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  • 1. ® CoreBuilder 5000 ™ Network Router Module Installation Guide for Token Ring http://www.3com.com/ Document Number 17-00670-3 Published May 1997
  • 2. 3Com Corporation Copyright © 3Com Corporation, 1997. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be 5400 Bayfront Plaza reproduced in any form or by any means, or used to make any derivative work (such as translation, transformation, or adaptation) without permission from 3Com Corporation. Portions of this document are Santa Clara, California reproduced in whole or part with permission from third parties. 95052-8145 3Com Corporation reserves the right to revise this documentation and to make changes in content from time to time without obligation on the part of 3Com Corporation to provide notification of such revision or change. 3Com Corporation provides this documentation without warranty of any kind, either implied or expressed, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. 3Com may make improvements or changes in the products or programs described in this documentation at any time. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LEGENDS: If you are a United States government agency, then this documentation and the software described herein are provided to you subject to the following restricted rights: For units of the Department of Defense: Restricted Rights Legend: Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) for Restricted Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software Clause at 48 C.F.R. 52.227-7013. For civilian agencies: Restricted Rights Legend: Use, reproduction, or disclosure is subject to restrictions set forth in subparagraph (a) through (d) of the Commercial Computer Software – Restricted Rights Clause at 48 C.F.R. 52.227-19 and the limitations set forth in the 3Com Corporation standard commercial agreement for the software. Unpublished rights reserved under the copyright laws of the United States. If there is any software on removable media described in this documentation, it is furnished under a license agreement included with the product as a separate document, in the hardcopy documentation, or on the removable media in a directory file named LICENSE.TXT. If you are unable to locate a copy, please contact 3Com and a copy will be sent to you. Federal Communications Commission Notice This equipment was tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case you must correct the interference at your own expense. Canadian Emissions Requirements This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations. Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du Canada. EMC Directive Compliance This equipment was tested and conforms to the Council Directive 89/336/EEC for electromagnetic compatibility. Conformity with this directive is based upon compliance with the following harmonized standards: EN 55022 – Limits and Methods of Measurement of Radio Interference EN 50082-1 – Electromagnetic Compatibility Generic Immunity Standard: Residential, Commercial, and Light Industry Warning: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause radio interference, in which case you may be required to take adequate measures. Compliance with this directive depends on the use of shielded cables. Low Voltage Directive Compliance This equipment was tested and conforms to the Council Directive 72/23/EEC for safety of electrical equipment. Conformity with this directive is based upon compliance with the following harmonized standard: EN 60950 – Safety of Information Technology Equipment ii
  • 3. VCCI Class 1 Compliance This equipment is in the 1st Class category (information equipment to be used in commercial or industrial areas) and conforms to the standards set by the Voluntary Control Council for Interference by Information Technology Equipment aimed at preventing radio interference in commercial or industrial areas. Consequently, when the equipment is used in a residential area or in an adjacent area, radio interference may be caused to radio and TV receivers, and so on. Read the instructions for correct handling. Fiber Cable Classification Notice Use this equipment only with fiber cable classified by Underwriters Laboratories as to fire and smoke characteristics in accordance with Section 770-2(b) and Section 725-2(b) of the National Electrical Code. UK General Approval Statement The CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub and ONline System Concentrator are manufactured to the International Safety Standard EN 60950 and are approved in the U.K. under the General Approval Number NS/G/12345/J/100003 for indirect connection to the public telecommunication network. Trademarks Unless otherwise indicated, 3Com registered trademarks are registered in the United States and may or may not be registered in other countries. 3Com, Boundary Routing, CardFacts, EtherLink, LANplex, LANsentry, LinkBuilder, NETBuilder, NETBuilder II, NetFacts, Parallel Tasking, SmartAgent, TokenDisk, TokenLink, Transcend, TriChannel, and ViewBuilder are registered trademarks of 3Com Corporation. 3TECH, CELLplex, CoreBuilder, EtherDisk, EtherLink II, FDDILink, MultiProbe, NetProbe, and ONline are trademarks of 3Com Corporation. 3ComFacts is a service mark of 3Com Corporation. The 3Com Multichannel Architecture Communications System is registered under U.S. Patent Number 5,301,303. AT&T is a registered trademark of American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Banyan and VINES are registered trademarks of Banyan Systems Inc. CompuServe is a registered trademark of CompuServe, Inc. DEC, DECnet, DELNI, POLYCENTER, VAX, VT100, VT220, and the Digital logo are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. Hayes is a registered trademark of Hayes Microcomputer Products. OpenView is a registered trademark of Hewlett-Packard Company. Intel is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation. AIX, IBM, and NetView are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation. Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, Windows 95, and Windows NT are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. V30 is a trademark of NEC Corporation. NetWare and Novell are registered trademarks of Novell, Incorporated. IPX is a trademark of Novell, Incorporated. OSF and OSF/Motif are registered trademarks of Open Software Foundation, Inc. ONC, OpenWindows, Solaris, Solstice, Sun, Sun Microsystems, SunNet Manager, and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. iii
  • 4. SPARCstation is a trademark licensed exclusively to Sun Microsystems Inc. OPEN LOOK is a registered trademark of Unix System Laboratories, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of X/Open Company, Ltd. in the United States and other countries. Other brand and product names may be registered trademarks or trademarks of their respective holders. iv
  • 5. CONTENTS ABOUT THIS GUIDE Introduction 1 Audience 1 How to Use This Guide 2 Conventions 2 Related Documents 4 3Com Documents 4 Reference Documents 4 1 INTRODUCTION Router Module Overview 1-1 Router Functions 1-1 Module Architecture 1-2 Router Models 1-3 Typical Applications 1-4 Router Module Features 1-6 FDDI Support 1-6 WAN Support 1-6 Protocol Translation 1-7 Scalable Protocol Support 1-7 WAN Optimization 1-9 ATM Migration 1-9 Management Support 1-9 Distributed, Scalable Reliability 1-10 Hot Swap Capability 1-10
