People & News: Key themes from Reuters Institute Digital News Report 2013

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  • First a little bit of background about Reuters Institute and this project. Roots in fellowship programme but doing more research into issues affecting journalism and one of biggest impacts is obviously digital and the way it is affecting brands, the business of journalism and also the practice of journalismThere are many surveys that are specific to a moment in time and to a specific country but very little that in a rigorous way maps how behaviour is changing over time and then combines that with deep analysis of what this means. That is what we are trying to do and with a lens around news. We are hugely grateful to Newsworks along with Google, BBC, Ofcom and a range of academic partners for supporting us in this ambitious project
  • It’s actually one of the largest comparative projects around news ever carried out …. In total 9 countries 11000 sample including over 2000 in the UK. It is important to point out that this is an online survey because we are looking at online habits ….and so when we compare online and offline which we do – at a number of stages - then the figures will underreport behaviour of those people who are not online who will use traditional media like print and TV and radio news a little bit more. But obviously we are interested in the key trends and the changes over time. There is a huge amount in here (Paying for news, social media, detailed brand performance in 9 countries) And there is a lot we are not going to talk about today but you can look at it at your leisure on our website for via pdf copy What we are going to talk about today are mainly the issues that are relevant to you and the story of digital disruption in the UK and for that I will hand over to my colleague Nic Newman who is the main author of this report.
  • I am going to focus today just on two main issues  The speed and scope of the multiplatform revolution as we move beyond the PC into a world of tablets and smartphones And the role of brands – new and traditional – in a world where news is increasingly being accessed on demand – but of course not only on demand - and audiences are wanting to exercise greater control. And as part of that we’ll in particular look at UK brands and how they are managing the transition in comparison with some other countries  And then finally a little bit about what all this means for the future in particular for the business of journalism and the challenges that all this implies….
  • AGE OF MULTIPLATFORM Audiences increasingly want news on any device, in any format, and at any time of day and in this data we see that not as early adopter behaviour but as increasingly mainstream. >> Tablet usage has doubled in the 10 months since the last survey in the five countries covered in both 2012 and 2013. Weekly use for news has risen from 8% to 16% of our UK sample and you can see these are international trends.These figures are not exactly comparable because we routed the questions slightly differently last year. They are however consistent with other data showing a sharp increase in news traffic from tablets.
  • Mobile usage is also up substantially. In many countries smartphone users are now in the majority and most of them use these devices to access news every week. Ofcom Technology tracker Oct.–Dec. 2012 shows 55% smartphone ownership in the UK. A Pew Internet Project survey from Aug.–Sept. 2012 found 45% of US adults owned a smartphone (66% among 18–29 year olds). >>>> So in the UK almost 50% use smartphones and 29% using those for news each week, computer still the main digital access point but this is very different picture from even a year ago. And here is the US – almost identical figures and you can see that computer, the smartphone and the tablet are really the only devices that matter for news. It is not just ownership it is regular usage for news that is significant.
  • It is quite interesting looking at Denmark which is furthest ahead here … as a model of where the UK might be in a year or two’s time – much less reliance on the computer, 25% using the tablet and 43% using the smartphone …so a lot of people are accessing on all three but significant numbers are using smartphones and tablets as the primary weekly access point …
  • And at a very top level what are we saying? News and the internet is primarily about three devices and significant numbers now using two or three of these every week …. This is the global average from our 9 countries 33% using two, 9% using three and the UK is just above that at 35%.
  • But amongst young people in particular the trends are even more marked. So you can see here that the age profile of people using smartphones in particular is much younger when compared to the computer and the tablet. In fact, in that 25-34 year old group 55% use smartphone for news but 30% now say the smartphone is their MAIN source of digital news.
  • So our research shows that people accessing more frequently using these devices and the more devices they have the more frequently they access. Digital devices are encouraging people to consume more news, extending the range of access points
  • And this chart shows some of the differences in how smartphones and tablets are used. 79% of smartphone users agree with the statement that they use the mobile to access quick updates, less than one in five (19%) agree that they use the smartphone for in depth news … where you see the tablet is perceived as a better device for getting in depth news
  • But here is a key point. Just because people are using more digital devices doesn’t mean they are consuming less news on traditional platforms … pretty much everyone we talked to there ALSO read a newspaper.  So tablet users (on the left) 82% of them also watch TV news - a built programme or a 24 hour channel - at least once a week, 60% read a newspaper and 45% listen to the radio each week– there isn’t a clear trend to substitution here – though we do see signs of that in the United States where tablet users read significantly fewer newspapers that the average. 
  • This chart looks at WHEN people access the news by age and we can see the classic news consumption curve with all age groups getting their news in the morning radio, tv, newspapers and online and then another spike at lunchtime and then the early evening peak coinciding with the commute home and the early evening news bulletins …but what you see is younger group in particular losing that appointment to view, tending to get news throughout the day – a lot of that is driven by smartphone and digital news in general. Older people still have those more habitual points in the day for example around radio in the morning and evening TV news
  • When you look at this by platform it is remarkable the extent of the difference we now see between the generations with young people preferring digital media, and older groups still preferring TV, radio and print.
