Ohio State University—Office of the CIO             The Ohio State University                 Office of the CIO   Project ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOIntroductionThe project work environment within the Offices of the CIO and the Ohio...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOA great number of people within the university have been planning, managing andexec...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Classification—Framework Requirements MatrixThe number of activities recomm...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOTABLE OF CONTENTSIntroduction ........................................................
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOIssue Management Plan Template .......................................................
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOTransition to Production—Guidelines...................................................
Ohio State University—Office of the CIO                                           OSU CIO Project Management Framework    ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIO                                  Project Classification—Sizing Matrix             ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIO               Project Classification—Framework Requirements Matrix                ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIODEFINE Phase—Activity Overview     Activity                                   Purpo...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOAssign Core Projectteam Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00   Page 12 of 136
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPLAN Phase—Activity Overview     Activity                                   Purpose...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPLAN Phase—Activity Overview     Activity                                  Purpose ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPLAN Phase—Activity Overview      Activity                                 Purpose ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPLAN Phase—Activity Overview    Activity                                  Purpose  ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOLAUNCH Phase—Activity Overview      Activity                                 Purpos...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOMANAGE Phase—Activity Overview     Activity                                  Purpos...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOMANAGE Phase—Activity Overview     Activity                                  Purpos...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOMANAGE Phase—Activity Overview     Activity                                  Purpos...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOCLOSE Phase—Activity Overview      Activity                                 Purpose...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Request Approval—Activity DefinitionPurpose:The objective of this activity ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOOutputs:Approved or denied Project Request formTopProject Management Framework Draf...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Request Form TemplateRequest Identifier (To be completed by OIT):InitiatorO...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00   Page 25 of 136
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Request Approval—Guidelines   1. Customer details: - The customer name, pho...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Overview Statement—Activity DefinitionPurpose: The Project Overview Stateme...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Overview Statement Template                          Project Overview State...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Overview Statement—Guidelines  1. Project Name and Date  2. Revision Histor...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIO thereby reducing the probability that they will occur. Risks that have a high prob...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOBusiness Case—Activity DefinitionPurpose:The objective of this activity is to help ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOBusiness Case Template                                      BUSINESS CASE1. Project...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOg. Any Business Process changes?If so, outline them4. Financial Analysis – Outputs,...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOBusiness Case—GuidelinesA Business Case must include the level of detail appropriat...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIO3. Consideration and Selection of Preferred OptionGenerate a wide range of options ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOROI benefits may either be earned once upon the implementation of the proposedsolut...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Governance—Activity DefinitionPurpose:The objective of this activity is to ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Governance Document Template1. Role Definitions and Responsibilities:Roles ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Governance—Guidelines1. Identify roles that will exist in your project. e.g...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIO6. Decision-making Structure: e.g. Identify sponsoring groups for decisions related...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPhase Gate—Activity DefinitionPurpose: The objective of this activity is to ensure ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPhase Gate Form Template   Project Name   Project Manager   Phase                  ...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPhase Gate—Guidelines   1. In a lot of projects, this might seem a mere formality b...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPlanning Kick-off Meeting—Activity DefinitionPurpose:The objective of this activity...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPlanning Kick-off Meeting Agenda TemplateProject Name:Attendees:Date:Time:Location:...
Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPlanning Kick-off meeting—Guidelines      Prior to the meeting:   1. Send out a mee...
Project management Framework
Project management Framework
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Project management Framework
Project management Framework
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  1. 1. Ohio State University—Office of the CIO The Ohio State University Office of the CIO Project Management Framework DRAFT Version 1.00 July 27, 2004 Prepared by: Office of Project Management Services Reena Chaba & E.J. Shaffer CIO Workgroup Contributors: Linda Ayres, OIT/Partnership Management Linda DeBula, OIT/ATS Glenn Donaldson, OIT/ADS Bill Karl, OAA/OUS Nanci Gobey, OIT/ADS Cindy Gray, CIO/TELR Jamie Lambert, OIT/UNITS David Lindstedt, CIO/OPMS External Consultant: Bob Wysocki, Enterprise Information Insights, Inc.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 1 of 136
  2. 2. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOIntroductionThe project work environment within the Offices of the CIO and the Ohio StateUniversity customers we support is dynamic and fast-paced. Our projects must deal withdynamic business scenarios and sometimes unclear customer requirements. It is theProject Manager’s job to manage uncertainty and change in a manner that does notnegatively affect the outcome of their projects. The OSU CIO Project ManagementFramework was built to make the Project Manager’s job a little easier. This frameworkcontains definitions, guidelines and templates for the various project managementactivities undertaken to deliver successful projects.We live in very tight fiscal times, short-staffed organizations, burgeoning requests for ourservices, and often times unrealistic schedule deadlines. Given this environment, wesimply cannot afford to perform activities that do not add value to the final deliverablesof our projects. As such, our project management approach was designed to support ourability to complete quality work at the lowest cost, in the shortest period of time, with therequisite level of quality. The project management processes focus on those activities,which are clearly value-added.The Offices of the CIO has built the Project Management Framework, which is acustomized project management methodology, in order to enable project leaders to focuson those processes that bring value. Our methodology: • Provides a common language for communicating about the function of project management within the organization, • Encourages appropriate communication and planning prior to the start of project work, • Establishes a means for managing projects more efficiently, • Enables the tracking of progress against pre-determined metrics and facilitates standardized reporting, • Leads to effective project outcomes which achieve institutional objectives, and • Builds on a set of best practices learned over time.The methodology development process was guided by the following objectives: • The design should seek to be reasonably comprehensive, flexible, and accessible; • The content will enforce discipline but not disallow application of a manager’s critical judgment and insight,The Framework will provide a clear communications vehicle about project management,inform key stakeholders about the process, and enable all participants to mitigate projectrisks.The framework establishes common ground for all projects within the Offices of the CIOat the Ohio State University. With the glossary of Project management terms, it will alsoensure common terminology between different areas within the university.The long-term intent is to build a project management repository to document bestpractices, lessons learned, and examples of various documents that may be developedduring a project.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 2 of 136
