Inclusive mobility action plan for metro manila

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Recognizing that there is no single solution to Metro Manila's complex transportation issue, it is
but logical to approach the challenges in a systemic multi-disciplinary manner. Initiatives for
inclusive mobility should be synchronized and managed for collective impact. Collective impact
refers to the formulation of programmatic and deliberate efforts to ensure that on-going
initiatives and projects undertaken by partners and stakeholders in inclusive mobility are
continued until they achieve their objectives.

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Inclusive mobility action plan for metro manila

  1. 1. INCLUSIVE MOBILITY NETWORK Action Plan Ateneo School of Government JANUARY 2014 with generous support from
  2. 2. Table of Contents List of Acronyms......................................................................................................................................................................... 3 I. Introduction ....................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Background: Why are we writing up an Inclusive Mobility Action Plan? ............................................... 5 Rationale ................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 II. Strategic Framework of the Action Plan .............................................................................................................. 7 Envisioned Impact: Where do we want to go? ...................................................................................................... 7 Inclusive Mobility Outcomes: Where do we want to go? ................................................................................. 8 Mobility ................................................................................................................................................................................. 8 Safety...................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Productivity ........................................................................................................................................................................ 9 Civility.................................................................................................................................................................................... 9 III. Inclusive Mobility Action Strategies, Programs and Initiatives ........................................................... 10 The Action Planning Process ....................................................................................................................................... 10 Identification and Diagnosis of Problems, Issues, and Concerns......................................................... 10 Design of Strategies, Programs, and Initiatives ............................................................................................ 10 Delivery Arrangement for Action Plan .............................................................................................................. 11 Identification and Diagnosis of Problems, Issues, and Concerns in Inclusive Mobility in Metro Manila ................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Strategies Programs and Initiatives ......................................................................................................................... 18 Key Initiatives for the Short-Term....................................................................................................................... 23 Government, Private, and Civil Society Sector Roles and Tasks .......................................................... 24 IV. References ................................................................................................................................................................... 30 2
  3. 3. List of Acronyms AUV Asian Utility Vehicle BRT Bus Rapid Transit CAI Asia Clean Air Initiative for Asian Cities CCTV Closed-circuit television DepEd Department of Education DOTC Department of Transportation and Communications DPWH Department of Public Works and Highways GDP Gross Domestic Product GTZ Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit iBoP Asia Innovations at the Base of the Pyramid in Southeast Asia IM Inclusive Mobility IT Information Technology JICA Japan International Cooperation Agency LRT Light Rail Transit LTFRB Land Transportation and Franchising Regulatory Board LTO Land Transportation Office MMARAS Metro Manila Accident Reporting and Analysis System MMDA Metropolitan Manila Development Authority MRT Metro Rail Transit MVIS Motorized Vehicle Inspection System NCR National Capital Region NEDA National Economic Development Authority NMT Non-motorized Transport OECD Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development ONEISS Online National Electronic Surveillance System PPP Public-Private Partnership 3
  4. 4. PUJ Public Utility Jeepney PUV Public Utility Vehicle PWD Persons with Disability TESDA Technical Education and Skills Development Authority UP-NCTS University of the Philippines National Center for Transportation Studies WHO World Health Organization 4
  5. 5. I. Introduction Background: Why are we writing up an Inclusive Mobility Action Plan? Metro Manila is home to 15% of the Philippine population, contributes 35% of the country’s gross domestic product, and is ranked 28th wealthiest urban conglomeration in the world and 2nd in Southeast Asia.1 Given this rapid urbanization, Metro Manila needs to develop an efficient transport system to support and maintain its economic growth relative to its increasing population. Even more so given that according to the Department of Transportation and Communication (DOTC, 2011), 8 out of 10 people in Metro Manila take public transport. Yet the transportation system continues to pose great risks to both pedestrians and motorists. In this regard, the Ateneo School of Government (ASoG) with funding from the Rockefeller Foundation (RF) established the Inclusive Mobility Project in 2011. It has since developed a new platform that helps integrate and raise awareness on critical yet unheralded urban innovations in Metro Manila. It has also established a dynamic digital resource center (http://inclusivemobility.net/). These efforts have contributed to a mind shift from the narrow view of the problem as “traffic” to “mobility”, particularly for the poor and vulnerable. Recently, the project conducted two workshops: the Metro Manila Transport Challenge Mapping Workshop (12 September 2013) and the Inclusive Mobility Initiatives Mapping Workshop (17 October 2013). Both workshops were participated in by Metro Manila transport stakeholders – supply (e.g. PUV operators) and demand (e.g. commuters) sectors. The workshops were designed to determine issues, challenges, initiatives (that may not even require new policies), and opportunities facing the transport sector in Metro Manila. It was a solution-seeking process envisaged to contribute towards determining the elements for visioning the future of transportation and mobility in Metro Manila. It was also designed to find champions or advocates for better transportation system—one that prioritizes the welfare of the people and ensures the efficient delivery of goods and services. Rationale Recognizing that there is no single solution to Metro Manila's complex transportation issue, it is but logical to approach the challenges in a systemic multi-disciplinary manner. Initiatives for inclusive mobility should be synchronized and managed for collective impact. Collective impact refers to the formulation of programmatic and deliberate efforts to ensure that on-going initiatives and projects undertaken by partners and stakeholders in inclusive mobility are continued until they achieve their objectives. The objectives of this action plan are: 1. To broaden and make more inclusive the processes of diagnosing and designing solutions for Metro Manila's mobility problem; 2. To increase the overall quality of the mobility system in Metro Manila by ensuring that it adequately serves even the poor, the vulnerable, the disadvantaged, the marginalized, and the voiceless Metro Manilans; 1 http://www.philippinechamber.com/index.php/speeches/664-21st-mmbc 5
  6. 6. 3. To encourage multi-sector partnership in attaining collective impact in solving the Metro Manila mobility problem; and 4. To create an inclusive Metro Manila mobility system that will serve as a key foundation for enhancing livability and sustainability of Metro Manila as one of the world's premiere metropolitan centers. 6
  7. 7. II. Strategic Framework of the Action Plan Figure 1 indicates the objective is to develop an inclusive transportation system that utilizes the different innovations in the infrastructure and related services to respond to the mobility needs of the stakeholders (government, private sector, and community). The course of action is to spell out a comprehensive action plan that includes desired outputs in the institutional, physical, economic, environmental, and social dimensions. This plan will lead to an inclusive transportation system in the areas of enhanced mobility, safety, productivity, and civility as outcomes. Figure 1. Strategic framework of the action plan. Envisioned Impact: Where do we want to go? The envisioned impact of inclusive mobility is based on the vision of the transportation system in Metro Manila agreed upon by the participants of the IM Action Plan Meeting held last 19 November 2013. A safe, seamless, well-connected, accessible, and user-friendly Metro Manila sustainable urban transport system that works for all Metro Manilans, especially the poor, the vulnerable, the disadvantaged, and the marginalized. 7
  8. 8. Inclusive Mobility Outcomes: Where do we want to go? This action plan is grounded on a multi-sectoral network of Metro Manilans actively partnering with the government, private sector, and civil society organizations. Through the network, citizens strategically, sustainably, and innovatively promote the mobility of all citizens, especially the poor and the vulnerable, that will contribute to the coherent long-term development of the whole metropolis and enhance the overall well-being of all its constituents. Mobility Enhanced Mobility is defined as achieving travel purposes at the least cost, and travel time. The indicators are (1) reduced travel time, (2) reduced passenger-waiting time, (3) reduced volume count, and (4) enhanced quality of travel experience. In Metro Manila, the presence of public, formal and informal, transportation hubs and terminals are strategically located in areas readily accessible to commuters such as malls, marketplaces, schools, etc. However, the non-motorized transport (NMT) users such as bikers and pedestrians are still struggling to claim their own share in road space. Bike lanes, sidewalks, and other NMT facilities are usually occupied by sidewalk vendors and used as private parking spaces. Hence, the desired outcomes to enhanced mobility are  Improving physical connectivity and ticket fare integration among urban rail lines, buses, and feeder modes such PUJs and tricycles including the last mile connection. These include pedestrian spaces both at grade and footbridges (overpasses) as well as bicycle user system including but not limited to bike lanes, bike racks, repair shops, and building’s shower rooms and PWD friendly infrastructure.  Improving communications especially in mapping the public transport hubs, terminals, and loading and unloading bay with schedules.  Crafting and utilizing NMT and public transport users’ audit. Also providing incentives for building owners to install wide pedestrian spaces and for companies to manage their own travel demand management measures (e.g. Car pooling, cycling to work). Safety Enhanced Safety is defined as travelling with least risk of loss of life, limb, and property. The indicators are (1) reduced deaths and injuries on the road, (2) reduced number of vehicular accidents, (3) faster response time to aid road accident victims, and (4) faster response time in clearing roads. There are high incidents of accidents that led to both fatal and non-fatal injuries as shown in data from WHO (2008), DOTC (2012-2013), MMARAS (2008-2011). The desired outcomes to enhanced safety are  Developing better information, education, and communication campaign particularly on pedestrian safety, road safety, and road-sharing concepts (e.g. role of carless streets, road courtesy, disaster preparation management, and air quality measurement) thru the use of traditional and social media. 8
