PEOPLE & NEWS
Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism
Digital News Report 2014
In partnership with
Background and methodology
One of the largest news surveys in the world –online news habits of more than 18,000 people in ...
 Role of smartphones a key agent of change
 Traditional media continues to dominate online usage in the UK, but
this is ...
Smartphones and
tablets
Consistent pattern of strong growth in all markets
• 8b Which, if any, of the following devices have you used to access ne...
UK penetration now higher than US – but still behind Denmark
• 8b Which, if any, of the following devices have you used to...
Impact and value of new devices
• Increasing the frequency with which we access the news
• Increasing the access points fo...
56%
20%
55%
23%
48%
25%
35%
23%22%
17%
Smartphone Tablet
Smartphone and tablet by age
18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55+
35-44 gr...
OPT9a. Thinking specifically about when you look for news on a MOBILE, which of the following statements
most applies to y...
Smartphone users tend to access fewer new sources
and brands with strong app propositions do best
On a smartphone, news
br...
Multiplatform world
In general new devices are not replacing TV, radio or print, though usage
patterns are changing an bec...
From brand’s point of view …
It’s an increasingly complex world. Different devices are used at different
points through th...
From audience’s point of view …
GENERATIONAL SPLIT: Older people prefer a newspaper ‘edition’ or scheduled ‘TV
broadcasts’...
Newspaper brands
overall reach
Newspaper usage across platforms
93%
83% 81%
78%
75% 75% 74% 72%
58%
55%
82%
67% 68% 67%
48%
31%
49%
35% 33%
40%
Finland D...
Q5b. Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week?
Showing answers for Huff Post and Buzz...
UK brands suffering less disruption
Paying for news
Paying for news
Overall numbers still low but an increasing proportion are moving to online
subscription with 1. Times 2. ...
Who is paying for online news?
Motivations for paying for news
Motivations for paying for news
Role of the reporter as
driver of engagement
The influence and value of individual journalists
In Spain, France and the United States the journalist is considered
impo...
The influence and value of individual journalists
In Spain, France and the United States the journalist is considered
impo...
64% of Twitter users follow a professional news account
• 48% follow a journalist
• 40% follow a breaking news account
• 2...
Launch:
Thursday 12th June
Edelman, London
Friday 13th June
Editors News Summit, Barcelona
More Information
www.digitalnew...
A closer look
at newsbrands
in the
digital world
Newspaper brand readers are deeply
involved with all things digital
MORE…
 Devices
 Interest
 Engagement
 Social
 Int...
Digital newspaper brand readers are.....
56% more likely
than the average
internet user
to read news on a
tablet
Digital newspaper readers are.....
36% more likely
to read news on a
smartphone
Digital newspaper brand readers are.....
67% more likely
use Twitter for news
Digital newspaper readers are more likely to
access
Newspaper brands reach nearly three-quarters
of the UK online audience
Q5 Which, if any, of the following have you used to...
Print
84%
Which platforms do newspaper
readers use?
Base: 1494 newspaper readers
Computer
36%
Tablet
15%
Smartphone
16%
% ...
Youngest readers favour digital newsbrands
63% 63%
67%
72%
79%
85%
43%
47%
54%
63%
72%
79%
49%
37% 38%
34%
28% 30%
18-24 2...
Most popular commercial news source
41%
39%
30%
26%
16%
16%
13%
9%
6%
6%
56%
46%
35%
23%
10%
11%
10%
10%
1%
4%
Digital new...
Impact of devices
% accessing digital newspaper brands last week
Base: 1598 device users
37
One device
% 50
Two devices
% ...
Tablet newspaper readers
read newspapers on
their tablet last week
Base: Total sample 2082 internet users who have accesse...
Base:481 who access news via their tablet
Tablet readers are highly engaged with
newspapers overall
read a newspaper on ta...
Smartphone newspaper readers
4.9m
read newspapers on their
smartphone last week
Base: Total sample 2082 internet users who...
Base: 635 who access news via their smartphone
Smartphone readers are highly engaged with
newspapers overall
read a newspa...
Which devices do digital newspaper
readers use?
% of all digital newspaper readers using each device last week
Computer
71...
More frequent access
57%
62%
66%
70%
28%
24%
24%
21%
Several times a day Once a day
Q1b Typically, how often do you access...
More interested
News Lovers Daily Briefers Casual users
UK internet users Print + digital newspapers
19%
29%
52%
29%
16%
5...
Multiplatform readers are more interested in news
64%
72%
75%
79%
UK internet users
Print newspapers
Digital newspapers
Pr...
News lovers read newspapers
8.1
million readers
=
84%
of News Lovers are
newspaper readers
Digital newspaper readers more
engaged with fast and slow news
Followed a live
news page
within a website
Used an app Look...
Digital newspaper readers more engaged with fast and
slow news
59%
43%
16%
14%
13%
8%
7%
7%
5%
4%
74%
61%
23%
20%
20%
12%
...
Multiplatform newspaper
readers are 75% more likely
to share a news story
More active on social networks
Multiplatform new...
56% of all people sharing
news via social media are
digital newspaper readers
More active on social networks
55% of all pe...
More active, more frequently
Digital and multi-
platform newspaper
readers share, comment
and discuss with friends
more of...
Paying for news
49%
7%
47%
17%
Bought a printed newspaper Paid for digital news
UK internet users Digital newspaper readers
Brand and journalists create loyalty
19%
12%
18%
38%
45%
32%
57%
10%
18%
18%
33%
37%
43%
45%
Quality of specific area
No o...
Brand and journalists create trust
63%
44%
74%
59%
Brand Journalists
UK internet users Multi-platform newspaper readers
% ...
Summary for newspaper brands
 Central, influential role
 Massive audience – 73% of UK online population
 New audiences ...
More information
 www.newsworks.org.uk
 www.digitalnewsreport.org
People & News 2014
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People & News 2014

