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Guidelines for Development/Business Plans of Candidate ... Guidelines for Development/Business Plans of Candidate ... Document Transcript

  • Asia Pacific Water Forum Network of Regional Water Knowledge Hubs Guidelines for Development/Business Plans of Candidate Regional Water Knowledge Hubs The views expressed in this paper are the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), or its Board of Directors, or the governments they represent. ADB does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this paper and accepts no responsibility for any consequences of their use. Terminology used may not necessarily be consistent with ADB official terms. Prepared by Carel Keuls UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education Version 1.2, December 2007
  • Table of Contents I Introduction........................................................................................................................ 3 II Regional water Knowledge hubs ....................................................................................... 4 II.1 Rationale.................................................................................................................. 4 II.2 Collaborative network of hubs ................................................................................ 4 II.2.1 Regional water knowledge hubs................................................................. 4 II.2.2 Key principles for hubs............................................................................... 5 II.2.3 The hub and its knowledge network ........................................................... 5 II.2.4 Governance and initial activities ................................................................ 6 III Guidelines for a development/business plan ..................................................................... 7 III.1 Priority topic / knowledge domain .......................................................................... 7 III.2 The hub’s core team ................................................................................................ 7 III.3 Strategic framework of hub and network ................................................................ 7 III.4 present and future status .......................................................................................... 8 III.5 Support from others................................................................................................. 9 III.6 Sustainability of the hub.......................................................................................... 9 III.7 Communications strategy ...................................................................................... 10 III.8 Tools for sharing knowledge and information ...................................................... 10 III.9 Operations of hub and network ............................................................................. 10 III.10 Outline of the development/ business plan............................................................ 11 Appendix I: Short description of the Asia-Pacific Water Forum .............................................. i 1. Background .............................................................................................................. i 2. Goal and objectives .................................................................................................. i 3. Approach ................................................................................................................. ii 4. Governance............................................................................................................. iii 5. Lead organisations.................................................................................................. iii 6. Asia Pacific Water Summit .................................................................................... iv Appendix II: Candidate regional water knowledge hubs .......................................................... v 2
  • I INTRODUCTION The Asia-Pacific Water Forum (APWF) was launched in 2006 to improve sustainable water management in the region by capitalizing on its diversity and rich history of experience in dealing with water as a fundamental part of human existence. APWF has set out to identify and champion solutions to water issues in the region, and aims to boost investments, build capacity, and enhance cooperation in the water sector. APWF operates as an independent, not-for-profit, non-partisan, and non-political network. It is inclusive, open and flexible, with a light governance structure and delegation of responsibilities to lead organizations for priority themes and key result areas (KRA). The lead organizations are responsible for developing cooperation in the region for the delivery of high-quality products and services that meet the priority needs of decision-makers and practitioners. APWF’s objectives, three priority themes, five KRAs, and its organization are shown in Appendix 1. PUB Singapore and UNESCO are co-leaders of APWF’s KRA 1 on “developing knowledge and lessons,” while the Asian Development Bank (ADB) is the leader of APWF’s Priority Theme A on “water financing and capacity development” and of its KRA 3 on increasing public outreach. PUB Singapore, ADB and UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education agreed in June 2007 to collaborate in establishing a network of regional water knowledge hubs under APWF’s KRA 1, to improve water knowledge management in the region, and deliver high-quality products and services in knowledge networking and capacity development. Representatives of several candidate regional water knowledge hubs (WKH) met in Singapore on 29-31 October 2007 to discuss this new approach during a regional consultation meeting hosted by Singapore’s Public Utilities Board (PUB Singapore) under the auspices of APWF’s KRA 1. The regional consultation meeting concluded that establishing regional water knowledge hubs that focus on key water sector topics (knowledge domains) will help the countries of the Asia-Pacific region in addressing the formidable water management challenges of the 21st century. The participants agreed to establish the Asia Pacific Water Forum’s Network of Regional Water Knowledge Hubs. The Network will allow the knowledge hubs to collaborate and support each other in their joint vision to develop, share and disseminate knowledge and capacity development services in the region. The meeting also agreed that each candidate regional water knowledge hub will develop its own development/business plan, and to present and peer review these in the first meeting of the new network, expected to be convened in Singapore at the end of the first quarter of 2008. The participants requested that guidelines be prepared to help each candidate hub in this task. This first version of the guidelines is therefore issued to assist the first batch of candidate regional water knowledge hubs in developing their plans. The guidelines will be updated as needed. 3
  • II REGIONAL WATER KNOWLEDGE HUBS II.1 RATIONALE The Asia Pacific region faces unprecedented challenges in water management in the next two decades because of climate change, urbanization, decentralization, environmental degradation, governance reforms, and other profound changes in society. To address these formidable challenges, the countries in the region need to urgently improve their knowledge generation, sharing, and capacity development for delivering water services and managing water resources in river basins. A new approach is needed that emphasizes knowledge partnerships and networking. In this approach, space is created for countries with advanced expertise and existing centers of excellence in the region to offer their services as regional water knowledge hubs to clients and partners in the region.1 II.2 COLLABORATIVE NETWORK OF HUBS II.2.1 Regional water knowledge hubs At the regional consultation meeting in Singapore in October 2007, a number of candidate organizations have already decided to form a collaborative network. Each of these candidate hubs will prepare a development/business plan for providing products and services in a specific priority topic (knowledge domain) in the water sector (See Appendix II). Water Water Knowledge Knowledge HUB HUB APWF Water Water Knowledge Network of Knowledge HUB WKHs HUB Water Water Knowledge Knowledge HUB HUB 1 In modern usage, hubs are known as common connection points in a network, as a central server to which clients connect. In airline travel, hubs connect people to their destination. Hub is also used to refer to a center of excellence and business, as in a financial hub. A knowledge hub can be regarded as connecting people to the best information, analysis, and people. A knowledge hub has a reputation for excellence in delivering products and services to clients. For the purpose of this document, the concept of regional water knowledge hubs is used to refer to centers of excellence that will deliver the best information, knowledge, and capacity development services in their specific area of focus (their knowledge domain). These domains are priority water sector topics to help the countries in the Asia Pacific region in addressing the water management challenges of the 21st century. (From: Lincklaen Arriens, W. and Luijendijk, J., 2007. Water knowledge networking – partnering for better results). 4
  • Figure 1 The collaborative network of regional water knowledge Each regional water knowledge hub is expected to deliver high-quality products and services to its clients. Each hub will demonstrate leadership in its priority topic of focus to (i) develop and assist a network of knowledge institutions, experts, and champions in its area of focus; (ii) disseminate good practice cases and advice for policy development; and (iii) provide capacity development programs in collaboration with its partners and clients. II.2.2 Key principles for hubs The hubs are expected to pursue high standards of excellence reflected in key operating principles. For the new approach to work and become self-sustaining, the regional water knowledge hubs will need to demonstrate and maintain excellence in their products and services to meet client needs. Adopting a number of common key performance and operating principles will help to ensure that this happens. Each regional water knowledge hub, working in its knowledge domain, should be able to demonstrate: • vision and leadership • a focus on client needs • significant outcomes and impact in the region • an (international) team of experienced specialists • generation and identification of state-of-the art knowledge • a stimulating research environment including internships for younger researchers • relevant and feasible knowledge solutions to address water management challenges in the region • regular comparative analysis across the region • excellent products and services that meet client needs • an inclusive attitude to knowledge networking • dissemination of up-to-date information for the region • an entrepreneurial approach to developing a sustainable business model • adequate human and financial resources to develop the knowledge hub’s excellence. II.2.3 The hub and its knowledge network Each regional water knowledge hub will develop and maintain its own network of partners and clients for the topic in which it provides