  9. 9.  Enforcing strictly traffic, transportation and other related ordinances (e.g. role of insurances).  Improving road-sharing infrastructure (pedestrian and road improvements), and PWD street guides infrastructure. Productivity Enhanced Productivity is defined as generating higher production of goods and services as a result of less travel cost, effort, and time. The indicators are (1) higher occupancy of vehicles, (2) higher ratio of trips using public transport compared to private vehicles, (3) faster delivery of government and private sector services, and (4) lower cost of operating and maintaining transport vehicles and facilities. According to Dr. Jose Regin Regidor of UPNCTS, over the last decade motorists and commuters have lost some P1.513 trillion representing fuel costs and man-hour lost due to the worsening traffic in Metro Manila. As such the desired outcomes are  Implementing existing urban design/plan and transport plans in improving the public transport infrastructure and services.  Promoting way-finding apps that cater to all sectors especially the PWDs for better mobility management.  Implementing transport demand management measures (e.g. companies with carpooling and/or bike to work incentives, work from home arrangements etc.) Civility Enhanced Civility is defined as having enhanced courtesy, discipline, and contribution to an engaging and encouraging travel and mobility environment. The indicators are (1) reduced incidence of road rage and other forms of violence and conflict, (2) reduced incidence of illegal parking as well as reckless and discourteous driving behavior, (3) reduced unnecessary use of horns and wangwang, and (4) reduced negative road behavior such as spitting, jaywalking, littering, smoking, and wearing improper/indecent attire. A retired American law enforcement officer, Michael Brown, said that an average driver in Metro Manila “does not feel bound by the rules of the road”. Also, according to him, law enforcers on the road find much difficulty in managing the general flow of traffic. The desired outcomes are:  Increasing sensitivity to the mobility needs of the urban poor, the women, the children, the elderly, and PWDs  Mobilizing and actively educating stakeholders in partnership with representatives from government, non-government organizations, international organizations, academe, and business sector on pedestrian and motorist safety as well as road-sharing implementation modes. 9
  10. 10. III. Inclusive Mobility Action Strategies, Programs and Initiatives The Action Planning Process The Inclusive Mobility project facilitated two workshops that engaged the stakeholders to determine solutions to the issues, challenges, and initiatives facing the transport sector in Metro Manila. It is visualized to contribute towards shaping the elements for visioning the future of transportation and mobility in Metro Manila. It is also designed to find champions for a transportation system that prioritizes people’s improved mobility, safety, productivity, and civility. The outputs of these workshops will contribute substantially to the ‘Transport, Traffic, and Mobility Summit’ being planned by Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) in conjunction with related government agencies like Department of Transportation and Communication (DOTC) and Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH). Identification and Diagnosis of Problems, Issues, and Concerns The Metro Manila Transport Challenge Mapping Workshop held 12 September 2013 gathered a wide range of stakeholders (total of 59 participants) from commuters, cyclists, pedestrians, transport advocates, and transport IT innovators. The workshop utilized participatory consultative techniques using maps, metacards and sticker dots that effectively mustered insights from the participants. The workshop process includes (1) articulating the views and insights of the participants about the state of transportation, traffic, and mobility in Metro Manila, (2) identifying the primary hindrances that affect the changes in mobility and transportation in Metro Manila, and (3) determining the features and benefits of the different modes of transportation in Metro Manila relative to mobility, safety, productivity, and civility. Design of Strategies, Programs, and Initiatives The Metro Manila Inclusive Mobility Initiatives Mapping Workshop verified the effects of the various initiatives in traffic, mobility and transportation and determined ways to address the negative effects. It was attended by a total of 45 participants representing cyclists, PWDs, private entities, academe, urban planners, and representatives from informal settlement communities. The workshops using maps, metacards, and sticker dots enabled the participants to carry out the following objectives: 1. Identifying opportunities and challenges in mobility, safety, productivity, and civility of the roads of Metro Manila (Enablers or Barriers) 2. Ascertaining policies and actions being done by the government, the business and private sector, and the citizens 3. Setting Priorities – Immediate (selected initiatives for implementation within one year), Short-term (selected initiatives for implementation within 3 years), and Long-term Plans (all other initiatives for implementation in 10 years) for the government, the private sector, and the citizens. A steering committee was convened to further flesh out the details, validate, and prioritize the actions to be taken. The Secretariat, the IM Project team, will draft the action plan for the proposed Network. The action plan will be presented for review and approval by general 10
  11. 11. assembly of prospective members of the Inclusive Mobility Network by February 2014. The finalized Inclusive Mobility Action Plan for presentation at the larger Traffic, Transport, and Mobility Summit will hopefully be adopted for implementation by the MMDA and other implementing agencies by early 2014 Delivery Arrangement for Action Plan The formation, operation, and development of the Inclusive Mobility Network will be undertaken through a participatory multi-stakeholder process that engages the government, private sector, and civil society organizations in critical partnerships. Critical partnerships refer to the process of actively working with government, private, and civil society sectors but maintaining the independence to evaluate and critique the government as a way of strengthening the total effort towards inclusive mobility. Identification and Diagnosis of Problems, Issues, and Concerns in Inclusive Mobility in Metro Manila In 2011, the MMDA, DOTC, and DPWH organized the Metro Manila Traffic and Transport Stakeholder Consultative Workshop. The workshop (1) identified various stakeholders in Metro Manila traffic and transport, (2) advanced inter-stakeholder awareness and stakeholder community building, (3) obtained various feedback on the initiatives of MMDA, DOTC and DPWH, and 4) gathered suggestions and recommendations on how to address the worsening traffic and mobility problems in Metro Manila. Although several initiatives and projects have been implemented by MMDA, DOTC, and DPWH, these projects have been implemented in a fragmented and uncoordinated manner. While there are bold efforts to solve the transport and traffic problems in the Metro, vehicle volume continues to increase clogging both major and minor thoroughfares in Metro Manila. In 2012, MMDA accounted 53,140 cars, 55,218 utility vehicles, 3,713 sport utility vehicles and 1,333 buses newly registered in Metro Manila. Outcome Perspective Mobility  Issues among motorists and non-motorized transport road users Commuters in Metro Manila travel using different modes of transport like buses, light rail trains, jeepneys, tricycles, and taxis. These public transportations are regulated differently though. Buses, jeepneys, and taxis have boundary system2 that most likely causes drivers to disregard traffic rules and driving ethics as they compete for commuters. This behavior however leads to irregular and heavy traffic flow. The growing number of private vehicles has congested main roads and highways. Although, the MMDA implemented the number coding scheme3 to mitigate the congestion, transport policy planning is still car-centered. For policy planning to be inclusive, it should consider regulating car ownership (e.g. Singapore model) and finetuning the system for high seating capacity vehicles like jeepneys and buses. 2 A fixed amount paid to the operators of Jeepneys, buses, taxis, etc. for driving commuters for a certain number of hours per day. This “boundary” along with the fuel and maintenance expenses will be deducted from the amount the drivers earned from their hours of travel. The difference is the driver’s income. 3 The Unified Vehicular Volume Reduction Program or the number coding scheme is MMDA’s way to reduce the volume of vehicles plying the major routes of Metro Manila. 11
  12. 12. Meanwhile, the cyclists’ major problem is the lack of bicycle lanes on roads and highways. Cyclists compete for road space with motorized vehicles. In Metro Manila, only the Cities of Marikina, Makati, Pasig, Manila and Quezon have designated bicycle lanes. Among these cities, Marikina has the most extensive network of bike lanes, And while there is an advocacy to encourage people to cycle to work, workplaces generally have no available shower room facility.  Challenge to Commuters, Pedestrians, and PWDs Poor road facilities and infrastructures hinder pedestrians to achieve seamless mobility. For instance, footbridges are difficult to climb and poor lighting makes them prone to accidents and crimes. The MRT and LRT escalators and elevators meant for PWDs, elderly, and pregnant women are usually under maintenance while stairs are too high and/or too steep. Sidewalks are often used as parking space or occupied by vendors making it hard for pedestrians to walk and jog. It is also used as waiting area of commuters, terminals of tricycles, and loading and unloading zones of public transport modes. These situations and the lack of access ramps also add to the difficulty for PWDs to travel especially those who are on their wheelchairs. Drivers and riders seem to lack knowledge when it comes to the rights of PWDs on roads. Parking spaces dedicated for PWDs are often disregarded. Loading and unloading zones are not designed to accommodate the PWDs.  Issues among lawmakers and law enforcers Having too many agencies responsible for easing the traffic flow, vehicle congestion, and other transport matters is seen as a problem. The DPWH for instance is the one responsible for the construction, maintenance, and improvement of roads and road facilities. On the other hand, the Land Transportation Office (LTO) and the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB) under the DOTC are mandated to regulate registration of motor vehicles, licensing of drivers and conductors, franchising of public utility vehicles, and adjudicating apprehensions. Meanwhile, the MMDA is responsible for metro wide development, transport and vehicular traffic management, and monitoring and regulating traffic flow of city buses in major thoroughfares in Metro Manila such as EDSA. The local government in each city has their own set of enforcers, and traffic and transport code enacted through the passing of city ordinances. A clear example of this overlap of functions and authority is the decision of the City of Manila last July 2013 to ban the buses that do not have terminals inside the city. This move has affected residents as well as commuters entering the city. It also further congested traffic in neighboring cities. The lack of coordination and information dissemination also added confusion among the bus drivers and local government officials of the neighboring cities. Another concern is the lack of drive of government officials to improve and promote the use of public transport modes that can transport more people. In other countries like Singapore, the government recognized their country’s land constraints and the need to avoid traffic gridlocks. In order restrain and stabilize vehicle ownership, the government 12