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Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, Digital News Report 2014

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  • David Levy, director and joint editor:
    This is our third annual report that attempts to track and compare changes in online news consumption across countries.
     
    It’s the largest international news survey of its type in the world and it’s based on an online poll by YouGov of over 18,000 people in ten countries
     
    You can see the countries in our survey here and I guess what is useful for you is that it sets what’s going on - here in the UK - in an international context. A lot of the terms of the debate are set by what is happening in the United States and part of the value of this study is show that different countries have very particular media systems and cultures. And whilst in some respects technology is driving change everywhere – we can also see the UK is following a more European path or its own path driven by the characteristics of this market.
     
  • Example of country section from full report.
  • Nic Newman: author and joint editor
    I am really just going to focus on four things that I think emerge clearly as stories from this year’s data and which I hope will be relevant to what it is you do
     
    Firstly the role of smartphone in particular. I think we now have three years of evidence that shows it is really THIS device that is causing the biggest change in news habits and leading us to a more personal and social approach to news - particularly for the young
     
    Secondly … and to David’s point earlier …despite these trends traditional news brands are still very strong here in the UK in terms of reach and engagement – though there is much more disruption in other countries .
     
    Thirdly we have new evidence about paying for news and in particular around who is paying for news and what drives their motivations
     
    And finally I’ll talk a little bit about how digital and social media are encouraging a more direct relationship between individual journalists and audiences and what that might mean for News Brands
  • So firstly … smartphone …this shows the percentage of people accessing news via smartphones and the growth that we’ve seen in the last three years in the five countries we’ve been looking at since 2012.
     
    Across our entire sample 64% have access to an internet connected phone and in every country the majority of those people 37% are using them to access news every week. You can see the UK growth on the left
  • On Tablets it is a similar story … so on average a third have access now to a tablet and 20% about a fifth of or entire sample are using them for news each week. And the growth continues to be phenomenal. You can see in the UK gone from 8% to 23% in three years
  • So we’ve seen a big growth in the usage of news on smartphone and tablets …but it is much more than that. We see that these devices in particular are affecting behaviour and driving different kinds of value
    Smartphones in particular are encouraging people to access news more frequently – see that every year in our data …. And the more devices you have the more likely you are to access more frequently
     They are extending access points to different points in a day, giving people access to news wherever they are  
    So this is a quote from a young smartphone user that we talked to as part of our research …” it’s easy, its right here you have everything at your fingertips all the time”
     And some of these devices are also making it more likely to pay for a news service of some kind
    People do seem to feel differently about their smartphones in particular and are coming to rely on them more and more In the UK, 24% say the mobile phone is their MAIN way of accessing digital news – and for under 45s that figure rise to 30% - almost a third say it is their most important way of accessing news.

  • he other key point about smartphones and tablets is that they are very different demographics
     
    So smartphones still being used for news by younger people – it is getting a bit older stretching into the 35-44 category – under 45 over 45 split which don’t see with the tablet where news usage older and the biggest growth this year has been in the 44-54 group. Those are international figures but if anything more striking in the UK
  • In terms of apps vs mobile websites …. One of the interesting findings is that we’ve seen an increase in the use of apps in the UK on both smartphones and tablets …despite the fact that most news organisations now have optimised mobile websites … majority prefer simplicity and ease of use of an app on smartphone.
    On a tablet mobile web is still used more for news but apps are catching up. And then it is worth noting that the UK still has very high proportion of apple devices compared with other countries and iphone users are much more likely to be using an app that users of other phones.

  • And then another interesting finding is that when using a smartphone people seem to use fewer news brands than they do on a tablet or computer.
     