  3. 3. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOA great number of people within the university have been planning, managing andexecuting projects for a long time. The framework exists to help build on our successesand learn from our failures. It is meant to grow our project management capabilities overtime. It is important to note that the framework is meant as a guide; it is not rigid and canbe tailored to suit your project’s requirements.In order to follow the framework, one must first understand the project classificationprocess.Project ClassificationAll projects can be classified into a category based on the amount of work effort and risk.A small project would fall into Class 1 while a big project would fall into Class 5.Why classify? • “One size doesn’t fit all” when it comes to managing projects • The amount of documentation and required project management activities must scale to size of projectHow do we classify? • Size is determined based on work effort, represented by the estimated number of person-hours required to complete the work (not duration) and the budget for staff resources, both internal and external to the organization. • It is not necessary to use actual staff salaries in calculating internal cost. A blended rate for the department can be used. • The point of estimating staff costs is that staff time is not “free.”Considering the Project RiskAlthough work effort and staff budget are good indicators for the amount of projectmanagement that should be expended, certain factors can also bring about the need forthe application of more robust project management practices. The Risk Matrix identifiesfive risk factors to be evaluated once the initial classification level is determined. In theevent that the total risk score is greater than 10, the classification level could beincreased.5 Phase Project Life CycleThe Project Life Cycle has been divided into 5 phases: • Define • Plan • Launch • Execute • CloseEach phase has activities associated with it. Each activity has an activity definition,guidelines and may have a template. These components facilitate the activities performedby the Project Manager.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 3 of 136
  4. 4. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Classification—Framework Requirements MatrixThe number of activities recommended depends upon the class into which the project iscategorized. A class 1 project will involve only a few of these activities. A class 5 willinvolve all the activities in the framework. Also the activities recommended for eachclass are the bare minimum and it depends upon the discretion of the Project Manager toperform other activities (even if they are not recommended) if s/he feels that the activityis required for the project. The Framework Requirements matrix shows how theactivities are currently mapped to the project classes.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 4 of 136
  5. 5. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOTABLE OF CONTENTSIntroduction ...........................................................................................................2OSU CIO Project Management Framework..........................................................8Project Classification—Sizing Matrix.....................................................................9Project Classification—Risk Matrix .......................................................................9Project Classification—Framework Requirements Matrix ...................................10DEFINE Phase—Activity Overview.....................................................................11PLAN Phase—Activity Overview.........................................................................13LAUNCH Phase—Activity Overview ...................................................................17MANAGE Phase—Activity Overview ..................................................................18CLOSE Phase—Activity Overview......................................................................21Project Request Approval—Activity Definition ....................................................22Project Request Form Template .........................................................................24Project Request Approval—Guidelines...............................................................26Project Overview Statement—Activity Definition.................................................27Project Overview Statement Template................................................................28Project Overview Statement—Guidelines ...........................................................29Business Case—Activity Definition .....................................................................31Business Case Template ....................................................................................32Business Case—Guidelines ...............................................................................34Project Governance—Activity Definition .............................................................37Project Governance Document Template ...........................................................38Project Governance—Guidelines........................................................................39Phase Gate—Activity Definition ..........................................................................41Phase Gate Form Template................................................................................42Phase Gate—Guidelines ....................................................................................43Planning Kick-off Meeting—Activity Definition ....................................................44Planning Kick-off Meeting Agenda Template ......................................................45Planning Kick-off meeting—Guidelines...............................................................46Project Approach—Activity Definition..................................................................47Project Approach Document Template ...............................................................48Project Approach—Guidelines ............................................................................49Quality Strategy—Activity Definition....................................................................52Quality Strategy Template ..................................................................................53Quality Strategy—Guidelines ..............................................................................54Work Plan- Work Breakdown Structure—Activity Definition................................56Work Plan—Work Breakdown Structure—Guidelines.........................................58Work Plan—Estimating Time and Cost—Activity Definition ................................60Work Plan—Estimating Time and Cost—Guidelines ..........................................61Work Plan—Schedule Development—Activity Definition ....................................62Work Plan—Schedule Development—Guidelines ..............................................63Risk Management Strategy Plan—Activity Definition..........................................65Risk Management Strategy Plan Template.........................................................66Risk Management Strategy Planning—Guidelines .............................................67Communication Management Plan—Activity Definition ......................................68Communication Plan Template ...........................................................................69Communication Planning—Guidelines................................................................70Issue Management—Activity Definition...............................................................71Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 5 of 136
  6. 6. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOIssue Management Plan Template .....................................................................72Issues Log Template...........................................................................................73Issue Management—Guidelines .........................................................................74Quality Assurance Plan—Activity Definition ........................................................75Quality Assurance Planning Template ................................................................76Quality Assurance Planning—Guidelines ...........................................................77Resource Plan—Activity Definition......................................................................78Resource Plan Template ....................................................................................79Resources Planning—Guidelines .......................................................................80Procurement Planning—Activity Definition..........................................................81Procurement Plan Template ...............................................................................82Procurement Planning—Guidelines ....................................................................83Operational Transfer Plan—Activity Definition ....................................................85Operational Transfer Plan Template ...................................................................86Operational Transfer—Guidelines.......................................................................87Integrated Project Plan—Activity Definition.........................................................88Integrated Project Planning—Guidelines ............................................................89Team Assignment—Activity Definition ................................................................90Team Assignment—Guidelines ..........................................................................91Launch Kick-off meeting—Activity Definition.......................................................92Launch Kick-off Meeting Agenda Template ........................................................93Launch Kick-off Meeting—Guidelines .................................................................94Initial Risk Identification—Activity Definition........................................................95Risk Management Matrix Template ....................................................................96Initial Risk Identification—Guidelines ..................................................................97Team Readiness—Activity Definition ..................................................................98Team Readiness—Guidelines ............................................................................99Performance