  13. 13. introduced innovation in policies like vehicle quota system that complements the range of ownership taxes (e.g. usage charges). Parallel to this is their effort to continuously upgrade the whole transport system (through transit-oriented planning) that encourages more people to take public transport. Safety  Issues among motorists and non-motorized vehicle users Public transport drivers competing for the passengers oftentimes drive recklessly and overload their vehicles thereby endangering commuters and motorists. Tricycles meanwhile ply along major roads and highways despite the law that prohibits them from using these roads. Poor quality and deteriorating road infrastructures like open manholes, poorly painted concrete barriers, poor lighting, and lack of warning signs cause accidents. Open parking spaces and lack of bicycle racks expose the vehicles to theft. Driving intoxicated, high on drugs, or while using the mobile phone are major causes of injuries and deaths on the road as well.  Challenge to Commuters, Pedestrians, and PWDs Just before 2013 ended, a bus fell from the skyway in Taguig City killing 22 and injuring 20 passengers. This is just the most recent of the many road accidents caused by reckless driving. Pedestrians meanwhile are forced to walk on roads because the sidewalks are often littered with vendors or used as parking spaces. Footbridges meant to keep pedestrians safe from crossing highways have steep and narrow stairs discouraging its use. Meanwhile, the MRT and LRT still lack the safety doors to prevent falling down the rails. Dim lampposts and scarce police visibility have increased the crime incidence in Metro Manila roads. Additionally, PWDs criticize the lack of public knowledge on and sometimes disregard of their rights. Particularly galling is the lack of public transport to accommodate the PWDs.  Challenge to lawmakers and enforcers The DPWH recorded a total of 889 accidents in the National Capital Region (NCR) in 2012. Eight hundred forty nine (849) or 96% of these cases were caused by human error while 28 or 3% were caused by vehicular defect. The remaining 12 or 1% were caused by road defect. Also, the lax rules on obtaining a driver’s license diminish the quality of driving in the country that in turn has made Philippine roads some of the most dangerous roads in the world. The Discovery Channel’s documentary called “Don’t drive here in Metro Manila” aired last year showed how poor the driver’s licensing process in the Philippines is. For instance, answers to the LTO driving examination are posted inside the examination room that apparently does not concern LTO examiners. 13
  14. 14. Productivity  Challenge among motorists and non-motorized vehicle users According to National Economic Development Authority (NEDA) Secretary Arsenio Balisacan, a study by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) said that the Philippines is losing PhP2.4 billion in potential income because of the amount of time spent in heavy traffic instead of spending it in work. Heavy traffic is usually caused by poor road infrastructures, lack of discipline on the road, corrupt traffic enforcers, and lack of coordination among the transportation authorities. Rough roads, poor lighting, and lack of signage are just some of the examples of poor road infrastructures. Apparently, the Philippines spend less in public infrastructure than other countries in Southeast Asia. According to NEDA, the Philippines spend only 2.5 percent of its GDP, which is small, compared to its neighboring countries (inquirer.net).  Challenge to Commuters , Pedestrians, and PWDs Poor people find transport fare costly. In a study conducted by the Inclusive Mobility Project, families living in three informal settlements in Quezon City spent at least 15% of their income for transport. For a minimum wage earner, this amount can already buy one kilo of rice or three cans of sardines—enough for a full day’s meal. Likewise, poor signage and often dilapidated directional signboards delay the travel time which result to loss of productivity.  Challenge to law makers and enforcers Corrupt law enforcers are not helping in solving the issues in productivity. Instead of lessening the number of traffic law violators that cause traffic, they even tolerate them as long as they receive bribes. Civility  Challenge to motorists and non-motorized vehicle users Most public transport drivers drive recklessly, overtake indiscriminately, and compete with other vehicles in road space and getting passengers. Meanwhile, some drivers lack proper hygiene as they spit, pee, and throw garbage anywhere. There are also motorists who do not respect commuters and pedestrians.  Challenge to Commuters , Pedestrians, and PWDs In jeepneys, there are passengers who don’t reach out for other passenger’s fare. Some people throw their empty food wrappers into the road. There are also commuters who play loud music on their MP3 players or talk loudly over their phones, which can disturb other passengers.  Challenge to law makers and enforcers Tokenism still persists among some government officials. At the start of their term, these officials construct road facilities and even PWD access ramps. However, some simply abandon these projects or construct substandard facilities. 14
  15. 15. Multi-Dimensional Perspective In order to develop a comprehensive perspective on the opportunities and challenges in Mobility, Safety, Productivity, and Civility, the dimensions were fleshed out-- Physical, Economic, Social, Environmental, Institutional, and Technology (as cross-cutting). Physical Dilapidated roads and substandard infrastructures hinder the mobility, productivity, safety and civility of road users. The roads and some sidewalks are congested with vehicles and illegal vendors. Lack of light posts encourages pickpockets and hold-uppers. Footbridges are oftentimes too steep for vulnerable commuters (pregnant, elderly, children, and PWDs) to use for crossing the streets. Roads are flood prone because of poor drainage system. PWD accessibility is lacking on both roads and buildings. Bike lanes are inadequate and only Marikina City constructed a fairly comprehensive network where bikers can ride seamlessly. Also, there are only limited bike racks in Metro Manila where bikes can be safely parked. There are still a number of road signs that are faded or dilapidated to be useful to pedestrians and motorists. Even as Metro Manila lacks quality public open spaces, vendors and cars often occupy these spaces. Moreover, several private establishments do not have enough parking spaces leaving their customers with no choice but to park on sidewalks or even on the streets. Economic There transport cost in Metro Manila vis-à-vis the minimum wage can be disparate. Poor families spend as much as 15% of their income for transportation which adversely affect their budget for food and nutrition. Students are normally denied their fare discounts by jeepney drivers. Taxi fare is expensive and drivers sometimes ask for additional payment during rush hours or on holiday seasons. The economic costs of heavy traffic and substandard transportation infrastructures are significant to both individual commuters and national economy. Social There is conflict of interest among stakeholders in transportation relative to the general welfare. Car owners only think about their right for road space and have a hard time dealing with public transport drivers. Meanwhile, public transport drivers only care about getting as much passengers as they could due to the prevailing boundary system. The lack of discipline and respect among drivers, commuters, pedestrians, and law enforcers are also social issues. Drivers tend to drive recklessly and sometimes disregard traffic laws and signage. Jaywalking, spitting, and bribery continue to be major concerns. Private car owners are not receptive to the idea of using public transportation to resolve vehicle congestion. In fact, government officials are averse to taking public transportation. 15
  16. 16. Environmental Motorized transport, particularly the poorly maintained vehicles, is a major source of pollution in Metro Manila. According to CAI-Asia, the Motorized Vehicle Inspection System (MVIS) designed to foster efficient and road-worthy public transport system has been poorly implemented. Therefore the general public is exposed to safety and health hazards. Highways and secondary roads need more trees while walkways are dirty and hardly walkable. Garbage bins are insufficient and waste segregation is not firmly effected. Also, noise pollution is a prevalent concern in Metro Manila where jeepneys blare loud music and buses use loud horns to get passengers’ attention. Institutional The transport sector is still not cohesive as multi-stakeholder consultations are rare. That is why there are transportation projects that do not address the needs of the road users. Road signs and traffic rules have yet to be standardized as well.. Planning is difficult because there are also too many agencies with overlapping functions involved in traffic management and enforcement in Metro Manila. In addition, decisions made by agencies are not always based on scientific and relevant information. There is no central repository of information and database available to the public and even the decision makers. Drivers should get more rigorous training on traffic rules, road ethics and road safety measures. In fact, the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) should certify drivers of big vehicles like ten wheeler trucks and heavy duty vehicles. Technological Public transportation is not operated on a centralized time schedule. The LRTs and MRTs have not mounted gates to protect riders from falling off the rails. They have not sufficiently installed CCTV cameras are to efficiently monitor traffic and to better secure pedestrians and motorists. Modal Perspective This section describes the identified challenges (negative conditions/ features) per transportation mode (train, bus, jeepney, AUs, private vehicle, tricycle, and bicycle) with regards to mobility, safety, productivity, and civility. The information was generated during the Metro Manila Transport Challenge Mapping Workshop held last 12 September 2013. Train (PNR, MRT, LRT) In terms of mobility, it seems like commuters are satisfied with the way trains transport passengers. However, safety issues were raised based on their personal experiences. People in jampacked trains are vulnerable to pickpockets. Then the poor lighting in the walkways of the train stations add to the security threat. There are no safety hand rails or barriers to keep the passengers at a safe distace from the tracks—making it a potential spot for suicide attempts. The gap between the platform and train endanger the PWDs. Meanwhile, inoperative ticket vending machines create long queues for tickets that delay people going to work. Although the elderly, pregnant women, and PWDs are prioritized, some abuse this privilege which becomea a a problem in civility. The lack of sanitary toilet facilities also needs to be addressed. 16