    In the UK 55% say they use only one news brand in a week compared with 50% on a tablet and 45% on a computer. People using tablet and computer are more likely to be using two three or four sources a week.
     
    So this could be related to context, short of time rely on one new brand, it could be about the nature and ease of apps or about real estate your favourite brand is just sitting there on home screen –  
    but either way it does seem to be favouring brands that have strong app propositions and also those brands that have strong updating news – so the BBC, SKY and actually Mail Online as well although I don’t have the figures here do significantly better on a smartphone than on a computer ….and some of the aggregators that grew up in the web era like Yahoo and MSN seem to do considerably worse.
  • Another key question is the extent to which the growth of these new devices and consumption patterns is affecting traditional media broadcast and print. Are tablet and smartphone users using less of traditional media?
     
    Well if you look at the averages and these are the averages for all our countries you can see that in general the use of tablets and smartphones is additional – rather than substitutional. So a tablet user is as likely or more likely to read a newspaper or watch TV news as non tablet user.
    We do see a bit more substitution with smartphones – particular on the morning and evening commute where in the UK the smartphone has a pretty healthy lead over print now – though this is a substitution of platform not of brand. Traditional brands that have adapted to smartphones are doing really well.
  • And in terms of time of day …. we’ve seen smartphone and tablet completely change the consumption curve for internet news …used to be in the middle of the day but now have these early peaks and late peaks.
     
    This is an example from the Guardian – using their log files and looking at it from a brand’s point of view …see this new digital peak that simply wasn’t there before and this led number of news organisations (eg FT) to change publishing cycle over the last year and journalistic shift patterns to hit these much earlier internet peaks. Cross media brands are learning to deal with these new cycles
  • We can also see the influence of the smartphone in the general news consumption area – this looks at all news consumption by age …. We can see the idea of the edition, the appointment to view, is still very strong with older groups – peaks are morning newspaper, radio and tv and then early evening tv, radio and newspaper
     
    But we can see the younger demographics are really losing that sense of the edition and just want to access news when they want to access it – throughout the day
     
    So simplistically news orgs have to produce editions for the over 45s and always on for under 45s ( and also think about the sort of editions that work for older groups on tablets and younger groups on smartphone).
  • So secondly Newspaper reach …or rather news brands that come from a newspaper background. This is important to journalism because across all of our countries most journalists are employed by these commercial news brands
     
    So we ask people abut the brands they use offline and online and then tag newspaper brands and broadcaster brands and digital born brands to see what that cross platform picture looks like
     
    At a top level what we see is that on average these brands reach 75% of our online sample in pretty much all of our countries except for France which has traditionally lower newspaper readership and also US which has been much more disrupted by pure players. But you can also see that the importance of print to that online reach is very different in these different countries. Print very important in the UK in keeping that 75% reach whereas in Finland and Denmark a huge amount of that reach is coming from online.
  • Now there has been a lot of talk this year about new players online …the growth of Buzzfeed and Huffington Post and advertising formats.
     
    We find that these new free players cropping up with increasing regularity in our data as well as other more serious digital born players like Yahoo. They tend to be popular with younger audiences and particularly around entertainment content and we see them growing in many countries albeit from a low base. They are not doing as well in Europe as in the US where HuffPo has an audience twice size of the New York Times or the Washington Post …. And Buzzfeed has also pretty much overtaken the NYT in comscore figures this year
     
  • So these brands are increasing competition in certain areas and in some countries we are seeing more disruption from a combination of their activity and longer established digital born brands like Yahoo and Google News
     
    So see Japan where traditional newspapers been very slow to properly move online and where Yahoo has opened up a dominant position …also see the US where the combination of these digital brands now rivals the web reach of broadcast and print brands (not the combined reach but the web reach)
     
    On the other hand in the UK and Finland, (Denmark is another) where brands are stronger and have also developed strong propositions of their own in the entertainment space like Mail Online or Mirror … we see far less disruption in general. So there is more competition but the US model is not necessarily going to sweep the board – and may never do so.
  • The big issue of course remains the commercial income streams advertising and reader payment and our data this year shows that payment for news in some form over the last year remains relatively low - despite publisher efforts to get more people to pay through a variety of means. (between 7% in the UK and 22% in Brazil though this is an urban sample)
     
    What we have seen though is quite a dramatic move to subscription in pretty much all of the countries we look at – which reflects many of the new digital only or bundled digital subscription offers.
    In the UK we’ve obviously seen the Telegraph and the Sun joining the Times and FT in putting some or all of their content behind a paywall and that has contributed to a far greater proportion – almost half of those paying now having an on-going relationship

  • Who are these people? Well across all of our countries those who are paying tend to be men, tend to be older, tend be of a higher educational background, they are very interested in news and a large proportion are tablet owners.
  • And in the UK this year we did quite a lot of work on motivation for payment.
     
