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Tech Nation eye tracking

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Tech Nation eye tracking

Tech Nation eye tracking

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  • Eye tracking was conducted as part of the Tech Nation in-home ethnographies, covering the 5 technology segments. It allowed us to explore how people were interacting with a variety of media and tech devices, through monitoring actualbehaviour when using their devices, rather than relying on self perception. Eye tracking was conducted at the outset of the ethnographies to make sure that behaviour and responses were not biased by any questioning or other ethnographic activities. Up to 30 minutes of eye tracking was conducted with each respondent, with participants left alone to encourage natural behaviour. They were simply asked to use media and tech devices of their choice, as they normally would at that time of day. Specialist mobile eye-tracking equipment was used to measure and trace respondents’ visual paths. Each respondent wore eye-tracking glasses which project infra-red light onto respondents’ eyes. The reflection of the beam was captured and interpreted by sensors, allowing visual paths and dwell times to be displayed and interrogated. A video camera was also incorporated in glasses, so that the gaze path could be overlaid on the film footage of what respondents were looking at. Afterwards, respondents were asked about their own perceptions of their attention paid to different devices used, and the content they were looking at.
  • Reminder slide for who groups are.
  • Tech Nation has already shown that media habits are shaped by the tech you own. In-home wi-fi has fuelled the interplay between mobile devices and other media. It offers more immediate, in-the-moment reference and use. There’s no longer the effort of using a desktop, which removes people from the moment. However, some tech groups – notably Price Pragmatists and Quality Seekers do not currently have the equipment to multi-screen
  • ITV news was on the TV, but Danny’s viewing was frequently punctuated by checking his ancient Blackberry and messaging friends.
  • Majority of time spent watching TV, yet habitually referred to phone 22 times, with each instance averaging just 7 seconds Lack of interest in technology – and lack of a particularly interesting programme (eg sport) on TV, possibly fuelled quite high level of attention switching. The longest dwell time for TV was only 3 ½ minutes – which was almost 5 times longer than the longest phone dwell time, but the typical behaviour was to flick between screens.
  • BBC early evening news on the TV, but the majority of time spent reading the print newspaper. Other/non-media includes his wife Jan, when they were discussing an ad.
  • Presence of another person, as well as TV being on, resulted in large number of visits – but most attention on print newspaper.The print newspaper is quite absorbing - each visit lasts over a minute, and the longest dwell time is over 7 minutes
  • An ad in the newspaper captures attention and stimulates discussion – here we see our Quality Seekers being interviewed after eye-tracking, explaining what happened when he saw the ad. It’s then overlayed with the eye tracking video taken previously to show where John’s gaze fell.
  • Newspapers are involving and demand more attention – in another session the quality seeker respondent put the newspaper aside “for later” as there was something they particularly wanted to watch on TV and they could not concentrate on both. As light commercial TV viewers, Quality Seekers can be more reliant on their newspaper to point them in the direction of new products and offers. In this session, John recalled discussing an ad for Virgin broadband that Jan would follow up online.
  • Although our TV worshipper Michelle has the TV on all the time, the research took place outside “family time”, so the main task - and it was considered an obligation as well as a pleasure – was reading the paper. Closely checking the paper for information, new product news, deals and offers is part of good household management. Once again, the eye-tracking demonstrated that newspapers require a level of concentration and attention higher than other media/devices.Another female TV Worshipper was more visually engaged by the TV – it accounted for 42% of time spent – however, she also frequently dipped into her newspaper, laptop and smartphone. Again, the print newspaper had the longest average dwell time per view.
  • Another TV Worshipper,Dean, also had the TV on all the time, visiting 26 times, but with an average dwell time of just 10 seconds. His regular evening ritual involves sitting down with the Sun after work – he looked at the paper 24 times, but the average dwell time was more than twice as long as TV, at 23 seconds. But the longest dwell time was for his laptop – a total of just under 9 ½ minutes over 11 visual visits. It’s not that he has a short attention span, or that he’s inattentive, or that the TV and newspaper content is too dull to keep him engaged. Laptop visits were directly related to the TV and newspaper content he was consuming. He consulted his laptop to find out more info about the Europa Cup draw as it was announced on TV. The second laptop task was prompted by his newspaper.