  • 6. 2 INSTALLING THE MODULE Precautionary Procedures 2-1 Quick Installation 2-2 Unpacking Procedures 2-2 Preparing to Install the Router Module 2-4 Restoring Base Board Positions 2-4 Verifying CPU Board Positions 2-5 Installing the Router Module 2-5 Making NIM Connections 2-7 Making FDDI NIM Connections 2-7 Connecting the Multi-Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM 2-7 Connecting the Multi-Mode, Single Attachment Station NIM 2-8 Connecting the Multi-Mode Optical Bypass Switch 2-9 Connecting the Single Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM 2-10 Making Quad Serial NIM Connections 2-11 Making ATM NIM Connections 2-12 ATM Connector Types 2-12 ATM Distance Limitations 2-12 3 CONFIGURING THE MODULE Configuration Overview 3-1 Attaching a Management Terminal 3-2 Connecting to the Console Port 3-2 Connecting to the Auxiliary Port 3-3 Configuring the Cisco NIM Connections 3-3 Configuring Cisco Parameters 3-3 Setting General Interface Parameters 3-4 Setting Token Ring Speed 3-4 Configuring 3Com Parameters 3-5 4 MONITORING OPERATION Monitoring Router Module LEDs 4-1 Common Front Panel LEDs 4-2 FDDI NIM LEDs 4-6 Quad Serial NIM LEDs 4-7 ATM NIM LEDs 4-9 vi
  • 7. Displaying the Router Module Configuration 4-10 Using the SHOW MODULE Command 4-11 Using the SHOW MODULE VERBOSE Command 4-11 Using the SHOW PORT Command 4-11 Using the SHOW PORT VERBOSE Command 4-12 Interpreting the SHOW PORT Status Field 4-13 5 TROUBLESHOOTING Troubleshooting Startup Problems 5-1 Troubleshooting Network Connection Problems 5-2 Troubleshooting WAN Connection Problems 5-2 Correcting Operating Malfunctions 5-3 Recovering a Lost Password 5-4 A PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS General Specifications A-2 Electrical Specifications A-3 Environmental Specifications A-3 Mechanical Specifications A-3 B CABLING SPECIFICATIONS Console and Auxiliary Port Cables B-1 Console Port Pinouts B-2 Auxiliary Port Pinouts B-2 Quad Serial NIM Cables B-3 EIA-530 DTE Synchronous Serial Cable Pinouts B-4 EIA-232 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Assembly and Pinouts (DB-25) B-5 EIA-449 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Assembly and Pinouts (DB-37) B-8 V.35 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Assembly and Pinouts B-10 X.21 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Pinouts (DB-15) B-13 vii
  • 8. C VIRTUAL CONFIGURATION REGISTER VCR Tasks C-1 VCR Bit Definitions C-2 Boot Field C-2 Setting Boot Field Values C-3 Default Boot Filenames C-3 Break Function C-4 Internet Protocol Broadcast Address C-5 Engine Management Terminal Baud Rate C-5 Bootload Failure Response C-5 NVRAM Disable C-6 Changing VCR Settings C-6 Enabling Booting From Flash Memory C-7 D FDDI PRECAUTIONS FDDI Laser Safety Information D-1 Processing D-2 E TECHNICAL SUPPORT Online Technical Services E-1 World Wide Web Site E-2 3Com Bulletin Board Service E-2 Access by Analog Modem E-2 Access by Digital Modem E-2 3ComFacts Automated Fax Service E-3 3ComForum on CompuServe Online Service E-3 Support From Your Network Supplier E-4 Support From 3Com Corporation E-5 Returning Products for Repair E-6 Accessing the 3Com MIB E-6 Contacting 3Com Technical Publications E-7 INDEX 3COM CORPORATION LIMITED WARRANTY viii
  • 9. FIGURES 1-1 CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module 1-2 1-2 Quad Serial Network Router Module Typical Application 1-4 1-3 ATM OC3 Network Router Module Typical Application 1-4 1-4 Dual Attachment FDDI Network Router Module Typical Application 1-5 2-1 Locating the Spacing Clips 2-3 2-2 Base Board DIP Switch and Jumper Plug Positions 2-4 2-3 CPU Board Jumper Plug Positions 2-5 2-4 CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module in a CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub 2-6 2-5 Multi-Mode FDDI Network Interface Connector, MIC Type 2-7 2-6 Making Connections to the FDDI MM, DAS NIM 2-8 2-7 Making Connections to the FDDI MM, SAS NIM 2-8 2-8 Connecting the Multi-Mode Optical Bypass Switch 2-9 2-9 Making Connections to the FDDI SM, DAS NIM 2-10 2-10 Making Connections to the Quad Serial NIM 2-11 2-11 Making Connections to the ATM NIMs 2-12 4-1 Common Front Panel LEDs 4-2 4-2 FDDI NIM LEDs 4-6 4-3 Quad Serial NIM LEDs 4-7 4-4 ATM NIM LEDs 4-9 4-5 SHOW MODULE Command Information 4-11 4-6 SHOW MODULE VERBOSE Command Information 4-11 4-7 SHOW PORT Command Information 4-12 4-8 SHOW PORT VERBOSE Command Information 4-12 B-1 EIA-530 Cable Assembly B-4 B-2 EIA-232 Serial Cable Assembly B-5 B-3 EIA-449 Serial Cable Assembly B-8 B-4 V.35 Serial Cable Assembly B-10 B-5 X.21 Cable Assembly B-13 D-1 Required Class 1 Laser Product Label D-2 ix
  • 10. TABLES 1 How to Use This Guide 2 2 Graphic Conventions 2 3 Text Conventions 3 1-1 Software Feature Sets 1-8 2-1 Quick Installation Steps 2-2 2-2 ATM Distance Limitations 2-13 4-1 Front Panel LED Definitions 4-3 4-2 Quad Serial NIM LED Definitions 4-8 4-3 ATM NIM LED Definitions 4-10 4-4 SHOW PORT Status Field Definitions 4-13 5-1 Troubleshooting Malfunctions 5-3 A-1 General Router Module Specifications A-2 A-2 Electrical Router Module Specifications A-3 A-3 Environmental Router Module Specifications A-3 A-4 Mechanical Router Module Specifications A-3 B-1 Console Port Pinout Specification B-2 B-2 Auxiliary Port Pinout Specification B-2 B-3 EIA-530 Cable Pinout Specifications B-4 B-4 EIA-232 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-25) B-6 B-5 EIA-232 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-25) B-7 B-6 EIA-449 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-37) B-8 B-7 EIA-449 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-37) B-9 B-8 V.35 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to Winchester-Type 34-Pin) B-11 B-9 V.35 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to Winchester-Type 34-Pin) B-12 B-10 X.21 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-15) B-13 B-11 X.21 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-15) B-14 C-1 Virtual Configuration Register Bit Values C-2 C-2 Boot Field Values (Configuration Register Bits 00 to 03) C-2 C-3 Default Boot Filenames C-4 C-4 Broadcast Address Destination Settings C-5 C-5 Engine Management Terminal Baud Rate Settings C-5 xi
  • 11. ABOUT THIS GUIDE Introduction This guide describes how to install, configure, and monitor the 3Com CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Module. If the information in the release notes shipped with your product differs from the information in this guide, follow the release note instructions. Audience This guide is intended for the following people at your site: s Network manager or administrator s Trained hardware installer or service personnel
  • 12. 2 ABOUT THIS GUIDE How to Use This Table 1 shows the location of specific information. Guide Table 1 How to Use This Guide If you are looking for: Turn to: General information about the router module Chapter 1 Description of the router module architecture Typical applications of the router module Features of the router module Procedures for unpacking and preparing to install the router Chapter 2 module Procedures for installing the router module Procedures for making NIM connections An overview of the router module configuration process Chapter 3 Procedures for attaching a management terminal Procedures for configuring the Cisco NIM connections Procedures for configuring Cisco parameters Procedures for configuring 3Com parameters Information for monitoring router module LEDs Chapter 4 Procedures for displaying the router module configuration Information on troubleshooting the router module Chapter 5 Procedures for recovering a lost password Module specifications, cable requirements, and other reference Appendices A-E information Conventions Table 2 and Table 3 list conventions used throughout this guide. Table 2 Graphic Conventions Icon Type Description Information Information notes call attention to important features Note or instructions. Caution Cautions alert you to personal safety risk, system damage, or loss of data. Warning Warnings alert you to the risk of severe personal injury.
