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Portland, Oregon., Union Station.A TALE OF TWO CITIESExamining Transportation History inPortland Maine and Portland Oregon
Population Timeline                                  Portland ME     Portland OR              600,000              525,000...
BOOM YEARS 1900-1945Fueled in part by the “lewis and    Growth in Portland, Maine was more modest than that of            ...
Passenger StationsUnion Station Portland Maine- Opened 1888Union Station Portland Oregon- Opened 1896Grand Trunk Station P...
Northern Pacific, Union Pacific, Great Northernand Southern Pacific all served Portland,Oregon with passenger and freight ser...
Railroads around Union Station
Passenger Service in Portland MaineFrom Wikipedia-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_history_of_Portland,_MaineDuring t...
Passenger Service in                            Portland MaineFrom Wikipedia-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_history...
Images ofUnion Station,Portland Maine
In 1935 the Boston and Maine railroad’s Flying Yankee made the run between Portland and Boston in 51 minutes!  Driving the...
Union Station Location:     Maine Central RR   Boston and Maine RR Grand Trunk Terminal, Yard and Docks
Railroad Map of the East End. Grand Trunk Railroad is shown in Yellow
Grand Trunk Depot
Images of the formerGrand Trunk Depot
The Grand Trunk   Railway Connected  Montreal to Portland.    Portland was the  closest ice-free port when the St.Lawrence...
GrandTrunkScheduleSleeper Servicebetween Montrealand Portland ME
PORTLAND OREGON            PORTLAND MAINE Transit Timeline           Transit Timeline                    Text
Portland Oregon Timeline   Portland Maine TImeline
The Interurban           EraFrom Wikipedia:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/InterurbanInterurbans were often extensions of exi...
Images of the Oregon Electric Railway
TROLLEYS andINTERURBANSCLOCKWISE FROM LEFT- Pond Cove Line(ME) Interurbans and Locals on CongressSt., oregon electric trai...
Streetcar Lines in Oregon (Left) and           Maine (Right)
Portland Maine Area Streetcar and Interurban               Lines in 1916
The Portland-LewistonInterurban ran every hour 24 hours a day, 7 days a  week with every other     hour an express.
Clockwise from Left, Oregon Advertisement, CongressSt.(ME), Portland Lewiston Interurban, MonumentSquare (ME)
PHOTOs Top to Bottom- 1.Portland-Lewiston Interurban onTemple St,2. Congress St 1920s, 3. StreetcarTurning onto Preble St ...
1945-1990URBAN RENEWAL,SUBURBANIZATION,AND THE RISE OF THEAUTOMOBILE
The World    ofTomorrow              The Post-War Period             witessed a massive PR            campaign to present ...
General Motors’  “Futurama” exhibit at 1939  World’s Fair
The Great American Streetcar Scandal      In the 1920s automaker General Motors (GM) began a covert campaign to     underm...
Suburbanization and Urban Renewal      A combination of federal policies and private investment spawns a massive restructu...
Grand Trunk Terminal Demolished 1966Neither Portland is spared from theensuing destruction as city plannersreconfigure the ...
The Master Plans                                                                       Both cities commissioned           ...
ROBERT MOSES’ 1943 PLAN FOR PORTLAND OREGON (LEFT) AND VICTOR GRUEN’S 1967PLAN FOR PORTLAND MAINE (RIGHT). BOTH PLANS WERE...
The Franklin Arterial Before and After
The Portland Street Grid Before the Franklin Arterial
Images from a leafletdistributed to residents of theMunjoy South Neighborhood inPortland Maine about theirimpending removal
Portland ME 1950                                        Portland ME- PresentWe are convinced that the real shopping center...
Even the people that were standing therewith tears coming down their cheeks, someof the elderly people that were standingn...
PORTLAND IMPROVEMENTImages from Robert Moses’ plan     for Portland Oregon
Moses” rendition of HarborDrive was typical of his“parkway” concept, whichenvisioned a “park for cars”.Harbor Drive was ev...
