Pain

1,308 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,308
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
27
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Pain

  1. 1. COME TO YOUR SENSES<br />Pain<br />
  2. 2. Pain<br />Pain is useful because it alerts us to something harmful. <br />Pain is not as specialized as some other receptors and is transmitted by a bare nerve ending. <br />Capsaicinis a chemical found in hot peppers such as jalapenos, and they also stimulate pain receptors. Capsaicin produces a burning or stinging sensation. <br />Thicker and faster axons send information about sharp pains and thinner axons send information about duller pain. <br />The axons for pain enter the spinal cord and release two neurotransmitters. <br />These neurotransmitters are glutamate (released when there is mild pain) and a combination of glutamate and substance P (released when pain is more severe).<br />
  3. 3. Pain<br />Pain is sent to several places in the brain. <br />One pathway for pain goes through the thalamus and then to the somatosensory cortex in the parietal lobe. <br />The somatosensory cortex responds to what kind of pain is felt and where the pain is in the body. <br />Other pathways for pain include through the medulla, the amygdala, the hippocampus, the prefrontal cortex, and the cingulate cortex. <br />These areas respond to the unpleasant emotional aspects of pain.<br />
  4. 4. Pain<br />Pain reception in the brain<br />

×