  • And in a nutshell this is the problem for news brands … (going back to our chart) … how does the industry cope with such a divided picture, these two very different sets of behaviour. Our survey very clearly show traditional media patterns are not going away … they are deeply entrenched but these people on the left are moving very fast in terms of their expectations and the task -- which many news brands are doing very successfully in the UK -- is to engage both sets of people with relevant content in most appropriate way
  • Which brings me onto the second theme with is brands and trust 
  • This is one of my favourite charts – derived from a question we ask about what sources people use to access news and we’ve then put that together in traditional news brands newspapers or broadcasters, aggregators and pure players yahoo, msn, Huffington post, Google news and then social media and blogs/essentially personal media . And what is interesting is that in every country apart from Japan where Yahoo has over 60% of the market, traditional news brands in aggregate remain by far the most important source of news…. So in the video earlier your young people using social aggregators to access news but the links they are clicking on are still to mainstream news though you can also see that in some countries like the Unites States pure players and blogs are a much more significant factor in the states in a way that they are not here in the UK.So in fact the UK has the biggest share of traditional media broadcasters and newspapers and we think this is partly because here and also in Denmark brands are strong and have also been quite innovative in adopting to the internet.
  • Clearly a lot of that in the UK has come from the BBC and broadcasters –(as this charts shows) nowhere else do you get broadcast brands that are as strong internet news, but brands that have come from a print background are also very strong in terms of weekly access compared with other countries.  
  • A key issue for the news industry is this issue of how you find news …. Not least because gatekeepers tend to take quite a bit of the value , so it is again interesting in the UK when you ask people how people GET TO news, brand is the most important factor in the UK
  • – compare that with France where it is overwhelmingly search and we also see that pattern in Germany and Italy and Spain…
  • That does of course change a bit with young people.  This chart shows just brand, search and social as gateways to news – so how do you get to news and here for under 45s see social 3x as important than for over 45s and more that search … but interestingly in the UK young and old still go for brands as their number 1 gateway
  • And of course a lot of this has got to do with trust . If you compare traditional news brands with some of the new competition, so aggregators or foreign news brands or social media, how do people feel about those brands in terms of credibility and trust.  What this chart shows – and this is just UK data - is that in general mainstream media is hugely trusted. 79% say broadcaster websites like the BBC and Sky and ITV news are very or quite trustworthy and 60% for newspapers like mail online and guardian.  In contrast some of the foreign operated news providers that are operating from outside the UK …newspapers, or broadcasters or pure players … have lower level of trust and even lower for social media sources such as Facebook (8% and Twitter 9%) for newsThis is true for young people and old people …so how do we reconcile the fact that people using social media increasingly for news discovery but don’t trust the content that they are looking at ..  I think one plausible explanation – backed up by other research - is that they have a sophisticated view in that they value it for alerting, discovery but still look to those trusted brands they know for validation and proper analysis and context.
  • Just one other point …. Related to brands. We asked people about what brands people used on different platforms so we could understand if the historic switch to mobile would benefit some brands more than others. So we asked people specifically what brand you are looking at when you are looking on a mobile or a tablet or a computer and we find that ….  In general most brands seem to have the same level of performance but there are some exceptions …  Those brands built around breaking new, not just in the UK but in other sampled countries tend to do better ….see Sky news there… whereas those brands that of the computer generation like MSN and Yahoo tend to have suffered in market share at least in the UK and the US
  • Additionally we find that in general, brand, ….branded icons are a key way of finding news on these devices when compared with search and social applications. Clearly as we’ve seen this depends on generation – younger people more likely to use aggregators and say they have a slightly weaker attachment to brand… but again in many cases the content that lies behind those aggregators tends to be traditional media brands in the UK at least ….though even here there is growing competition.
  • So finally just to recap  I think we are seeing a polarisation of audience behaviour – actually the habits of older group are perhaps more enduring than we thought but at the same time the digital natives are really hitting their stride with new patterns – chiefly exponential growth in use of new devices and new discovery mechanismsFor most people digital media represents an additional layer extending the range of choices and locations. It is not yet replacing other forms of usage. News organisations need to work across all media channels not just one Traditional media in the UK remains really pretty resilient – certainly in terms of audiences – the business side obviously is a different discussion …and especially when compared with other countriesBrands of course still matter – even in a world of infinite competition and new gateways audiences still care about quality and trust. And I suppose the point of caution here is that strong news brands can come from anywhere – people aren’t going to continue to use traditional brands if they don’t adapt to the new distribution models – and there many new competitors who want to capture those audiences.
  • Nic has just outlined some of the key findings from the published report, which you can access via the Newsworks website from 20th June. We’ll also post today’s presentation, and more detailed newsbrand charts. There is a huge amount of very detailed data to explore!For the next 15 -20 minutes I will take you through some of the analysis that we have done for newspaper brands that will not be in the main report. We wanted to look at how the macro trends that Nic has just outlined are affecting newsbrands and their readership, and some implications for the future. The overall conclusion is that newspaper brands are extremely well placed to play an increasingly pivotal role in the future of news.