leadership. This is shown in Figure 2. The network will include in-country, regional and international partners and clients and work together to improve the cycle of knowledge generation, dissemination and application. Working as partners with the hub, national and regional water knowledge institutions can be contributors of information, good practices, and lessons learned in producing state-of-the art knowledge, advice, and capacity development services. Typical clients of the hub will include national and local governments, water service providers, river basin organizations, civil society organizations, the private sector, and development and financing agencies that will benefit from having access to the best information, analysis, advice, and people to prepare and implement water reforms and investment projects. Particular focus is needed on serving the needs of water organizations that plan and implement projects. Depending on the situation, it is possible for organizations to be clients and partners of the hub at the same time. Another typical group of beneficiaries of a hub and its network will be the individual professionals that will get improved access to knowledge and information. The countries in 5
  • the region will benefit through creating a new generation of water leaders and champions who will have the necessary knowledge, skills, and passion for better water management at local and national levels to meet the water challenges in the 21st century Regional Clients International Knowledge Development Partners Agencies National water agencies National Knowledge Partners APWF Regional Training Ministries Research Institutes Water Institutes of Finance, Local Water & Planning Knowledge Clients Hub National Private Regional Partners Secretariat Partners of regional network International Donor Financing countries and National Agencies agencies Clients Figure 2 A regional water knowledge hub with its partners and clients II.2.4 Governance and initial activities The regional water knowledge hubs will work under the auspices of APWF’s KRA 1 on “developing knowledge and lessons.” Each hub will be independently responsible for delivering its products and services, guided by the key operating principles adopted by the collaborative network of hubs. The hubs will be endorsed by APWF’s Governing Council on the recommendation of PUB Singapore and UNESCO as the KRA 1 lead organizations. The recommendation will be based on the development/business plan of the hub which will be peer reviewed and discussed by the other hubs. Following endorsement, the progress and performance of the hubs will also be peer reviewed by the collaborative network on a regular basis, and results shared with the APWF Governing Council. Pending the establishment of a secretariat of the collaborative network, the initial activities are being coordinated by a team of experts from PUB Singapore, UNESCO, UNESCO-IHE, and ADB. The network members will meet again in Singapore at the end of the first quarter of 2008 to review and discuss each other’s development/business plans and further activities of the network. In the meantime the coordination team will proceed with some preliminary network actions like (i) the development of a website and communications platform for the Network; and (ii) develop guidelines for the network’s operation including objectives, principles, activities, results, and governance (this document). The contact persons of the coordinating organizations are: PUB Singapore: Mr. Han Tong NG (NG_Han_Tong@pub.gov.sg) Mr. Meng Kin WONG (WONG_Meng_Kin@pub.gov.sg) PUB’s WaterHub: Mr. Ban Thong TAN (TAN_Ban_Thong@pub.gov.sg) Ms. Luana CHOW (Luana_CHOW@pub.gov.sg) UNESCO: Mr. Toshihiro SONODA (t.sonoda@unesco.org) UNESCO-IHE: Mr. Jan LUIJENDIJK (j.luijendijk@unesco-ihe.org) ADB: Mr. Wouter LINCKLAEN ARRIENS (wlincklaenarriens@adb.org) 6
  • III GUIDELINES FOR A DEVELOPMENT/BUSINESS PLAN Preparation of a good plan starts with asking questions. The following guidelines offer some suggestions, drawing on lessons learned from other water knowledge networks around the world. Helpful questions to ask include: • What are common characteristics of a regional water knowledge hub? • What is the topic (knowledge domain) of the hub? • Who are the core team driving the hub? • What is the hub’s vision and mission? • What is the present status of the hub? • What are the strategic goals for the medium and long-term? • Who are/will become partners of the hub? • What are/will become the clients of the hub? • What will be the activities of the hub? • What is the governance and organizational structure of the hub? • What are the resources available and to be mobilized for the hub’s operations? • What is the hub’s communication strategy? • What tools will be used to share knowledge and information? III.1 PRIORITY TOPIC / KNOWLEDGE DOMAIN Please explain and describe in a few simple sentences the specific priority water sector topic / knowledge domain of the hub, and its strengths and comparative advantage to provide leadership in this area. Define the domain as clearly and distinctive as possible. If there are links to the topics led by other hubs, describe these. III.2 THE HUB’S CORE TEAM A successful hub is usually driven by a small core team of highly-committed experts that are given the responsibility and autonomy for its work, including management of the hub’s knowledge network. Who are these core people in your hub? III.3 STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF HUB AND NETWORK The hub and its knowledge network will need a strategic framework to guide it towards delivering results, and sustaining its services over time. A strategic framework includes clear and powerful statements of the vision, the mission, and objectives of the hub and its network. Vision The vision statement describes the desired outcome of the hub and network. Mission The mission statement describes what the hub and network will do to attain the vision. Goals Describe medium and long-term goals of what the hub and network will achieve. A maximum of about five to seven goals is a good rule of thumb and will give the hub and its network a focused profile. 7