Tracking & Reporting—Activity Definition ....................................100Project Status Report Template ........................................................................101Performance Tracking and Reporting—Guidelines...........................................103Schedule Control—Activity Definition................................................................104Schedule Control—Guidelines ..........................................................................105Change Control—Activity Definition ..................................................................106Change Request Form Template......................................................................107Change Control—Guidelines ............................................................................109Cost Control—Activity Definition .......................................................................110Cost Control—Guidelines .................................................................................111Quality Assurance & Control—Activity Definition ..............................................112Quality Assurance & Control—Guidelines ........................................................113Procurement Management—Activity Definition.................................................114Procurement Management—Guidelines ...........................................................115Risk Management—Activity Definition ..............................................................116Risk Management—Guidelines ........................................................................117Information Distribution—Activity Definition ......................................................118Information Distribution—Guidelines.................................................................119Time Tracking & Management—Activity Definition ...........................................120Time Tracking and Management—Guidelines..................................................121Transition to Production—Activity Definition .....................................................122Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 6 of 136
  7. 7. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOTransition to Production—Guidelines................................................................124Wrap-up Meeting—Activity Definition................................................................125Wrap-up meeting—Guidelines ..........................................................................126Lessons Learned—Activity Definition................................................................127Lessons Learned—Guidelines ..........................................................................128Administrative Closure—Activity Definition .......................................................129Administrative Closure—Guidelines..................................................................130GLOSSARY ......................................................................................................131Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 7 of 136
  8. 8. Ohio State University—Office of the CIO OSU CIO Project Management Framework DRAFT—July 27, 2004 (Version 0.89) Project Management Phases and Activities DEFINE PLAN LAUNCH MANAGE CLOSEProject Request Planning Kick-off Launch Kick-off Meeting Project Plan Execution Transition to ProductionApproval Meeting Performance TrackingAssign Project Manager Project Approach Initial Risk Identification Wrap-up Meeting & ReportingProject Overview Quality Strategy Initial Team Development Schedule Control Lessons LearnedStatement Work Plan—WorkBusiness Case Change Control Administrative Closure breakdown Structure Work Plan—EstimatingProject Governance Cost Control Celebrate! time and costPhase Gate—Gain Work Plan—Schedule Quality Assurance &approval to develop Development Controlproject planAssign Core project Procurement Risk Management Planteam Management Communications Risk Management Management Plan Information Issue Management Plan Distribution Time Tracking & Quality Assurance Plan Management Phase Gate—Gain Resource Plan approval to move to production Procurement Plan Operational Transfer Plan Integrated Project Plan Phase Gate—Gain approval for plan Team Assignment Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 8 of 136
  9. 9. Ohio State University—Office of the CIO Project Classification—Sizing Matrix Project Work Effort Staff Budget (internal Class (Hours) & external) 1 80 – 159 <$8,000 2 160 – 499 $8,000 – $24,999 3 500 – 4,999 $25,000 – $249,999 4 5,000 – 9,999 $250,000 – 499,999 5 >10,000 >$500,000 Project Classification—Risk Matrix Low Medium High Very High Risk Factor Score (0) (1) (2) (3)Team Size <5 5–9 10 – 14 >15(# of bodies)# Workgroups 1–2 3–4 5–6 >7InvolvedTechnology /Technique / Expert Familiar New to OSU Break-throughProcess The solution is The solution is There is more than The solution is well defined and known but some one approach to not known orComplexity no problems are problems are achieving the only vaguely expected expected project goal definedPolitical Profile / Org Unit Director Area VP/Dean Area Enterprise-wideImpact 0 – 10 No change to classification Scoring 11 – 13 Increase class 1 level TOTAL 14 – 15 Increase class 2 levelsProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 9 of 136
  10. 10. Ohio State University—Office of the CIO Project Classification—Framework Requirements Matrix Project Class 1 2 3 4 5 Define Project Request Approval X X X X X Assign Project Manager/Lead X X X X X Project Overview Statement X X X X X Business Case X X Project Governance X X Phase Gate - Develop Plan Approval X X X Assign Core Project team X X X Plan Planning Kick-off Meeting X X X Project Approach X X X X Quality Strategy X X X X X Work Plan-Work Breakdown Structure X X X X X Work Plan-Estimating time and cost X X X X X Work Plan-Schedule Development X X X X X Risk Management Plan X X X Communications Management Plan X X X Issue Management Plan X X Quality Assurance Plan X Resource Plan X X Operational Transfer Plan X X Procurement Plan X Integrated Project Plan X X X Phase Gate - Plan Approval X X X Team Assignment X X X Launch Launch Kick-off meeting X X X X Initial Risk Identification X X X Team Readiness X X X Manage Project Plan Execution X X X X X Performance Tracking & Reporting X X X X X Time Tracking & Management X X X Schedule Control X X X Change Control X X X Cost Control X X X Risk Management X X X Quality Assurance & Control X Procurement Management X Information Distribution X X X Phase Gate - MTP Approval X X X Close Transition to Production X X X X Wrap-up Meeting X X Lessons Learned X X Administrative Closure X X X X X Celebrate! X X X X XProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 10 of 136
  11. 11. Ohio State University—Office of the CIODEFINE Phase—Activity Overview Activity Purpose Highlights Outputs The objective of this activity is to formalize and Anyone can make a Project Request. The Project Approved orProject Request institutionalize the initiation of projects. By doing this, we Request form needs to be signed by the Operating deniedApproval ensure that only those projects that warrant investment are Unit Head. The Project Approver needs to evaluate Project actually undertaken and executed. This will also help in the request on the basis of pre-set criteria. Request form managing the workload of individual departments.Assign ProjectManager The Project Overview Statement (POS) essentially is a The problem is identified. The project goal and Project short document that establishes the purpose of the project, objectives are determined. The success criteria are Overview and explains what business value it will provide to the identified. The required effort is estimated. Statement organization. The objective of this activity is to secure Assumptions, risks and obstacles are identified.Project Overview management approval and to provide the Project ManagerStatement with the authority to apply organizational resources to project activities. The POS becomes a source of reference for the project team. The objective of this activity is to help Initiators in The Business Need is established. Dependencies are Business justifying a business need. This activity is needed so as to identified. A Cost-Benefit analysis is done. Funding CaseBusiness Case ensure that the costs and benefits for all projects are requirements and risks are identified. weighed before investment is made. The objective of this activity is to define the roles and Escalation procedures are defined. Rules and ProjectProject Governance responsibilities of the various team members and responsibilities are defined. Governance stakeholders, and to define the decision-making structure document for the project. The objective of this activity is to ensure that management Senior management analyzes status reports and the Approved orPhase Gate—Gain approves the transition of a project across its various communication with the customer, and in rejectedapproval to develop phases. This will ensure that projects that are not likely to conjunction with the Project Manager makes a Phase gateproject plan succeed are ‘killed’ early. decision if the project should move to the next form phase. Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 11 of 136
  12. 12. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOAssign Core Projectteam Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 12 of 136