Different Tracks,Different Outcomes1972-Present
The Tide Turns inOregonThe Mt. Hood Freeway arose out ofRobert Moses’ 1943 plan. It wouldhave run from Downtown Portlandto...
In addition to the dramaticshowdown over the Mt. HoodFreeway Portland, Oregon’s 1972Master Plan signaled a reversal ofthe ...
1952                                             1970Sequence of Aerial Photographs shows      2010 the evolution of highw...
Portland, Maine experienced a brief resurgence in the 1980s as the city’s “Old Port” neighborhood transformed from a wareh...
MAX LIGHT RAIL     WES COMMUTER RAILPORTLAND STREETCAR   VINTAGE TROLLEY
Back to the Future The current rail transit system in Portland Oregon has nearly reached its                    maximum ex...
PORTLAND STREETCARDensity of Development  Starting in 2001 Portland Streetcar was the first new modern streetcar system bui...
The Pearl             The Pearl       District              District        2010               1970       Streetcar LineTh...
Intercity Rail  Services inPortland Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon
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Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon

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Detailed History comparing Portland Maine to Portland Oregon through Transit Policies.

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Transcript of "Tale of Two Cities Portland Maine/Oregon"

  1. 1. Portland, Oregon., Union Station.A TALE OF TWO CITIESExamining Transportation History inPortland Maine and Portland Oregon
  2. 2. Population Timeline Portland ME Portland OR 600,000 525,000 450,000 375,000 Population 300,000 225,000 150,000 75,000 0 1880 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000
  3. 3. BOOM YEARS 1900-1945Fueled in part by the “lewis and Growth in Portland, Maine was more modest than that of its west coast sibling but was no less impressive for a new clark exposition” in 1905, england city of that era. known as “canada’s winter port” Portland Oregon tripled its portland bustled with Irish, italian, afro-american and jewish dialects as laborers loaded timber, grain andpopulation from 90,000 people in textiles off of the grand trunk railroad from canada onto cargo ships. 1900 to 300,000 in 1930!
  4. 4. Passenger StationsUnion Station Portland Maine- Opened 1888Union Station Portland Oregon- Opened 1896Grand Trunk Station Portland Maine- Opened 1905
  5. 5. Northern Pacific, Union Pacific, Great Northernand Southern Pacific all served Portland,Oregon with passenger and freight service.In itsheyday, a total of 92 trains called on Portlanddaily. There were fifty-two steam trains andthirty-eight electric trains coming or goingevery 11 minutes from 6:30 am to 11:30 pm.Service has dwindled to a handful of trains.
  6. 6. Railroads around Union Station
  7. 7. Passenger Service in Portland MaineFrom Wikipedia-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_history_of_Portland,_MaineDuring the heyday of passenger rail in the 1920s, a variety of companies providedpassenger rail services to Portland. ■ Portland had two terminals: Union Station and the Grand Trunk’s India Street Terminal. All passenger trains, except the two daily Grand Trunk trains to Montreal, operated in and out of Union Station, where switching services were provided by Portland Terminal Company. ■ In the westbound direction, Portland had four “banks” of transfers: one in the early morning, one centered around noon, one at 5 pm, and one late at night. Union Station was relatively quiet in between those times. ■ Schedules were generally designed to have trains leave Portland in the morning and arrive in the evening. The only notable exceptions were overnight services (MEC #8), the B&M evening connecting services to Boston (B&M #176, 250), and one single commuter-like train in the westbound direction (MEC #138/#44). ■ In some cases, traveling to Lewiston required a change of train at Brunswick. ■ The afternoon commuter-like trains in the eastbound direction resulted from heavy eastbound connecting traffic from the Boston & Maine. The fact that these trains fell within the commuter timeslot appears accidental. ■ There is evidence in the schedule that the Grand Trunk deliberately discouraged commuter travel. GT #83 does not allow terminations in Lewiston, even though it is likely that the equipment moving from Lewiston to Lewiston Junction to meet #83 would have needed to run back empty to Lewiston after its tour of duty.