  • Objectives Break the goals down into objectives, and activities to achieve these. Clearly formulated objectives will help to monitor the work of the hub and its network systematically. Developing a logical framework connecting activities, outputs, objectives/outcome, and impacts will help, together with a results-based monitoring system. III.4 PRESENT AND FUTURE STATUS Some of the candidate hubs already engage in knowledge networking. Their networks can be further developed with clear client and partner relationships. By describing the present status and reflecting on the mission, vision and goals, a picture of a future status of the hub and its may be developed more easily. Some relevant features to describe the present status are: • Partners, clients, stakeholders It is recommended that the core group starts with completing this figure by filling in actual, real names and organizations. Which stakeholders are/will become partners and clients of the hub’s knowledge network? Prepare a similar picture with potential future clients and partners. This is the desired future status of the hub. Clarify the role and relationships with partners and clients. • Developing the hub’s activities Once the core team of the hub has defined the vision and mission of the hub and its network, with a clear view on its objectives, clients and partners, the time has come to start its activities and to produce added value. The process aims to improve the access to, and the use of knowledge related to the key water topic (the knowledge domain). If the topic needs further definition, now is the time to do so, led by the core team. Otherwise the hub and its partners can proceed with developing solution-based products and services and disseminating them to their clients. It is important that the development of the hub and its network proceed in realistic steps, using available resources and achievable milestones. One set of activities can be related to the start-up phase and development of the hub’s network itself, and another set of activities will develop the products and services the hub and its network aim to deliver. Potential (start-up) activities may include: • Involving stakeholders and decision makers right from the beginning • Organizing a start-up workshop with key partners and clients (commonly shared vision, mission and goals) • Implementing a communications strategy to raise awareness • Defining some small concrete activities or projects, with clear responsibilities and deadlines for planned results. • Organization and governance of the hub’s network Each hub’s knowledge network of partners and clients can develop its own model of organisation and governance, but in general the following issues need to be addressed: • The governance structure should be clear, transparent and simple o What are the basic organisational elements of the network? (e.g. partners, clients, secretariat, chair) o Is a legal status needed, or can the hub serve as the legal entity? 8
  • • What are the network’s operating principles? Think of basic ethical values and principles of how the collaboration among the network members and work with other partners should be developed jointly • What operational guidelines are needed to support the working processes of the hub and its network? (See also III.9) • Resources The following resources could be considered in support of the functioning of a hub: • Human resources: The start-up and development of the hub and its network will need a dedicated core team of at least three to five people. The core team needs to be selected carefully, with mixed competencies in project management, administration, communication, promotion and resource mobilization, technical specialism on the key water topic (knowledge domain), and international experience. • Financial resources: the hub’s network will need core funding for its secretariat, network infrastructure such as websites or databases, and core services and activities such as regular meetings or workshops. In addition, funding will be required for specific projects or programmes initiated by the network and its members. • Contributions: to support a sustainable network, consider what funding can be raised from the hub itself, from in-kind contributions of the network members, from membership fees, and from income-generating activities and support from public contributors and private sponsors. • Products and services Creative reflection will be needed in considering the following points: • The hub’s clients are willing to pay for services or to support the network if its services fit into their strategy and meet their needs • Assess what products and services are needed in countries throughout the region • The network in itself may not be a powerful mechanism for “selling” services; it will depend on a smart combination of complementary aspects that the hub and its partners in the network are able to bring together. The benefits will have to flow back to the contributing partners as well. III.5 SUPPORT FROM OTHERS Apart from the commitment of the hub’s team and its core network partners, the effectiveness and sustainability of the network will also require the commitment of other stakeholders. Commitment by others to support the hub depends largely on simple, convincing messages that engage them to feel a part of the mission, vision and objectives of the hub and the network. This basic process involves proactive communication and discussion with senior staff from partners and client organisations. Their opinion will help to sharpen the focus of the hub and the start up of the network. III.6 SUSTAINABILITY OF THE HUB Cost recovery is a key aspect in developing the hub and its network. Basic elements to consider in a funding strategy can include • Membership fees • In-kind contributions • Funding from public or private sources • Revenue from products and services (consider tapping into budgets of ODA projects). 9