  • The most striking conclusion of our analysis is that newspapers have managed to attract an exceptionally active and influential audience in the multi-platform world of news. Whilst print continues to shape the lives of millions every day, newspaper brands’ digital innovations have attracted people who are likely to be shaping the multiplatform future. Newspaper readers own more devices, and use more sources of news than average. Younger people are the most avid readers of digital newspaper brands. Newspaper readers are highly interested in news, and spend more time on each platform. Digital newspaper readers are more likely to share through social media, vote and post opinions. Let’s look at some of these behaviours in more detail.
  • First I should remind you that this is an online survey, so excludes people who don’t have internet access (that means quite a lot of older print readers, for instance). And it doesn’t cover the 9% of people who are not interested in news. Yet the reach of newspaper brands among this online audience is still huge – over three quarters accessed a newspaper in the previous week, which equates to 36 and a half million people.Let’s have a look at how that breaks down...Notes on calculation: Total population = 63,047,162Internet population= 52,731,2099% of internet populationnot interested in newsInternet users interested in news =47,985,40076% of total internet users interested in news = 36.5 million
  • We often hear that young people don’t read newspapers any more.But in fact, over two thirds of 18-24 year olds had read a newspaper in the previous week. And readership increases through older lifestages. Where we do see a difference by age, it is in the platforms they choose. Older people are most likely to read print. But 18-24’s are the most likely to read digital newspaper brands. And it may surprise you to know that slightly more of them read a newspaper in any format than watched or listened to news from TV and radio broadcasters, whether it was via traditional or online platforms.This fits with NRS data, which shows that newspaper readership has increased overall due to digital newspapers attracting a younger audience than print alone did.
  • Not only are young people the most likely to read digital newspapers, but they are also the most likely to read across platforms – well over a quarter of the 18-34 age group read both print and online newspaper brands. So there’s a significant young audience that have newspapers at the very heart of their news agenda.
  • There’s lots of information in the survey that shows how newspaper brands have really engaged the new digital audiences. The increasing use of new devices, such as smartphones and tablets, has a significant impact on whether people read online newspaper brands. When people own just one device, which will probably be a PC or laptop, about a third of them read online newspapers. This increases to over half of the people who use 2 devices to access news, and 63% of the people use 3 devices will have read an online newspaper brand last week.(NB: the average for accessing online newspaper brands among the total sample of online adults interested in news is 35%)
  • And even if some people don’t use multiple devices for news, we can still see that owners of smartphones and tablets are much more likely to read newspaper brands than people who use computers. As more people own these devices – and fewer use desktops and laptops, we can predict that digital newspaper brands will continue to grow. (we already know from comScore that nearly 14% of newspaper website visits are coming via tablet – and mobile access adds about 2million extra visitors per month than the pc only figure)
  • We can already see that online and multiplatform newspaper readers are more likely to have a smartphone – and to use it for news. The UK average figure refers to the total sample - people who have online access and are interested in news. Half of these own a smartphone, and 31% use a smartphone for news – so about 60% of smartphone owners actually use it for getting news. Whereas online newspaper readers are more likely to own a smartphone – 57% - and a much higher proportion,72% are using it for news.
  • But we don’t think that mobile on its own is likely to replace computers, despite the huge improvements in mobile sites. Smartphones are mostly used for quick updates and the experience is not felt to match up.
  • But there’s plenty of evidence that tablets are game-changing devices. Tablets appeal equally to both online and multi-platform newspaper readers. And the news reading experience is very different....
  • Tablets have a far broader role than mobile,when in comes to news. They are used much more for reading in depth news, especially by online newspaper readers, as well as quick updates. Tablets also have the power to engage more strongly, they are more personal. Reading on a tablet feels more like reading a print newspaper. Nearly half the people who access online newspaper readers on their tablet feel that it provides a better experience than on a computer – with a further quarter feeling there’s no difference. This is great news for newspaper brands, as tablet ownership really takes off. We also find that people who read newspapers on their tablet are more likely to pay for accessing content, and that they are happier to consider paying in the future - 21% compared with an overall UK online average of 5%.
  • So when we put all this information together, what devices are actually being used to access online newspapers? Well, computers are still the most popular way to access newspapers online. Mobile is second, with 4 in 10 online newspaper readers accessing via smartphone in the past week. And a quarter are using tablets. The evidence in this report is that use of smartphones and tablets is likely to increase, which means that the overall readership of newspaper brands on digital platforms is also likely to get bigger.
  • Looking at all the different platforms together, though, it’s important to remember that print is still by far the biggest platform for newspapers. Even for this sample of online adults, print still dominates – 85% of newspaper readers read print, compared with 41% using computers. Over half of the 36.5 million who read a newspaper in any format the previous week ONLY read a print version. And while 34% of digital newspaper readers own a tablet, tablet readers form just 9% of the total newspaper reach.Detailed breakdown:Print only51% - Computer only8% - Tablet only1% - Smartphone only2% - Print and computer only 20% -Print and tablet only - 3% Print and smartphone only -3% Print and computer and smartphone - 5% Print and computer and tablet - 3% Print and computer and smartphone and tablet - 1% Computer and smartphone - 3% Computer and tablet - 1%
  • We’ve seen that newspaper readers are younger than many people think, and that the advent of new devices and platforms has increased overall reach. The Reuters Institute study also shows us that newspaper readers access news more frequently. And frequency increases as people read different newspaper formats:On average the UK study showed that 58% of people accessed news several times a day, with 28% just getting a daily fix.Print newspaper readers are a little more likely to access news several times a dayThis jumps to 67% of online newspaper readersAnd among multi-platform newspaper readers – that’s people reading both print and online, we see that 7 out of 10 are in the “several times a day” group.