  8. 8. Passenger Service in Portland MaineFrom Wikipedia-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_history_of_Portland,_MaineDuring the heyday of passenger rail in the 1920s, a variety of companies providedpassenger rail services to Portland. ■ Portland had two terminals: Union Station and the Grand Trunk’s India Street Terminal. All passenger trains, except the two daily Grand Trunk trains to Montreal, operated in and out of Union Station, where switching services were provided by Portland Terminal Company. ■ In the westbound direction, Portland had four “banks” of transfers: one in the early morning, one centered around noon, one at 5 pm, and one late at night. Union Station was relatively quiet in between those times. ■ Schedules were generally designed to have trains leave Portland in the morning and arrive in the evening. The only notable exceptions were overnight services (MEC #8), the B&M evening connecting services to Boston (B&M #176, 250), and one single commuter-like train in the westbound direction (MEC #138/#44). ■ In some cases, traveling to Lewiston required a change of train at Brunswick. ■ The afternoon commuter-like trains in the eastbound direction resulted from heavy eastbound connecting traffic from the Boston & Maine. The fact that these trains fell within the commuter timeslot appears accidental. ■ There is evidence in the schedule that the Grand Trunk deliberately discouraged commuter travel. GT #83 does not allow terminations in Lewiston, even though it is likely that the equipment moving from Lewiston to Lewiston Junction to meet #83 would have needed to run back empty to Lewiston after its tour of duty.
  9. 9. Images ofUnion Station,Portland Maine
  10. 10. In 1935 the Boston and Maine railroad’s Flying Yankee made the run between Portland and Boston in 51 minutes! Driving the same distance by highway today still takes roughly two hours without traffic.
  11. 11. Union Station Location: Maine Central RR Boston and Maine RR Grand Trunk Terminal, Yard and Docks
  12. 12. Railroad Map of the East End. Grand Trunk Railroad is shown in Yellow
  13. 13. Grand Trunk Depot
  14. 14. Images of the formerGrand Trunk Depot
  15. 15. The Grand Trunk Railway Connected Montreal to Portland. Portland was the closest ice-free port when the St.Lawrenceriver froze in the winter. The Grand Trunk waterfront includedgrain elevators, multiple piers and a beautiful “Richardson Romanesque” depot built in 1905.
  16. 16. GrandTrunkScheduleSleeper Servicebetween Montrealand Portland ME
  17. 17. PORTLAND OREGON PORTLAND MAINE Transit Timeline Transit Timeline Text
  18. 18. Portland Oregon Timeline Portland Maine TImeline
  19. 19. The Interurban EraFrom Wikipedia:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/InterurbanInterurbans were often extensions of existing streetcar linesrunning between urban areas or from urban to rural areas. Thelines were mainly electrified in an era when steam railroads hadnot yet adopted electricity to any large degree. By 1910, there wasa very large network of small interurban lines in the U.S.,particularly in Indiana and Ohio. Many were financially weak fromthe beginning. An electric interurban railroad was expensive tobuild, and there were always construction surprises, such as anunplanned bridge, or a town that demanded streets for theinterurban to construct, and franchise fees. In operation,interurbans were labor-intensive and physical plant expensive,and frequently passenger revenues were not as originallyprojected. Many did not survive the 1920s, following the countrysgrowing adoption of the automobile and the onset of the GreatDepression in 1930.Interurbans such as the Oregon Electric Railway and the Portland-LewistonInterurban connected places as far as Eugene Oregon or Bath Maine withcity centers like Pioneer Plaza or Monument Square. Map of Interurbans in Southern Maine
  20. 20. Images of the Oregon Electric Railway
  21. 21. TROLLEYS andINTERURBANSCLOCKWISE FROM LEFT- Pond Cove Line(ME) Interurbans and Locals on CongressSt., oregon electric train, Independenceoregon electric station
  22. 22. Streetcar Lines in Oregon (Left) and Maine (Right)
  23. 23. Portland Maine Area Streetcar and Interurban Lines in 1916
  24. 24. The Portland-LewistonInterurban ran every hour 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with every other hour an express.