  • III.7 COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY It is important to develop a communications strategy to build and maintain trust and transparency in the hub’s network. The communications strategy should address the internal communication between hub and partners, and external communications with clients and stakeholders. III.8 TOOLS FOR SHARING KNOWLEDGE AND INFORMATION Although face-to-face communication remains important, the distance between network stakeholders (members, clients, partners) may in practice limit the possibilities. Fortunately there are many other options and tools to communicate and share knowledge and information in the hub and its network. • Electronic tools: o Telephone, o Email o Electronic newsletter o Email discussion groups o Online chats o Website o Collaborative work platform (an integrated web-based platform for network participants to share documents, discuss and share opinions, etc.) • Face-to-face or combined ways and tools o Print publications o Practical examples and stories o Communities of practice (face-to-face and electronic) o Workshops and conferences o Events o Field trips o Media (radio broadcasting, local television) Hubs and their networks should select an effective mix of communication tools that best serve their audience, objectives, infrastructure and resources. Another aspect that needs attention is the manner in which the hub and its network promotes the network and its key water topic. The network secretariat may implement a collaborative website and platform for document sharing (e.g. development plans, meeting minutes, presentations, articles, etc.) to which each network member has access. The web-based platform can also include links to other hubs and their topics, networks, and activities. III.9 OPERATIONS OF HUB AND NETWORK Knowledge networks can operate well with a minimum of formality, in contrast to organizations which feature a hierarchical structure. However, each network should consider developing its own guidelines that support the working processes in an appropriate manner. These guidelines may describe some of the following elements • Governance structure o Chair, network manager/coordinator, secretariat o Basic tasks and responsibilities of the organizational units o Rules for (s)election • Membership o Criteria for membership o Rights and obligations of members 10
  • o Membership contributions or fees o Division of work among members • Decision making rules and processes • Organisation of meetings • Reimbursements • Ownership of network products and services (Intellectual Property Rights) • Rules for conflict resolution. III.10 OUTLINE OF THE DEVELOPMENT/ BUSINESS PLAN The following table of contents for the Hub development plan is proposed: 1. Background/introduction 2. Focus of the Regional Water Knowledge Hub, including its knowledge domain (priority water sector topic) 3. Vision, Mission, and Objectives 4. Description of current and future situation • Clients and partner relationships • Network development • Products and services development • Capacity in research, training & education, consultancy • Regional products and services (e.g. comparative analysis) • Review procedures • Cost recovery strategy 5. Development plan and activities 2008-2011 Objectives for: • Hub network development and governance • Clients and partners • Products and services • Capacity in research, training & education, consultancy • Regional products and services • Review and Q&A procedures • Cost recovery strategy • Implementation expectations 6. Workplan 2008 • Specific objectives for 2008 • Hub Activities in 2008 • Expected results • Expected Impact • Collaboration with other Hubs • Cost recovery strategy The key operating principles for regional water knowledge hubs adopted in the regional consultation meeting in October 2007 in Singapore can serve as a useful checklist in preparing the plan, to ensure all important principles are covered. 11
  • APPENDIX I: SHORT DESCRIPTION OF THE ASIA-PACIFIC WATER FORUM 1. BACKGROUND The idea of establishing the Asia-Pacific Water Forum was born during the regional process leading up to the 4th World Water Forum. The region's water ministers sought to establish an effective mechanism to encourage more collaborative efforts on water resources management and to accelerate the process of effective integration of water resources management into the socio-economic development process of the Asian and Pacific region. Improvements in the region can be further enhanced by harnessing the knowledge and experience of stakeholders and creating a cooperative platform through which this growing knowledge base can be disseminated. On March 21, 2006, during the 4th World Water Forum, Mexico City, Water Ministers of the Asia-Pacific Region issued a Joint Declaration. This initiative for establishing an APWF was supported by several agencies in the region, including ADB, UNESCAP, GWP, KWF, SOPAC, JBIC, MRC, FAO, UNDP, UNEP, UNESCO, UNICEF, UNISDR and IUCN. The APWF was officially launched on 27 September 2006 at headquarters of the Asian Development Bank, in the presence of former Prime Minister of Japan Yoshihiro Mori, who succeeded Mr. Hashimoto as the President of Japan Water Forum. 