  17. 17. Bus Unlike other vehicles, buses are restricted to national roads because of their big size. While its seating capacity ranges from 40 to 60 passengers, buses continue to cause traffic jams. Buses don’t have designated bus stops except on EDSA even though there is bus segregation scheme being implemented by the MMDA. And since buses travel in national roads along with other vehicles, they register longer travel time compared to the MRT and LRT. Bus drivers are reputedly reckless. And buses have not been redesigned to accommodate the PWDs, elderly, and pregnant women. Jeepney The “Sasakyan ng Masa”, jeepneys offer the cheapest minimum transportation fare among all the public transport modes in Metro Manila. With a seating capacity ranging from 18-23 passengers and with routes passing through arterial roads and highways, the jeepneys are a convenient and cost-efficient choice among commuters. While tehere is no mobility issue safety concerns were raised – from theft to reckless driving. AUV AUV is a a semi-taxi and semi-jeepney transporet mode. With at least 10-person seating capacity, AUVs transport passengers who can afford the higher fare due to the air condition. According to commuters, supply of AUVs does not meet the demand of the commuters. This causes long queues of passengers in terminals—an issue in productivity as this could mean loss of time and money for students and workers. Public terminals are also not enough for this type of public transport vehicle. They see this as an issue in mobility. Old models of AUVs cause discomfort to passengers too. Private Vehicles Eight out of ten people in Metro Manila take public transport in going to their destinations. Yet, most of the road space is used by private vehicles. The MMDA has already expressed their plans to amend the number-coding scheme to solve the congestion of private vehicles. However, workshop participants believe that the number coding itself will not suffice to slow down the increasing number of private vehicles. Tricycles Tricycle is a motorcycle with side cab that can carry 2 to 4 passengers and is designed for shortdistance trips. It transports people door-to-door just like taxicabs but cheaper. However, like cabs, tricycles do not have discounts for students and senior citizens. Its minimum fare applies to all passengers and varies from distance. While it is considered a “mini-version of cabs” tricycles are prohibited to ply along highways and main roads. However, this policy is not strictly enforced. Also, tricycles are not covered by insurance. Bicycles Despite its health and environmental benefits, bicycles have the least share in road space in Metro Manila. The lack of bike lanes, bike racks, and other bicycle facilities make bike riders suscpetible to accidents. Although it occupies little road space, it can only safely transport one person. And since riding a bicycle requires balancing and pedalling, bikers are drenched in sweat when they reach their destinations. Thus, offices should be enjoined to install shower facilities to also encourage their employees to bike to work. 17
  18. 18. Strategies Programs and Initiatives The Action Plan will be pursued by the Inclusive Mobility Network using a ten-point strategy, as follows: 1. Making the transport system work for the poor and vulnerable. This strategy aims to lower transport fares and find ways to improve the day-to-day experience of public transport users. It includes but is not limited to initiatives such as (1) mapping designated vehicles stops, (2) creating more accessible transportation modes, (3) creating and maintaining pedestrian spaces, and (4) standardizing the infrastructure designs to meet the needs of both NMT and the PWD. The test for inclusive mobility is not that the average person is mobile but that even the poor and vulnerable are. If we aim only for the average person, we exclude half of the population! Situation Now Most Metro Manilans use public transport (8 out of 10), but the public transport system is expensive (up to 15 percent of income is spent to transport fares), inconvenient, and unsafe specially for the poor and vulnerable Key Initiatives        Expand and enhance the public transport system Map and label the entire transport system -- transport hubs, vehicle stops, pedestrian facilities, street signs Increase and maintain pedestrian and PWD spaces, facilities, and policies Design public transport vehicles for PWDs Standardize pedestrian and PWD facilities Increase physical connectivity in the entire transport system Enhance road-sharing infrastructure and policy 2. Designing the city to be walkable, bike-able, and accessible. This strategy aims to create a healthier community with more walkable and pedestrian friendly spaces. It wants to increase in walking and bike routes. Initiatives may include converting riverbanks to bike lanes and parks as well as, developing walkways outside train terminals. To move the city, every person should be able to carry himself/herself, if not all the way, then part of the way. Every person should try to walk, bike, and/or commutes to their various destinations. Taking their cars should be the last resort. Situation Now Practically all Metro Manilans can walk and a great number are probably predisposed to bike but they are discouraged by the absence of proper infrastructure, facilities, and safety arrangements. Metro Manilans, therefore, are being prevented by the system. 18
  19. 19. Key Initiatives      Provide infrastructure and policy support for NMT Provide parking space for bikes and shower facilities for bikers in transport terminals Construct bike lanes and parks along riverbanks Enforce policies on common areas, setbacks, and public spaces against encroachment and privatization Promote bike plan programs for government and private sector employees 3. Moving people, not vehicles. Urban transport is about moving the majority of city’s population. This entails building more efficient transport system that connects people with their jobs, health care, education, and other basic needs. Those who have less in wheels must have more in roads. Efficient and effective public transport must be the backbone of the transport system. Situation Now Traffic and transport policy, management, and enforcement in Metro Manila move vehicles, especially cars, and not people. This matches the car ownership-fixation of the public and makes transformation difficult. Key Initiatives      Encourage the use of public transport Fast-track the evaluation, design, and implementation of innovative systems such as the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system Use infrastructure and policy to encourage high occupancy vehicles Increase preferential treatment to non-motorized transport in road-sharing schemes. Use congestion pricing to prevent traffic jams and gridlocks. 4. Ensuring mobility with safety and civility. The strategy pertains to strict implementation of laws (e.g. on traffic and road safety) while safeguarding and promoting the welfare of the general public who uses the public transport system. On the other hand, the general public (users) has an important role in performing its duties as a good citizen. Mobility in a highly urbanized and complex city must not sacrifice safety and civility. The dignity and security of human life must be upheld. Situation Now Metro Manila experiences high rates of road accidents and road deaths and injuries. The high volume of vehicles without dedicated lanes or tracks competing for limited road space increase the risks of collisions. Key Initiatives  Improve the road emergency response capacity of local governments and hospitals. 19
  20. 20.  Make road behavior a focus of civics education and information campaigns. 5. Promoting clean air, clean streets, clean vehicles, and clean facilities. Clean streets and clean facilities are probably one of the most visible government services regularly done to enhance public health and reducing environmental degradation caused by pollution from the transport sector. This also includes the promotion for the use of new technologies (e.g. e-vehicles) as alternative to fossil fuel based transport modes. The sustainability of the transport system must be assured, and this must be evident on the ground, not only in statistics. Situation Now Metro Manila is highly polluted. It is also characterized by dirty even unsanitary public spaces and facilities. Key Initiatives   Strictly and consistently enforce the environment-oriented national policies and local ordinances. Provide tangible incentives to fast-track the adoption and use of environmentallyfriendly and fuel efficient vehicles. 6. Planning and communicating better and traveling less. This strategy aims to advance an effective planning process that competently allocates resources. Moreover, it helps decision makers and transport users prioritize transport activities that reduce the need for personal travel and provide alternative transportation options. Mobility is accomplishing travel purposes at least travel, cost, and time. Habitual planning and communicating, individually and collectively, help reduce travel. Situation Now The framework, predisposition, and capacity for synchronized planning at the regional, city, village, household, and personal levels practically do not exist, thus preventing stakeholders to contribute to a well-functioning transport system. Key Initiatives     Enhance the integrated, sustainable, and inclusive urban planning capacities of local governments and the MMDA Increase the integration, consistency, and interoperability of national and local government agency plans, programs, and operations in Metro Manila Generate deeper and wider understanding of transport and mobility issues by undertaking inclusive mobility audits and studies Increase the capacity of local authorities for inclusive mobility planning and management by designing and conducting training courses for inclusive mobility professionals 20
  21. 21.  Hold regular tripartite meetings among government, the private sector, and civil society to communicate, plan, and cooperate habitually on inclusive mobility issues 7. Sharing information to increase connectivity and accessibility. Leveraging on the use of technology, this strategy targets to transform the transportation sector. Public sharing of information enables alternative and out-of-the-box options and solutions. This can also trigger innovation among key local players and markets to improve their services. Some examples are android apps and Internet portals. Situation Now Modern information and communication technology is available to Metro Manilans but the applications and content needed to enable intelligent and timely travel routes are still inadequate. Key Initiatives       Encourage new ways of harnessing social and traditional media for enhancing mobility. Develop new route options apps Make information on traffic and transport matters understandable to the public through the use of local language and the use of popular media. Increase the use of infographics for making transport and mobility issues widely understandable to ordinary Metro Manilans Establish an IM Portal that will widely generate, store, and share information promoting inclusive mobility Engage the media in producing and disseminating content on inclusive mobility. 8. Making our neighborhoods more accessible to the rest of the city. This strategy is associated on how neighborhoods are planned, its land use, and travel behavior of residents. It also considers the level of access to common destinations such as offices, malls, market etc. The strategy also looks at how neighborhoods are designed whether it encourages walking and biking, among others and its incentives – with the aim on how to increase or create higher levels of neighborhood connectivity. We cannot expect the whole city to be hospitable to our travel intentions, if we close our villages to the rest of the city. Situation Now As roads become more congested many villages control and limit access to their subdivision roads. This reduces the flow of vehicles in the metropolis and increases travel time. Key Initiatives   Fast-track and expand the government takeover of the maintenance and regulation of subdivision roads to make them available to the public Identify private villages and neighborhoods as well as closed streets for specific purposive action to encourage openness to public transport. 21
  22. 22. 9. Changing mindsets and behaviors—the authorities’ as well as ours. The strategy pushes a paradigm shift to a more comprehensive transportation system that veers away from the car-centric paradigm to a more person-based and environmental friendly system. It deviates from “traffic as the problem” to finding mobility solutions. Inclusive mobility is a set of conditions shaped by human intentions and behaviors – more of ours and less of the authorities. Situation Now Filipinos continue to have a fixation on car-ownership. City governments continue to resist greater levels of unified metropolitan governance. While a paradigm shift is needed, there are still just a handful of influential champions of inclusive mobility in government and the private sector. Key Initiatives    Encourage transport user contribution to overall mobility Introduce courses or sessions on inclusive mobility in schools Ensure that appointments of government officials and appropriation of government funds promote rather than hinder inclusive mobility. 10. Attaining the mobility of all by engaging all especially the poor. The poor and the vulnerable sector of the society are the most affected whenever there are changes/projects in the transport sector. Thus, the IM Network offers an online platform to give them voice and to facilitate suggestions and recommendations. We cannot inflict inclusive mobility on the poor and the vulnerable. They must actively and meaningfully participate and own their share of inclusive mobility schemes and initiatives, commensurate to their collective footprint on the streets. Situation Now The poor, the vulnerable, and the marginalized comprise the majority of Metro Manila population. They are least capable (cost-wise and physically) to travel in Metro Manila. Yet, they have no power, influence, or participation in the formulation of transport policies and in the design and construction of facilities. Key Initiatives     Ensure that the poor, the vulnerable, the disadvantaged, and the marginalized are given specific and adequate representation in all national and local consultations relating to the design, implementation, and evaluation of transport policies and initiatives. Use the traditional and social media to increase the overall interest and knowledge of citizens regarding the transport system in Metro Manila. Demonstrate using a real inclusive mobility challenge in a selected community in Metro Manila how active citizen participation can be used to add value to national and local government efforts to enhance mobility Establish an Inclusive Mobility Network that will harness and engender the active participation of all stakeholders in inclusive mobility in Metro Manila. 22