  • When we look in more detail at when people read newspapers, we can see how the addition of digital editions changes people’s habits. For print newspaper readers (the red line) we see the typical early morning and early evening peaks accessing news that we see for TV – plus a smaller peak at lunchtime. Online readers follow a similar pattern – except that online doesn’t fall off so steeply in the evenings. But that’s only half the story. People could also answer “throughout the day” – and nearly half of people who read both print and online newspapers say they are accessing throughout the day (compared with just 37% of the overall sample)
  • It’s not surprising that people who seek out more frequent news updates are generally more interested in news. But our analysis shows that the newspaper audience much more involved than average. When we look at people who are “very interested” in news we see similar numbers for the study average, print, digital and multiplatform newspaper readers. But when we look at how many are “extremely interested”, it’s clear that more newspaper readers fall into that category – and, as with frequency of access, we can see that people who read both print and digital versions have the keenest interest in news.
  • The Reuters Institute Digital News Report divides people up into 3 kinds of news reader. The majority of UK consumersare ‘daily briefers’ (as in other countries). They have a moderate interest in the news and access several times a day. News Lovers have a very high interest in news and access frequently. They make up 22% of the total UK online sample.When we look at people who read both print and online newspapers, we can see a considerably higher proportion are News Lovers – nearly a third of all the multiplatform audience.
  • The Reuters Institute report estimates that there are now 10 million ‘News Lovers’ in the UK, and reveals that they consume more news, share more, are wealthier and are more likely to pay for news. 83% of this group - that’s 8.3 million people -are newspaper readers.This is mainly driven by quality and mid-market readers and those who read online newspaper brands of all types. Almost a third of people who read both print and online newsbrands are news lovers, compared with less than a quarter of UK respondents in the study.
  • Multi-platform newspaper readers are particularly active news consumers. They use more types of media to access news. The study average is 3.7 media – which is surprisingly low given all the options available. People who read both print and digital newspapers use nearly 5 types of media.
  • The UK consumer is not very experimental, and only used 4 brands of news in the week prior to the survey – that includes all TV brands, radio brands, newspaper brands and digital only brands such as Yahoo, Google and Huffington Post. It’s still pretty common, for example, to just watch the BBC and read a print newspaper. And over a third of people who use BBC News don’t use any other brand, in any other media. Newspaper readers access a wider news repertoire, especially if they read both print and digital newspapers – these readers use an average of 7 brands for news. This has a couple of key implications:The multiplatform newspaper audience is clearly more active and interested so it’s important for newspaper brands to maintain loyaltyGreater interaction and shared readership with other sites helps build frequency/influence online.
  • The influence and interactionof online newspaper readers with social media is striking. Compared with the average online adult who is interested in news, they are 150% more likely to share on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube; or take part in a range of interactions from talking with friends online, posting a comment, emailing stories, rating and voting in online polls.
  • In fact, sharing of news is pretty low among the general online population, with only 18% passing on a link to a news story in the previous week, even though they say they are interested in news.Online newspaper brand readers are more likely to share news – 28% passed on a news story link. And the most active are readers of quality online newspapers - 40% of them shared. Most sharers used Facebook, but numbers were pretty low – 10% overall. And only 5% of the total sample shared a link via Twitter. This very much fits in with Twitter’s own analysis that 1% of users are responsible for generating half the content.
  • We hear a lot about how the national press is not trusted. The diverse nature of newspapers in this country means that it is easy to take a swipe at titles with a different political point of view, or a different take on news content. However, newspapers are in fact one of the most trusted and influential environments – and this translates into the digital arena. Whilst on average 60% said they trusted the news content of UK newspaper websites, only 7% actively distrust newspaper sites. And when it comes to the newspaper you most regularly use, 78% of online newspaper readers find their chosen title trustworthy. This is vital, since trust is more important for online newspaper readers – 86% tend to access news from sites they know and trust – compared with 77% of the overall sample. And they are much more likely to go to a branded news site, mobile site or app too find news in the first instance than use a search engine or social media.Readers of online quality brands are likely to trust their regular newspaper most (83%), followed by readers of an online popular title (78%).