  25. 25. Clockwise from Left, Oregon Advertisement, CongressSt.(ME), Portland Lewiston Interurban, MonumentSquare (ME)
  26. 26. PHOTOs Top to Bottom- 1.Portland-Lewiston Interurban onTemple St,2. Congress St 1920s, 3. StreetcarTurning onto Preble St fromMonument Square
  27. 27. 1945-1990URBAN RENEWAL,SUBURBANIZATION,AND THE RISE OF THEAUTOMOBILE
  28. 28. The World ofTomorrow The Post-War Period witessed a massive PR campaign to present the automobile as the key to a better future. Rail transit and inner cities were compared to disease, while automobiles promised access to “light, air and open spaces”.
  29. 29. General Motors’ “Futurama” exhibit at 1939 World’s Fair
  30. 30. The Great American Streetcar Scandal In the 1920s automaker General Motors (GM) began a covert campaign to undermine the popular rail-based public transit systems that were ubiquitous in and around the country’s bustling urban areas. At the time, only one in 10 Americans owned cars and most people traveled by trolley and streetcar.Within three decades, GM, with help from Standard Oil, Firestone Tire, Mack Truck andPhillips Petroleum, succeeded in decimating the nation’s trolley systems, while seeingto the creation of the federal highway system and the ensuing dominance of theautomobile as America’s preferred mode of transport.GM began by funding a companycalled National City Lines (NCL), which by 1946 controlled streetcar operations in 80American cities.“Despite public opinion polls that showed 88 percent of the publicfavoring expansion of the rail lines after World War II, NCL systematically closed itsstreetcars down until, by 1955, only a few remained,” writes author Jim Motavalli in his2001 book, Forward Drive.GM first replaced trolleys with free-roaming buses, eliminating the need for tracksembedded in the street and clearing the way for cars. As dramatized in a 1996 PBSdocudrama, Taken for a Ride, Alfred P. Sloan, GM’s president at the time, said, “We’vegot 90 percent of the market out there that we can…turn into automobile users. If wecan eliminate the rail alternatives, we will create a new market for our cars.” And theydid just that, with the help of GM subsidiaries Yellow Coach and Greyhound Bus. Sloanpredicted that the jolting rides of buses would soon lead people to not want them andto buy GM’s cars instead.GM was later instrumental in the creation of the National Highway Users Conference,which became the most powerful lobby in Washington. Highway lobbyists workeddirectly with lawmakers to craft highway-friendly legislation, and GM’s promotionalfilms were showcasing America’s burgeoning interstate highway system as therealization of the so-called “American dream of freedom on wheels.”When GM President Charles Wilson became Secretary of Defense in 1953, he workedwith Congress to craft the $25 billion Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. Referred to atthe time as the “greatest public works project in the history of the world,” the federallyfunded race to build roads from coast-to-coast was on. http://environment.about.com/od/fossilfuels/a/streetcars.htm
  31. 31. Suburbanization and Urban Renewal A combination of federal policies and private investment spawns a massive restructuring of American society. Traditional towns and cities are reoriented towards the automobile as the upper and middle classes flee to the suburbs. While new expressways are routed through low-income neighborhoods displacing working poor and minorities into massive public housing blocksFederal Transportation Policy Federal Housing Policy• THE FEDERAL AID HIGHWAY ACT OF 1956 • Federal housing policy beginning in era of new deal, help authorizes $25 Billion for the construction of subsidize