  • 13. Conventions 3 Table 3 Text Conventions Convention Description Enter vs. Type When the word enter is used in this guide, it means type something, then press the Return or Enter key. Do not press the Return or Enter key when instructed to type. Syntax vs. Command Syntax indicates that the general form of a command syntax is provided. You must evaluate the syntax and supply the appropriate port, path, value, address, or string. For example: Enable RIPIP by using the following syntax: SETDefault !<port> -RIPIP CONTrol = Listen In this example, you must supply a port number for !<port>. Command indicates that all variables in the command have been supplied and you can enter the command as shown in text. For example: Remove the IP address by entering the following command: SETDefault !0 -IP NETaddr = 0.0.0.0 For consistency and clarity, the full-form syntax (upper- and lowercase letters) is provided. However, you can enter the abbreviated form of a command by typing only the uppercase portion and supplying the appropriate port, path, address, value, and so on. You can enter the command in either upper- or lowercase letters at the prompt. Text represented as This typeface is used to represent displays that screen display appear on your terminal screen. For example: NetLogin: Text represented as This typeface is used to represent commands that commands you enter. For example: SETDefault !0 -IP NETaddr = 0.0.0.0 Keys Specific keys are referred to in the text as Return key or Escape key, or they may be shown as [Return] or [Esc]. If two or more keys are to be pressed simultaneously, the keys are linked with a plus sign (+). For example: Press [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Del]. Italics Italics are used to denote new terms or emphasis.
  • 14. 4 ABOUT THIS GUIDE Related Documents This section provides information on supporting documentation, including: s 3Com Documents s Reference Documents 3Com Documents The following documents provide additional information on 3Com products: CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub Installation and Operation Guide – Provides information on the installation, operation, and configuration of the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub. This guide also describes the principal features of the CoreBuilder 5000 Fault-Tolerant Controller Module. CoreBuilder 5000 Distributed Management Module User Guide – Provides information on the CoreBuilder 5000 Distributed Management Module’s operation, installation, and configuration. This guide also describes the software commands associated with the Distributed Management Module. CoreBuilder 5000 Distributed Management Module Commands Guide – Describes each management command by providing details on command format and use. For a complete list of 3Com documents, contact your 3Com representative. Reference Documents The following documents supply related background information: Case, J., Fedor, M., Scoffstall, M., and J. Davin, The Simple Network Management Protocol, RFC 1157, University of Tennessee at Knoxville, Performance Systems International and the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science, May 1990. Rose, M., and K. McCloghrie, Structure and Identification of Management Information for TCP/IP-based Internets, RFC 1155, Performance Systems International and Hughes LAN Systems, May 1990.
  • 15. INTRODUCTION 1 This chapter contains the following topics: s Router Module Overview s Router Module Features Router Module The 3Com CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Module is a Overview multiprotocol backplane router that operates in a 3Com® CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System. This section describes the following topics: s Router Functions s Module Architecture s Router Models s Typical Applications Router Functions The CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module (referred to in this guide as the router module) is designed to: s Provide the physical network interface to connect local- and wide-area networks in multiprotocol environments s Run standard Cisco Systems® Internetworking Operating System® (IOS) router software s Provide high-performance, fault-tolerant connectivity to backbone networks for Token Ring local area networks (LANs) within the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System s Deliver standards-based translation bridging and multiprotocol routing capability
  • 16. 1-2 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION s Internetwork Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), Fiber Data Distributed Interface (FDDI), or wide area network (WAN) connections with four Token Ring backplane networks s Support the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System backplane for connectivity to 4 of 10 CoreBuilder 5000 Token Ring backplane networks s Act as the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) agent for in-band or out-of-band management by any SNMP-compliant network management application or the 3Com Transcend® Enterprise Manager Module Architecture The router module (Figure 1-1) occupies three slots in the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System. Base board (integrated NIMs 2 and 3) Network Interface Module (optional NIM 1) Faceplate CPU board Figure 1-1 CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module
  • 17. Router Module Overview 1-3 The base router module consists of a CoreBuilder 5000 14-inch base board with an attached CPU board. Both the base board and the CPU board plug directly into the CoreBuilder 5000 backplane. The base router module provides four Token Ring backplane connections (complex port connections), any one of which you can connect to any one of 10 CoreBuilder 5000 backplane networks. The Token Ring ports are equivalent to Cisco Systems IOS interface connections. You can connect only one Token Ring backplane connection to any one CoreBuilder 5000 backplane network. You can mount any one of multiple standard Cisco Systems Network Interface Module (NIM) types on the base board to provide additional routing connections (Cisco Systems NPM connections) for various protocol types (see Figure 1-1). Each NIM type requires a unique 3Com faceplate. Router Models The router module is available in the following configurations: Base – Includes 4 Token Ring backplane connections. FDDI MM, DAS – Multi-mode, dual attachment station/4 Token Ring backplane connections. FDDI MM, SAS – Multi-mode, single attachment station/4 Token Ring backplane connections. FDDI SM, DAS – Single mode, dual attachment station/4 Token Ring backplane connections. Quad Serial – 4 synchronous serial/4 Token Ring backplane connections. ATM OC3, MM – Multi-mode fiber optic cable (OC3)/4 Token Ring backplane connections ATM OC3, SM – Single mode fiber, optic cable (OC3)/4 Token Ring backplane connections
  • 18. 1-4 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Typical Applications Figure 1-2, Figure 1-3, and Figure 1-4 show typical applications of the Quad Serial, ATM OC3, and FDDI router modules. Local site A Remote site B 3Com Edge Router Module Dedicated or dial-up synchronous serial connections 4th floor Remote site C 3Com Edge Router Module 3rd floor CoreBuilder 5000 Remote site D Network Router Module 2nd floor 3Com Edge Router Module 1st floor Remote site E 3Com Edge Router Module Figure 1-2 Quad Serial Network Router Module Typical Application Local site A 4th floor Ethernet ATM OC-3 MM CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module 3rd floor CoreBuilder 5000 ATM OC-3 MM ATM Service Network Router Module 2nd floor Token Ring CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module 1st floor Figure 1-3 ATM OC3 Network Router Module Typical Application
  • 19. Router Module Overview 1-5 Building B To other sites CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module Building A 4th floor FDDI campus backbone 3rd floor dual-attachment, multi-mode or single mode CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module 2nd floor Building C 1st floor To other sites CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module Figure 1-4 Dual Attachment FDDI Network Router Module Typical Application
  • 20. 1-6 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Router Module This section describes the following features of the router module: Features s FDDI Support s WAN Support s Protocol Translation s Scalable Protocol Support s WAN Optimization s ATM Migration s Management Support s Distributed, Scalable Reliability s Hot Swap Capability FDDI Support The router module provides support for three FDDI configurations on the following two FDDI interfaces: Multi-Mode Fiber – Can support distances of up to 2 km for both Class A Dual Attachment Stations (DAS) and Class B Single Attachment Stations (SAS). Single Mode Fiber – Can support distances of up to 10 km for Class A Dual Attachment Stations (DAS). The FDDI interfaces also include a connector for attachment to an external optical bypass unit. If the router module stops operating, the optical bypass unit ensures that the FDDI signal bypasses that router. The FDDI ring and other stations remain operational. WAN Support The router module configured with a Quad Serial NIM provides four synchronous serial ports to support backbone or redundant network connections over the wide area network (WAN). The serial ports support the following connection protocols: s V.35 s EIA-232 s EIA-449 s RS-422 s X.21
  • 21. Router Module Features 1-7 Each serial port is capable of providing T1/E1 rate connectivity. Each port operates in full duplex mode at speeds from 1,200 bits per second (bps) to 2,048 Megabits per second (Mbps). You can configure the synchronous serial ports to support IBM ® Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) traffic using synchronous pass through or Data Link Switching (DLSw). Protocol Translation The router module protocol translation function allows you to extend the life of your existing network devices. The router module allows networks operating in dissimilar protocol environments to communicate while managing up to 180 simultaneous sessions. The router module supports the following bidirectional translations: s X.25 to TCP s X.25 to Local Area Transport (LAT) s X.25 to XRemote devices s LAT to TCP s LAT to TN3270 devices Scalable Protocol Each router module type allows you to select a specific level of protocol Support support to best match the needs of your application. Four Cisco IOS router software feature sets offer an increasing level of protocol support: IP/IPX – The base feature set is used in applications requiring only IP/IPX protocols. Desktop – Provides additional LAN support for use in applications with limited LAN protocol requirements. Desktop plus IBM – Adds IBM support. Enterprise – Adds top-level protocol support, including SNA (Synchronous Network Architecture) integration.