  13. 13. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPLAN Phase—Activity Overview Activity Purpose Highlights Outputs The objective of this activity is to review the approved The Project Manager calls for this meeting. S/he Minutes of Project Overview statement, set expectations, and sets the guidelines for project execution and the kick-offPlanning Kick-off articulate any risks that are likely to occur and dispel any articulates expectations from the project team. meetingMeeting doubts that the team may have. Project timelines, Project Approach, risks, assumptions, and constraints are discussed. The objective of this activity is to establish a high-level The Project life cycle and the various phases for the Project approach of how to implement the project goals by project are determined. Any reusable components Approach developing an implementation approach, and project from other projects are identified. The various DocumentProject Approach policies/standards. The purpose is also to define the methods in which the project objective can be solution for the project and the method of delivering that achieved are evaluated and the best method is solution. This activity will also validate which planning chosen. A rationale is provided for this decision. activities will be needed for the project. The objective of this activity is to decide on the Quality The Project Manager and team decide which List of QA Strategy that will be used for the project. Quality Assurance and which Quality control and QCQuality Strategy activities will be carried out for the project. activities The objective of this activity is to decompose the project The project work is decomposed into smaller WorkWork Plan—Work into activities, sub-tasks, and work packages. This allows components to give better management control. BreakdownBreakdown the Project Manager to estimate the duration of the structureStructure project, determine the required resources and schedule the work. The objective of this activity is to estimate the time and Time duration estimates are given for each task Time and costWork Plan— cost for each task. This will be an input to the depending upon resource availability and capability. estimatesEstimating time and development of the Work Plan.costWork Plan— The objective of this activity is to document the various Resources are assigned to tasks. Quality reviews and Work PlanSchedule tasks that need to be executed during the project duration, testing are planned for. Once the overall schedule isDevelopment to assign responsibility for each of the tasks, and to set, the Project Manager is responsible for closely Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 13 of 136
  14. 14. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPLAN Phase—Activity Overview Activity Purpose Highlights Outputs establish timelines for the tasks. It also establishes monitoring progress. dependencies between various tasks. This will ensure that the project can be completed on time and that the business scope of the Overview statement is addressed. The objective of this activity is to define how risks will be The process of identifying risks is defined. Roles Risk identified, determine who owns the responsibility of and responsibilities for the risk management process Management identifying risks, decide at what frequency the risks need are defined. Frequency of updating the matrix is Strategy PlanRisk Management to be revisited, identify the risk monitoring tool, determine determined.Strategy Plan to whom risks will be escalated, define how to manage risks, and how to handle issues that are likely to become risks. The objective of this activity is make sure that team Target groups for different types of communication CommunicatiCommunications members, customers and stakeholders have the are defined. The frequency, format, and results of onManagement Plan information they need to do their jobs. the communication are defined. Management Plan The objective of this activity is to ensure that issues are An issue management process is defined. Roles and Issue identified, evaluated and assigned for resolution. This responsibilities are assigned. An issue log is ManagementIssue Management Plan, IssuesPlan process brings visibility to issues, accountability as to how documented and tracked. they are acted upon, and their timely resolution. log The objective of this activity is to validate that the major Acceptance criteria for deliverables, quality Quality Plan, deliverables are completed and that the processes are assurance activities, in-process control plans, and checklists being implemented with an acceptable level of quality. quality -related responsibilities are defined.Quality Assurance Frequency of project plan reviews, frequency ofPlan receiving and sending status reports, and frequency of checking for process improvements are determined. Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 14 of 136
  15. 15. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPLAN Phase—Activity Overview Activity Purpose Highlights Outputs The objective of this activity is to document how many The type and amount of resources needed are resources will be needed during the various phases of the determined. The estimated output, availability, and project and how they will be acquired, to examine if any cost of the resources are determined. Training needsResource Plan of the resources need training, and if so, to ensure that are identified and planned for. they receive the required training. The objective of this activity is to identify procurement Items that will be procured are identified. Inability Procurement strategies that will be used, outline the scope of products of currently used products to fulfill this need must PlanProcurement Plan and/or services to be procured, and identify be described. Evaluation criteria of vendors are set. responsibilities for the full procurement lifecycle. Officials who must approve the purchase are identified. The objective of this activity is to lay down the pre- Roles and responsibilities for the installation process OperationalOperational requisites of rolling out an application. This is to ensure are identified. Dependencies that exist are identified. Transfer PlanTransfer Plan the smooth transition from the ‘project’ to the ‘going live’ stage. The objective of this activity is to ensure that the various Assumptions used are reviewed. This activity Integrated elements of the project are properly coordinated. ensures the following: Roles and responsibilities are Project PlanIntegrated Project identified, a quality plan is written, reviews arePlan planned for, and most importantly that all the plans have considered all relevant factors. The objective of this activity is to ensure that individuals The Project Manager resolves conflict between Team with the required skills are assigned to a project, and to resource availability and Work Plan. Work AssignmentsTeam Assignment level resources in the Work Plan. packages are defined, assigned and any questions Fine tuned regarding work packages are discussed. Work PlanPhase Gate—Gain The objective of this activity is to ensure that management Senior management analyzes status reports and the Approval orapproval for plan approves the transition of a project across its various communication with the customer, and in rejection h hi ill h j h lik l j i ih h j k Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 15 of 136
  16. 16. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPLAN Phase—Activity Overview Activity Purpose Highlights Outputs phases. This will ensure that projects that are not likely to conjunction with the Project Manager makes a succeed are ‘killed’ early. decision on whether the project should move to the next phase.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 16 of 136
  17. 17. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOLAUNCH Phase—Activity Overview Activity Purpose Highlights Outputs The objective of this activity is to ensure that all the The Project Manager should inform the team of the Minutes ofLaunch Kick-off project team members are aware of the ground rules of the ground rules for the project, the working style, the the meetingMeeting project. communication plan and the escalation process for conflict resolution. The objective of this activity is to ensure that the entire Risks are identified and categorized. For each risk Risk matrixInitial Risk team identifies risks for the project. This ensures that all identified, assess the risk event in terms ofIdentification perspectives are taken into account while planning for likelihood of occurrence and its effect on project risks. objectives if the risk event occurs. The objective of this activity is to ensure that individuals Training needs identified need to be met. Team Key goals for assigned to a project are provided the requisite training in members identify key goals at the start of the each teamTeam Readiness order to perform the job and that key goals and project. member responsibilities are identified for the team members at the start of the project. Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 17 of 136
  18. 18. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOMANAGE Phase—Activity Overview Activity Purpose Highlights OutputsProject PlanExecution The objective of this process is to ensure that the team is Team meetings can be held so that information can WeeklyPerformance making satisfactory progress toward the project goals. The be exchanged. The Project Manager monitors—at StatusTracking & purpose is to: 1.Track cost, time, scope and quality, 2. least weekly—progress to plan on key elements. Reports,Reporting Track actual accomplishments and results, and 3. Provide The status of the project is reported to the relevant Tracked visibility into progress. stakeholders. Project Schedule The objective of this activity is to ensure that tasks are The Project Manager is responsible for tracking the Tracked executed as per Work Plan so that the deadline for the various tasks in a project. Tracking is done by Work Plan project can be met. If the schedule cannot be met, the exchanging task status information with team relevant stakeholders need to be informed. members and then incorporating the latest statusSchedule Control information into your project Work Plan. If the any task, schedule or resource information has been changed, the Project Manager needs to communicate the revised Work Plan to the project team. The objective of this activity is to ensure that all changes Any change to scope has to be communicated to the Approved or to scope are documented and authorized by the relevant Project Manager. The Project Manager ensures that deniedChange Control stakeholders. the Change Request Form has been filled out. The Change Project Manager analyzes the change request. The Request Form Project Manager and established governance may approve or deny a change request. The objective of this activity is to manage project cost Costs are agreed upon with the sponsor at the start Status reportsCost Control such that it is aligned with budgeted cost. and upon completion of the project. The budget has to be constantly monitored by the Project Manager. Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 18 of 136