  • So what have we learned from our close look at newspaper brands in the Reuters Institute Digital News survey? News is continuing to play a really important role in people’s lives and national newspaper brands remain at the heart of news provision, attracting a huge audience overall, and some really important new audiences. Younger people are engaging with online newspapers – but they have not abandoned print. People who access newspaper brands are among the most active news seekers – 8.3 million of the 10 million “News Lovers” identified by the Reuters Institute study read a newspaper in some format – whether it’s print, or on their computer, mobile or tablet. Online newspaper readers form the majority of news sharers, keeping newspaper brands current in many Facebook and Twitter feeds. The advent of new platforms is increasing reach and frequency for newspaper brands – the more devices people own, the more they are likely to access newspaper brands. UK newspaper brands are highly trusted destination brands.What’s more, tablet & smartphonereaders more likely to access brands, which augurs well for the future of newspaper brands.The move to more mobile devices, particularlytablets, offers new opportunities for monetising content – as the convenience and experience means people are more prepared to pay for news on these than via desktop computingNewspapers’ challenge is to secure and grow this massive audience, through a combination of great journalism and innovation – the evidence is that they are achieving that objective right now.
  • People & News: Key themes from Reuters Institute Digital News Report 2013

    1. 1. 1People & NewsDigital News Report 2013In partnership withKey themes from
    2. 2. To download the full report, charts (excl special newspaperanalysis) and data tables got to www.digitalnewsreport.org
    3. 3. 3• This study has been commissioned to understand how news is currently beingconsumed globally with a particular focus on digital news consumption and devicesused to access the news.• Core questions were asked in France, Germany, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, Braziland the US as well as the UK to a nationally representative audience to provide aninternational comparison.• This is a study for the Reuters Institute made possible with the assistance of thefollowing organisations and also academic partners from the Hans BredowInstitute, Hamburg, Roskilde University, Denmark and the School of Journalism atthe Paris Institute of Political Science,Background and objectivesWebsite: digitalnewsreport.org
    4. 4. 4Source: Internet World Stats http://www.internetworldstats.com population estimate 2012• The research was conducted online in January and early February 2013.• The data was weighted to targets set on age and gender, region, newspaper readership and social grade to reflectthe total population. The sample is reflective of the population who have access to the internet.• A comprehensive online questionnaire was designed with input from all stakeholders to capture all aspects of newsconsumption.*Please note that Brazil is representative of an urban population rather than a national population as such the internetpenetration is likely to be higher than stated above, which must be taken into consideration when interpreting results.CountryStartingsampleNon-newsusersFinalsampleTotalpopulationInternetpenetrationUK 2308 9% 2078 63,047,162 84%Germany 1099 3% 1062 81,305,856 83%Spain 1016 4% 979 47,042,984 67%Italy 1003 4% 965 61,261,254 58%France 1016 4% 973 65,630,692 80%Denmark 1024 2% 1007 5,543,453 90%US 2170 7% 2028 313,847,465 78%Brazil* 1003 2% 985 193,946,886 46%Japan 1004 2% 978 127,368,088 80%Methodology
    5. 5. 5 Speed of the multiplatform revolution – moving beyond the PC The role of brands in a world where audiences are increasingly able toexercise control over what and where they consume news What these changes mean for media companies and the future ofjournalismFocus for today
    6. 6. Digital News Report 2013AGE OF MULTIPLATFORM
    7. 7. 713% 11%8%6% 5%25%16% 16%11% 10%Denmark US UK France GermanyTablet usage for news2012 2013Q8a/Q8b Which, if any, of the following devices have you used to access news in the last week?Base: All markets UK (n=2078) US (n==2028) Spain (n=979) Japan (n=978) Italy (n=965) Germany (n=1062) France (n==973)Denmark (n=1007) Urban Brazil (n=985)** These figures are not totally comparable because we routed the questions slightly differently last year and the list ofdevices was more detailed this year. They are however consistent with log files of news organisations that show a sizeableincrease in traffic from tabletsNews usage on a tablet has increased significantly over the past ten months**Growth news access via tablet
    8. 8. 867%71%29% 28%16% 16%2% 2%UK USComputer Smartphone Tablet E-readerQ8a/Q8b Which, if any, of the following devices have you used to access news in the last week?Base: All markets UK (n=2078) US (n==2028) Spain (n=979) Japan (n=978) Italy (n=965) Germany (n=1062) France (n==973)Denmark (n=1007) Urban Brazil (n=985)Access via different devicesComputers are the most prevalent device for accessing news across countries. Smartphones and tablets arealso now significantly used for news.
    9. 9. 967%58%29%43%16%25%2% 1%UK DenmarkComputer Smartphone Tablet E-readerQ8a/Q8b Which, if any, of the following devices have you used to access news in the last week?Base: All markets UK (n=2078) US (n==2028) Spain (n=979) Japan (n=978) Italy (n=965) Germany (n=1062) France (n==973)Denmark (n=1007) Urban Brazil (n=985)Access via different devicesComputers are the most prevalent device for accessing news across countries. Smartphones and tablets arealso now significantly used for news. Denmark has the highest level of smartphone and tablet access.