  • 22. 1-8 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Table 1-1 details the specific protocol support offered in each feature set. Table 1-1 Software Feature Sets Feature Features Included in Each Feature Set Category IP/IPX Desktop Desktop plus IBM Enterprise LAN Support IP, Bridging, IP, Bridging, IP, Bridging, LAN IP, Bridging, LAN LAN LAN Extension, Extension, Host Extension, Host Extension, Host Software, Software, Novell IPX, Software, Novell IPX, Host Novell IPX, DECnet IV, DECnet IV, AppleTalk Software, DECnet™ IV, AppleTalk Phase 1 Phase 1 and 2, DECnet Novell® IPX™ Appletalk® and 2 V, XNS, Banyan® Phase 1 and 2 VINES®, OSI, Apollo® Domain IBM Support SRB/RSRB, SRT, SRB/RSRB, SRT, DLSW+, SNA & DLSW+, SNA & NETBIOS™ WAN NETBIOS WAN optimization (with optimization (with local local acknowledgment, acknowledgment, caching, and filtering), caching, and SDLC integration, filtering), SDLC SDLC-to-LAN integration, conversion, SDLC SDLC-to-LAN Transport (STUN), conversion, SDLC Frame Relay SNA Transport (STUN), Support Frame Relay SNA (RFC 1490)TG/COS, Support (RFC 1490) QLLC, DSPU Concentration Protocol X.25-to-TCP, Translation X.25-to-LAT, and X.25-to-XRemote; LAT-to-TCP and LAT-to-TN3279 (bidirectional) IP Routing RIP, OSPF, RIP, OSPF, PIM, RIP, OSPF, PIM, RIP, OSPF, PIM, NHRP, PIM, NHRP NHRP, BGP, NHRP, BGP, EGP, BGP, EGP, IGRP, EGP, IGRP™ IGRP, Enhanced IGRP Enhanced IGRP, ES-IS, IS-IS WAN Services HDLC, PPP, X.25, Frame Relay, ISDN, SMDS, IPXWAN 2.0, ATM WAN Header and link compression, X.25 packet payload compression, Optimization dial-on-demand, dial backup, bandwidth-on-demand, custom and priority queuing, access lists, access security, snapshot routing Network Autoinstall, SNMP, TELNET Management
  • 23. Router Module Features 1-9 WAN Optimization The router module provides the following features to help limit network operating costs by optimizing WAN network connections: Dial-On-Demand Routing – A more economical alternative to a second leased line as backup, a dial-on-demand backup dials up a second line automatically if the primary WAN link fails. Data Compression – The router module provides four types of data compression for different network environments: s Link compression s X.25 packet payload compression s TCP/IP header compression s DEC™ LAT compression ATM Migration The router module can be upgraded to support your migration to an ATM backbone (see Figure 1-3). Add an ATM network backbone by replacing your original router module NIM, with one of two ATM NIM types: s OC-3, MM (Optical Carrier Type 3, Multi-Mode) s OC-3, SM (Optical Carrier Type 3, Single Mode) Each ATM NIM type provides 155 Mbps backbone bandwidth. Management The router module is shipped with a comprehensive Management Support Information Base (MIB) for using Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), the industry standard for network management. You can monitor and control the router module from any SNMP-based management station, including the 3Com Transcend Enterprise Manager. In addition, the router module is fully compatible with CiscoWorks ® network management software from Cisco Systems. TELNET capability provides for direct access in-band to the agent, and a console port on the module provides for out-of-band management capability.
  • 24. 1-10 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Distributed, Scalable The router module operates in the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Reliability which is structured to eliminate any single point of failure. The CoreBuilder 5000 hub provides redundancy for power supplies, switched ports, controller modules, and the hub management module. Automatic switching to the redundant components ensures continuation of the specific function. 3Com fault-tolerant features are fully-scalable, allowing you to implement and alter the degree of fault-tolerance you need as your network grows. Hot Swap Capability The router module features “hot swap” capability. You can swap the router module in or out of (install or remove from) a powered-on CoreBuilder 5000 hub.
  • 25. INSTALLING THE MODULE 2 This chapter contains the following sections: s Precautionary Procedures s Quick Installation s Unpacking Procedures s Preparing to Install the Router Module s Installing the Router Module s Making NIM Connections Precautionary CAUTION: Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage static-sensitive Procedures devices on circuit boards. Follow these precautions when you unpack or handle the router module: s Do not remove the board from its antistatic shielding bag until you are ready to inspect or install it. s Handle the board by the faceplate only. Use proper grounding techniques when you install the module, including: s Using a footstrap and grounded static mat or wearing a grounded static discharge wrist strap. s Touching the rack or other ground source just before you handle the module.