2. GOAL AND OBJECTIVES The APWF is an independent, not-for-profit, non-partisan, non-political network. APWF will be inclusive, open and flexible, with an appropriate governance superstructure and an optimal delegation of responsibility to the contributing member organizations for the delivery of agreed products and services of high quality and practical value. The goal of the APWF is to contribute to sustainable water management in order to achieve the targets of the MDGs in Asia and the Pacific by capitalizing on the region's diversity and rich history of experience in dealing with water as a fundamental part of the human existence. Specifically, the APWF shall champion efforts aimed at boosting investments, building capacity, and enhancing cooperation in the water sector at the regional level and beyond. The Asia-Pacific Water Forum is to work in complete solidarity to identify and adopt solutions to water issues in the region. To achieve this goal, APWF will provide countries and organizations in the Asia-Pacific region with a common platform and voice in articulating the region’s strategies and promoting its achievements in solving water problems, including meeting the necessary investment requirements. For this purpose, APWF will comprise a well-coordinated network of member organizations that are able and willing to voluntarily commit their resources in order to deliver high quality products and services that meet the priority needs of policy and decision-makers and practitioners in the water sector. APWF will add value to the ongoing work of organizations and initiatives in the water sector in terms of investment, optimizing i
  • implementation arrangements, achieving economies of scale, and developing unified approaches to water policies and programs. 3. APPROACH A number of key institutions from the region have committed themselves to supporting the APWF as “lead organizations” responsible for identifying strategies and initiating actions to achieve progress under each of the Priority Themes (PTs) and Key Result Areas (KRAs). The approach of the APWF's network organization will be to add value to the ongoing work of organizations and initiatives in the water sector in terms of investment, optimizing implementation arrangements, achieving economies of scale, and developing unified approaches to water policies and programs. The Regional Document prepared for the 4th World Water Forum identified three Priority Themes common across the Asia-Pacific region. Adopting strategies and initiating actions needed to address these themes will be the main focus of APWF activities leading up to the 1st Asia-Pacific Water Summit. The actions required to make progress under each of the Priority Themes have been divided into five categories, or "Key Result Areas" (KRAs). APWF will provide top-quality and user- friendly network coordination services, including a first-class interactive website, to showcase activities and results in each of the KRAs and to facilitate the necessary linkages among the KRAs as they relate to the Priority Themes. ii
  • 4. GOVERNANCE The governance structure for APWF will be based on a highly participatory bottom-up approach, supported by a light managerial and administrative structure responsible for coordinating APWF activities. All decisions of the APWF and the Governing Council shall be made by consensus. To the extent possible, all groups or committees established by the APWF shall be inclusive and open to any interested members who may wish to participate. President The strategic direction of the APWF will be guided by the President of the APWF, Mr. Yoshiro Mori, President of the Japan Water Forum. Governing Council The Governing Council is to be kept small. It currently consists of the Chair, Mr. Tommy Koh, Ambassador- At-Large of Singapore, and the two Vice-Chairs, Ms. Erna Witoelar, the UN Special Ambassador for Millennium Development Goals in Asia and the Pacific, and Mr. Ravi Narayanan, the former Chief Executive of WaterAid. They have the power to make decisions, which are made by consensus. The meetings of the Governing Council are to be open and inclusive. Therefore, the leaders of the three Priority Themes; the leaders of the five KRAs; the five sub-regional coordinators may attend the meetings. Any other interested members may also attend these meetings as observers. Secretariat The Japan Water Forum (JWF) will take on the responsibility of hosting and staffing the Secretariat of the APWF, whose role will be to execute the APWF's work plan, to manage the central database and website, to coordinate network services, and to convene the meetings of the Governing Council. Sub-regional Coordinators The Sub-regional Coordinators are the organizations in the five sub-regions that represented the Asia-Pacific during the preparatory process leading up to the 4th World Water forum and who prepared the Regional Document that lead to the Ministerial Declaration and, ultimately, to the creation of the APWF. The Coordinators will be called upon for assistance in linking the various activities undertaken in the context of the five KRA's and the three Priority Themes with stakeholders in their Sub-region, from the ground level through that of government leaders. 5. LEAD ORGANISATIONS There are two types of Lead Organizations involved in the APWF: those leading activities under the five KRAs; and those guiding progress under the three Priority Themes. Like the Sub-regional coordinators, both types of Lead Organizations shall operate on a voluntary basis and must be willing and able to commit the resources necessary to cover their active participation. They must also be part of a wide network of local practitioners, with access to decision-makers, and are thus able to build linkages between the grass roots and governmental levels. Member Organizations The APWF membership will be open to various groups in order to cover a broad and diverse constituency willing to work together to achieve water for all. There are five categories in the iii