  23. 23.  Promote the use of citizen petitions, whether online or otherwise, as an avenue for meaningful citizen participation in inclusive mobility decision-making. Key Initiatives for the Short-Term The following are the key initiatives that can be implemented by the Inclusive Mobility Network in the short-term or a period of one (1) year 4: 1. IM Network Action Plan The IM Network Action Plan is the key tool for mobilizing stakeholders to achieve collective impact. 2. IM Portal The IM Portal is the primary tool for creating, consolidating, and sharing IM-relevant information among the stakeholders, the general public, and the targets of IM advocacy.  website and social media;  with maps that can crowd-source problems, best practices, black spots;  bloggers 3. Infographics Infographics are the knowledge products of choice for educating the general public about the transport and mobility system in Metro Manila and presenting and advocating positions on IM issues. 4. IM Audit Studies IM social audits are the preferred mode by which the IM Network will measure policy, implementation, and evaluation gaps that need to be addressed by decision-makers and stakeholders in order to enhance inclusive mobility. 5. Community Level IM Pilot Projects Community-level IM pilot projects are well-chosen real-life experiments for learning and demonstrating how to combine efforts and resources of various stakeholders, for attaining IM objectives set for specific communities. 6. IM Professionals Course The IM Professionals Course is a systematic approach to building the competency of IM duty bearers in national and local governments, the private sector, and civil society. It seeks to hasten the design and completion of innovative IM initiatives in Metro Manila. 7. IM Network Expansion The formalization of the Inclusive Mobility Network enables the active participation of the poor, the vulnerable, the disadvantaged, and the marginalized in promoting their mobility together with the rest of the metropolis. 4 These key actions/initiatives were identified by the select set of representatives from the larger assembly of the past 2 IM workshops. 23
  24. 24. 8. On-line Petitions On-line petitions empower IM advocates to communicate their policy preferences to their leaders and decision-makers in government as well as to the private and civil society sectors. 9. Media Engagement Media engagement is crucial in enlarging the reach of IM awareness raising and policy advocacy and will be actively pursued by the Network and its members. 10. Regular Tripartite Policy Meetings The IM Network will promote regular and frequent dialogues with decision-makers in government, private sector, and civil society to promote critical collaboration to attain the greater and long-term goal of inclusive mobility in the metropolis. Government, Private, and Civil Society Sector Roles and Tasks In the Philippines, the partnership between the government, private sector and civil society has been recognized as an effective means to bring about efficient delivery of services. Each has a critical role to foster collective impact, broadening social action, greater civil participation, and sound decision making that responds to the community needs. It is important to note however, that actions and initiatives to address these complex social problems should not start from scratch or creating entirely new solution. That any initiatives should build on existing collaborative efforts already addressing specific issues. The Role and Tasks of the Government The public sector, both national and local governments, plays a crucial role in addressing the challenges facing the transport sector. The government enacts the policies that can shape and transform the system. Learning from the experience of Living Cities5, the effort of government to collaborate with the private sector, non-profit, and philanthropic sectors collectively created a new civic infrastructure that harnessed and aligned their financial resources to support their intended beneficiaries. OECD (2013) 6 emphasized that governments play a pivotal role in influencing private sector investment. As such they can improve the business climate to encourage investments in sustainable transport infrastructures. The Role and Tasks of the Private Sector In rapidly growing cities, transportation infrastructure development usually cannot keep up with the demand and the externalities brought about by urban transportation (e.g. congestion, air pollution). This scenario according to GTZ (2004) is when private sector participation plays an important role especially in finding adequate resources to help cities finance infrastructure and deliver adequate services 7. Aside from financing, private sector can also lessen the burden 5 Living Cities is an innovative philanthropic collaborative of 22 of the world’s largest foundations and financial institutions that collectively share knowledge and experience to improve the lives of low-income people and the cities where they live. http://www.livingcities.org 6 OECD Environment Working Papers No. 56. Mobilising Private Investment in Sustainable Transport: The Case of Land-based Passenger Transport Infrastructure. http://bit.ly/1dvsgxZ 7 GTZ. 2004. Private Sector Participation in Urban Transport Provision. http://bit.ly/1dft1Ar 24
  25. 25. from government in development projects utilizing the mechanisms such as the Public-Private Partnership (PPP). The private sector can also get involve in construction, operation and maintenance of existing and new systems (Worldbank, 1996) 8. According to OECD, PPPs have been successfully implemented for BRT sytems, rails, and shared-used bicycle and car systems. Investments in the transportation sector can bring about increase in economic activities. The Role and Tasks of Civil Society Sustainable cities will not be made possible without citizen movements and advocacy in favor of sustainable transport and taking into consideration the key elements of inclusive mobility, safety, productivity, and civility. Civil society often takes the lead in initiatives that changes mindsets and behaviors of transport users, private sector, and decision-makers. This sector also generates specific actions and can continue even beyond turnover in governments. Civil society groups can also function on the following: participate in independent monitoring and evaluation of programs and projects that other people value; can participate in data gathering (and may even provide up-to-date data) for sound decision-making; and may even accumulate and share knowledge, capacity, skills and networks. Inclusive Mobility Action Program9 Overview of the Program Thrusts This program for inclusive mobility relies on the optimal utilization of all technological, planning, organizational resources, and the development of culture of transport users. Thus each individual will have contribution to enhanced mobility and can be made possible through the following: 1) Improving physical connectivity; 2) Improving communications; and 3) Encouraging transport user contribution to overall mobility. Government Initiatives The following are the suggested key actions to be undertaken by the government: 1. Map and survey to gather up-to-date information that can enhance the transportation system in Metro Manila. Ensure that knowledge product be made public knowledge. 2. Promote alternative designs of public transport vehicles that are friendly to vulnerable groups like PWDs, women and elderly. 3. Implement policies (e.g. National Building Code) to protect the use of setbacks, easements, and pedestrian lanes (to minimize government cost of reacquiring right-of-way). 4. Review the design standards and specifications of sidewalks. 5. Create more walkable public spaces. 6. Allocate budget for LGUs for development and maintenance of sidewalks and bikeways. 8 Jorge M. Rebelo. 1996. Essentials for Sustainable Urban Transport in Brazil Large Metropolitan Area. World Bank Policy Research Working Paper. http://bit.ly/JHmdyU 9 Key actions/ initiatives of the government, private sector, and civil groups are based from the Inclusive Mobility Initiatives Mapping Workshop. 25
  26. 26. 7. Provide incentives to encourage employees to practice bike to work. Private Sector Initiatives The following are the suggested key actions to be undertaken by the private sector: 1. Synchronize with government the initiatives (infrastructure projects) spearheaded by the private sector (e.g. sidewalks, bikeways). 2. Improve accessibility within private subdivisions, malls, etc. 3. Invest in biking, pedestrian, and PWD friendly facilities based on standards. 4. Promote car-pooling policy within the company and provide incentives to those who will participate. Or provision of service vehicles/ shuttle services for employees. Civil Society Initiatives The following are the suggested key actions to be undertaken by the civil society sector: 1. Report violations, complaints and suggestions using available traditional and on-line platforms (e.g. social media) 2. Promote walking and cycling. 3. Mainstream innovative/ alternative transport vehicles for consideration in long term plans of especially if it will affect LGU infra/ public works. Inclusive Safety Action Program Overview of the Program Thrusts The program’s thrust is to enhance the safety in roads of both the motorized and non-motorized road users. Enhanced safety can also be made possible through the following: 1) Advocating and having better information, education and communication campaign; 2) Use of traditional and social media in disseminating public information that will aide in public transportation and road safety; and 3) Strict enforcement of traffic and transportation ordinances. Government Initiatives The following are the recommended key actions to be undertaken by the government: 1. Promote polices that aimed to promote walking and cycling and improve the conditions for pedestrians and cyclist. 2. Promote policies that will support the provision of PWD-friendly transport facilities that follow international standards. 3. Provide of safe loading and unloading areas/facilities. 4. Enforce strictly traffic laws and standards in road safety. 26
