Your Research Impact:
how to measure the impact of your publications
OR
Am I famous yet?

Tracy Speeding at www.flickr.com...
Making and measuring impact workshops

Things to consider pre-publication
• Create an (academic) online profile
• Where sh...
Why do we want to know?
 Was anyone interested in my research?
 Who, why, what did they do?
 Making contacts and connec...
Measuring “impact”






Of a Journal
 How much impact does a specific journal have on the
community?
 How many times...
Article impact: Counting citations
Use citation counts to see how often an ARTICLE has
been cited
 Web of Knowledge – Cit...
Article impact: Counting downloads

University Library
Article impact: Who is reading it?
 Cited Reference searching
 Citation mapping
 Citation alerts
using
 WoK
 Zetoc
 ...
Article impact: Cited reference searching
 Find out how many times a particular piece of
work has been cited.
 Discover ...
Citation mapping: who and where

University Library
Citation alerts
 Alert you to when a new article is indexed in
which your work is cited.
 WoK, Scopus, Zetoc, Google Sch...
The h-index measures the impact of an
individual PERSON
Impact?
I wonder who
I’ll squash if I
fall?
Calculating the h index
A scholar with an index of h has published h papers, each of
which has been cited by others at lea...
How does the H-index work?

Paper 1
Paper 2
Paper 3
Paper 4
Paper 5
Paper 6
Paper 7
Paper 8

cited

162 times
94 times
37 ...
How does the H-index work?

Paper 1
cited 162 times
Paper 2
94 times
Paper 3
37 times
Paper 4
12 times
Paper 5___________
...
H index issues










Comparing apples and pears
Varies depending on database
Varies depending on discipline
O...
Other sources:
 Google Scholar Citations www.scholar.google.co.uk
 Can work out your personal citation data
 Widget for...
Google Scholar Citation tool
http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=DuejtHQAAAAJ&hl=en
Maximising your altmetrics impact
For example, create a profile on
 ResearchGate
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Moir...
University Library
University Library
Altmetrics – alternative metrics
 Traditional filters (citation counts, h-index, JIF…)






Slow, take a long time ...
Altmetrics data is being collected from many
sources
 Views – HTML views and PDF downloads
 Mentions – blog posts, Wikip...
Organisations and publishers are already
collecting and displaying altmetrics data

University Library
A free open-source tool to help
researchers understand the
impact of their outputs… from
traditional journal articles to
b...
Altmetric.com

Includes a free ‘bookmarklet’ to allow researchers
to see metrics relating to individual articles
Example paper on Altmetric.com

http://www.nature.com/news/einstein-s-lost-theoryuncovered-1.14767
University Library
University Library
Issues?
 Do altmetrics reflect actual impact or just ‘buzz’?
 Can altmetrics distinguish ‘scholarly interest’ from
‘soci...
17 reasons why you should blog about your research
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

It helps you become more clear about...
http://www.geek.com/geek-cetera/social-media-explained-with-donuts-1466613/
More information
Library Guide on Research Impact:
 http://libguides.ncl.ac.uk/impact

MyRI:
 http://www.ndlr.ie/myri/

...
Measuring the impact of your research publications
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Measuring the impact of your research publications