  • 26. 2-2 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE Quick Installation Table 2-1 outlines the steps for quick installation of the CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Module. If you are familiar with installing CoreBuilder 5000 modules, use this table as a checklist. Otherwise, refer to the remainder of this chapter and to Chapters 3 and 4 to complete the installation. . Table 2-1 Quick Installation Steps Step Procedure Section Title/Page Number 1 Unpack the module. Unpacking Procedures on page 2-2 2 Prepare to install the module by verifying Preparing to Install the Router DIP switch and jumper plug positions. Module on page 2-4 3 Install the module into three contiguous Installing the Router Module slots in the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated on page 2-5 System Hub. 4 Connect the NIM cables. Making NIM Connections on page 2-7 5 Attach a terminal to the console or auxiliary Attaching a Management ports. Terminal on page 3-2 6 Configure the NIM connections using Cisco Configuring the Cisco NIM IOS router configuration commands. Connections on page 3-3 7 Configure the Cisco router interfaces using Configuring Cisco Cisco IOS router configuration commands. Parameters on page 3-3 8 Configure the Token Ring backplane Configuring 3Com connections using DMM software. Parameters on page 3-5 9 Monitor initial router module operation. Monitoring Router Module LEDs on page 4-1 For information about potential problems, refer to the troubleshooting techniques described in Chapter 5, Troubleshooting. Unpacking To unpack the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module: Procedures 1 Verify that the module is the model you ordered by checking the model number listed on the side of the shipping carton. The product model number listed on the box contains the prefix “3C9.”
  • 27. Unpacking Procedures 2-3 2 Remove the module, in its antistatic bag, from the shipping carton. 3 Remove the module from the antistatic shielding bag and inspect it for damage. CAUTION: Always handle the module by the faceplate, being careful not to touch the components. If the module appears to be damaged, return it to the antistatic shielding bag, repack it in the shipping carton, and contact your local supplier. Keep the shipping carton and the antistatic shielding bag in which your module was shipped so that you can repackage the module for storage or shipment. 4 Remove the spacing clips from the router module (Figure 2-1). Spacing clips Figure 2-1 Locating the Spacing Clips
  • 28. 2-4 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE CAUTION: The spacing clips on the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module are used only to protect the module during shipping. You must manually remove the spacing clips before you install the module. Failure to remove the spacing clips before installation could result in damage to the CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub. Preparing to Install This section includes information to allow you to restore correct DIP the Router Module switch and jumper plug positions on the base and CPU boards if the positions are inadvertently altered. If you believe the default positions have been altered, refer to the following sections: s Restoring Base Board Positions s Verifying CPU Board Positions Restoring Base Do not attempt to configure the DIP switches and jumper plugs on the Board Positions base board. However, if you suspect that the DIP switch or jumper plug positions have been altered, restore them to the positions shown in Figure 2-2. . Jumper plug positions empty Plug inserted in bottom All DIP switch position positions on On Figure 2-2 Base Board DIP Switch and Jumper Plug Positions
  • 29. Installing the Router Module 2-5 Verifying CPU Board Do not attempt to configure the jumper plugs on the CPU board. Positions However, if you suspect that the jumper plug positions have been altered, restore them to the positions shown in Figure 2-3. . Plugs not inserted Plug inserted in bottom position Plug inserted Figure 2-3 CPU Board Jumper Plug Positions Installing the This section describes how to install the router module in the Router Module CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub. You do not need to power off the hub to install or remove the router module. You can insert the module while the hub is operating (hot swap capability). To install the router module: 1 Properly ground yourself prior to handling the module. Put on a static wrist guard or touch a grounded static mat before you handle the module. 2 Locate 3 adjacent open slots in the hub, or remove panels on the hub to expose 3 slots for the router module.
  • 30. 2-6 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE 3 Insert the router module into the board guides at the top and bottom of the slot and slide it into the hub by pressing firmly at the top and bottom of the faceplate. Make sure that the module ejectors are open fully when you insert the module and that the connectors are well-seated into the backplane of the hub. Figure 2-4 shows a router module being installed in a CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub. Spring-loaded screws Ejector (opened) CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module Ejector Spring-loaded screws Figure 2-4 CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module in a CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub To minimize electromagnetic interference, ensure that the slots adjacent to the router module are occupied or have blank panels installed. 4 Push the module ejectors closed. 5 Using your fingers, tighten the spring-loaded screws on the front of the router module faceplate (do not overtighten).
  • 31. Making NIM Connections 2-7 Making NIM This section provides guidelines for making NIM (Network Interface Connections Module) network cable connections. This section describes the following topics: s Making FDDI NIM Connections s Making Quad Serial NIM Connections s Making ATM NIM Connections Making FDDI NIM This section provides information on the following topics: Connections s Connecting the Multi-Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM s Connecting the Multi-Mode, Single Attachment Station NIM s Connecting the Multi-Mode Optical Bypass Switch s Connecting the Single Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM Connecting the Multi-Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM The Multi-Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM (MM, DAS) connectors are Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) standard physical sublayer (PHY) connectors. The media interface connector (MIC) connects to FDDI-standard 62.5/125 micron multi-mode fiber optic cable. Figure 2-5 shows the MIC connector typically used for network and chassis connections in multi-mode FDDI applications. H1738 Figure 2-5 Multi-Mode FDDI Network Interface Connector, MIC Type A dual attachment station requires two connections, one to the primary ring and one to the secondary ring. On the FDDI MM, DAS NIM, the PHY-A port is the left port and PHY-B is the right port. Figure 2-6 shows how to connect a FDDI MM, DAS router module to another Dual Attachment Station.
  • 32. 2-8 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE PHY-A PHY-B PHY-B Dual Attachment Station (DAS) PHY-A Figure 2-6 Making Connections to the FDDI MM, DAS NIM To connect the FDDI MM, DAS NIM to another Dual Attachment Station: 1 Connect PHY-A on the router module to PHY-B on the other DAS. 2 Connect PHY-B on the router module to PHY-A on the other DAS. Connecting the Multi-Mode, Single Attachment Station NIM Connect the Single Attachment router module’s PHY-A port through a concentrator to a Single Attachment ring (Figure 2-7). PHY-A To concentrator Figure 2-7 Making Connections to the FDDI MM, SAS NIM
  • 33. Making NIM Connections 2-9 You can also connect the FDDI MM, SAS router module directly to another device in a point-to-point configuration. Connecting the Multi-Mode Optical Bypass Switch The Multi-Mode FDDI router modules provide an optical bypass capability that automatically drops the router module from the FDDI ring if the module fails. Dropping the module from the ring ensures that the ring remains available to the other stations. Figure 2-8 shows how to connect an optical bypass switch (not included with the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module) to the FDDI MM, DAS NIM. Optical bypass switch Optical bypass interface cable To ring DIN connector Bypass operation Figure 2-8 Connecting the Multi-Mode Optical Bypass Switch To connect the FDDI MM, DAS NIM to an optical bypass switch: 1 Connect PHY-A on the router module to PHY-B on the optical bypass switch. 2 Connect PHY-B on the router module to PHY-A on the optical bypass switch. 3 Connect one end of the optical bypass interface cable to the 6-pin Deutsche Industrie-Norm (DIN) connector on the optical bypass switch. 4 Connect the other end of the optical bypass interface cable to the 6-pin DIN connector on the router module.