    So we asked people why they signed up for a digital subscription in the first place …and why stayed or renewed their subscription. And we offered them a broad range of reasons such brand, the inducements, the writers etc
     
    What we find is that in terms of signing up, some of the key factors where the bar is longer relate to freedom to access the brand they like on any device (this is what we were talking about earlier the tablet and smartphone effect) and also – for many – the fact that they couldn’t get the content any other way
     
  • Once they had signed up the key factor are much more about the content itself, the range of coverage and the role of particular writers and columnists – we see that even more strongly in countries like the US and France
  • And this brings me onto my last point – which is about the growing value and influence of journalists, writers and reporters in a digital and social landscape. So apart from encouraging people to pay for news we ask people about the extent to which trust is engendered by the brand itself and by the journalist
     
    What we see is that in some countries like the US, France and Spain the individual journalist is almost as important or more important in terms of Spain
  • – while in the UK, Germany and Finland the brand itself has still has more trust though even here the reporter plays an important part in the story.

  • And then in terms of engagement we did a study in social media to see the extent to which brands and journalists are driving the conversation or being driven by it
    This was relatively similar to the study Newsworks did with Twitter a few months ago but takes in all journalists and all news brands in the UK including broadcasters…and what we find is 64% following a news brand of some kind and of those the largest proportion (48%) is made up of journalists.
     
    We also find that the contribution of journalists is particularly valued in social media not just on entertainment or sports stories but on big breaking news stories – the contribution of brands and journalists is considered particularly significant
  • Newsworks:
    Now we will take you through some of the analysis that we have done for UK newspaper brands that will not be in the main report..
  • The Reuters research confirms and expands upon what we knew from many other data sources – newsbrand attract an exceptionally active and influential audience. Whilst print continues to shape the lives of millions every day, newspaper brands’ digital innovations have attracted people who are likely to be shaping the multiplatform future.
    Newspaper readers own more devices and they are more interested in all types of news.
    The national press engages people of all ages and they read more than just snippets.
    Digital newspaper readers are more likely to share through social media, vote and post opinions.
    Most importantly, all these innovations and new behaviours in the digital world are strengthening the relationship with newsbrands. Far from being “traditional”, the newspaper brand audiences in the digital world are experimental and influential. Let’s give you a little flavour….
  • Digital newspaper readers – that’s everyone who read at least UK national newspaper brand via a computer, tablet or mobile in the week before the study – are more likely to use a tablet for news
  • And smartphones
  • And Twitter
  • And practically every other digital source you can list. All this competition – and a huge amount of it actually has very small numbers of people interested, despite the hype – is not decreasing the impact and influence of newspaper brands. As we know from our own research partnership with Twitter, newsbrands and social media are interdependent and each helps strengthen and broaden the reach and impact of the other. And the more news sources people access, the more likely they are to be newspaper brand readers.
    So to coin a phrase, what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.
  • Despite all this digital disruption, UK newspaper brands remain a powerful force in news – and the digital revolution has helped to grow their audience and their influence.
    This is an online survey, so excludes people who don’t have internet access (that means quite a lot of older print readers, for instance).
    Yet the reach of newspaper brands among this online audience is still huge – nearly three quarters accessed a newspaper in the previous week, which equates to 29.5 million people.

    (For comparison, NRS PADD April 2013-March 2014 gives 36 million weekly reach for print and online alone, excluding tablet and smartphone.)
    Note on the sample definition:
    The full sample is referred to as “UK internet users” as it is representative of the population who have access to the internet – however a small proportion were screened out if they had not accessed news in the past month
  • This presentation – and indeed the whole report, is about digital news. However, it’s important to remember that print is still by far the biggest platform for newspapers.
    Even for this sample of online adults, print still dominates – 84% of readers are still reading print.
    Nearly half (48%) of the 29.5 million who read a newspaper in any format the previous week ONLY read a print version.
    The main change has been in the way that people are accessing digital newspaper brands
    – there’s been a 5% point drop in the use of desktop computers and laptops, while smartphone and particularly tablet platforms are increasing importance
    – smartphone use is up 2%,
    – tablet increased from 9% to 15%.

    Print + smartphone = 11% of readers
    Print + computer = 25% of readers
    Print + tablet = 10% of readers
  • We often hear that young people don’t read newspapers any more.
    But in fact, nearly two thirds of 18-34 year olds had read a newspaper in some form during the previous week. And readership increases through older lifestages.
    Where we do see a difference by age, it is in the platforms they choose.
    Older people are most likely to read print.
    But 18-24’s are the most likely to read digital newspaper brands. And it may surprise you to know that more of them read a newspaper in any format than watched TV news – while only 5% listened to commercial radio news broadcasts.