suburban living. Federal Housing Administration – new deal agency, meant to address millions of Americans losing 41,000 miles of the Federal Interstate Highway homes to foreclosure. Stimulate construction of new housing System while Federal Govt handles 90% of units, while stabilizing mortgage industry. construction costs • The AMERICAN HOUSING ACT OF 1949 contributes greatly to suburbanization and the flight of the white middle and upper• Municipal Bonds are used to fund massive classes out of the city through two concurrent programsexpressways such as the Cross-Bronx Expressway • TITLE 1 of the Housing Act provided Federal financing for in NYC. Built by Robert Moses the Expressway “slum clearance” and “urban renewal” programs which resulted in the destruction of millions of houses, historic landmarks and displaces thousands of low-middle income neighborhood relationships in favor of massive, crime-ridden residents housing projects.• Enables upper and middle-class to commute • TITLE 2 of the Housing Act dramatically expanded the ability of the Federal Housing Administration to provide low-interest from suburbs to inner city financing to middle-class suburban homeowners• Regional shopping centers and strip malls are • Minorities seldom qualify for homeownership loans leading to built to service the suburban market increased racial segregation in the North• By 1970 more Americans are living in the suburbs than the city
  32. 32. Grand Trunk Terminal Demolished 1966Neither Portland is spared from theensuing destruction as city plannersreconfigure the old streetcarneighborhoods to the age of theautomobile.Urban Renewaland the “twoPortlands” "When the ball hit the tower and it came down with the rest of the roof on the station itself, I remember the big black cloud of dust and things that swept over the street," he says. "And all of us, we all wound up with dirty faces that we didnt know we had." Train Riders Northeast Founder- Wayne Davis http://www.mpbn.net/Home/tabid/36/ctl/ViewItem/mid/3478/ItemId/17804/Default.aspx Portland Maine Union Station Demolished 1961
  33. 33. The Master Plans Both cities commissioned comprehensive “master plans” that reconfigured the urbanVictor Gruen with a prototype shopping center in order to better enable mall automotive travel from the suburbs. ,. . SOUTH-AND MUNJOY YOUTo ReMden~ Properly Owners Munjoy and in South: Portland, Oregon began as early asYour neighborhood contains many soundhomes. Theexcellent condition of many yards and gardens 1943 when they hired the legendaryshowspride and responsibility-- necessaryelementsin on urban renewalprogram. “Master Builder” of NYC, Robert Moses,Mtmjoy Southhas beenchosenas the third area inthe city to be improved the combined by efforts of to develop a transportation plan like hisyou, your neighbors, and the Portland RmewolAU-thar.y. ’ legendary public works projects in New Robert Moses with a model of the failed Brooklyn-Some your homes of ore showing signs of aging andneg-lecL Therehi,in effect, o combination many of elements York. Battery Bridgethc~ Indicate that unless some solution Is presented,your neighborhood .will .’* ontlnue:~:.value of your " " ’ to decrease downhill causing the Portland, Maine followed suit much properties later when they hired architect, Victor Gruen to publish a master plan called “Patterns of Progress” in 1968. Victor Gruen is known as the inventor of the modern shopping mall.
  34. 34. ROBERT MOSES’ 1943 PLAN FOR PORTLAND OREGON (LEFT) AND VICTOR GRUEN’S 1967PLAN FOR PORTLAND MAINE (RIGHT). BOTH PLANS WERE ONLY PARTIALLY COMPLETED,BUT NONETHELESS RESULTED IN THE RAZING OF HUNDREDS OF HISTORIC LANDMARKSAND THE DISPLACEMENT OF THOUSANDS OF INNER-CITY RESIDENTS.
