the North Suburban Library System

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  • June 1938: First superhero in Superman, Batman appears a month later in Detective Comics
    1939: The Flash, Hawkman
    1940: Batman no. 1
    1940: The Spirit strip in newspapers
    1940: Walt Disney Comics

    Not a coincidence that comics arrived in in time for WWII -- many of the creators, isolated from their homes, refugees, Superman = ultimate immigrant
    Need for heroes strong
  • June 1938: First superhero in Superman, Batman appears a month later in Detective Comics
    1939: The Flash, Hawkman
    1940: Batman no. 1
    1940: The Spirit strip in newspapers
    1940: Walt Disney Comics

    Not a coincidence that comics arrived in in time for WWII -- many of the creators, isolated from their homes, refugees, Superman = ultimate immigrant
    Need for heroes strong
  • June 1938: First superhero in Superman, Batman appears a month later in Detective Comics
    1939: The Flash, Hawkman
    1940: Batman no. 1
    1940: The Spirit strip in newspapers
    1940: Walt Disney Comics

    Not a coincidence that comics arrived in in time for WWII -- many of the creators, isolated from their homes, refugees, Superman = ultimate immigrant
    Need for heroes strong

  • June 1938: First superhero in Superman, Batman appears a month later in Detective Comics
    1939: The Flash, Hawkman
    1940: Batman no. 1
    1940: The Spirit strip in newspapers
    1940: Walt Disney Comics

    Not a coincidence that comics arrived in in time for WWII -- many of the creators, isolated from their homes, refugees, Superman = ultimate immigrant
    Need for heroes strong
  • June 1938: First superhero in Superman, Batman appears a month later in Detective Comics
    1939: The Flash, Hawkman
    1940: Batman no. 1
    1940: The Spirit strip in newspapers
    1940: Walt Disney Comics

    Not a coincidence that comics arrived in in time for WWII -- many of the creators, isolated from their homes, refugees, Superman = ultimate immigrant
    Need for heroes strong

  • June 1938: First superhero in Superman, Batman appears a month later in Detective Comics
    1939: The Flash, Hawkman
    1940: Batman no. 1
    1940: The Spirit strip in newspapers
    1940: Walt Disney Comics

    Not a coincidence that comics arrived in in time for WWII -- many of the creators, isolated from their homes, refugees, Superman = ultimate immigrant
    Need for heroes strong

  • June 1938: First superhero in Superman, Batman appears a month later in Detective Comics
    1939: The Flash, Hawkman
    1940: Batman no. 1
    1940: The Spirit strip in newspapers
    1940: Walt Disney Comics

    Not a coincidence that comics arrived in in time for WWII -- many of the creators, isolated from their homes, refugees, Superman = ultimate immigrant
    Need for heroes strong
  • June 1938: First superhero in Superman, Batman appears a month later in Detective Comics
    1939: The Flash, Hawkman
    1940: Batman no. 1
    1940: The Spirit strip in newspapers
    1940: Walt Disney Comics

    Not a coincidence that comics arrived in in time for WWII -- many of the creators, isolated from their homes, refugees, Superman = ultimate immigrant
    Need for heroes strong

  • June 1938: First superhero in Superman, Batman appears a month later in Detective Comics
    1939: The Flash, Hawkman
    1940: Batman no. 1
    1940: The Spirit strip in newspapers
    1940: Walt Disney Comics

    Not a coincidence that comics arrived in in time for WWII -- many of the creators, isolated from their homes, refugees, Superman = ultimate immigrant
    Need for heroes strong
  • 1941: Captain America 1 – Captain America punches out Hitler
    Superheroes dominated because of the need for heroes in wartime, as well as the customary habit of creating clear enemies and heroes

    Comics became a kind of propaganda, despite the fascism inherent in the idea of superheroes, something the creators would not outwardly wrangle with until later
  • December 1941: Wonder Woman first appearance, 1st female superhero,
    Hidden elements of S&M flying under the radar
    Batman, of course, accused of being homosexual (just what was Robin up to?)