  1. 1. Your Research Impact: how to measure the impact of your publications OR Am I famous yet? Tracy Speeding at www.flickr.com/shutterbugsheep Moira Bent & Jenny Campbell University Library
  2. 2. Making and measuring impact workshops Things to consider pre-publication • Create an (academic) online profile • Where should/could I publish? • Understand & use the Journal Citation Report (JCR) and other journal ranking tools • Understand Open Access publishing models and how OA can increase the visibility of your research • Understand how to apply for OA publishing funds at Newcastle University Things to consider post publication • Who has been reading it? • How often? • Where from? • Have I made a difference? University Library
  3. 3. Why do we want to know?  Was anyone interested in my research?  Who, why, what did they do?  Making contacts and connections for future collaborations     Feel good factor – exciting, challenging Making a difference – social responsibility Building your reputation, recognition To report back to funder  REF University Library
  4. 4. Measuring “impact”    Of a Journal  How much impact does a specific journal have on the community?  How many times are articles from that journal cited by others?  Use Impact Factors Of an article  How often was a specific article cited/read by others?  Count citations  Count downloads/views Of an individual author  What impact is an individual person having on the community  How important is an individual?  Use h-index and other metrics  Use Altmetrics  Count web/blog page hits Hmm, am I famous yet?
  5. 5. Article impact: Counting citations Use citation counts to see how often an ARTICLE has been cited  Web of Knowledge – Cited Reference Searching  Well established  Good coverage, within limits  Citation mapping tool  Scopus  Different coverage  More open access titles  Citation counts and tracking  Google Scholar  Not specific in terms of coverage  Picks up non traditional publications eg eprints  Citation counts and tracking  CiteseerX and others  http://csxstatic.ist.psu.edu/about University Library
  6. 6. Article impact: Counting downloads University Library
  7. 7. Article impact: Who is reading it?  Cited Reference searching  Citation mapping  Citation alerts using  WoK  Zetoc  Google Scholar  Publish or Perish  Citeseer University Library Image used: http://www.flickr.com/photos/asimulator/3258082746/
  8. 8. Article impact: Cited reference searching  Find out how many times a particular piece of work has been cited.  Discover who is citing a specific piece of research.  Discover how older research is influencing newer research.  Track the work of a specific researcher. University Library
  9. 9. Citation mapping: who and where University Library
  10. 10. Citation alerts  Alert you to when a new article is indexed in which your work is cited.  WoK, Scopus, Zetoc, Google Scholar and other databases. University Library
  11. 11. The h-index measures the impact of an individual PERSON Impact? I wonder who I’ll squash if I fall?
  12. 12. Calculating the h index A scholar with an index of h has published h papers, each of which has been cited by others at least h times Use WoK or Scopus  Clegg, William  Gatehouse, A  Briddon, P WoK h=61 Scopus h=48 WoK h=42 Scopus h=33 WoK h=44 Scopus h=42  May vary depending on forms of author name, affiliation etc  As with any metric, use with caution! University Library
  13. 13. How does the H-index work? Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3 Paper 4 Paper 5 Paper 6 Paper 7 Paper 8 cited 162 times 94 times 37 times 12 times 6 times 4 times 4 times 3 times University Library
  14. 14. How does the H-index work? Paper 1 cited 162 times Paper 2 94 times Paper 3 37 times Paper 4 12 times Paper 5___________ 6 times Paper 6 4 times Paper 7 4 times Paper 8 3 times University Library
  15. 15. H index issues          Comparing apples and pears Varies depending on database Varies depending on discipline One seminal paper does not imply high h-index Doesn’t recognise new researchers Doesn’t allow weighting in multi-authored papers Can be slightly skewed by self citation May miss out key articles May not account for books, book chapters, reports and other types of resource University Library
  16. 16. Other sources:  Google Scholar Citations www.scholar.google.co.uk  Can work out your personal citation data  Widget for other people’s data – accuracy is debatable http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=DuejtHQAAAAJ  Has h-index for journals as well as individuals  Publish or Perish: (http://www.harzing.com/pop.htm) (free)     Uses Google Scholar citations, and runs as standalone software that links to the web. Has to be downloaded Difficult to identify publications Less accurate than Scopus or WoS, . University Library
  17. 17. Google Scholar Citation tool http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=DuejtHQAAAAJ&hl=en
  18. 18. Maximising your altmetrics impact For example, create a profile on  ResearchGate http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Moira_Bent/  Academia.edu http://newcastle.academia.edu/MoiraBent  LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/moira-bent/27/303/a68 Or write a blog/ tweet/ join other social research networks University Library
  19. 19. University Library
  20. 20. University Library
  21. 21. Altmetrics – alternative metrics  Traditional filters (citation counts, h-index, JIF…)      Slow, take a long time to accumulate Don’t always measure impact at article level Restricted – behind paywalls Neglect impact outside of academia Don’t take account of scholarly attention received via new channels  Altmetrics considers the creation and study of new metrics based on the social web for analysing and informing scholarship  A supplemental measure of the quality of scholarship  http://altmetrics.org/manifesto/ University Library
  22. 22. Altmetrics data is being collected from many sources  Views – HTML views and PDF downloads  Mentions – blog posts, Wikipedia articles, online news items, comments on blog posts, etc  Social Media – Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, etc  Captures/Shares – Mendeley, CiteULike, social bookmarks, etc  Cites – citations in the scholarly literature, tracked by Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, etc Combination of scholarly attention and social/public attention University Library
  23. 23. Organisations and publishers are already collecting and displaying altmetrics data University Library
  24. 24. A free open-source tool to help researchers understand the impact of their outputs… from traditional journal articles to blog posts and datasets… University Library
  25. 25. Altmetric.com Includes a free ‘bookmarklet’ to allow researchers to see metrics relating to individual articles
  26. 26. Example paper on Altmetric.com http://www.nature.com/news/einstein-s-lost-theoryuncovered-1.14767
  27. 27. University Library
  28. 28. University Library
  29. 29. Issues?  Do altmetrics reflect actual impact or just ‘buzz’?  Can altmetrics distinguish ‘scholarly interest’ from ‘social interest’?  Isn’t ‘gaming’ easy?  Tools to enable institutional comparisons much less developed than tools for individual researcher  Can be difficult to interpret – require scrutiny, contextualisation and interpretation University Library
  30. 30. 17 reasons why you should blog about your research • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • It helps you become more clear about your ideas. It gives you practice at presenting your ideas for a non-specialist audience. It increases your visibility within academia. It increases your visibility outside academia and makes it much easier for journalists, campaigners and practitioners to find you. It increases your visibility more than a static site and allows people who find you to get an overall sense of your academic interests. It’s a great way of making connections & finding potential collaborators. It can provide an archive of your thoughts, ideas and reactions which can later be incorporated into more formal work. It makes it easier for people to find your published work and increases the likelihood they will and cite it. Its informality and immediate accessibility can help make writing part of your everyday life rather than being a source of stress and anxiety. Its a great way to promote events and call for papers. Particularly if you blog regularly and your blog is connected to Twitter. It helps ensure you can continue to develop strands of thought which, for now, don’t have any practical implications but might at some point in the future. It encourages you to reflexively interrogate and organise your work, drawing out emergent themes and placing isolated snippets of commentary into shared categories. It allows you to procrastinate for a further 10 to 20 minutes before going back to NVivo in a useful(ish) way. It helps you build a community around your ideas and interests It allows you to start a conversation that other researchers can join using comments It’s a tremendous way to access additional relevant information/sources through the connections you make It can also be a great way to increase your sample size by crowd sourcing contributions and through public scrutiny help prepare you for the peer review process when the time comes to publish your work http://markcarrigan.net/2013/08/27/13-reasons-why-you-should-blog-about-your-research/
  31. 31. http://www.geek.com/geek-cetera/social-media-explained-with-donuts-1466613/
  32. 32. More information Library Guide on Research Impact:  http://libguides.ncl.ac.uk/impact MyRI:  http://www.ndlr.ie/myri/ Other opinions  http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/2013090317251515077789-the-new-rules-for-career-success  http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2012/09/28/social-mediatips-for-scientists University Library
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