  19. 19. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOMANAGE Phase—Activity Overview Activity Purpose Highlights Outputs The variance between Budgeted cost and Project cost needs to be communicated to and approved by the sponsor/customer. This should also be present in the status report. The objective of this activity is to ensure that the project This process comprises project reviews, product ReviewQuality Assurance team meets the project requirements and that all requisite reviews, code reviews, testing, and any other reports, Bug& Control quality criteria are met. process that the Project Manager might think reports necessary. Defects are identified, and categorized. Root causes are analyzed. The objective of this activity is to ensure that appropriate Any guidelines set by the University in this regard Signed resources are employed, that the process of selection is supersedes this process. A vendor is chosen on pre- Contract(s) /Procurement fair and that the quality of work is acceptable. set criteria. The contract needs to be signed by PurchaseManagement authorized signatories. Order(s) /Statement(s) of Work The objective of this activity is to identify risks, to reduce Management monitors risks with a risk exposure Revised Risk the probability of the identified risks, to identify over the threshold limit. Risk mitigation strategies MatrixRisk Management mitigation strategies, to identify contingency plans for the are planned and contingency plans are developed. bigger risks, and if realized, to reduce the impact of these The Risk Matrix is revisited at and appropriate risks. frequency. The objective of this activity is to ensure that all All relevant information needs to be communicated StatusInformation appropriate parties are kept informed. to the appropriate parties at the right time and in the reports,Distribution appropriate format. Minutes of meetingsTime Tracking & The objective of this activity is to ensure that all time Time spent is tracked at a project level, and Time Sheets,Management spent on a project is logged in. analyzed at an organizational level. Variance Reports, Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 19 of 136
  20. 20. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOMANAGE Phase—Activity Overview Activity Purpose Highlights Outputs Estimates for future projects The objective of this activity is to ensure that management Senior management analyzes status reports and the Approved or approves the transition of a project across its various communication with the customer, and in rejectedPhase Gate—Gain phases. This will ensure that projects that are not likely to conjunction with the Project Manager makes aapproval to move to Phase gate succeed are ‘killed’ early. decision on whether the project should move to the formproduction next phase. Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 20 of 136
  21. 21. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOCLOSE Phase—Activity Overview Activity Purpose Highlights Outputs The objective of this activity is to ensure that the Its ensured that all planned testing is carried out, all SummaryTransition to Operational Transfer Plan is carried out after the required customer requirements are met and that the product Report,Production checks are done. is fully operational. The Project Manager ensures Customer that the customer accepts the product before Sign-off Transition to Production. The objective of this activity is to ensure that the Project The Project Manager calls this meeting. The Project Minutes team discusses the project after the project has been Manager, and the team members discuss the projectWrap-up Meeting executed so that Lessons Learned are captured and issues experience including problems faced during project are analyzed. execution. Solutions to such problems are suggested and discussed. Lessons Learned are discussed. The objective of this activity is to ensure that the Lessons The Project Manager develops this ‘Lessons LessonsLessons Learned Learned during the project are documented and Learned’ document with the help of the project Learned incorporated in the knowledge base for future use. team. This document is deposited in the knowledge Document base. The objective of this activity is to ensure that the Project is The Project Manager ensures that the project isAdministrative approved, accepted and closed. approved and accepted by the relevant stakeholders.Closure All documentation and records are reviewed, organized and archived. Backups are taken. Resources are released and the project is closed.Celebrate! Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 21 of 136
  22. 22. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Request Approval—Activity DefinitionPurpose:The objective of this activity is to formalize the process by which new projects/servicerequests are initiated. By doing this, we can ensure that only those projects that warrantinvestment are actually undertaken and executed. This will also help in managing theworkload of individual departments.This process applies to all projects undertaken by the Office of the CIO of the Ohio StateUniversity.Participants:Initiator: Any customer or member of the Office of the CIO who submits a requestOperating Unit Manager: Resource OwnerApprover: The appropriate decision makerSponsor: The body or person who funds the projectInputs:Project Request Approval form [1]Process:1. The Initiator completes the Project Request form and requests approval (signature) from the appropriate person as established via the standard operating procedure of the work unit. Anyone can initiate a request. The form contains information such as: a. Customer name, phone, and department b. Description of the business need or production problem c. High-level business reason category for the request d. Goal of the project e. Impact on the business unit2. The appropriate area manager reviews the request to determine a high-level work effort range for planning purposes.3. The request goes to the Project Approver for a decision. Approval signifies authorization to invest effort.4. The Governance Body/Process evaluates the Project Request form and makes a decision to accept or deny the request based on the following criteria: a. Value to organization b. Criticality c. Estimated effort and resource availability d. Risks e. Impact and/or dependence on other projects f. Any other criteria thought necessary and relevant to the organization/project5. If the Governance Body grants approval, the project moves to the next stage, based upon the Project Class, where a Project Overview Statement is created. In some cases, the creation of a separate Business Case document may be required.6. Depending on the size and scope of the project, the Project Manager and the Core Project team may be assigned at any time after project initiation and definitely prior to project kick-off.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 22 of 136
  23. 23. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOOutputs:Approved or denied Project Request formTopProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 23 of 136
  24. 24. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Request Form TemplateRequest Identifier (To be completed by OIT):InitiatorOperating Unit ManagerCustomer/Sponsor NameDepartmentDateEmail IDPhoneDescription of businessneed/problem/opportunityType of Request Internal mandate (University Policy, System Upgrade) External mandate (Legal requirement, Government) Correct an error (Malfunction/Fix) Value-add/Process improvement/Business opportunityGoalBusiness ImpactEstimated labor hours (optional)Date needed (Explain in Impact)(optional)Project Initiator:Date SignTo be completed by the Project ApproversProject request Approved / Denied Sign:Comments, if any: Date:Governance Sign: Date:Sponsor Sign: Date:Customer Sign: Date:Others Sign: Date:Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 24 of 136
  25. 25. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 25 of 136
  26. 26. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Request Approval—Guidelines 1. Customer details: - The customer name, phone number, and customer department need to be filled out in the form. 2. Description of business need or problem or opportunity: - Why is this project required? A brief description of the business need has to be filled in. e.g. Different departments of the University use different email systems. This increases the amount of training provided to people taking calls in the help desk. Supporting documentation (if available) for the ‘Business Need’ field needs to be provided by the Initiator. 3. Classify the request by type: This field will help assign priority to the project. Is this project being created to correct errors that exist? Or is this project request a result of an internal or external mandate? Is it a process improvement, a value add or a business opportunity? e.g. A change in legal requirement would be an external mandate while a system upgrade or a change that is mandated by the Department Head would be an internal mandate. 4. Goal: Describe the project goal. What does the project plan to achieve? e.g. The goal is to route all help desk inquiries through a single point. OR The goal is to ensure that all university departments use the same email system. 5. Business Impact: Determine if any area of work will be affected by decisions on the project. What will be accomplished if the project is undertaken? What will be the result if the project is not undertaken? The Initiator needs to identify related projects i.e. projects which are dependent on this initiative, or projects upon which this initiative is dependent. 6. High-level effort range: Estimate approximately how many person-hours will be required for executing the project. 7. Date Needed: This is an optional field and needs to be filled in only if there is a deadline before which the project definitely needs to be completed. 8. To grant or deny approval to the project request: The criteria that need to be taken into account while evaluating a project request are as follows: • Value to organization: Is this project aligned with the overall strategy? • Criticality- How critical is the project? Is the need being satisfied by a less efficient method or is it not being satisfied at all? • Amount of effort to be spent • Workload of resources- If the existing workload doesn’t allow for immediate assignment, then the project priority must be reviewed with the initiator. • Risks • Impact on other projects • Any other criteria thought necessary and relevant to the organization/project 9. Additional approvals from the sponsor or customer may be required.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 26 of 136