  • Late 1940s: Romance comics (for girls), Western comics, Crime comics
    1950: Horror Comics became the mainstream, science ficton
    1950s: Korean War pushes war comics to the fore again
  • Late 1940s: Romance comics (for girls), Western comics, Crime comics
    1950: Horror Comics became the mainstream, science ficton
    1950s: Korean War pushes war comics to the fore again
  • Late 1940s: Romance comics (for girls), Western comics, Crime comics
    1950: Horror Comics became the mainstream, science ficton
    1950s: Korean War pushes war comics to the fore again

  • MAD magazine

  • 1954: Frederick Wertham’s Seduction of the Innocent
    1954: U.S. Senate Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency in the United States hearings
    1954: Comics publishers got together to self-regulate, created Comics Code Authority
    1954 onward: crime and horror comics almost extinct, romance comics had little romance, superhero comics returned and sci fi comics became more popular
    1958: Superman’s Girlfriend Lois Lane comic
    1959: Wonder Woman revamped and given new origin
    1959: Aquaman, Justice League of America

  • 1961: Silver Age, also known as Marvel Age, Fantastic Four, noted for natural dialogue, then Hulk
    1963: Amazing Spider-Man
    1964: X-Men
    1969: al superhero titles failing, even Marvel

    Marvel famous for adding humanity back into its heroes -- they were fallible, not invulnerable
    Stan Lee (at 17) created Marvel, and often impressed by trying to tackle important issues within his comics -- X-Men the clearest, as a story of civil rights with two distinct points of view (Magneto vs. Xavier)
    Much like Twilight Zone
  • Death of Gwen Stacey

    The first major move to give a superhero “feet of clay”
    Hero didn’t get there in time, shocking to readers
    Getting closer to reality
    Pushing Spider-man’s guilt to the fore as his motivator
  • Embraced 1960s counterculture
    The “x” both differentiates from mainstream comics and indicates the X-rated contet
    Harvey Kurtzman, R. Crumb,

  • “First” graphic novel
    A Contract with God - stories of 1930s immigrant life in the Bronx in a Jewish tenement in
    Will Eisner, creator of the Spirit, one of the first creators to aggressively push the format as a venue for serious and literary topics
  • Took the tearing down a step further
    Just what would make a man dress up in a giant bat costume and run around being a vigilante? When you think about it, any one of those “heroes” would be unstable and potentially quite dangerous
    Scene: in a group much like Justice League, one member proceeds to try to rape the lone female member
    When another “Hooded Justice” comes to her rescue, he’s accused of getting off on violence, which he doesn’t deny
  • 1986: Batman: Dark Knight Returns gives Batman a dark edge, John Byrne reinvents Superman with Man of Steel, Alan Moore’s Watchmen

    Tearing down superheroes almost viciously
    Superman leads to the detonation of a nuclear bomb in NYC, Batman the only one to try and stop him, leads to Batman starting a vigilante army to fight the U.S., Superman, and everything he once protected
    Quite violent, reveals Batman’s darkest nature, especially his fascist streak, as well as Superman’s
    Definitions of right and wrong much harder to distinguish, with both heroes committing atrocious acts
  • From underground comics hero, rather surprised those who knew him

    Addressed a very literary, serious subject in the Holocaust memoir
    Use of mice/animals to represent people quite groundbreaking
    Speaks to format -- why mice?

    The farther away an image is from reality, the easier it is for every reader to relate -- the more it looks “not like me”, the easier it is to dismiss it

    1986: Art Speigelman’s Maus wins the Pulitzer
    1986: DC starts marking titles “For Mature Readers” causing writers and artists to quit in protest
  • Sandman a masterwork of literary references, using numerous literary devices including foreshadowing, etc.
    An elaborate, complex universe, adult concerns and storylines, existential ponderings
    Nature of dreams, fantasy
    Neil Gaiman created from old DC character from the 1940s


  • 1987: Lone Wolf and Cub translated and published, Mai the Psychic Girl, first manga in U.S.

    Layout the key -- leisurely storytelling, focus on emotion, cinematic style very unlike western comics

    1987: Marvel’s The Punisher becomes favorite, violence and psychotic behavior










  • You don’t even need to be an artist!

    Made up entirely of clip art for office brochures/presentations

    Scathing critique of post Sept. 11 attitude in the U.S.
  • You don’t even need to be an artist!

    Made up entirely of clip art for office brochures/presentations

    Scathing critique of post Sept. 11 attitude in the U.S.
  • You don’t even need to be an artist!

    Made up entirely of clip art for office brochures/presentations

    Scathing critique of post Sept. 11 attitude in the U.S.
  • You don’t even need to be an artist!