  • 34. 2-10 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE Connecting the Single Mode, Dual Attachment Station NIM A dual attachment, single mode module configuration requires two connections: one to the primary ring and one to the secondary ring. Figure 2-9 shows how to connect a FDDI SM, DAS router module to another Dual Attachment Station. FC connector type To primary ring To secondary ring From primary ring From secondary ring Figure 2-9 Making Connections to the FDDI SM, DAS NIM To connect the FDDI SM, DAS NIM to another Dual Attachment Station: 1 Connect one end of an FC connector cable to the PHY-A XMTR connector on the router module. 2 Connect the other end of the FC connector cable to the primary ring RCVR connector on the other DAS. 3 Connect one end of a second FC connector cable to the PHY-A RCVR connector on the router module. 4 Connect the other end of the second FC connector cable to the primary ring XMTR connector on the other DAS. 5 Connect one end of a third FC connector cable to the PHY-B XMTR connector on the router module. 6 Connect the other end of the third FC connector cable to the secondary ring RCVR connector on the other DAS. 7 Connect one end of a fourth FC connector cable to the PHY-B RCVR connector on the router module. 8 Connect the other end of the fourth FC connector cable to the secondary ring XMTR connector on the other DAS.
  • 35. Making NIM Connections 2-11 Making Quad Serial The Quad Serial NIM has four synchronous serial ports with custom NIM Connections DB-60 connectors. When setting up your serial port connections, consider distance limitations and potential electromagnetic interference (EMI) as defined in the Electronics Industries Association (EIA) and Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) standards, such as standard EIA/TIA-232. Figure 2-10 shows how to connect the Quad Serial NIM from any one serial port on the router module to a modem or other communications device. Custom 60-pin Serial transmission cable connector EIA/TIA-232, EIA/TIA-449, V.35, X.21 or EIA-530 Connector Modem or other communications device Figure 2-10 Making Connections to the Quad Serial NIM Be careful to insert the DB-60 connector correctly to prevent damage to the connector pins. To connect the Quad Serial NIM, attach each serial port from the custom 60-pin connector to a modem or other DCE device using one of the following standard device cable connectors: s EIA/TIA-232 s EIA/TIA-449 s EIA-530 s V.35 s X.21
  • 36. 2-12 CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING THE MODULE Making ATM NIM This section provides information on the following topics: Connections s ATM Connector Types s ATM Distance Limitations ATM Connector Types Each ATM NIM type requires a specific connector (Figure 2-11): OC-3 MM NIM – Requires a multi-mode SC-type connector. OC-3 SM NIM – Requires a single mode SC-type connector. SC-type connector for ATM OC-3 SM NIM SC-type connector for ATM OC-3 MM NIM Figure 2-11 Making Connections to the ATM NIMs ATM Distance Limitations The SONET (Synchronous Optical Network) specification for fiber-optic transmission defines two types of fiber: s single mode s multimode Single-mode fiber is capable of higher bandwidth and greater cable run distances than multimode fiber.
  • 37. Making NIM Connections 2-13 The typical maximum distances for single-mode and multimode transmissions, as defined by the SONET, are provided in Table 2-2. If you connect two optical devices at a distance greater than those specified in Table 2-2, significant signal loss could occur, making transmission unreliable. Table 2-2 ATM Distance Limitations Fiber Type Maximum Distance Between Stations Single mode Up to 9 miles (15 kilometers) Multimode Up to 1.5 miles (3 kilometers)
  • 38. CONFIGURING THE MODULE 3 This chapter contains the following topics: s Configuration Overview s Attaching a Management Terminal s Configuring the Cisco NIM Connections s Configuring Cisco Parameters s Configuring 3Com Parameters CAUTION: Throughout this chapter, Cisco nomenclature refers to the four Token Ring backplane connections as interfaces 0, 1, 2, and 3. 3Com refers to the same four router connections as ports 1, 2, 3, and 4. For example, when configuring the router module, Cisco interface 0 is equivalent to 3Com port 1. Configuration The following list is an overview of the procedures that are required Overview configure the router module. For more detail, refer to sections that follow. CAUTION: Failure to follow the configuration sequence specified in this section could result in error messages at the router management terminal during the configuration procedure. For best results, use the procedure as outlined in the sections that follow. To configure the router module: 1 Attach a Management Terminal – Attach a management terminal to the console port of the router module. 2 Configure the Cisco NIM Connections – From the management terminal, use Cisco router configuration commands to configure the NIM (Network Interface Module) connections.
  • 39. 3-2 CHAPTER 3: CONFIGURING THE MODULE 3 Configure the Cisco Parameters – Use the management terminal to configure the four Cisco router interfaces, including interface speed. 4 Configure the 3Com Parameters – Use the management terminal that is connected to the 3Com® CoreBuilder 5000 Distributed Management Module (DMM) to configure the four 3Com router ports, including CoreBuilder™ 5000 backplane network speed. Each of these steps is detailed in the sections that follow. If you are using the router module in an unmanaged hub (one in which a DMM module is not installed), upon power on, the router module uses the last module configuration saved in NVRAM. To disable NVRAM configuration, set DIP switch 5 to Off (see Figure 2-2). When you power on the router module with NVRAM configuration disabled, the four Token Ring ports are set to isolated mode. Attaching a This section provides information on attaching a terminal to the console Management or auxiliary ports of the router module for use as a Cisco management Terminal terminal. You must use the console port for initial router configuration. After you configure the router, you can use the auxiliary port for an asynchronous serial connection. Connecting to the All router modules include an asynchronous router console port (female Console Port DB-25 connector) wired as a data communications equipment (DCE) device. The port requires a straight-through cable for connection to a local terminal. The port uses the following default parameters: s 9600 baud s 8 data bits s No parity generated or checked s 2 stop bits
  • 40. Configuring the Cisco NIM Connections 3-3 Connecting to the All router modules include a male DB-25 connector auxiliary port Auxiliary Port (labeled AUX PORT DTE). The auxiliary port is a shared-memory data terminal equipment (DTE) port to which you can attach an EIA/TIA-232 connector from a channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU), a modem, or protocol analyzer for network access. Console and auxiliary port cabling requirements are provided in Appendix B, Cabling Specifications. Configuring the From the Cisco management terminal, use Cisco IOS routing Cisco NIM configuration commands to configure the FDDI or Quad Serial NIM Connections connections. If you are configuring a base router module without a NIM installed (Model Number 6701CS-NN), proceed to the next section Configuring Cisco Parameters. You may receive status messages referring to NIM 1, NIM 2, and NIM 3. Cisco IOS makes the following NIM designations: s Optional NIM as NIM 1 s Token Ring backplane interfaces 0 and 1 (3Com ports 1 and 2) as NIM 2 s Token Ring backplane interfaces 2 and 3 (3Com ports 3 and 4) as NIM 3 For detailed information on Cisco IOS routing configuration commands, refer to the Cisco hardcopy documentation set (Part Number 17-00138-MS) or to the Cisco documentation set on the Cisco UniverCD™ CD-ROM (Part Number 17-00138-CD). Configuring Cisco This section outlines procedures for configuring Cisco parameters for Parameters the four Token Ring interface connections on the router module using Cisco IOS software management commands. The procedures include: s Setting General Interface Parameters s Setting Token Ring Speed