  • As we can see in the video, screen entertainment is still top of mind for this family minded TV Worshipper and the newspaper insert ad spurs him to action. We’ll see a montage of Dean explaining his behaviour in an interview after the eye-tracking, interspersed with video footage of where his gaze landed when he was following up the newspaper ad.
  • “TV is just noise background” when not appointment to view. Whereas newspaper reading is highly engaging and requires concentration
  • Andy focused exclusively on his desktop, which is his home media hub. Working from home, this is the main focal point for both professional and home entertainment use. Like many Social Addicts, Andy does not have a TV set and views content on his other electronic devices.
  • We captured Andy’s daily ritual as he took a break from work without leaving his workspace. He looked ata mixture of editorial and entertainment content. The bulk of his time was shared between catching up with the day’s events and watching videos on a newspaper website. To keep connected with friends and professional acquaintances he habitually checked his emails throughout and dipped into his Facebook page. Opportunities for advertising are evident, with Andy’s gaze often captured by online ads. Always seeking the latest devices to keep connected, this included adverts for tech products.
  • With no TV set at home, Sophie’s laptop grabbed the vast majority of her attention. She uses her laptop for watching BBC iPlayer, reading newspaper sites and online shopping, as well as Facebook and YouTube.Her laptop use was punctuated with chat and social media on her smartphone (4 visits in total at an average of 22.8 secs). What’s interesting is that the pattern is almost exactly the same as Andy’s: being a Social Addict does not mean people are unable to focus, they just need to know they are connected. The longest online dwell time for Sophie was 21minutes, as she watched short videos, browsed fashion/shopping sites and checked Facebook.
  • We also saw the same pattern for Tiffany, who is a 26 year old social addict (her home is very atypical as she had just inherited from her grandmother). However, during the eye tracking she was highly focussed on her print newspaper, despite having her laptop and tablet nearby, and the TV permanently on.
  • Lucy not only owns a wide range of technology, but she also needs to keep multiple devices on the go to ensure that she’s not missing anything. During eye-tracking attention divided fairly evenly between devices, in terms of overall time.Lucy browsed her newspaper, devoting time to detailed reading of articles of interest. (She will often return to the newspaper throughout the day, at times convenient to her to allow sufficient attention . She finds the paper better for this than online or apps). Her smartphone is never far from her grasp, except when watching films with the family, when she makes a special effort to make sure that her mobile devices are kept out of (her) reach. Smartphone used for a range of activities: app-based games, web browsing, weather, Sky News app, browsing shopping sites, Facebook. Laptop and tablet for more focused attention, including newsbrands
  • Lucy had the highest number of visits of all – 162 - as she tried to keep up with various media activities. The maximum visit time for on any one medium was just over a minute and a half.She browsed her newspaper, devoting time to reading of articles of interest as well as noting ads. (She will often return to the newspaper throughout the day, at times convenient to her to allow sufficient attention )Lucy’s smartphone is never far from her grasp, whether watching TV, reading a newspaper, spending time with family, or even cooking. When watching films with the family, she makes a special effort to make sure that her mobile devices are kept out of reach. Lucy used her smartphone for a range of activities: app-based games, web browsing, weather, Sky News app, browsing shopping sites, Facebook
  • TV:while TV does not always receive the majority of concentration, it’s often a constant in the in-home repertoire. TV is habitually switched on (even when streamed via a mobile device) and has both audio and visual pull. Aside from immersive, appointment viewing, it often grabs attention as interesting content is heard.Newsbrands: Written or text-based materials(e.g. eBooks, tablet, print and online newspapers) are typically a primary source of attention when used, with people immersed in the content. Text based media often used separately from other distractions, and there is little active interplay with secondary devices – though some follow up ads Newsbrands (print and online) command a large share of attention, typically in the primary role. Users will often return to content at a time of convenience, in order to