The black mamba project
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The black mamba project

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  • Dendroaspis polylepis also known as the Black Mamba is the world’s fastest snakes, and it is also one of the most venomous. The reptile has an average lifespan in the wild of eleven years or more. The snake can reach heights up to fourteen feet, and can weigh up to three and a half pounds.
  • The Black Mamba is shy in nature, and will usually try to escape if it is confronted. However, if the snake is threatened it will raise its head up spreading its cobra-like neck flap open. It will then display its black colored mouth and hiss. The snake then strikes repeatedly injecting large amounts of potent neuro- and cardio toxin with each strike. The Black Mamba has the ability to lift a third of its body off the ground to attack if needed.

The black mamba project The black mamba project Presentation Transcript

  • Dendroaspis polylepis (Dendroaspis polylepis)also known as the BlackMamba is the world’sfastestsnake, and it is also oneofthe most venomous.Thereptile has an averagelifespan in the wild ofelevenyears or more. The By: Nichole Fieldssnake canreach heights up tofourteen Biology 101feet, and can weigh up Photography by Atleeto threeand a half pounds. Professor Swatski Hargis
  • The snake is not black atall,but instead a grey toolive tone.Its name refers to theblackcolor in its mouth that itdisplays as a defensemechanism whenthreatened. Photography by Kibuyu
  • The Black Mamba’shabitatranges from EasternAfricain southern Ethiopia toSouthwest Africa. Newport Geographic
  • The Black Mamba dwellsin the savannas androckyhills of southern andeasternAfrica. It spends itsnightsin burrows, or deepamong rocksand timber. The coldbloodedsnake relies on externalheat to maintain its bodytemperature, so it basksin the sun during the dayon low tree branches androcks. Photography by O. Taillon
  • The carnivorous snakefeeds on rodents, bats,small mammals, birds,andlizards. The snake isable toswallow its prey whole,and digest it within afewhours, unlike someother snakes. Photography by Tad Arensmeier
  • The world’s fastest snake,the Black Mamba, cantravelspeeds up to 12.5 milesper hour. This speed isnormallynot used to hunt prey, buttoescape danger. Photography by A. Jaszlics
  • The Black Mamba is shyin nature, and will usuallytry to escape if it isconfronted.However, if the snake isthreatenedit will raise its head up,spreading its cobralike-neck flap open. It willthen displayits black colored mouth,and hiss.The snake then strikesrepeatedly injectinglarge amounts of potentneuro-and cardio toxin witheach strike.The Black Mamba has theability to lift athird of its body off theground toattack if needed. Photography by thebutterflydiaries
  • The Black Mamba’s biteis 100% fatal and can causedeath within 20 minutes. Photography by Rod Patterson
  • The snake can deliver up to400 milligrams of venom,butonly 10 to 15 milligrams isneeded to kill an adulthuman.The venom is injectedthroughtwo hollow fangs, whichremainflat until the snake bites,and movablemouth bones erect them. Photography by Guenter Leitenbauer
  • Symptoms Include: Pain in the area bitten Tingling sensation in the extremities Drooping eyelids(Eyelid Ptosis) Tunnel Vision Sweating Excessive Salivation Lack of Muscle Control …………without medical attention the symptoms rapidly progress to: Convulsions Respiratory Failure Coma And death due to suffocation from paralysisPhotography by Brad
  • Works Cited“Black Mamba Snakes.” Animal Corner. Web. 4 Oct. 2011. <http://animalcorner.co.uk/ven_snakesblkmambahtml-.Tov Ibscy16E.email/>.“Black Mamba.” Animals Nat Geo Wild. National Geographic.com.Web. 4 Oct. 2011. <http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/>.“Black Mamba.” Encyclopedia of Animals (2006). Primary Search.EBSCO. Web. 25 Sept. 2011. <http://ezproxy.hacc.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=prh&AN=20073437&site=ehost-live>.
  • Works Cited“Black Mamba vs. Animal Kingdom.” 15 May 2008. YouTube.Web. 25 Nov. 2011.“Jeff Corwin black mamba clip.” 29 May 2010. YouTube. Web.25 Nov. 2011.
  • Works CitedA. Jaszlics. “The Black Mamba.” Photograph. Flickr.Yahoo. 4 Nov. 2008.Web. 25 Nov. 2011.Arensmeirer, Tad. “Black Mamba Swallowing.” Photograph. Flickr.Yahoo.27 March 2007. Web. 25 Nov. 2011.Brad. “Black Mamba.” Photograph. Flickr.Yahoo. 16 July 2008. Web. 25Nov. 2011.Hargis, Atlee. “IMG 0928.” Photograph. Flickr.Yahoo. 8 April 2009.Web. 25 Nov. 2011.Kibuyu. “Dendroaspis polylepis.” Photograph. Flickr.Yahoo. 1986. Web.25 Nov. 2011.
  • Works CitedLeitenbauer, Guenter. “Black Mamba(Dendroaspis polylepis).Photograph. Flickr.Yahoo. 12 Aug. 2006. Web. 25 Nov. 2011.O. Taillon. “African savanna.” Photograph. Flickr.Yahoo. 24 July 2005.Web. 25 Nov. 2011.