  • 41. 3-4 CHAPTER 3: CONFIGURING THE MODULE Setting General Set any required general Cisco parameters for the four router Interface Parameters interfaces. Cisco Systems IOS software provides management commands for configuring routing interface connections. Refer to the Cisco hardcopy documentation set (Part Number 17-00138-MS) or to the Cisco documentation set on the Cisco UniverCD CD-ROM (Part Number 17-00138-CD). Setting Token Ring Set the Token Ring speed of each router interface connection to match Speed the speed of the CoreBuilder 5000 backplane network to which it will be connected. To set the Token Ring speed of a router interface: 1 Use DMM at the CoreBuilder 5000 management station to ensure that the router interface port is in isolated mode: CB5000> set port 7.1 network isolated Port 07.01 network id set to ISOLATED. 2 At the router management terminal, set the configuration mode to enable: Router> enable 3 Enter the required password: Password:**** 4 Set the router management terminal to configuration mode: Router# config terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z. Router(config)# 5 Specify the number of the Token Ring interface: Router(config)# interface tokenring 0 Router(config-if)# 6 Shut down the router interface: Router(config-if)# shutdown Router(config-if)# 7 Specify the ring speed of the router interface (in this example, 4 MBPS): Router(config-if)# ring-speed 4 Router(config-if)#
  • 42. Configuring 3Com Parameters 3-5 8 Remove the router interface from shutdown state: Router(config-if)# no shutdown Router(config-if)# 9 Exit from configuration mode: Router(config-if)# ^Z Router# 10 Save the interface configuration changes: Router# write mem Building configuration... [OK] Router# At this point, the system may display a sequence of RESET messages on the router management terminal. This a normal, temporary condition that ends when the interface synchronizes to the new speed. Configuring 3Com This section outlines procedures for using DMM commands to Parameters configure basic parameters for the 3Com router module. Refer to the 3Com CoreBuilder 5000 Integrated System Hub Installation and Operation Guide, Chapter 1, for a CoreBuilder 5000 backplane architecture description and to the 3Com DMM Commands Guide for detailed information on DMM configuration commands. To configure the 3Com router module: 1 Set the Token Ring speed of the targeted four CoreBuilder 5000 backplane networks. You must set the Token Ring speed of a backplane network to match the Token Ring speed of the Cisco interface you intend to connect to the backplane network. In the following example, Token Ring backplane network 9 is set to 4 Mbps, the same speed at which the Cisco interface port was set. CB5000> set network token_ring token_ring_9 ring_speed 4mbps Value set to 4 MBPS. 2 Connect each of the router ports to one of the 10 CoreBuilder 5000 backplane networks (or set the port to isolated mode).
  • 43. 3-6 CHAPTER 3: CONFIGURING THE MODULE You cannot set more than one router port to any one backplane network. In the following example, 3Com router port 1 (Cisco interface 0) is set to backplane network 9: CB5000> set port 7.1 network token_ring_9 Port 07.01 network id set to TOKEN_RING_9. At this point, the system may display a sequence of RESET messages at the Cisco router management terminal. This is a normal, temporary condition that ends when the interface successfully connects to the backplane network. 3 Save the configuration: CB5000> save all Failure to save configuration settings may result in loss of configuration data.
  • 44. MONITORING OPERATION 4 This chapter contains the following topics: s Monitoring Router Module LEDs s Displaying the Router Module Configuration Monitoring Router This section identifies the front panel LEDs of the CoreBuilder™ 5000 Module LEDs Network Router Module: s Common Front Panel LEDs s FDDI NIM LEDs s Quad Serial NIM LEDs s ATM NIM LEDs
  • 45. 4-2 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION Common Front Panel The front panel LEDs of the base model (without NIM) router module LEDs are common to all router module models. Figure 4-1 shows the common front panel LEDs. Table 4-1 describes the LEDs. Figure 4-1 Common Front Panel LEDs RESET is a recessed pushbutton that is used to reset the router module under certain conditions. Refer to Chapter 5, Troubleshooting, for more information on using the RESET button.
  • 46. Monitoring Router Module LEDs 4-3 . Table 4-1 Front Panel LED Definitions LED Description Definition MOD STATUS Module Status ON – Indicates that 3Com router software is loaded and the router module is operational. OFF – Indicates that 3Com router software is not operational. NIM PRES NIM Present ON – Indicates that an optional NIM is installed on the router module. OFF – Indicates that an optional NIM is not installed on the router module. SYS RUN System Run ON – Indicates that Cisco IOS router software is loaded and operational. OFF – Indicates that Cisco IOS router software is not loaded and operational. LEDS NIM NIM 1 Data ON – Indicates that data traffic is present Present on one or more of the interfaces on the optional NIM. OFF – Indicates that data traffic is not present on any interfaces on the optional NIM. LEDS DTR A, B NIM 2 (Dual ON – Indicates that data traffic is present Token Ring A on one or both of Cisco interfaces 0 and 1 and B) Data (3Com ports 1 and 2). Present OFF – Indicates that data traffic is present on one or both of Cisco interfaces 0 and 1 (3Com ports 1 and 2). LEDS DTR C, D NIM 3(Dual ON – Indicates that data traffic is present Token Ring C on one or both of Cisco interfaces 2 and 3 and D) Data (3Com ports 3 and 4). Present OFF – Indicates that data traffic is present on one or both of Cisco interfaces 2 and 3 (3Com ports 3 and 4). HLTH NIM NIM 1 Healthy ON – Indicates that optional NIM 1 is operational and line protocol for the NIM interfaces is up. OFF – Indicates that the optional NIM 1 is not operational. HLTH DTR A, B NIM 2 (Dual ON – Indicates that Cisco interfaces 0 and 1 Token Ring A (3Com ports 1 and 2) are operational and and B) Healthy line protocol for the interfaces is up. OFF – Indicates that Cisco interfaces 0 and 1 (3Com ports 1 and 2) are not operational.
  • 47. 4-4 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION Table 4-1 Front Panel LED Definitions (continued) LED Description Definition HLTH DTR C, D NIM 3 (Dual ON – Indicates that Cisco interfaces 2 and 3 Token Ring A (3Com ports 3 and 4) are operational and and B) Healthy line protocol for the interfaces is up. OFF – Indicates that Cisco interfaces 2 and 3 (3Com ports 3 and 4) are not operational. 16 MBPS A Port 1 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 1 (Cisco interface interface 0) set 0) is set to 16 Mbps. to 16 Mbps OFF – Indicates that port 1 (Cisco interface 0) is set to 4 Mbps or is not initialized. 16 MBPS B Port 2 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 2 (Cisco interface interface 1) set 1) is set to 16 Mbps. to 16 Mbps OFF – Indicates that port 2 (Cisco interface 1) is set to 4 Mbps or is not initialized. 16 MBPS C Port 3(Cisco ON – Indicates that port 3 (Cisco interface interface 2) set 2) is set to 16 Mbps. to 16 Mbps OFF – Indicates that port 3 (Cisco interface 2) is set to 4 Mbps or is not initialized. 16 MBPS D Port 4 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 4 (Cisco interface interface 3) set 3) is set to 16 Mbps. to 16 Mbps OFF – Indicates that port 4 (Cisco interface 3) is set to 4 Mbps or is not initialized. RING A IN Port 1 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 1 (Cisco interface interface 0) in 0) is connected or connecting to its assigned Ring backplane network, or is set to isolated mode. OFF – Indicates that port 1(Cisco interface 0) is not connected to its assigned backplane network. RING B IN Port 2 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 2 (Cisco interface interface 1) in 1) is connected or connecting to its assigned Ring backplane network, or is set to isolated mode. OFF – Indicates that port 2 (Cisco interface 1) is not connected to its assigned backplane network.