    10. 10. 10Multiplatform access is becoming mainstream
    11. 11. 11Smartphones are still more popular with younger age groups. Tablets are used equallythrough age groups but with a significant bulge with the 35-44 group. 75% of tablet usersare ABC1 (same as last year). Smartphone news users skew heavily maleSmartphone and tablet news user demographics78%51%16%68%53%16%70%41%24%75%25%17%70%13% 16%Computer Smartphone TabletComputer, smartphone and tablet by age18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55+Q8a /Q8b Which, if any, of the following devices do you ever use for any purpose? /Which, if any, of the followingdevices have you used to access news in the last week?Base: All (n=2078)
    12. 12. 12Frequency of access grows with devicesDevice Several times a dayTablet and smartphones are extending the range of access points and increasing thefrequency with which people access news. The more devices, the more you consume ….REUTERS INSTITUTE DIGITAL NEWS REPORT 2013
    13. 13. 1379%19%62%42%Quick news updates In depth newsMobile TabletMobiles are used most for quick updates during the day. Consumers agree that tabletsoffer more in depth news and better experience for accessing news.UK7a/b You’ve told us that you read news on a MOBILE/TABLET. With that in mind, please could you tell us how much you agree ordisagree with the following statements:Base US : Read news on a mobile (n=583); Read news on a tablet (n=329) % net agreeSmartphones and tablets - differences
    14. 14. 1482% TV News60% Newspapers45% RadioTablet and smartphones are in general not replacing other ways of consuming news.Instead they are extending the range of access points and increasing the frequency withwhich people access newsDigital users ALSO consume via traditional platformsQ3: Which, if any, of the following have you used in the last week as a source of news?Base: All markets (n=11004) Tablet users (n=2726)
    15. 15. 15-10%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%First thing in themorningLater in themorningLunchtime Afternoon Early evening Late evening Last thing at nightWhen do you typically access the news? (by age)All 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55+UK2 When do you typically access the news?Base: UK=2078 18 to 24 (n=269) 25 to 34: (n=286) 35 to 44: (n=321) 45 to 54 (n=383) 55+ (n=819)Typically consumers access news first thing in the morning or early evening.Younger people tend to access in a more even way throughout the day. Older people follow thebreakfast, lunch and early evening (42%) peaks far more compared with the young (21%).When do you access news? (Age)
    16. 16. 16Q4: You say you’ve used these sources of news in the last week, which would you say is your MAIN source of news? Base:(UK=2078)In our UK sample of Internet users we can see a clear platform preference divide. For under 45’s – almost halfthe adult population - the Internet is now the MAIN source of news as well as their most frequently accessed.For over 45’s it remains TV with other traditional sources remaining important.52%24%49%28%18%53%12%57%Online TVMAIN source of news by age18-24 25-44 45-54 55+Divided nation (UK): Young prefer online, old prefer television news
    17. 17. 17Q4: You say you’ve used these sources of news in the last week, which would you say is your MAIN source of news? Base:(UK=2078)In our UK sample of Internet users we can see a clear platform preference divide. For under 45’s – almost halfthe adult population - the Internet is now the MAIN source of news as well as their most frequently accessed.For over 45’s it remains TV with other traditional sources remaining important.52%24%49%28%18%53%12%57%Online TVMAIN source of news by age18-24 25-44 45-54 55+Divided nation (UK): Young prefer online, old prefer television news
    18. 18. Digital News Report 2013BRAND AND TRUST
    19. 19. 19Q5: Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week?Base: Online users in each market (UK=1534 ; US=1470; Germany=698 ; France=658 Denmark=816 ; Urban Brazil=892; Italy = 775; Spain=776; Japan = 831)The enduring power of traditional brands ….87% 85%81% 80%74% 74% 74%71%65%32%22%32%48% 47%56%38%31%78%31%41%44%57%44% 43%30%43%30%UK Denmark Spain Urban Brazil Italy US France Germany JapanTraditional news brand Aggregators Social Media&BlogsThe UK has the strongest traditional news brands of our surveyed countries. Aggregators/pureplayers have made the most impact in Japan
    20. 20. 20Online news: Traditional brands vs new sourcesQ3: Which, if any, of the following have you used in the last week as a source of news?Base: All markets UK (n=2078) US (n=2028) Spain (n=979) Japan (n=978) Italy (n=965) Germany (n=1062) France (n=973) Denmark (n=1007) UrbanBrazil (n=985)UK Germany Spain Italy France Denmark US Brazil JapanBroadcast newsbrands45% 20% 36% 31% 18% 35% 35% 42% 38%Newspaperbrands35% 25% 42% 37% 26% 54% 31% 37% 26%Newer brands(HuffPost, Yahoo)24% 28% 25% 38% 26% 18% 41% 43% 66%Social media,blogs23% 21% 35% 35% 20% 33% 32% 51% 25%
    21. 21. 21Q5: Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week?Base: Online users in each market (UK=1534 ; US=1470; Germany=698 ; France=658 Denmark=816 ; Urban Brazil=892; Italy = 775; Spain=776; Japan = 831)Finding news – the role of brand34%16%24%45%17%14%UK FranceBrand Search SocialBrand is the primary gateway to news in the UK …
    22. 22. 22Q5: Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week?Base: Online users in each market (UK=1534 ; US=1470; Germany=698 ; France=658 Denmark=816 ; Urban Brazil=892; Italy = 775; Spain=776; Japan = 831)Finding news – the role of brand34%16%24%45%17%14%UK FranceBrand Search SocialBrand is the primary gateway to news in the UK, but in France, Germany andItaly it is search …