    Across all age groups readership of newspaper brands is:
    61% read print
    35% read digital
    72% read either print or digital = total reach in a week
  • While the BBC is the most popular broadcast and online news provider, newspapers are the most popular commercial source for news among the youngest age groups – as well as older people.

    Newspaper reading kicks in later in life for many people - in the youngest group, we see an uplift in total newspaper readership from 57% of 18-20 year olds to 68% of 21-24 age group. This ties in with our own Truly Madly Deeply research, which identified a key need to “become a grown up” when young people enter the world of work.
  • The UK tends to follow the US in the adoption of new devices and technologies. But the impact this has on news habits is very different between the two countries. In the US – and some Southern European countries, there’s a far greater to tendency to ditch the old when the new comes in. But the British are much more likely to weave the new in with the old. So this survey confirms that in the UK the increasing ownership of smartphones and tablets is good news for the newspaper audiences. The more devices people use, the more likely they are to read digital newspaper brands.

    When people own just one device, which will probably be a PC or laptop, just over a third of them read online newspapers.
    →For people who use 2 devices, half are reading digital newspaper brands.
    →And the most digitally connected – people using 3 or more devices – are also the most likely to read digital newspaper brands.
    What’s even more interesting – and important for the future of print – is that readership of print newspapers is also much higher among people who use multiple devices (69% for owners of 3+ devices), with the result that almost 9 out of 10 (88%) read a newspaper in either print or digital format if they own 3 or more devices.
  • Whilst only 23% of the population are currently using a tablet to access news, there is clear evidence that tablet ownership is strengthening rather than weakening the role of newspaper brands. The survey reports that 11% are reading newspaper brands via their tablet – that’s a weekly reach of 4.5 million.
  • Tablet users who access news engage strongly with newspapers across all platforms. They are more likely than other device users to read newspapers both in print and online, as well as accessing via their tablet.

    (For the total internet sample, readership of newspaper brands is:
    35% read digital
    61% read print
    72% read either print or digital = total reach in a week)
  • Around a third of people who read news on their smartphone said they read a newspaper brand. That’s just under 5 million readers. Of course, it’s pretty difficult for people to remember every website they visit via their phone, as they tend to snack more. So this estimate is considerably lower than tracking data – comScore’s monthly data supplied directly by the phone manufacturers shows that newspapers reach 12.65 million mobile users – that’s more than 60% of the people who access the internet by phone. But it’s a clear demonstration that publishers have created content that appeals across a range of devices.
  • And while smartphone readers are slightly less likely to read a print newspaper during the week (57% versus average 61%), they are much more likely to be digital readers than the average internet user – so total newspaper brands reach is just above the average of 72%.
  • So when we put all this information together, what devices are actually being used to access online newspapers?
    Well, computers are still the most popular way to access newspapers online. Mobile is second, with a third of digital newspaper readers accessing via smartphone in the past week. And 30% are using tablets, up from just a quarter in 2013. The evidence in this report is that use of smartphones and tablets is likely to increase, which means that the overall readership of newspaper brands on digital platforms is also likely to get bigger.
  • We’ve seen that newspaper readers are younger than many people think, and that the advent of new devices and platforms has increased overall reach. The Reuters Institute study also shows us that newspaper readers access news more frequently. And frequency increases as people read different newspaper formats:
    On average the UK study showed that 57% of people accessed news several times a day, with 28% just getting a daily fix.
    Print newspaper readers are more likely to access news several times a day
    This jumps to 66% of digital newspaper readers
    And among multi-platform newspaper readers – that’s people reading both print and digital, we see that 7 out of 10 are in the “several times a day” group.
  • The Reuters Institute Digital News Report divides people up into 3 kinds of news reader. The majority are ‘daily briefers’ with a moderate interest in the news who access several times a day. News Lovers have a very high interest in news and access more frequently.
    -They make up 19% of the total UK online sample.
    -When we look at people who read both print and digital newspapers, we can see a considerably higher proportion are News Lovers (29%)

  • Looking at it another way, we can see that 84% of news lovers - that’s 8.1 million people -are people who read newspapers.
  • This love of news means they are more engaged. Digital newspaper readers are reading quick updates more than the general digital population, but they’re also much more attracted to longer form journalism, and anything that enhances the news experience, including video, audio, blogs, apps on phones and tablets and live news pages.