  • APWF membership: 1) national, regional, and provincial agencies which are in charge of water provision / policy development/ management, 2) institutions and universities which contribute knowledge to address water issues, 3) CSOs and communities which are responsible for water provision/advocacy, 4) private companies/ corporations which contribute to water, including through corporate social responsibility activities, and 5) media institutions which support the objectives of the APWF. 6. ASIA PACIFIC WATER SUMMIT The APWF will organize Asia-Pacific Water Summits (APWS) to be held once every 2-3 years. The first Summit has been held in Beppu, Japan on 3-4 December 2007 and subsequent Summits are to be organized in other countries of the Asia Pacific region through an open process. The Summits will bring together leaders of the region and showcase leadership in decision- making, excellence in practice and innovation, and concrete results that have had substantial impacts at the policy down through the grassroots levels. Each APWS will target top-level policy and decision-makers beyond the water sector, such as heads of governments and ministers of finance and planning, as well as leaders from the private sector, local governments, civil society and media in the region. The primary objective of the Summits is to create the opportunity for the political leaders of the region to recognize the significance of the water issues for achieving MDGs. The dialogue with other water stakeholders at the Summits will facilitate this recognition, which is expected to be translated into concrete actions in each country by pushing the issue towards the top of their political agendas. The First Summit The first summit in Japan focused on APWF’s three priority themes: water financing and capacity development, water-related disaster management, and water for development and ecosystems. APWF Milestones Mar. 2006 Announcement of the Asia-Pacific Water Forum at the 4th World Water Forum in Mexico City Sep. 2006 Official Launching Ceremony of the Asia-Pacific Water Forum at the ADB headquarters (Manila) Feb. 2007 1st Governing Council meeting of the Asia-Pacific Water Forum (Singapore) July 2007 2nd Governing Council meeting of the Asia-Pacific Water Forum (Singapore) Oct. 2007 Regional consultation meeting for candidate regional water knowledge hubs hosted by PUB Singapore (Singapore) Dec. 2007 1st Asia-Pacific Water Summit (Beppu, Oita, Japan) iv
  • APPENDIX II: CANDIDATE REGIONAL WATER KNOWLEDGE HUBS The following organizations have volunteered to become a regional water knowledge hub in a specific water-related knowledge domain and have indicated their interest to join the APWF Network of Regional Water Knowledge Hubs: (Organizations are listed in alphabetical order, with their current or proposed role) 1. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Canberra Facilitator for identifying a candidate regional water knowledge hub in Australia 2. International Centre for Water Hazard and Risk Management (ICHARM), Tsukuba Candidate regional water knowledge hub for disaster risk reduction and flood management, and leader of Asia Pacific Water Forum’s Priority Theme 2 on Water- related Disaster Management 3. International Research and Training Centre on Erosion and Sedimentation (IRTCES), Beijing Candidate regional water knowledge hub for erosion and sedimentation in river basins 4. International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Colombo Candidate regional water knowledge hub for irrigation service reform 5. Japan Water Agency (JWA), Tokyo Secretariat of the Network of Asian River Basin Organizations, and partner of the candidate regional water knowledge hub for river basin organizations and management 6. National Hydraulic Research Institute, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MONRE), Kuala Lumpur Candidate regional water knowledge hub for climate change 7. Ministry of Public Works (MPW), Jakarta Candidate regional water knowledge hub for river basin organizations and management 8. K-Water, Daejon Candidate regional water knowledge hub for water quality management in river basins 9. PUB Singapore Candidate regional water knowledge hub for urban water management, and co-leader of Asia Pacific Water Forum’s Key Result Area 1 on Developing Knowledge and Lessons 10. Scientific Information Center of the Interstate Commission for Water Coordination (SIC-ICWC), Tashkent Candidate regional water knowledge hub for water resources management in central Asia 11. Pacific Islands Applied Geo-science Commission (SOPAC), Suva Candidate regional water knowledge hub for water services and resource management in the Pacific 12. Yellow River Conservancy Commission (YRCC), Zhengzhou Candidate regional water knowledge hub for decision support systems for river basin management (Hydroinformatics) v
  • Other regional water knowledge hubs could be established on other priority topics including, but not limited to: (i) Water governance (ii) Sanitation; (iii) Water supply for rural areas and small towns; (iv) Groundwater management; (v) Environment, ecosystems and healthy rivers; and (vi) Water and energy (vii) Transboundary water resources management. vi