allow detailed reading free of major distractionsThere is generally less evidence of newsbrands being used in a secondary role due to the need to concentrate on the written word With smartphones, there is habitual use and signs of dependency especially among groups such as Social Addicts. There’s a comfort in having them within reach, and they are often referred to with no clear prompt. This is fuelled by a desire to keep connected socially and to tap into information sourcesLaptops are typically a primary focus of attention. They are often used for activities that require more concentration, like watching videos, reading news content, shopping, or online bankingTablet use has parallels with both laptops and smartphones and occupies a middle ground. It offers an immediate reference point, and provides a more satisfying user experience than smaller devices
  • Content is the overarching driver of attention: - across all media and all devices/formats, content of interest or relevance – whether entertainment, information, or advertising – is likely to grab and retain focus Context drives choice of device and determines which receives primary attention: - in home environment laptops or desktops are often used in preference to smartphones for video and entertainment content the main TV set will typically be preferred for such content, unless it is already in use by another family memberNo single media channel has a monopoly on being the primary focus, it shifts by content, mood, and presence of others in the room.Eye-tracking helps to demonstrate that there is no straight line equation between reported time spent with a particular medium and the level of attention, engagement or effectiveness of communications in that medium. It’s far more complex. People are often unaware of their own behaviour – they think they are “always on” social media/always checking emails, for example, but their visual attention is captured for very short time spans. Conversely, impact can be achieved in a very short visual time span – several of our respondents could play back ads they had seen in newspapers, their motivations and intended actions even though they had captured visual attention momentarily.

Transcript

  • 1. Squeezed financially & low interest in tech 25% are 16-34 Only 20% own a smartphone A typical John Lewis customer 70% tend to buy tech once it‟s been tried and tested Family life revolves around TV, TV and more TV Constantly connected brand junkies Tech aficionados who love to show off 44% are over 35 70% are over 35 Highest ownership of most mobile devices Account for 36% of annual tech purchases 98% have pay TV
  • 2. Eye tracking key findings Wi-fi fuels interplay between mobile devices and other media But many Price Pragmatists and Quality Seekers do not currently have the equipment to multi-screen
  • 3. Other / Nonmedia 9% Blackberry 11% % of overall time spent on each media / activity / device TV 81%
  • 4. Avg. dwell time per visit: 22 visits 23 visits Number of visits* by media/device 50.1 secs 7.1 secs * „Visits‟ are occasions where participants switch attention to a media / device, including initial occasions and revisits
  • 5.  Sport on TV is likely to capture more attention. Uses laptop or phone at the same time to banter with friends about the event  Films on TV or DVD are particularly engrossing. Will often look up details about the film and its stars afterwards  Likely to seek other distractions, such as reading the paper, using laptop, or chatting if soaps or reality shows are on the box
  • 6. Other / Non-media 13% Newspaper TV (print) 7% 80% % of overall time spent on each media / activity / device
  • 7. Avg. dwell time per visit: 27 visits 32 visits Number of visits* by media / device 65 secs 6.9 secs
  • 8.  Print newspaper is engrossing, with TV and radio offering background noise and minimal distraction  No internet on mobile plus prospect of starting up desktop PC to check for information tends to be a barrier to spur-of-the-moment second screening  Visual path often drawn to newspaper ads, and their role is valued. As a BBC loyalist, print ads provide a valuable source of information, deals and offers. Intend to follow up online
  • 9. Michelle Other / Non-media 4% TV 7% Newspaper (print) Smartphone 10% % of overall time spent on each media / activity / device 79%
  • 10. Michelle 8.9 secs Avg. dwell time per visit: 1 min 55 secs 7 visits 22 visits 24 visits Number of visits* by media / device 30.4 secs
  • 11. Dean Other / TV Non-media 17% 5% Smartphone 7% Newspaper (print) 36% Laptop 36% % of overall time spent on each media / activity / device