    Read list of headlines – 75% of digital newspaper readers vs 59% for total online sample; longer news stories – 61% vs 43%.
  • This love of news means they are more engaged. Digital newspaper readers are reading quick updates more than the general digital population, but they’re also much more attracted to longer form journalism, and anything that enhances the news experience, including video, audio, blogs, apps on phones and tablets and live news pages.
    Read list of headlines – 75% vs 59% for total online sample; longer news stories – 61% vs 43%.
  • And the influence and interaction of digital and multiplatform newspaper readers with social media is striking. Compared with the average online adult, they are more likely to share on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube (28% vs 16%); or take part in a range of interactions from talking with friends online, posting a comment, emailing stories, rating and voting in online polls. They also do all this more frequently than the average internet user. Refer to News on the Tweet
    You could refer to these as the content generation.
  • They also do all this more frequently than the average internet user.
  • Which brings us to the thorny question of paying for content. Nic has already shown that few are paying for digital news and not many say they are prepared to pay.
    But of course many digital newspaper readers are paying for news – they are buying print!
    And they are more likely to be paying for digital – mainly due to a rise in subscriptions. And I doubt that many people said they would pay for Sky when it was first launched. It’s a question of getting the content right – or of finding ways to provide it without charge, by building valuable audiences that advertisers want to reach.

    (Digital newspaper subscription is up from 37% of people paying in 2013 to 53% in 2014 – including digital as part of print + package, this rises to 67% versus 54% in2013. )
  • Brands and journalists, and the content they create, are key reasons why people do subscribe - and even stronger reasons why they stay.
  • What’s more, in the UK, the brand and journalists are fundamental to the creation of trust in a news source - even more so among newspaper readers than among the general digital population. This ability to engender trust, loyalty and engagement is what makes UK newspaper brands strong destination brands in the multi-platform world of news.
  • So what have we learned from our close look at newspaper brands in the Reuters Institute Digital News survey?
    News is continuing to play a really important role in people’s lives and national newspaper brands remain at the heart of news provision.

    The audience is still huge.

    And newsbrands are attracting some really important new audiences. Younger people are engaging with online newspapers – but they have not abandoned print. Newspaper brands attract people who are curious, experimental and influential.

    Digital newspaper readers also form the majority of news sharers, keeping newspaper brands current in many Facebook and Twitter feeds.

    New platforms and devices are continuing to provide growth opportunities.
    And above all, in a complex and multi-layered media world, the trust and influence of newspapers across all platforms makes them strong destination brands.
  • People & News 2014