  35. 35. The Franklin Arterial Before and After
  36. 36. The Portland Street Grid Before the Franklin Arterial
  37. 37. Images from a leafletdistributed to residents of theMunjoy South Neighborhood inPortland Maine about theirimpending removal
  38. 38. Portland ME 1950 Portland ME- PresentWe are convinced that the real shopping center will be the most profitabletype of chain store location yet developed, for the simple reason that it willinclude features to induce people to drive considerable distances to enjoyits advantages.- Victor Gruen 1948 Union Station Before and After
  39. 39. Even the people that were standing therewith tears coming down their cheeks, someof the elderly people that were standingnext to me, didn’t really think the demolitionwas going to happen. I think that most ofthe city hoped that at the last moment agreat white night of sorts would ride in andhave some sort of grand plan to save thestation. Train Riders Northeast Founder- Wayne Davis All Aboard forUnion Station PP103"It happened so quickly,[...]Passenger serviceended in 1960, and before you knew it, MaineCentral Railroad was selling off all itsproperties, and there was nothing to stopthem. It made people realize that majorcomponents of the citys history could bedestroyed with the flick of a finger and theyneeded to take steps to protect it."http://www.pressherald.com/news/the-ugly-birth-of-preservation_2011-08-31.html
  40. 40. PORTLAND IMPROVEMENTImages from Robert Moses’ plan for Portland Oregon
  41. 41. Moses” rendition of HarborDrive was typical of his“parkway” concept, whichenvisioned a “park for cars”.Harbor Drive was eventuallycompleted in 1950
  42. 42. Different Tracks,Different Outcomes1972-Present
  43. 43. The Tide Turns inOregonThe Mt. Hood Freeway arose out ofRobert Moses’ 1943 plan. It wouldhave run from Downtown Portlandto the suburbs and required therazing of more than 1700 individualhouseholds. The neighborhoodcitizens revolted and in 1975 theproject was cancelled. Funds forthe freeway were then reallocatedtowards the creation of one of thefirst modern light-rail systems inthe country. Rendering of the failed Mt. Hood Freeway
  44. 44. In addition to the dramaticshowdown over the Mt. HoodFreeway Portland, Oregon’s 1972Master Plan signaled a reversal ofthe auto-centric conventions of theera. The plan included the creationof some of what became the mostpopular gathering places in modernportland and contributed to the Harbor Drive circa 1955subsequent “PortlandRenaissance” of the 1990s whenthe population of highly-educatedyoung people surged. Included in the 1972 plan was aproposal to remove Robert Moses’harbor Drive and replace it with apedestrian park. Harbor Drive present
  45. 45. 1952 1970Sequence of Aerial Photographs shows 2010 the evolution of highway constructionin Portland Oregon. The Robert Moses plan was in its early phases in the above image from 1952, by 1970 the highways were at their peak. The image at right from 2010 shows arevitalized waterfront where the Harbor Expressway has been turned into a park.
  46. 46. Portland, Maine experienced a brief resurgence in the 1980s as the city’s “Old Port” neighborhood transformed from a warehouse district into a retail destination, Portland ME Portland OR thanks in part to the Victor Gruen master plan. The resurgence was short lived however and 600,000 the population remains lower today than that of its peak in 1950. 525,000 450,000 375,000 Population Portland Oregon’s population surged by the early1990s with the completion the MAX light rail lines 300,000and the addition of Portland Streetcar . High-techcompanies such as Intel, Lattice Semiconductor 225,000and Tektronix form the nucleus of a tech industrycluster that would become known as the “Silicon 150,000Forest”. Tech industry locates around “Transit-Oriented Developments” dotting the rail-lines 75,000from downtown out to suburbs like Beavertonand Hillsboro. 0 1880 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 While the population of Portland Maine has gonefrom 65,000 people in 1970 to 64,000 people in2010, the population of Portland Oregon hasgrown by nearly 40% ( 1980 366,383- 2009566,141) since 1980.
  47. 47. MAX LIGHT RAIL WES COMMUTER RAILPORTLAND STREETCAR VINTAGE TROLLEY
  48. 48. Back to the Future The current rail transit system in Portland Oregon has nearly reached its maximum extent in the pre-auto era.In addition to the original MAX Light Rail lines, the Portland rail system now includes an overwhelmingly successful modern streetcar system and a suburban regional rail line. Intercity and long distance service is served by Amtrak Cascades and Empire Builder trains
  49. 49. PORTLAND STREETCARDensity of Development Starting in 2001 Portland Streetcar was the first new modern streetcar system built in the U.S in over 40 years. As opposed to the MAX Light Rail System, which is designed for a commuter schedule, Portland Streetcar was built explicitly for purposes of promoting density of development. The graph above shows how successful the plan was.
  50. 50. The Pearl The Pearl District District 2010 1970 Streetcar LineThe Pearl District 1990 The Pearl District 2010
  51. 51. Intercity Rail Services inPortland Oregon
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