  27. 27. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Overview Statement—Activity DefinitionPurpose: The Project Overview Statement (POS) is a short document that establishes thepurpose of the project, and explains what business value it hopes to provide to theorganization. The objective of this activity is to secure management approval and toprovide the Project Manager with the authority to apply organizational resources toproject activities. The POS becomes a source of reference for the project team.Participants: The Project Manager prepares this document. The intended audience ismanagement, stakeholders, sponsor and the project team.Inputs: Approved Project Request form[1]Process:1. State the Problem or opportunity that the project addresses.2. Establish the Project Goal. The goal gives purpose and direction to the project.3. Clearly state the project objectives that are concise, verifiable, feasible, and measurable.4. List the criteria that will be considered while measuring the success of a project.5. Determine the effort that will be required for the project. This estimate should be a more fine-tuned estimate compared to the one made in the Project Request Form.6. Estimate the total cost of the project i.e. effort, operating expenses, and any capital costs like licensing costs.7. Determine the Class of the project.8. List any assumptions made, and any known constraints or obstacles imposed by the environment or management. Identify any project risks that might be present.9. Attach documentation, if necessary to support any of the above.10. This document needs to be approved by the relevant stakeholders.11. Maintain versions and details of what changes are made in what version.Outputs:Project Overview StatementProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 27 of 136
  28. 28. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Overview Statement Template Project Overview StatementProject NameDateVersionProject Sponsor/CustomerProject Manager/LeadProblem/OpportunityGoalObjectivesSuccess CriteriaEffortTotal CostClass of ProjectAssumptions, Risks,ObstaclesSupporting DocumentsPrepared By:Date:Approved By:Date:Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 28 of 136
  29. 29. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Overview Statement—Guidelines 1. Project Name and Date 2. Revision History and versions: Date, what changes were made and who made the amendments. Version is incremented for each significant change or edit. The signed off version becomes v1.0. Changes after this acceptance are incremented. 3. Project Sponsor/Customer 4. Project Manager 5. Problem/Opportunity: State the problem that the project will resolve. 5. Goal: What does the project hope to accomplish? 6. Objectives: A concrete statement describing what the project is trying to achieve. The objective should be written at a low level, so that it can be evaluated at the conclusion of a project to see whether it was achieved or not. A well-worded objective will be specific, measurable, attainable/achievable, realistic and time-bound. e.g. there should be no more than 2 queries in a day regarding the use of function X after the project is executed.7. Success Criteria: Success criteria should be identified. To the extent possible, these factors should be quantifiable and measurable. These success criteria should be determined based upon the following considerations: a. Metrics and User Surveys, b. Financial Savings, c. Operational/Readiness Improvements, etc. e.g. all web pages should download on a 64kbps line within 2 seconds. OR there should be an increase in savings by 0.10 dollar per transaction.8. Effort: Estimate the time that team members will spend on the project.9. Total Costs: An estimate of the effort that will be required to execute the project is required. Costs are divided into three types: a. Capital Items are costs associated with the procurement of assets such as hardware and software. b. Expense Items are costs associated with operating expenses, material, travel, training, supplies, books, copying, printing, etc. c. Effort are costs associated with the total time team members work on a project based on an hourly rate for each skill set or the actual salary of the team members.10. Class of Project: The Project Classification matrix needs to be used in order to determine the class of the project. When using the Classification matrix, the work effort; not the entire cost needs to be taken into account.11. Assumptions: Project assumptions are circumstances and events that need to occur for the project to be successful but are outside the total control of the project team. Assumptions are made to fill knowledge gaps; they may later prove to be incorrect and can have a significant impact on the project. List only those assumptions that have a reasonable chance of occurring. If an assumption is invalidated at a later date, then the activities and estimates in the project plan should be adjusted accordingly. Risks: Project risks are circumstances or events that exist outside of the control of the project team and will have an adverse impact on the project if they occur. (In other words, whereas an issue is a current problem that must be dealt with, a risk is a potential future problem that has not yet occurred.) All projects contain some risks. It may not be possible to eliminate risks entirely but they can be anticipated and managed,Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 29 of 136
  30. 30. Ohio State University—Office of the CIO thereby reducing the probability that they will occur. Risks that have a high probability of occurring and have a high negative impact should be listed. Obstacles/Constraints List any known constraints imposed by the environment or by management. Typical constraints may include fixed budget, limited resources, imposed interim and/or end dates, predetermined software systems and packages, and other predetermined solutions.12. Supporting Documents: Include in this section copies of pertinent documents such as: Business Case or Plan University guidelines or policies applicable to this project13. Approval: Use this section for approval signatures from project stakeholders.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 30 of 136
  31. 31. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOBusiness Case—Activity DefinitionPurpose:The objective of this activity is to help Initiators in justifying a business need to seniormanagement. This activity is needed to ensure that the costs and benefits for all projectsare weighed before a commitment of resources is made. This also ensures that theprojects invested in bring the greatest value to the organization.Participants:Initiator: Person from whom the project idea originatedSponsor: Person or body who will be funding the projectApprover: Established governanceInputs:Approved Project Request form [1]Process:1. Draft a project summary.2. Establish the business need that the project intends to fulfill. Collect necessary data and information to support this. Establish dependencies that exist. Establish that the project fits within the overall organizational strategy.3. Consider various options that might be considered in order to fulfill this business need. Choose an option and state why this option was preferred and chosen.4. Perform a Cost-Benefit Analysis. Identify the Total Cost of Operation and the Opportunity Costs. Identify funding requirements and risks.5. Identify competitive offerings and assess the proposed solution against these offerings. (Optional)6. Describe the overall approach as to how the project will be executed.7. Identify factors that need to be in place in order for the project to succeed.8. Identify measures that will be used to determine if the project was a success.Outputs:Complete Business Case with cost-benefit analysisNotes:Clearly mention what is and is not included under costs.TopProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 31 of 136
  32. 32. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOBusiness Case Template BUSINESS CASE1. Project Summarya. Project Initiatorb. Project Sponsorc. Project Descriptiond. Needs and scopee. Target customerf. Objectives, outcomes, andbenefitsg. Features to be included and theneed they satisfyh. Costsi. Risksj. Complexity assessmentk. Durationl. Leadership requirementsm. Team skill requirements2. Statement of Needa. Unmet Need or Opportunityb. Anticipated Benefitsc. Rationale for assigning priorityd. Specific Business needs(current and future)e. How was the need determinedf. Supporting datag. Names of stakeholdersconsultedh. Names of stakeholderssupporting this proposali. Consequences of notproceeding3. Consideration and selection of Preferred Optiona. Options consideredb. Strengths and weaknesses ofeach optionc. Reason preferred option waschosend. Investment alternativese. Assumptions madef. Alignment with Universitypolicies and strategiesProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 32 of 136
  33. 33. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOg. Any Business Process changes?If so, outline them4. Financial Analysis – Outputs, Benefits, costs, and Risksa. Costs Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 i. Capital costs ii. Operating costs iii. Total cost of ownership iv. Impact on other projects v. Impact on HRpolicies/requirementsb. Benefits i. Savings ii. Potential Revenue iii. Expected OutcomesSummaryc. Funding i. Net Impact (Cost –Benefitanalysis) ii. Funding Requirements iii. Other sources of fundingd. Unquantifiable impacte. ROIf. Risks5. Competitive Analysis6. Implementation Strategy7. Factors critical to projectsuccess8. Criteria for measuringsuccessProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 33 of 136