    1. 1. PEOPLE & NEWS Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism Digital News Report 2014 In partnership with
    2. 2. Background and methodology One of the largest news surveys in the world –online news habits of more than 18,000 people in ten countries Research conducted online in January/early February 2014 Additional analysis of key themes, country level insights from network of partners *
    3. 3.  Role of smartphones a key agent of change  Traditional media continues to dominate online usage in the UK, but this is not the case everywhere  Payment for news and the move to subscription  Rise of the reporter as a key focus of trust and engagement Key points
    4. 4. Smartphones and tablets
    5. 5. Consistent pattern of strong growth in all markets • 8b Which, if any, of the following devices have you used to access news in the last week? • Base: All (total sample in each country) 37% access news weekly ALL TEN COUNTRIES Strong growth in SMARTPHONE news access 28% 28% 20% 21% 32% 29% 28% 24% 22% 43% 33% 31% 35% 32% 52% UK USA France Germany Denmark 2012 2013 2014
    6. 6. UK penetration now higher than US – but still behind Denmark • 8b Which, if any, of the following devices have you used to access news in the last week? • Base: All (total sample in each country) 20% access news weekly ALL TEN COUNTRIES Strong growth in TABLET access 8% 11% 6% 6% 13% 16% 16% 11% 10% 25% 23% 20% 19% 17% 36% UK USA France Germany Denmark 2012 2013 2014
    7. 7. Impact and value of new devices • Increasing the frequency with which we access the news • Increasing the access points for news • Encouraging payment for news “in the café or at the bus it’s right there, you have all the news at your fingertips”
    8. 8. 56% 20% 55% 23% 48% 25% 35% 23%22% 17% Smartphone Tablet Smartphone and tablet by age 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55+ 35-44 group (+9%) driving smartphone growth Smartphones are still more popular with younger age groups. Tablets are used equally through age groups but with a significant bulge with the 35- 55 group. Smartphone news users and Tablet news users both skew male 44-54 group (+7%) driving tablet growth Smartphone and tablet demographics
    9. 9. OPT9a. Thinking specifically about when you look for news on a MOBILE, which of the following statements most applies to you? Please select one Use of apps increases with smartphone and tablet 41% 42% 47% 38% Mainly apps mainly browser 2013 2014 SMARTPHONE Apple users are significantly more likely to use news apps to download an app from a store (59% vs. 37% non iPhone owners) Smartphone users are more likely to use apps than mobile browser
    10. 10. Smartphone users tend to access fewer new sources and brands with strong app propositions do best On a smartphone, news brands with strong app proposition such as the BBC and Sky News & Mail Online tend to thrive. General aggregators are losing out
    11. 11. Multiplatform world In general new devices are not replacing TV, radio or print, though usage patterns are changing an becoming more complex
    12. 12. From brand’s point of view … It’s an increasingly complex world. Different devices are used at different points through the day
    13. 13. From audience’s point of view … GENERATIONAL SPLIT: Older people prefer a newspaper ‘edition’ or scheduled ‘TV broadcasts’, whereas younger respondents access news throughout the day – mainly online
    14. 14. Newspaper brands overall reach
    15. 15. Newspaper usage across platforms 93% 83% 81% 78% 75% 75% 74% 72% 58% 55% 82% 67% 68% 67% 48% 31% 49% 35% 33% 40% Finland Denmark Spain Italy Germany Japan Urban Brazil UK USA France Combined reach Online newspaper Q5. Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week? Base: All markets 2014 – UK: 2082; Germany: 2063; Spain: 2017; Italy: 2010; France: 1946; Denmark: 2036; Finland: 1520; USA: 2197; Urban Brazil: 1015; Japan: 1973 With the exception of France and USA, newspapers reach three quarters of all those interested in news - through a combination of print and online.
    16. 16. Q5b. Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week? Showing answers for Huff Post and Buzzfeed only Huff Post Buzzfeed US 17% 5% UK 9% 3% Italy 5% - France 5% 1% Spain 4% 1% Germany 3% 1% Brazil - 1% New challengers
    17. 17. UK brands suffering less disruption
    18. 18. Paying for news
    19. 19. Paying for news Overall numbers still low but an increasing proportion are moving to online subscription with 1. Times 2. Telegraph 3. Sun
    20. 20. Who is paying for online news?
    21. 21. Motivations for paying for news
    22. 22. Motivations for paying for news
    23. 23. Role of the reporter as driver of engagement
    24. 24. The influence and value of individual journalists In Spain, France and the United States the journalist is considered important for trust. In UK, Finland and Germany the brand is the most important driver
    25. 25. The influence and value of individual journalists In Spain, France and the United States the journalist is considered important for trust. In UK, Finland and Germany the brand is the most important driver
    26. 26. 64% of Twitter users follow a professional news account • 48% follow a journalist • 40% follow a breaking news account • 28% follow a general newsbrand Who follows “news” accounts among Twitter users
    27. 27. Launch: Thursday 12th June Edelman, London Friday 13th June Editors News Summit, Barcelona More Information www.digitalnewsreport.org
    28. 28. A closer look at newsbrands in the digital world
    29. 29. Newspaper brand readers are deeply involved with all things digital MORE…  Devices  Interest  Engagement  Social  Interactive  Experimental
    30. 30. Digital newspaper brand readers are..... 56% more likely than the average internet user to read news on a tablet
    31. 31. Digital newspaper readers are..... 36% more likely to read news on a smartphone
    32. 32. Digital newspaper brand readers are..... 67% more likely use Twitter for news
    33. 33. Digital newspaper readers are more likely to access
    34. 34. Newspaper brands reach nearly three-quarters of the UK online audience Q5 Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week? All UK daily and Sunday titles, print & online, plus London Evening Standard , Metro. Excl. national newspaper in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. Base: 2082 UK internet users 29.5million readers =72% accessed a newspaper in any format during the last week
    35. 35. Print 84% Which platforms do newspaper readers use? Base: 1494 newspaper readers Computer 36% Tablet 15% Smartphone 16% % of all newspaper readers using each format last week