  27. 27. 5. Provide insurance policy programs for drivers and highway enforcers. 6. Create programs in collaboration with local schools to include road safety education in school curriculums. Private Sector Initiatives The following are the suggested key actions to be undertaken by the private sector: 1. Support and implement infrastructure facilities that are PWD-friendly. 2. Light up the business establishments and waiting sheds. 3. Invest in sustainable transport and promote the use of NMT in the development projects to lessen the risks of accidents. 4. Maintain regularly the vehicles, public and private. 5. Support the institutionalization of road safety schools. 6. Change company policy (e.g. from boundary system to regular wage earners) that will have an effect to the driving habit of drivers. 7. Prevent if not cease the selling of motorcycles to unlicensed drivers 8. Install more CCTVs for monitoring violations Civil Society Initiatives The following are the suggested key actions to be undertaken by the civil society sector: 1. Abide and observe traffic safety practices 2. Participate in the inventory of major transport facilities (e.g. pedestrian crossings, footbridges etc.) that will have an effect to the safety of commuters and pedestrians. 3. Lead in the advocacy for road safety to different sectors and even to children. Inclusive Productivity Action Program Overview of the Program Thrusts This program aims to respond to the challenges and requirements of desired economic growth especially to the increasing service-oriented economy of Metro Manila. That improvement in this aspect should be able to support the growing population and diverse expectation in urban activities. Thus, key actions towards inclusive productivity should lead to improving efficiency, service offerings, and manageability of public transportation. This can also be made possible through the following: 1) Improvement in road-sharing infrastructure; 2) Utilizing existing urban design/ plan; and 3) Promoting way-finding apps. 27
  28. 28. Government Initiatives The following are the recommended key actions to be undertaken by the government: 1. Provide parking spaces and washrooms for cyclists in major transport stations such as MRT and LRT 2. Support alternative technology such as E-vehicles 3. Discover technique to effectively regulate public transport modes that include the formal and informal 4. Rationalize PUV franchising. 5. Promote policies that will encourage flexible work hours/home-based jobs. 6. Explore possibilities to create policies that will give 'tax incentives' for citizens who bike and walk to work 7. Promote programs for employees (e.g. 'bike plans/ loan program 10) 8. Create programs that will provide jobs for PWDs near the place where they live. Private Sector Initiatives The following are the suggested key actions/initiatives to be undertaken by the private sector: 1. Provide service vehicles/ shuttle services for employees. 2. Explore company policy for the possibility of flexible work hours/ home-based jobs. Civil Society Initiatives The following are the suggested key actions to be undertaken by the civil society sector: 1. Dismiss any form of bribery. 2. Endorse non-motorized transport. 3. Partake in activities that will generate and share data to make our transport system contribute to productivity. 10 Citing the example of Pasig City LGU for their Bike to Work Loan Program. 28
  29. 29. Inclusive Civility Action Program Overview of the Program Thrusts Inclusive civility action program is geared to making people contribute to the creation of a livable city with comfortable and safe streets, sidewalks, public transportation, and public spaces. Key actions to help achieve this is through the following: 1) Mobility sensitiveness; 2) Improving communications; and 3) Mobilizing and educating stakeholders. Government Initiatives The following are the recommended key actions to be undertaken by the government: 1. Create and implement a master plan for a safe, appropriate, environmental-friendly metro-wide public transport. 2. Promote and support projects that will convert riverbanks to bikelanes and parks 3. Review existing transport policies (e.g. bike/ motorcycle lanes) and obtain feedback/ information from actual practitioners. 4. Expand information campaigns on traffic/ transport protocols/rules 5. Enforce policies to stop any form of corruption. 6. Collaborate with the Department of Education (DepEd) to develop and teach a module on traffic rules, regulations, and road safety to elementary and high school students Private Sector Initiatives The following are the suggested key actions to be undertaken by the private sector: 1. Establish a course on public responsibility in the public transport infrastructures 2. Stop business establishments from using public spaces as their own. Civil Society Initiatives The following are the suggested key actions to be undertaken by the civil society sector: 1. Become responsible citizen – aware, courteous, and respectful to others 2. Demand the citizen’s right to a better public transport and livable city. 3. Desist from any form of bribery 29
  30. 30. IV. References The Inclusive Mobility Network Steering Committee The Inclusive Mobility Project Team Table 1 -- Areas for Improvement in the Different Transport Modes in Metro Manila by Outcome Area (Mobility, Safety, Productivity, Civility) Table 2 -- List of Enablers of and Barriers to Inclusive Mobility by Outcome Area (Mobility, Safety, Productivity, Civility) Table 3 -- List of Government, the Private Sector, and the Civil Society Initiatives for Inclusive Mobility by Outcome Area (Mobility, Safety, Productivity, Civility) Sources Consulted and Cited 30
  31. 31. Inclusive Mobility Network Steering Committee Mr. Rally De Leon Manager Lyon Couriers Ms. Trina Tolentino Executive Director Operation Katipunan Mr. Alberto Suansing Executive Director Global Road Safety Partnership Mr. Karlo Robosa App Developer Trip Barker Mr. Erwin Paala Secretary General Families of Road Victims and Survivors Mr. Chad Osorio Contracts Management Specialist Affiliated Network for Social Accountability (ANSA) in East Asia and Pacific Mr. Cyrus Ballega Abot-Kamay ng mga may Kapasansanang Pasigueno ang Pag-unlad (AKKAPP) Federation Ms. Lalaine Guanzon Public Relations Advisor Wheelmobile Mr. Quin Cruz Community Representative Pasig City
  32. 32. Mr. Ronald Rodriguez Project Assistant Pathways to Higher Education Mr. Ryan Sumo Freelance Illustrator/ Game developer/ mass transit advocate Ms. Louie Golla Director Motorcycle Philippines Federation and Ryders with Disabilities Mr. James Velasco Founder Ryders with Disabilities Inclusive Mobility Project Team Dr. Segundo Joaquin E. Romero Jr. Program Director iBoP-Asia Program Ateneo School of Government doyromero@yahoo.com Mr. Lorenzo Cordova Jr., EnP Research Associate Inclusive Mobility Project Ateneo School of Government lorenzojr.cordova@gmail.com Dr. Marie Danielle V. Guillen Senior Research Associate Inclusive Mobility Project Ateneo School of Government danielle.guillen@gmail.com Althea Muriel L. Pineda Project Associate Inclusive Mobility Project Ateneo School of Government altheamurielpineda@gmail.com
  33. 33. Table 1: Areas of Improvement in Different Transport Modes in Metro Manila by Outcome Area (Mobility, Safety, Productivity, Civility) MODE OF TRANSPORTATION MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY In terms of negative conditions/features TRAIN (PNR, MRT,LRT) BUS coaches are too few and unsafe no defined bus stops lack of signages and maps lack of security prone to pickpockets unsafe stations - lack barriers for safety of passengers uneven gap between train and platform is not safe poor lighting facilities at the walkways unsafe because of reckless drivers defective ticket vending machines mainly limited to national roads Non-aircon buses are uncomfortable JEEPNEY longer travel time CIVILITY priority train is abused (even able-bodied use) not enough toilet facilities at the train stations Not very sensitive to the needs of, PWDs, senior citizens and women Absence of real city buses unsafe -- more incidents of hold-up and pickpockets there are also more undisciplined drivers who don’t use the designated loading and There are still many undisciplined commuters who do not fall in line (marami pa ring line, commuters ang walang disiplina at di pumipila) no mechanism for abusive and undisciplined drivers
  34. 34. MODE OF TRANSPORTATION MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY In terms of negative conditions/features CIVILITY unloading points; do not care about the safety of their passengers AUV/FX lacks terminal PRIVATE VEHICLES TRICYCLE BICYCLE irregular supply old model FX small space -very uncomfortable feels unsafe number coding is not a deterrent in reducing number of vehicles more traffic violations because of reckless driving No convenient terminal (walang maayos na terminal) Lack of cycling lanes, infrastructure like bike racks and office shower rooms can cause air pollution no privacy no insurance – presence of colorum plenty of road hazards like poorly designed drainage system and poor road conditions waiting is longer uncomfortable because of long ques not enough space fare is more expensive No fare discounts for students and senior citizens Motorist spend more time on the road rather than spending it with more productive work more private vehicle owners give bribe to traffic enforcers no fare discount for students and senior citizens in some Some drivers don’t follow rules eg. Driving in areas not allowed limited carrying capacity some bikers do not have discipline spitting Sweaty when reaching your destination - shower facilities; some bikers are not familiar with traffic rules -counterflow; biking on sidewalks Snacks become more expensive than transport fare
  35. 35. Table 2: List of Enablers of and Barriers to Inclusive Mobility by Outcome Area (Mobility, Safety, Productivity, Civility) DIMENSIONS MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY Enablers public transport hierarchy Barriers over-crowding Enablers accessibility of PWDs and the elderly (provision of elevators Barriers crowded road Enablers mixed-use urban areas and communities Barriers people throw garbage on the road footbridges are difficult to climb; too high and steep) PHYSICAL Barriers urban sprawl (what is the shape of the community?) should have parking space for bikers overloaded jeepneys and buses buses are safer in case of accidents minimum size of road signs bigger fonts, shorter names -- for commuters and drivers to see from afar time and motion study traversing Metro Manila for all modes of transport vehicle density limited road space/ small passage way bikes occupy less road space structure and design of jeepneys and tricycles are not safe presence of footbridges heavy traffic situation encounters less traffic saves time size of vehicle as factor For PWDs: no safe sidewalks; no allotment for parking space substandard PWD access ramps; no loading and unloading zones there are designated bus stops concrete barriers do not improve motorist safety presence of pedestrian crosswalks/lights / signals absence of designated bike parking and shower facilities bus drivers are more aggressive (offensive drivers) Enablers road infrastructure
  36. 36. DIMENSIONS MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY Barriers too wide center island boxes Enablers mixeduse/transitoriented development, e.g., Araneta Center Barriers dangerous open manholes Enablers Barriers poor infrastructure maintenance instead of improvement absence of walkablesidewalks presence of FX/AUV share a ride safety and security of open car parks from thefts and robbers overloading public utility vehicles For bike riders: barriers to cycling (u-turn schemes, high overpass; no bike lanes) use of minimum width and quality of sidewalks as a basic right no bike parkings/lacks secured bike parking no parking space for PWDs poor signage/way of finding transport for commuters; no system for knowing route name or route of PUB/PUJ (visible from afar makes commuters go to center of road) should have overpasses with escalators/walk ways/walkaton absence of emergency exits in buses elevators and escalators are often out of order overcrowded public utility vehicles LRTs/MRTs have segregation/ special section for women, elderly, and PWDs road signs are not visible double parking and no parking signs CIVILITY Enablers Barriers inconsiderate people lackconcern to others Enablers
  37. 37. DIMENSIONS MOBILITY SAFETY Barriers difficult to climb MRT and LRT stations; elevators and esclators for PWDs and elderly most of the time out of order Enablers there should be tax incentives for a 3 meters setback of building (1st floor) for pedestrians Barriers unsafe footbridges (too steep, no proper lighting, too narrow, no ramps) dilapidated road conditions safe sidewalks for pedestrians LRTs/MRTs always operate beyond full capacity no efficient drainage system more effective traffic lights many streets without street lights sidewalk used as waiting area (loading and unloading zones) how to make mobility convernient to commuters lack of affordable housing for the poor poor streetlighting PRODUCTIVITY Enablers Barriers lack of quality public open spaces wrong infrastructure for PWDs in building, roads, public areas, etc. CIVILITY Enablers Barriers Enablers