    23. 23. 23Social media is becoming a mainstream way of finding newsQ10 : Thinking about how you FIND news online, which are the main ways that you come across news stories?Base: UK (n=2078)
    24. 24. 24Q9a Thinking about the types of sites, mobile sites or apps where you get news online, in broad terms how trustworthy do youfind the news content of the following?Base: UK=2078 % saying very or extremely trust worthyUK broadcasters are considered the most trustworthy sources of news with a third of the UK claiming that theyare “very trustworthy”.At the other end of the spectrum, blogs and social media sites are considered the least trustworthy.Trust in different sources of news79%60%21%11%8%9%Sites from UK broadcastersSites from UK newspapersEx UK news providersNews related blogsFacebookTwitter
    25. 25. 25The role of brand on mobile
    26. 26. 26Q8c : You say you access news via a Computer,/mobile, tablet. When using that device which of the following newssources have you used in the last week ?Sky News 15% 25% +10% 21%CNN 16% 19% +3% 16%TF1 10% 16% +6% 14%Yahoo (US) 37% 25% -12% 27%Yahoo (UK) 20% 8% -12% 9%MSN (US) 14% 10% -4% 10%Some brands do better on smartphonesBrands that have a reputation for breaking news do better on smartphones. Aggregator brands than havegrown up with advantages of browser tie-ins are losing out in the US and UK
    27. 27. 27UK12A-B thinking specifically about when you look for news on a MOBILE/TABLET, which of the following statements mostapplies to you?Base: 612 All who have accessed news via a smartphone in the last week; 340 All who have accessed news via a tablet in the last weekBranded icon on the home screen is the main way of accessing news – not an aggregator.50%25%15%48%26%17%I mainly access news directly via a brandedlink (logo) of a news providerI mainly access news via a searchengine, social network or other brand thataggregates newsI access news using both methods about thesameSmartphone TabletYounger age groups aremore comfortableaccessing news viasearch engines thantheir older counterparts(28% of 18-24 vs. 16%of over 55s).The role of brand on smartphones and tablets
    28. 28. 28 Polarisation of audience behaviour + Traditional media consumption stillstrong but digital natives hitting their stride For most people digital media represents an additional layer extendingthe range of choices and locations. It is not yet replacing other forms ofusage Traditional brands in the UK are doing well compared with othercountries Even in a world of greater competition, quality and trust still matters foryoung and oldImplications and recap
    29. 29. Digital News Report 2013A closer look at newspaperbrands in the digital world
    30. 30. Newspaper brand readers are leading the wayMORE… Devices Sources Interest Engagement Time spent Sharing Interactive Experimental
    31. 31. Newspaper brands reach over three-quartersof the UK online audience interested in newsQ5 Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week? All UK dailyand Sunday titles, print & online, plus London Evening Standard , Metro. Excl. national newspaperin Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. Base: 2078 UK internet users interested in news36.5million readers=76%accessed a newspaperin any format duringthe last week
    32. 32. 68%72%76% 75%80%84%46%57% 58%64%73%76%49%41%39%34%26%31%18-24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55-64 65+Read any newspaper last week Print newspapers Online newspapersYoungest readers favour digital newspapersQ5 Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week? All UK dailyand Sunday titles, print & online, plus London Evening Standard , Metro. Excl. national newspaperin Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. Base: 2078 UK internet users interested in news
    33. 33. 27% 26%21%23%20%23%18-24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55-64 65+18-24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55-64 65+Young people more likely to readboth print and online newspapersQ5 Which, if any, of the following have you used to access news in the last week? All UK dailyand Sunday titles, print & online, plus London Evening Standard , Metro. Excl. national newspaperin Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. Base: 2078 UK internet users interested in news
    34. 34. 513363The more devices people use, the more likelythey are to access digital newspaper brands% accessing online newspaper brands last weekBase: 2078 UK internet users interested in news/1949 using devices for any purposeOne device%Two devices%%Three devices
    35. 35. Ownership of tablets and smartphones increasesreach of digital newspaper brands% accessing online newspaper brands last weekBase: 2078 UK internet users interested in news/1405 using Computer to access news in lastweek, 585 using Smartphone/331 usingTablet43%Computer users52%Smartphone users55%Tablet users
    36. 36. 50%57%54%31%41%37%UK average Online newspapers Print + online newspapersUse smartphone Use for newsOnline newspaper readers more likely to have asmartphone, and use it for newsQ8a. Which, if any, of the following devices do you ever use for any purpose? Base: 2078 UK internetusers interested in news Q8b. Which, if any, of the following devices have you used to access news inthe last week? Base: 1949 who use any of these devices for any purpose
    37. 37. 79%19% 18%83%21%15%Quick updates during day More in depth news Better experience thanPC/laptopUK average Online newspaper readersMobile is predominantly used for quick updates,but experience does not match computersBase: 585 who have accessed news via a smartphone in the last week/318 online newspaper readers