    36. 36. Youngest readers favour digital newsbrands 63% 63% 67% 72% 79% 85% 43% 47% 54% 63% 72% 79% 49% 37% 38% 34% 28% 30% 18-24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55-64 65+ Read any newspaper last week Print newspaper Digital newspaper Q5 Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week? All UK daily and Sunday titles, print & online, plus London Evening Standard , Metro. Excl. national newspaper in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. Base: 2082 UK internet users
    37. 37. Most popular commercial news source 41% 39% 30% 26% 16% 16% 13% 9% 6% 6% 56% 46% 35% 23% 10% 11% 10% 10% 1% 4% Digital newspaper Print newspaper Facebook Twitter ITV broadcast Sky TV news YouTube Sky online ITV online Commercial radio 18-20 21-24 Q5 /Q12B Which, if any, of the following have you used for news in the last week? Base: 124 aged 18-20, 143 aged 21-24
    38. 38. Impact of devices % accessing digital newspaper brands last week Base: 1598 device users 37 One device % 50 Two devices % 65% Three+ devices
    39. 39. Tablet newspaper readers read newspapers on their tablet last week Base: Total sample 2082 internet users who have accessed the news 4.5m
    40. 40. Base:481 who access news via their tablet Tablet readers are highly engaged with newspapers overall read a newspaper on tablet46% read a print newspaper65% read a digital newspaper54% total newspaper readership81% People who read news on their tablet... AND
    41. 41. Smartphone newspaper readers 4.9m read newspapers on their smartphone last week Base: Total sample 2082 internet users who have accessed the news
    42. 42. Base: 635 who access news via their smartphone Smartphone readers are highly engaged with newspapers overall read a newspaper on phone35% read a print newspaper57% read a digital newspaper48% total newspaper readership73% People who read news on their smartphone... AND
    43. 43. Which devices do digital newspaper readers use? % of all digital newspaper readers using each device last week Computer 71% Smartphone 33% Tablet 30% Base: 746 digital newspaper readers (Q5), users of each device who accessed digital newspaper last week (Q19): computer 554, smartphone 245, tablet 225
    44. 44. More frequent access 57% 62% 66% 70% 28% 24% 24% 21% Several times a day Once a day Q1b Typically, how often do you access news? Base: 2082 internet users (excl those who had not accessed news in previous month), 1253 print, 746 digital, 505 print + digital newspaper readers UK internet users
    45. 45. More interested News Lovers Daily Briefers Casual users UK internet users Print + digital newspapers 19% 29% 52% 29% 16% 55% Base: 2082 internet users, 505 print + digital newspaper readers
    46. 46. Multiplatform readers are more interested in news 64% 72% 75% 79% UK internet users Print newspapers Digital newspapers Print + digital newspapers % Very/extremely interested in news Q1c. How interested, if at all, would you say you are in news? Base: 2082 internet users, 1253 print, 746 digital, 505 print + digital newspaper readers
    47. 47. News lovers read newspapers 8.1 million readers = 84% of News Lovers are newspaper readers
    48. 48. Digital newspaper readers more engaged with fast and slow news Followed a live news page within a website Used an app Looked at a list of news headlines Read longer news stories or articles Looked at a sequence or gallery of pictures about news Read a news blog Viewed a news graphic/infographic Watched news video Listened to news audio More likely to have……
    49. 49. Digital newspaper readers more engaged with fast and slow news 59% 43% 16% 14% 13% 8% 7% 7% 5% 4% 74% 61% 23% 20% 20% 12% 12% 13% 9% 7% Looked at a list of news headlines Read longer news stories or articles Watched news video Look at a sequence or gallery of pictures about news Used an “app” on my smartphone to access news Followed a live news page within a website Used an “app” on my tablet to access news Read a news blog Listened to news audio Viewed a news graphic (infographic) UK internet users Digital newspaper readers Q11. Thinking of the way you looked at news online in the last week, which of the following ways of consuming news did you use? Base: 2082 accessing news last week, 746 digital newspaper readers
    50. 50. Multiplatform newspaper readers are 75% more likely to share a news story More active on social networks Multiplatform newspaper readers are 75% more likely to comment on a news story Q13. During an average week in which, if any, of the following ways do you share or participate in news coverage? Base: 2082 UK internet users, 505 print + digital newspaper readers
    51. 51. 56% of all people sharing news via social media are digital newspaper readers More active on social networks 55% of all people who comment on a news story are digital newspaper readers Q13. During an average week in which, if any, of the following ways do you share or participate in news coverage? Base: 2082 UK internet users, 746 digital newspaper readers
    52. 52. More active, more frequently Digital and multi- platform newspaper readers share, comment and discuss with friends more often than average internet user OPTQ13B How frequently do you do each of the following? Base: 2082 UK internet users, 746 digital newspaper readers 505 print + digital newspaper readers
    53. 53. Paying for news 49% 7% 47% 17% Bought a printed newspaper Paid for digital news UK internet users Digital newspaper readers
    54. 54. Brand and journalists create loyalty 19% 12% 18% 38% 45% 32% 57% 10% 18% 18% 33% 37% 43% 45% Quality of specific area No other way to access valued content Special offers/subscribers’ club Quality of specific journalists Brand I prefer Access when/where I want Broad range Start subscription Stay subscribed OPTQ7b&c. What were the three most important factors in taking an online news subscription in the first place? What are the most important factors in keeping you subscribed to an online news product (chose up to three) Base: 78 digital newspaper readers with subscription
    55. 55. Brand and journalists create trust 63% 44% 74% 59% Brand Journalists UK internet users Multi-platform newspaper readers % saying important contributor to trust in news source Q5e_1. To what extent are the following important to you in terms of whether you trust a source of news. Base:2082 internet users, 505 print + digital newspaper readers
    56. 56. Summary for newspaper brands  Central, influential role  Massive audience – 73% of UK online population  New audiences and interactions  Growth through devices  Trusted destinations
    57. 57. More information  www.newsworks.org.uk  www.digitalnewsreport.org

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