  • 12.  Newspaper reading demands higher level of  The newspaper is engrossing, with TV and radio concentration offering background noise and minimal distraction  Eye track captures visual path as newspaper is  No internet on mobile and prospect of starting up searched for adverts, deals, and offers. Attention is desktop PC to check for information tends to be a drawn to grocery, holiday, plus tech items and TV barrier to spur-of-the-moment second screening subscriptions  Visual path often drawn to newspaper ads, and their  TV always on and provides a break from reading role is valued. As a BBC loyalist, print ads provide a  Content and time of day plays a vital role. TV is more valuable source of information, deals and offers likely to capture a greater share of attention if watched with family
  • 13. Andy Desktop 89% Other / Non-media 11% % of overall time spent on each media / activity / device
  • 14. Andy % of overall time spent on each activity Newsbrand text content 54% Newsbrand video content Email 34% 7% Maximum dwell time Number of visits 199 seconds 12 143 seconds 3 24 seconds 5 Advertising Other 3% 18 seconds 3 Advertising Tech 1% 9 seconds 2 Social Media 1% 6 seconds 1
  • 15. Sophie Other / non-media Laptop 2% 93% Smartphone 5% % of overall time spent on each media / activity / device
  • 16. Tiffany Other / non-media 2% Newspaper (print) 93% % of overall time spent on each media / activity / device TV 5%
  • 17.  Newspaper reading demands higher level of  The newspaper is engrossing, with TV and radio concentration, whether print or digital offering background noise and minimal distraction  Social media/messaging is on all the time, but dealt with  No internet on mobile and prospect of starting up quickly. It does not require long periods of focus desktop PC to check for information tends to be a  Desktop/laptop as media gateway - entertainment barrier to spur-of-the-moment second screening , news, social media hub  Visual path often drawn to newspaper ads, and their  Tablet/phone for more spur of the moment reference role is valued. As a BBC loyalist, print ads provide a and messaging valuable source of information, deals and offers
  • 18. Lucy Other / Non-media 7% Smartphone TV 29% 23% Tablet Newspaper 14% (print) 27% % of overall time spent on each media / activity / device
  • 19. 20 visits 28 visits 35 visits 80 visits Number of visits* by media / device Avg. dwell time per visit: 7.6 secs 22.1 secs 25.4 secs 18.7 secs
  • 20. Callum Other / Non-media 25% Laptop 15% Newspaper (print) Smartphone 21% 40% % of overall time spent on each media / activity / device
  • 21. 6 visits 27 visits 23 visits Number of visits* by media / device Avg. dwell time per visit: 23.5 secs 10.1 secs 55 secs
  • 22.  Typical pattern is multiple device/platform use, with newsbrands and streamed TV/video gaining most attention  However, when “on a mission”, researching new tablet via laptop, another Tech Rich had lowest number of visits overall  Recognition that newspaper /written content demands more concentration, whatever the device. Will sometimes take to another, non-tech room, eg kitchen
  • 23. Eye tracking key findings TV often a constant, but not constantly viewed Interesting audio content prompts attention Appointment to view (irrespective of screen used) more immersive Laptop/desktops typically primary focus of attention. Used for activities that require more concentration – videos, newsbrands, shopping, banking Habitual presence and checking, for reassurance, information and keeping in touch – but not universal, and very short dwell times Tablets offer both immediate reference point and better viewing/reading experience than smartphone Newsbrands typically primary source of attention Require concentration, irrespective of platform
  • 24. Eye tracking key findings • Time spent = complex notion • Content is the overarching driver of attention • Context drives choice of device and determines which receives primary attention
  • 25. TGI Clickstream Using Tech Types in Context
  • 26. 2+hrs/day online Five Tech Types 55% 50% 42% 39% 24% Price Pragmatist Quality Seekers TV Worshipper Social Addicts Tech Rich
  • 27. Online Activities Five Tech Types • Researching family history • Learning languages • Using e-mail • Sending text messages • Comparing prices • • Researching family history • Donating money to charity • Making travel/holiday plans • = Learning languages Checking stocks, shares, investment s Accessing government services • Fantasy sports • Study work • Online gambling • Learning languages • Viewing classified ads • • Researching information on fashion/beauty Paid for films, series, documentarie s (viewing/downloading) • Downloading ring tones/wallpaper for you mob phone • = Researching family history Updates via RSS feeds • Renting DVDs • Viewing /downloading free films, series, documentarie s TV programmes (visiting websites) • • • Listening/downloading paid for music • Playing paid for games Listening/downloading paid for music = Listening/downloading paid for music