  34. 34. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOBusiness Case—GuidelinesA Business Case must include the level of detail appropriate to the project or initiative.The most important aspect of the documentation is that it be detailed enough to enablesound judgments to be made about the merit of what is being proposed, and whetherfunding and other resources should be allocated to it.1. Project Summary a. Identify the project initiator and the project sponsor b. Describe the Project c. Present the Needs and Scope. Define the needs that drive the investment proposal. Define the scope of the project clearly. Be clear about what the project will include and what it will not include. d. List the Target customers or population. e. List the Objectives, Outcomes and Benefits f. List the features to be included and cite the specific business needs they satisfy. The developer of the Business Plan should present sufficient detail to allow the decision-makers to understand the business solution in order to evaluate it properly. g. List the Costs and Risks h. Assess the Complexity i. Duration j. Project leadership requirements: Are there any specific skills required of the person leading the project? k. Team skill Requirement: Identify the project resources by role and quantity, but not by name, over the life cycle of the proposed project. State how the resource estimate was calculated. Include an explanation of the split of effort between in- house and external resources, if appropriate. Examples of resource requirements are: Technical skills, Management skills, Technology resources, Capital Partnerships, alliances, etc.2. Statement of Need—Establishing the business need, issues definition, opportunitydescription a. Describe the extent of an unmet need, demand for services or opportunity that has been identified and which is considered to be a high priority. Identify why this need or demand has not been met with existing systems and facilities. b. Identify anticipated benefits to various groups. c. Explain the rationale for assigning the priority and the reasons that the timing is appropriate to implement the project. d. Define the specific business needs that drive the investment proposal. Account for both current and future needs of the business. e. Supporting data and information—Explain how the need was determined and how critical, urgent or important it is. Provide data or other evidence of need. f. Identify which stakeholders have been consulted. g. Identify how many stakeholders support the proposal. h. Look at the consequences of not proceeding with the project.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 34 of 136
  35. 35. Ohio State University—Office of the CIO3. Consideration and Selection of Preferred OptionGenerate a wide range of options that can be considered to address the identified need.Evaluate each option by summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of each option.State why the preferred option has been chosen.Include financial and investment alternatives.State the assumptions that have been made in choosing the preferred option.Comment on the strategic alignment of the project with University policies and strategies.Outline Business Process changes proposed to facilitate this project.4 Financial Analysis – Outputs, Benefits, Costs and Risksa. CostsIdentify the capital and operating cost of the preferred option for Year 1, Year 2 andbeyond.The proposed budget must include:-Capital and recurrent expenditure, including salaries, equipment, and consumables for • Software • Hardware • Maintenance • Training • Ongoing support • Operating cashIdentify total cost of ownershipIdentify impact upon other projects and initiativesIdentify impact upon Human Resources requirements and policies. Do we need to trainpeople or recruit people for this project?b. BenefitsIdentify any savings and how those savings will be usedIdentify any potential revenueDescribe the expected outcomes in terms that are as specific as possible, and relate to theneeds identified. e.g. • Compliance with statutory or other obligations • Improved decision making as a result of better information • Reduced costSummarize benefits and costs, and explain why the benefits outweigh the costs involved.c. FundingCalculate net impact of project by combining cost and benefits.Identify funding requirements. If funds have not been allocated or approved, state themeans by which funds will be acquired.Identify other sources of funding being considered or investigated.d. Unquantifiable Cost and Benefit AnalysisIdentify unquantifiable impact to• The University• The economy• Society• Distribution of benefitse. ROIProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 35 of 136
  36. 36. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOROI benefits may either be earned once upon the implementation of the proposedsolution or recur over the operational life of the solution. They may yield direct revenue,or strategically position the enterprise for market gains. Identify the ROI benefits andclassify them as such.4.6 RisksIdentify the expected risks to which the project will be exposed. Assess the likelihood ofeach risk occurring and its impact on the project. Outline a plan for managing the risks;include risk-minimization measures and contingency plans for recovery and damagelimitation.5. Competitive AnalysisDescribe how the proposed solution is competitive in the marketplace. Assess it againstthe top three competitors’ offerings, including price and quality.6. Implementation StrategyDescribe the proposed implementation strategy including: • How will the project be implemented • Project milestones and key dates • Who will be accountable for managing implementation • What resources (human, physical, other) and skills are required • What changes are required to working practices, and • Integration with existing and proposed systems.7. Factors critical to project successList those factors that must be in place to ensure success of the proposed solution. Bespecific.e.g. Commitment and awareness from Executive SponsorsAccess to necessary source dataCooperation by affected business or IT areasFull-time staff assignments to projectArchitecture fit (Status of interfacing systems)8. Criteria for measuring successDescribe what measures will be applied to measure the success of the proposed solution.e.g. • Financial (Cost vs. Revenue) • Performance • User acceptance • Schedule • Competitive differentiationProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 36 of 136
  37. 37. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Governance—Activity DefinitionPurpose:The objective of this activity is to define the roles and responsibilities of the various teammembers and stakeholders, and to define the decision-making structure for the project.Participants:Project Manager and stakeholdersInputs:Approved Project Request form [1], Project Overview Statement [1], Business Case [4]Process:1. Identify the various roles that exist. e.g. Project Manager, team member, reviewer.2. Identify the responsibilities that each role has. e.g. a. Define who will establish project requirements with the customer. b. Define who can interface with external providers, internal and external resources and customers. c. Define who reviews and approves the project plan. d. Define who authorizes project scope, schedule, and cost. e. Define who authorizes change in scope. f. Define who can sign a contract with a vendor. g. Define who can communicate with vendors. h. Define who can assign work.3. Define the rules of communication. e.g. a. Define who reports the status of the project to the stakeholders and at what frequency. b. Communication to the project resources from the management should go through the Project Manager.4. Define the organizational structure that the project will follow. e.g. even if a functional team member has a designation higher than the Project Manager, for the purpose of the project, the team member will be reporting to the Project Manager.5. Determine the person to whom the customer can escalate issues.6. Define the decision-making structure.7. Define the team operating rules.8. Outline the team meeting structure.Outputs:Project Governance DocumentTopProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 37 of 136
  38. 38. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Governance Document Template1. Role Definitions and Responsibilities:Roles Responsibilitiese.g. Project ManagerMentorReviewerQuality ManagerTesting TeamProject team2. Rules of Engagemente.g. a. Communicationb. Status Reportsc. Procurement of human resourcesd. Resource acquisition3. Organizational structure for the project4. Escalation Procedure5. Decision-making Structurea. Technical decisionsb. Changes in scopec. Conflict resolution6. Team Operating Rules7. Team Meeting Structuree.g. Who facilitates themeeting?Who records theminutes of the meeting?Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 38 of 136
  39. 39. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOProject Governance—Guidelines1. Identify roles that will exist in your project. e.g. Project Manager, mentor, reviewer, Quality Manager, Testing Team, Project team etc.2. Define the roles. Identify the responsibilities of each role. e.g. Project Manager may be responsible for the following: · Developing the project plan · Directing project resources · Managing project schedule · Managing project budget · Estimating project resources · Communicating project status · Tracking project status · Defining, assessing and mitigating project risks · Ensuring project meets technical requirements3. Define the rules of engagement. Some examples are: a. Communication. e.g. communication to project resources from say, the Program Director must flow through the appropriate Project Manager. b. Status reports e.g. the status of individual work assignments needs to be communicated on a daily basis to the Project Manager, bi-weekly status reports need to be sent by the Project Manager to the Operating Unit Head. c. Procurement of human resources e.g. the Project Manager acquires human resources for the project after speaking with the Operating Unit Head and the Resource Manager4. Organizational structure for the project. e.g. all team members report to the Project Manager, the Project Manager reports to the reviewer of the project, etc. Operating Unit Head Functional Heads Project Senior Project Reviewer Manager Project Manager Project team5. Escalation Procedure - In case of issues, a person should be identified as the ‘go-to’ person for a customer in order to escalate issues that the team cannot manage.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 39 of 136