    Made up entirely of clip art for office brochures/presentations

    Scathing critique of post Sept. 11 attitude in the U.S.



















































































  • NSLS 2010

    1. 1. Go Graphic! Robin Brenner * April 2010
    2. 2. Who reads comics? • Average age: 34 • Gender: 87 percent male; 13 percent female • Manga, teenagers: 75% female
    3. 3. It’s a format, not a genre
    4. 4. 1841 - Punch Magazine
    5. 5. 1894-1898 - Hogan’s Alley
    6. 6. 1897 - Katzenjammer Kids
    7. 7. 1905 - Little Nemo in Slumberland
    8. 8. 1929 - Funnies on Parade
    9. 9. 1929 - Tintin
    10. 10. 1931 - Dick Tracy
    11. 11. 1934 - Flash Gordon
    12. 12. 1938 - Dawn of the Golden Age
    13. 13. 1940s - The Golden Age
    14. 14. 1941 - The Spirit
    15. 15. 1947 - Young Romance
    16. 16. Horror and Science Fiction
    17. 17. True Crime Comics
    18. 18. 1952 - MAD
    19. 19. 1954 - Seduction of the Innocent Frederick Wertham Comics Code Authority
    20. 20. 1960s - The Silver (Marvel) Age
    21. 21. 1960s - The Silver (Marvel) Age
    22. 22. 1968 - Underground Comix
    23. 23. 1978 - A Contract with God
    24. 24. 1986 - Watchmen
    25. 25. 1986 - Batman: The Dark Knight Returns
    26. 26. 1986 - Maus
    27. 27. 1989 - Sandman
    28. 28. Mighty Morphin Space Invaders Transformers Power Rangers 1978 1976 1980 Japanese Pop Culture in the US
    29. 29. 1987 - Japanese Manga arrives
    30. 30. Lone Wolf and Cub 1987
    31. 31. Ranma 1/2 1993
    32. 32. Ghost in the Shell 1996
    33. 33. Sailor Moon 1999
    34. 34. Manga Boom Begins 2000
    35. 35. 1998 - PvP (Player versus Player)
    36. 36. 2000 - Megatokyo
    37. 37. 2003 - Dinosaur Comics
    38. 38. 2006 - Kate Beaton
    39. 39. Literacy Literacy (strict definition) - the ability to read and write. Literacy as a set of skills for interpreting information in: • Oral or written • Equations language • Gestures • Images • Videos & animation • Symbols • Sounds
    40. 40. Western Symbols
    41. 41. Speech Swearing Thought Dead Western Symbols
    42. 42. Japanese Symbols
    43. 43. Silence Sweatdrop Ghost Japanese Symbols
    44. 44. Japanese Symbols
    45. 45. Japanese Symbols
    46. 46. ANGER BLUSHING CANINE TOOTH SNORT = One irritated and embarrassed young man Japanese Symbols
    47. 47. Action Lines
    48. 48. Action Lines
    49. 49. Text Bubbles
    50. 50. Text Bubbles
    51. 51. Flowers & Sparkles
    52. 52. Flowers & Sparkles
    53. 53. Aladdin & Jasmine Jafar Sultan Character Types
    54. 54. Hisoka Tzusuki Muraki Character Types
    55. 55. Panel Sequences
    56. 56. Panel Sequences
    57. 57. Panel Sequences
    58. 58. Panel Sequences
    59. 59. Panel Sequences
    60. 60. Age Ratings
    61. 61. Age Ratings
    62. 62. Age Ratings
    63. 63. Age Ratings
    64. 64. Age Ratings
    65. 65. Age Ratings
    66. 66. Age Ratings
    67. 67. Age Ratings
    68. 68. Age Ratings
    69. 69. Age Ratings
    70. 70. Age Ratings
    71. 71. Age Ratings
    72. 72. Online Reviews
    73. 73. Online Resources
    74. 74. Adventures in Cartooning
    75. 75. Olympians
    76. 76. Binky the Space Cat
    77. 77. Lunch Lady
    78. 78. Kit Feeny
    79. 79. Dinosaur Hour
    80. 80. Alison Dare
    81. 81. Crogan Adventures
    82. 82. Prime Baby
    83. 83. Salt Water Taffy
    84. 84. Secret Science Alliance
    85. 85. Foiled
    86. 86. Smile
    87. 87. Transformations
    88. 88. Twilight
    89. 89. Graphic Spin: Cinderella
    90. 90. Wonderland
    91. 91. Calamity Jack
    92. 92. Trickster
    93. 93. Bayou
    94. 94. Pluto
    95. 95. Emma
    96. 96. Natsume Ono not simple House of Five Leaves
    97. 97. Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossom
    98. 98. Perspectives on World War II
    99. 99. Hill & Wang
    100. 100. New Orleans After the Deluge
    101. 101. The Photographer
    102. 102. Logicomix
    103. 103. Kick-Ass
    104. 104. Kick-Ass
    105. 105. Asterios Polyp
    106. 106. Events

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