    38. 38. 28%34% 35%17%24% 25%UK average Online newspapers Print + online newspapersUse tablet Use for newsTablet use is higher among digitaland multiplatform newspaper readersQ8a. Which, if any, of the following devices do you ever use for any purpose? Base: 2078 UK internet users interestedin news Q8b. Which, if any, of the following devices have you used to access news in the last week?Base: 1949 who use any of these devices for any purpose
    39. 39. 62%42% 43%63%48% 49%Quick updates during day More in depth news Better experience thanPC/laptopUK average Online newspaper readersTablets rival computers for news experience, providingboth quick updates and more in depth focus than mobileBase: 331 who have accessed news via a tablet in the last week/116 online newspaper readers
    40. 40. Which devices do digital newspaper readers use?Base: 722 digital newspaper readers using at least one platform/device% of all online newspaper readers using each device last week24%Smartphone83%Computer41%Tablets
    41. 41. Print85%Which platforms do newspaper readers use?Base: 1524 newspaper readers using at least one platform/deviceComputer41%Print + computer29%Print + tablet7%Print + smartphone7%Tablet9%Smartphone14%% of all newspaper readers using each format last week
    42. 42. 28%26%23%21%58%61%67%70%UK averagePrint newspapersOnline newspapersPrint + online newspapersOnce a day Several times a dayNewspaper readers access news more frequentlyQ1b. Typically, how often do you access news. Base: 2078 UK internet users interested in news/1547 newspaperreaders/1271 print, 752 online, 476 reading both print and online+
    43. 43. 0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%45%50%First thingin themorningLater in themorningLunchtime Afternoon EarlyeveningLateeveningLast thingat nightNearly half of multi-platform newspaperreaders access news throughout the dayPrint newspapers Online newspapersUK2. When do you typically access the news? Base: 2078 UK internet users interested in news/1547 newspaperreaders/1271 print, 752 online, 476 reading both print and online48% print +online readersaccess throughoutthe day
    44. 44. 41%42%42%42%27%29%33%37%UK averagePrint newspapersOnline newspapersPrint + online newspapersVery interested Extremely interestedMultiplatform readers are more interested in newsQ1c. How interested, if at all, would you say you are in news? Base: 2078 UK internet users interested innews/1547 newspaper readers/1271 print, 752 online, 476 reading both print and online+
    45. 45. Multiplatform newsbrand readersare hooked on newsBase: 2078 UK internet users interested in news/1547 newspaper readers/476 reading both print and online22%51%News Lovers Daily Briefers Casual UsersUK average Print + digital newspapers22% 32%51% 52%28%17%
    46. 46. News Lovers read newspapers8.3million readers=83%of News Lovers arenewspaper readers
    47. 47. average4.87TVprogrammes/bulletins24 hour TVRadioMagazinesPrintnewspapersNewspaperwebsitesNewsmagazinewebsitesTV/RadiowebsitesISP/aggregatorSocialmediaBlogsMulti-platform newspaper readers usemore types of media to access newsTotal sampleaverage = 3.7types of media
    48. 48. Multi-platform newspaper readersuse more brands to access news4UK averagebrands/sources5Printnewspaperreaders6Onlinenewspaperreaders7Multiplatformnewspaperreaders
    49. 49. Digital newspaper readers are over150%more likely to share a news storyon social networks or participatein news coverageUK8B Have you passed on a link to an online news story, video etc. via email, social networking or other means?UK8C. Where shared? Q13. During an average week in which, if any, of the following ways do you share orparticipate in news coverage? Base: 2078 UK internet users interested in news/752 online newspaper readers
    50. 50. 18%28%UK average Online newspaper readersDigital newspaper readers morelikely to share links to newsUK8B. Thinking about how you share news, in the last week, have you passed on a link toan online news story, video etc. via email, social networking or other means?Base: 2078 UK internet users interested in news/752 online newspaper readers56%of people whoshare news linksare digitalnewspaper readers
    51. 51. 79%78%60%21%11%9%8%UK broadcaster sitesNewspaper website you use most regularly*UK newspaper sitesNews providers outside UKNews related blogsTwitterFacebookNewspaper brands are highly trusted in the digitalenvironment, especially among readers of the brandQ UK9A. Thinking about the types of sites, mobile sites or apps where you get news online, howtrustworthy do you find the news content of the following? % answering very/quite trustworthy.Base: 2078 UK internet users interested in news/752 online newspaper readers*Base = online newspaper readers
    52. 52.  Central, influential role Massive audience – 76% of people interested in news New and influential audiences- nearly half of 16-24 news audience read digital newspapers,over a quarter read both print and digital- active news seekers who are hooked on news- digital audience 150% more likely to share online Growth through devices- the more devices, the more newspaper brands are read- mobile for quick updates, tablets better than PC experience Trusted destinations- 78% trust their digital newspaper brand- tablet & smartphone readers more likely to access brandsSummary for newspaper brands
    53. 53. All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc. Total samplesize was 2078 adults. Fieldwork was undertaken 29th January - 6thFebruary 2013. The survey was carried out online. The figures havebeen weighted and are representative of all GB adults (aged 18+).Sample & Method

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