  40. 40. Ohio State University—Office of the CIO6. Decision-making Structure: e.g. Identify sponsoring groups for decisions related to costs, Define who will decide on technical issues. Define who authorizes change in scope. Define who will resolve conflicts.7. Team Operating Rules: e.g. in the absence of the Project Manager on a certain day, does the Project Technical Lead assign work to the technical team?8. Team meeting structure: Does the Project Manager facilitate the meeting? Who records the minutes? Who will validate the minutes before sending it out to stakeholders?Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 40 of 136
  41. 41. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPhase Gate—Activity DefinitionPurpose: The objective of this activity is to ensure that management approves thetransition of a project across its various phases. This will ensure that projects that are notlikely to succeed are ‘killed’ early.Participants: The Project Manager, relevant stakeholdersInputs: Project Status Report [1], important customer communication [1], Phase gateform of earlier phases (if applicable)[3]Process:1. At the end of every phase, the Project Manager prepares a project status report and submits it to senior management to get approval to move on to the next phase of the project.2. The Project Manager also submits any important customer communication, which shows satisfaction or unhappiness with the project progress.3. The relevant stakeholders analyze the status report and the communication, and in conjunction with the Project Manager make a decision on whether the project should move to the next phase.4. The relevant stakeholders sign off the phase gate form.Outputs: Approved or denied Phase gate formProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 41 of 136
  42. 42. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPhase Gate Form Template Project Name Project Manager Phase End of the Define phase End of the Plan phase End of the Manage phase Status Significant Variances Comments by Project Manager Problems to be resolved Comments/Recommendations by approver Areas to be examined in next phase gate Approved/Kill project/Revise/Delay/Other changes Governance: Name: Sign: Date:Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 42 of 136
  43. 43. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPhase Gate—Guidelines 1. In a lot of projects, this might seem a mere formality but this process proves to be very useful in ventures where there is no clarity of objective, and effort is being wasted. 2. Where it seems that a few recommendations might put the project back on track, the established governance should document and communicate these recommendations to the Project Manager. It is the responsibility of the Project Manager to implement the suggestions or provide an explanation why the recommendation cannot be implemented. 3. In some cases, senior management may approve at the phase gate while in other cases, the approval may be sought from an external body e.g. the customer may decide whether the project should move to the next phase. 4. Questions to be asked are: a. Is the project on time? Were all milestones met? b. Is the project on budget? c. Is the project according to specification? d. Is the customer satisfied with results up to this point? e. What are the barriers standing in the way of the success of the project? f. What are the problems that the project faces? g. Were recommendations given in the past implemented? 5. The documents that accompany the phase gate form will be different for each phase of the project. 6. At the end of the definition phase, check if any comments have been listed by the governance in the Project Request Form. Also read through the assumptions, risks, and obstacles section in the Project Overview Statement and see if any assumption is untrue now, or if any risk is critical. 7. At the end of the planning phase, check if all the planning activities that were needed for the project have been performed. Ensure that the Quality Strategy activities are carried out. Ensure that the Work Plan is realistic. Ensure that the communication matrix has identified all relevant stakeholders for the various communications. 8. At the end of the launch phase, ensure that the Risk Matrix has identified all risks relevant to the project. 9. At the end of the management phase, ensure that all change requests are taken into account during transition to production during project closure.Project Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 43 of 136
  44. 44. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPlanning Kick-off Meeting—Activity DefinitionPurpose:The objective of this activity is to review the approved Project Overview Statement, toset expectations, to articulate any risks that are likely to occur, and to dispel any doubtsthat the team may have.Participants:The Project Manager calls for the meeting.The audience includes the relevant stakeholders (i.e. customer representative and affectedbusiness units) and the core project team.Inputs:Project Overview Statement [1], Business Case [4], Governance Document [4]Process:1. Schedule the meeting. Send out the agenda of the meeting in advance. The management and the project team need to be present for the meeting.2. Walk the team through the Project Overview Statement.3. Set guidelines for the project planning phase and articulate expectations for the planning activities from the core project team.4. Hand out copies of the Project Overview Statement and discuss the roles and responsibilities/governance document.5. Discuss project timelines.6. Discuss the overall approach of the project. This is the point at which brainstorming for the project starts.7. Discuss risks, constraints and assumptions.8. Answer any questions that the management or project team may have.9. Assign someone to take notes during the meeting. Identify action items and timelines. Send out the notes to relevant stakeholders.10. Determine (in advance) whether you want to discuss the Project Approach in the same meeting or in a separate meeting.Outputs:Notes taken during the kick-off meetingTopProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 44 of 136
  45. 45. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPlanning Kick-off Meeting Agenda TemplateProject Name:Attendees:Date:Time:Location:Project Manager:Core Project team Members:Stakeholders:Items: • Introduction of meeting participants • Start Date of the planning phase • End Date of the planning phase • Guidelines and expectations • Discussion of the Project Overview Statement elements • Discussion of Roles and responsibilities/Governance document (if applicable) • Project Approach and overall timeline • Existing Issues • Project Resources/Tools/Repository • Questions • Recap / summary/Acton ItemsProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 45 of 136
  46. 46. Ohio State University—Office of the CIOPlanning Kick-off meeting—Guidelines Prior to the meeting: 1. Send out a meeting announcement with a meeting agenda to attendees with the project objective, meeting objective and time frames. Team members are required to ‘RSVP’ to you. That requirement needs to be stated in the meeting announcement. 2. Take copies of the agenda to the meeting for the participants. 3. Prepare handouts for the meeting, if necessary During the meeting: 4. Make sure all the items in the agenda are discussed. 5. The start and end date of the planning phase needs to be articulated. 6. The Project Overview Statement and the Business Case (if applicable) could be handed out during the meeting. Discuss all the elements in the Project Overview Statement. 7. Distribute the Project team Organizational Chart from the Governance document. It is imperative this is distributed during this meeting. If it is not official yet, create a draft. Discuss roles and responsibilities. 8. The team needs to know their part in the project. Inform them that you will be discussing their responsibilities with them. 9. Project team Rules need to be set in the Kick-Off meeting. Start them off with one rule and give them a time limit to come up with more. 10. You need to let the team know what you expect from them as a group. e.g. They need to know that all information regarding the project needs to be validated by you before anyone else receives the information. 11. Discuss any existing issues and assign the issues to team members for resolution. 12. Discuss what resources and tools will be used for the project. Discuss where the project repository will reside. 13. Consider what skills the team can bring to determine the Project Approach and the WBS. 14. Emphasize the importance of the planning activities schedule. 15. The Project Manager may choose to discuss the overall approach of the project in this meeting or arrange for a separate meeting for this purpose. The Project Manager should consider which stakeholders need to be involved in the Project Approach meeting. Other factors that could be considered are the length of the meeting, the information that one would want the customer to hear, and the decisions that the customer should participate in. 16. Answer any questions that the team or other stakeholders may have. After the meeting: 17. Identify action items and send out the notes taken during the meeting to all relevant stakeholdersProject Management Framework Draft V.1.00 Page 46 of 136

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