  38. 38. DIMENSIONS MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY Enablers transportation is a major employer Barriers lack of discipline among commuters, pedestrians and motorists (rude drivers/some drivers drive recklessly while intoxicated/some drivers are implicated in crimes, “patok” jeepneys make loud music) Enablers the presence and practice of "bayanihan principle" Barriers long que for FX/AUV Enablers bicycle riding promotes mental and physical health among the workforce Barriers lack and no discipline among drivers and other motorist; some drivers do not follow traffic signals; some drivers do not have road courtesy reckless driving and indiscriminate overtaking Enablers Filipinos are normally polite and have a sense of shame "hiya" (considerate to others - give seats to the elderly, pregnant women, and PWDs) lack of discipline among drivers, commuters and pedestrians police/supervis or to manage people riding MRTs/LRTs commuters/pedestria ns and motorists do not care about other commuters/pedestria ns/ operators and drivers do not obey traffic and transport laws bike groups promote biking practices Choosy drivers whether taxi drivers, jeepney, tricycle, etc. bicycle riding is healthier, hence, more productive some drivers do not respect ambulance and other emergency vehicles; some drivers do not respect traffic markings (loading/unloading zones, no parking, etc.) some drivers observe road courtesy discrimination of drivers with bikers tourist police/guards are being used as city ambassadors abled persons lack awareness on the laws regarding PWDs Filipino time as an attitude personal hygiene and good grooming of some drivers some drivers do not have respect and consideration to their passengers there should be educational, cultural ads, and signage in train stations and on the roads to educate people on their roles and responsibilities regarding traffic and transport systems SOCIAL Barriers sectors have their own vested interests and usually hard for them to understand general welfare
  39. 39. DIMENSIONS MOBILITY SAFETY Barriers crowded transport system Enablers more drivers seem to be aware of cycling disregarding traffic officers "stop" hand signal results in no apprehension (sending bad signals) presence of TODA, jeepney associations, bus drivers, associations workshops new friends through social activities indiscriminate parking at national and secondary roads lack of awareness of drivers about PWDs rights in transportation and pedestrians; drivers should have seminars about rights of PWDs Barriers presence of bike theft PRODUCTIVITY Enablers Barriers difficulty in taking public utility vehicles especially every Monday Barriers there are underage and drivers driving without license Enablers we should all exercise discipline for a better society conflict between drivers and commuters lack and no discipline among commuters and pedestrians bikes and walking prove to have a calming effect lack of discipline among drivers and commuters some commuters do not have respect and consideration to other commuters (younger generations do not offer seats to the elderly and PWDs; to each its own attitude; talk loudly on the phone) group riders promote good camaraderie "everybody doing it" attitude some commuters do not have respect and consideration to drivers (e.g., heavy weight passenger do not offer to pay equivalent of two persons) road courtesy poor conditions of vehicles illegal parking of vehicles Enablers cleanliness of public utility vehicles CIVILITY
  40. 40. DIMENSIONS MOBILITY SAFETY Enablers vehicle upgrading implementing rules on noise pollution (mufflers) how loud is loud? disaster preparedness and management unregulated land use and development LGUs have no capacity to measure air pollution ENVIRONMENTAL Barriers lack of trees Barriers presence of smoke belching vehicles Enablers bikes and walking are nonpollutants PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY Barriers air and noise pollution Enablers green roofs Barriers no discipline in waste disposal don't follow waste segregation program Enablers provision of segregated recycling bins in every community Littering pocket parks/adding plants/trees to urban landscape air (foul smell of surrounding) and noise (loud and noisy jeepneys) pollution greening of landscape by providing plants (flowering and ornamental) and trees ride a bike Storm-water management (sewers, biowastes) presence of guiltfree litter bugs (throwing of plastic bags, cigarette butts and other garbage anywhere) no plastic bag policy helps reduce flooding community gardens calamities; environmental damages ECONOMIC smoke belching vehicles hazardous to health traffic situation in Metro Manila has a big impact in our economy increased productivity with improved transport system presence of beggars around public transportation terminals high cost of transport fares more time to work in transit urban development is too focused in Metro Manila Metro Manila is the main employment center
  41. 41. DIMENSIONS MOBILITY SAFETY Barriers students and senior citizen fare discounts should be strictly implemented Enablers cheap fares sidewalk is being used as vending areas availability of cheap umbrellas for sale everywhere cheaper reusable bag for unplanned shopping taxi fare is expensive; some taxi drivers choose passengers Barriers PRODUCTIVITY Enablers Barriers maintenance of vehicle that cause hindrance to commuters Enablers work from home/flexitime lost productive time due to traffic CIVILITY presence of one-stop shops / bayad centers, malls, etc. use taxi as miniconvenience store snacks more expensive than bus fare (for bikers/cyclist) an individual has to take leave of absence to be able to file a complaint against abusive drivers bicycle riding saves money no fare needed lost man hours in traffic Barriers use of public vehicles as avenues for business and networking INSTITUTIONA L boundary system (forces PUV drivers to wait for passengers) Lack of -standard hand signals (uncoordinated) for traffic directors; for pedestrians and cars many policies exist hopeless traffic enforcers existence and good enforcement of transportation policies unregulated tricycle regulatory board high cost of fares even for short trips more information campaigns from barangays TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORT: no effective planning for transport and traffic system Enablers presence of mixed income communities
  42. 42. DIMENSIONS MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY Barriers need for emphasis in transportation in landuse decision/planning Enablers presence of professional drivers Barriers tricycles operate in major roads Enablers use of motorcycle helmets is enforced Barriers location of public services/ agencies in hard to reach/inaccessible places Enablers efficient urban planning in consultation with all stakeholders Barriers no proper coordination among different agencies lack of long-term planning strict implementatio n of traffic and transport laws too much corruption presence of more MMDA, paid and volunteer traffic enforcers on the road poor training on traffic and road rules for drivers, commuters/pedestrian start development s outisde Metro Manila to decongest the Metropolis “tokenism” in construction of PWD facilities 13-inch tire-to-gutter for unloading vehicles (is there a rule in traffic code?) government to listen to the concern of the people no metro-wide bike policy/plan should enforce "car less day" policy folding bikes are not allowed inside establishments and offices no coordination between gov't agencies in projects in the same area - no stakeholder consultations and advice too many agencies involved in traffic management and enforcement (MMDA, LGU, Barangay) inter-gov't agency dialogue no lane designation implement one-stop shop information port for the public to see -citing all available modes of transport enforcers not wearing reflectorized clothes and traffic sign paddles no laws on proper hygiene and sanitation for commuters/ pedestrians and drivers de-politicize planning no road sign standardization HOUSING: lack of provision of affordable housing for the poor implement the accessibility on transportation LTFRB has no clear policy and complaint procedures for drivers and other motorists no limitation in the number of car ownership Enablers
  43. 43. DIMENSIONS MOBILITY SAFETY Barriers give importance to awareness raising on the rights of PWDs Enablers integrated transport systems Barriers overloaded buses, jeepneys, tricycles no shower facilities for bike to work citizens presence of rail system PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY should have "wiper on" and "headlight on" policy for cars, jeepneys and motorcycles DPWH road extension projects must indicate "road width" not just "number of lanes standard width" passing the bucks -among government agencies lack of awareness of drivers on the implementation of fare discounts for PWDS -discount IDs not accepted by some public utility drivers Enablers Barriers Enablers Barriers poor resettlement strategies for informal settlers Enablers use of cellular phones GPS APPS aid in navigation Lack oftransportation modes service schedule centralization of gov't offices for the purpose of document processing high cost of electricity use of solar powered or LED lights DPWH should regularly monitor their road projects professional drivers should be TESDA certified or should have technical driving certificates TECHNOL OGY there should be strict implementation of the seat belt law competing transport systems applications for information of commuters absence of gated MRTs and LRTs for safety
  44. 44. DIMENSIONS MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY Barriers unreliable transport schedule Enablers affordable data plans for cellular phones Barriers lack (sometimes absence) of CCTV cameras in MRT and LRT stations Enablers use of cellular phones for information alerts in times of crisis and calamities no shcedule for Metro Manila transport provide information for each barangay/city the available transit networks online drivers attentionon their electronic gadgets like cellphones, when driving availability of inexpensive bicycle spare parts especially lighting no proper vehicles design for PWDs Barriers Enablers E-Commerce and ability to do transactions on-line gov't should implement EPayment for gov't transactions use of GPS technology free wi-fi in the city CIVILITY Barriers Enablers use of social media for information and outlet use of existing waiting time/countdown clocks in traffic lights
  45. 45. Eight (8) out of 10 people in Metro Manila take public transport. Based on the study conducted by Ateneo School of Government's Inclusive Mobility Project, at least 15% of income was spent for transport fares. That working members of a family (mostly minimum wage earners) would sacrifice their budget on food Government 1 A transport system that works for the poor and the vulnerable Private Sector PILLARS RESOURCES and KEY RESPONSIBILITIES Table 3: List of Government, the Private Sector, and the Civil Society Initiatives for Inclusive Mobility by Outcome Area (Mobility, Safety, Productivity, Civility) PROGRAMS/ MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY FOCAL AREAS 1. Improving physical connectivity 1. Advocating and having better information, education and communication campaign 2. Use of traditional and social media 1. Improvement roadsharing infrastructure 1. Mobility sensitiveness 2. Utilizing existing urban design/plan 2. Improving communications 3. Encouraging Transport User Contribution to Overall Mobility Map out all of bus stops/waiting sheds for creation of 'PWD, Pregnant Women-friendly' waiting shed designs 3. Strict enforcement of traffic and transportation ordinances More convenient and up-to-standards PWD facilities 3. Mobilizing and educating stakeholders Re-design public transport/ vehicles for PWDs Create designated pedestrian lanes only for PWDs 3. Promoting way-finding apps Private school buses by making prohibitibly expensive for students to bring cars (except for PWD) Provide parking space and washrooms for bikes in terminals like MRT etc 2. Improving communications Support infrastructure projects for PWDs Strict implementation of 'magna carta for PWDs' Standardized the design for PWD walkway in MM and also bike lanes
  46. 46. PILLARS RESOURCES and KEY RESPONSIBILITIES PROGRAMS/ FOCAL AREAS MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY 1. Improving physical connectivity 1. Advocating and having better information, education and communication campaign 1. Improvement roadsharing infrastructure 1. Mobility sensitiveness 2. Improving communications 2. Use of traditional and social media 2. Utilizing existing urban design/plan 2. Improving communications 3. Encouraging Transport User Contribution to Overall Mobility 3. Strict enforcement of traffic and transportation ordinances 3. Promoting way-finding apps 3. Mobilizing and educating stakeholders Estimate cost/ source of funding for sidewalks and bikeways Provide 'walkable' walkways outside train terminals provision of 'bike plans' Convert riverbanks to bikelanes and parks A walkable, bikeable, accessible city. More than the issue of traffic, urban transport and mobility is a growing concern to Metro Manilans. Infrastructures like pedestrian overpasses are also widely seen around Metro Manila. These are constructed by either the MMDA or DPWH. Cycling also plays a major role in transporting people especially for those whose main mode of transport and Private Sector 2 Government Citizens and health just to travel for work. Government to protect the use of setbacks/ pedestrian lanes (to minimize government cost of reacquiring ROW)
  47. 47. In Metro Manila, traffic congestion resulted to an estimated PhP140 billion losses (or 4.6% of the country’s GDP) or the economic cost that is attributed to lost man-hours, SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY 1. Improving physical connectivity 1. Advocating and having better information, education and communication campaign 1. Improvement roadsharing infrastructure 1. Mobility sensitiveness 2. Improving communications 2. Use of traditional and social media 2. Utilizing existing urban design/plan 2. Improving communications 3. Encouraging Transport User Contribution to Overall Mobility 3. Strict enforcement of traffic and transportation ordinances 3. Promoting way-finding apps 3. Mobilizing and educating stakeholders Proper implementation of designated 'loading and unloading areas' Moving people, not vehicles Government 3 source of livelihood is bicycle. It is also strongly promoted by various groups and government agencies as a transportation mode for last mile connectivity with transport service designed to bring about cleaner air and safer streets. RESOURCES and KEY RESPONSIBILITIES PILLARS MOBILITY rationalization of 'public utility vehicles (PUV)' franchising Designated “loading and unloading” simplified signs, instructions/ icons, lines, boxes, colors, iconic sign boards, rulers, maps (visuals) Construction of public infrastructure for commuters Citizens PROGRAMS/ FOCAL AREAS
  48. 48. PILLARS RESOURCES and KEY RESPONSIBILITIES PROGRAMS/ FOCAL AREAS As of September 2010, the Land Transportation Franchising Regulatory Board (LTFRB) Provincial accounted for 5,321 city buses and 7,368 provincial buses in Metro Manila. The provincial buses were identified as one of the contributor of traffic in EDSA. Metro Manila is also being Private Sector additional fuel consumption, health costs and lost investment opportunities. MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY 1. Improving physical connectivity 1. Advocating and having better information, education and communication campaign 1. Improvement roadsharing infrastructure 1. Mobility sensitiveness 2. Improving communications 2. Use of traditional and social media 2. Utilizing existing urban design/plan 2. Improving communications 3. Encouraging Transport User Contribution to Overall Mobility 3. Strict enforcement of traffic and transportation ordinances provision of service vehicles/ shuttle services for employees 3. Promoting way-finding apps provision of service vehicles/ shuttle services for employees 3. Mobilizing and educating stakeholders
  49. 49. serviced by LRT and MRT Lines (LRT 1, LRT 2, MRT3, MRT 7, and PNR) with a total length of 101 kilometers covering 78 stations. In 2011, Stefan Trinder, a volunteer consultant of MMDA also computed the public transport ridership for PUJ and AUV/FX. He computed that around 19 million passengers and 100 million kilometers travelled per day using public utility jeepney (PUJ) and AUV/FX. According to the the Department of Health's Online National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (ONEISS) Report (2011), Metro Manila also registered the highest incidence of injury (18%) due to SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY 1. Improving physical connectivity 1. Advocating and having better information, education and communication campaign 1. Improvement roadsharing infrastructure 1. Mobility sensitiveness 2. Improving communications 2. Use of traditional and social media 2. Utilizing existing urban design/plan 2. Improving communications 3. Encouraging Transport User Contribution to Overall Mobility 3. Strict enforcement of traffic and transportation ordinances Use designated 'loading and unloading areas' 3. Promoting way-finding apps 3. Mobilizing and educating stakeholders Incentives for private sector to provide setback/easement for pedestrians Mobility with safety and civility Government 4 RESOURCES and KEY RESPONSIBILITIES PILLARS MOBILITY Strictly enforce traffic laws—assign more traffic enforcers to delinquent places Apprehension of ‘real traffic violators’ Engineering department should start building code implementation for setbacks/ eastment Strict implementation of ‘standard road safety’ Citizens PROGRAMS/ FOCAL AREAS Creation of insurance policy programs for drivers and highway enforcers
  50. 50. transportation and related accident. Out of 4,021 reported transport/ vehicular crash related injury, NCR shares the 14.1% with Region 1. Of the 2,077 reported mauling/ assault related injuries, 15.8% were accounted in Metro Manila. ONEISS also reported 4,099 cases of injuries among 0-19 years old. NCR accounted 18.9% of the report cases. What is alarming is that 40.2% of the total case happened on the road. RESOURCES and KEY RESPONSIBILITIES MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY 1. Improving physical connectivity 1. Advocating and having better information, education and communication campaign 1. Improvement roadsharing infrastructure 1. Mobility sensitiveness 2. Improving communications 2. Use of traditional and social media 2. Utilizing existing urban design/plan 2. Improving communications 3. Encouraging Transport User Contribution to Overall Mobility 3. Strict enforcement of traffic and transportation ordinances Implementation of a master plan for a safe, appropriate, environmentalfriendly metro-wide public transport 3. Promoting way-finding apps 3. Mobilizing and educating stakeholders Installing street lights and waiting sheds in dark places Stop selling of motorcycles to unlicensed drivers be vigilant-- report dilapidated roads that may not be safe for motorists and pedestrians business establishments should stop using public spaces as their own Private Sector PILLARS More CCTVs for monitoring violations report violations observe traffic safety practices Be vigilant be aware and concerned-know your neighbors understand/ care/ respect PWDs; be concerned Citizens PROGRAMS/ FOCAL AREAS Be specific: -How wide is safe? - pedestrian lane? - bike lane? -bus lane? -commuter waiting area? Metrics inventory of foot bridges on every major roads and pedestrian crossing on some places, there are too many, some too few, others zero at all observe courtesy at all times
  51. 51. It has been widely acknowledge that transport consumes more energy than any other sector. In fact, 80% of Metro Manila’s pollution is reported to be contributed by this sector. RESOURCES and KEY RESPONSIBILITIES Government 5 Clean air, clean streets, clean vehicles, and clean facilities Private Sector PILLARS Citizens PROGRAMS/ FOCAL AREAS MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY 1. Improving physical connectivity 1. Advocating and having better information, education and communication campaign 1. Improvement roadsharing infrastructure 1. Mobility sensitiveness 2. Improving communications 2. Use of traditional and social media 2. Utilizing existing urban design/plan 2. Improving communications 3. Encouraging Transport User Contribution to Overall Mobility Create more spaces in public elementary schools for waiting parents 3. Strict enforcement of traffic and transportation ordinances creation of regular maintenance policy for vehicles (check-up) 3. Promoting way-finding apps support E-vehicles 3. Mobilizing and educating stakeholders Implementation of a master plan for a safe, appropriate, environmentfriendly metro-wide public transport All transport sectors should shift to 'clean and efficient vehicles' (electric vehicles, solar, use of other alternative fuels) Implementation of a master plan for a safe, appropriate, environment-friendly metro-wide public transport More plants on hi-way walls Invest in sustainable/ environmentfriendly transport system help reduce pollution through tree planting and tree nurturing stop littering observe proper hygiene and cleanliness especially in public spaces
  52. 52. 6 Planning and communicating better and traveling less On the average, a person in Metro Manila spends at least 120 minutes on the road travelling. Due to traffic congestion, the UP NCTS in 2011 placed the average annual losses of PhP137 billion in Metro Manila. It has reached to more than RESOURCES and KEY RESPONSIBILITIES Government PILLARS Private Sector PROGRAMS/ FOCAL AREAS MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY 1. Improving physical connectivity 1. Advocating and having better information, education and communication campaign 1. Improvement roadsharing infrastructure 1. Mobility sensitiveness 2. Improving communications 2. Use of traditional and social media 2. Utilizing existing urban design/plan 2. Improving communications 3. Encouraging Transport User Contribution to Overall Mobility Review design standards and specifications of sidewalks 3. Strict enforcement of traffic and transportation ordinances Create a ‘comprehensive disaster response management plan’ 3. Promoting way-finding apps 3. Mobilizing and educating stakeholders review existing transport policies (e.g. bike/ motorcycle lanes; obtain feedback/ information from actual practitioners) be in-sync with gov't-- no vague tag lines "kailanga, disiplina, kailangan ng side-walk/ bikeways"; present own proposals, solution, e.g. 'how and how much? Even answers to legal impediments Create a 'comprehensive disaster response management plan' creation of flexible work hours/ home-based jobs business should establish a sense of public responsibility by funding maintenance of public transport infrastructures
  53. 53. PhP1.5 trillion of productivity losses since 2001. It was estimated that at least PhP40 billion went to direct losses, such as wasted gasoline, lost labor hours, employment of traffic aides, and wasted electricity. The remaining went to indirect losses, like missed business opportunities and reduced capital inflow from potential investors. People's productivity losses in traffic are estimated to worth to 2 months of remittances. 7 Sharing information to increase connectivity and accessibility There have been several RESOURCES and KEY RESPONSIBILITIES MOBILITY SAFETY PRODUCTIVITY CIVILITY 1. Improving physical connectivity 1. Advocating and having better information, education and communication campaign 1. Improvement roadsharing infrastructure 1. Mobility sensitiveness 2. Improving communications 2. Use of traditional and social media 2. Utilizing existing urban design/plan 2. Improving communications 3. Encouraging Transport User Contribution to Overall Mobility post in Facebook and other social media accounts any complaints and suggestions 3. Strict enforcement of traffic and transportation ordinances Create a 'comprehensive disaster response management plan' 3. Promoting way-finding apps Plan for trips 3. Mobilizing and educating stakeholders map out all bus stops/waiting sheds for creation of 'PWD, Pregrant Women-friendly' waiting shed designs Sharing info: - Users guide to transport laws and ordinances for greater IM IM portal/ platform for info sharing, mobilizing stakeholders conduct inventory of all modes of transportation (e.g., access data of regulators immediate information campaigns on traffic/ transport protocols/rules and immediate enforcement and implementation of said rules - Citizens PILLARS Government PROGRAMS/ FOCAL AREAS

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