  • 48. Monitoring Router Module LEDs 4-5 Table 4-1 Front Panel LED Definitions (continued) LED Description Definition RING C IN Port 3 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 3 (Cisco interface interface 2) in 2) is connected or connecting to its assigned Ring backplane network, or is set to isolated mode. OFF – Indicates that port 3 (Cisco interface 2) is not connected to its assigned backplane network. RING D IN Port 4 (Cisco ON – Indicates that port 4 (Cisco interface interface 3) in 3) is connected or connecting to its assigned Ring backplane network, or is set to isolated mode. OFF – Indicates that port 4 (Cisco interface 3) is not connected to its assigned backplane network.
  • 49. 4-6 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION FDDI NIM LEDs In addition to the common front panel LEDs, the three FDDI router module models also have the LEDs shown in Figure 4-2: PHY-A RING OP PHY-B RING OP FDDI MM, DAS FDDI MM, SAS FDDI SM, DAS Router Module Router Module Router Module Figure 4-2 FDDI NIM LEDs The PHY-A RING OP LED lights when the router module PHY-A attachment is connected in the FDDI A ring. The PHY-B RING OP LED (Dual-Attachment FDDI NIMs only) lights when the PHY-B attachment is connected in the FDDI B ring.
  • 50. Monitoring Router Module LEDs 4-7 Quad Serial NIM The Quad Serial NIM router module model includes the additional LEDs LEDs shown in Figure 4-3. P-3 LP CN TD TC RD RC P-2 LP CN TD TC RD RC P-1 LP CN TD TC RD RC P-0 LP CN TD TC RD RC Figure 4-3 Quad Serial NIM LEDs
  • 51. 4-8 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION Table 4-2 describes the Quad Serial NIM LEDs. Table 4-2 Quad Serial NIM LED Definitions LED Description Definition LP Looped ON – Indicates that the port is set to a loopback state. OFF – Indicates that the port is set to normal mode. CN Connected ON – Indicates that the port is in ready-state (DSR, DTR, DCD, RTS, CTS signals) to exchange data. OFF – Indicates that the port is not in ready-state to exchange data. TD Transmitted Data ON – Indicates that data is being transmitted over the serial link from the DTE device. The router module port can be set to operate as DTE or DCE. OFF – Indicates that data is not being transmitted by the DTE device. TC Transmitted Clock The clock supplied by the DCE device to synchronize transmitted data. RD Received Data ON – Indicates that data is being received over the serial link by the DCE device. Each router module port can be set to operate as DTE or DCE. OFF – Indicates that data is not being received by the DCE device. RC Received Clock The clock supplied by the DCE device to synchronize received data.
  • 52. Monitoring Router Module LEDs 4-9 ATM NIM LEDs The ATM MM and ATM SM router modules include the additional LEDs shown in Figure 4-4. Figure 4-4 ATM NIM LEDs
  • 53. 4-10 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION Table 4-3 describes the ATM NIM LEDs. Table 4-3 ATM NIM LED Definitions LED Description Definition Busy ATM NIM Busy ON – Indicates that the NIM is not available to receive data cells. OFF – Indicates that the NIM is available for data cells. Ready ATM NIM Ready ON – Indicates that the NIM is ready to receive data cells. OFF – Indicates that the NIM is not ready to receive ATM cells. RX Cells Received Cells ON – Indicates that the ATM NIM is receiving a a data cell. This LED flickers during normal operation. OFF – Indicates that the ATM NIM is not receiving a data cell. Rx Alarm Receive Alarm ON – Indicates that the receive signal is lost or that a remote alarm has been received by the ATM NIM. OFF – Indicates that the receive signal is not lost and that a remote alarm has not been received. Displaying the To display information about router module configuration and status, Router Module use the following DMM commands. Configuration s SHOW MODULE s SHOW MODULE VERBOSE s SHOW PORT s SHOW PORT VERBOSE
  • 54. Displaying the Router Module Configuration 4-11 Using the SHOW Use the SHOW MODULE command to display summary information MODULE Command about the router module: CB5000> show module 7.1 This command displays the summary information shown in Figure 4-5. Slot Module Version Network General Information ----- --------------- ------- ------------- ------------------- 07.01 6704R-TCS v1.00.0 PER_PORT Module up Figure 4-5 SHOW MODULE Command Information Using the SHOW Use the SHOW MODULE VERBOSE command to display detailed MODULE VERBOSE information about the router module: Command CB5000> show module 7.1 verbose This command displays the detailed information shown in Figure 4-6. Slot Module Version Network General Information ----- --------------- ------- ------------- ------------------- 07.01 6704R-TCS v1.00.0 PER_PORT Module up 6704R-TCS: CB5000 Token Ring Backbone Router Module Boot Version: v1.00 Native Software Version: 10.30 Native Boot Software Version: v5.20 Number Simple Ports: 1 Network Interface Module Type: FDDI-SINGLE-MODE-DUAL-ATTA Figure 4-6 SHOW MODULE VERBOSE Command Information Using the SHOW Use the SHOW PORT command to display summary information about PORT Command any of the four router module ports: CB5000> show port 7.2
  • 55. 4-12 CHAPTER 4: MONITORING OPERATION This command displays the summary information shown in Figure 4-7. Port Mode Status Network General Information ----- -------- ------------------- ---------------- --------------------- 07.02 LOGICAL OKAY TOKEN_RING_2 Figure 4-7 SHOW PORT Command Information Using the SHOW Use the SHOW PORT VERBOSE command to display detailed PORT VERBOSE information about any one of the four router module ports: Command CB5000> show port 7.2 verbose This command displays the detailed information shown in Figure 4-8. Port Display for Module 6704R-TCS : Port Mode Status Network General Information ----- -------- ------------------- ---------------- ---------------------- 07.02 LOGICAL OKAY TOKEN_RING_2 Port Connector: BACKPLANE IP Address: 151.104.12.1 Subnetwork Mask: ff.ff.00.00 Default Gateway: 0.0.0.0 Station Address: 08-00-8f-00-00-01 Speed: 16 MBPS Figure 4-8 SHOW PORT VERBOSE Command Information The Speed field in Figure 4-8 identifies the speed for the Cisco interface that corresponds to the 3Com port.
  • 56. Displaying the Router Module Configuration 4-13 Interpreting the The SHOW PORT and SHOW PORT VERBOSE commands provide SHOW PORT Status standard DMM command configuration information with the exception Field of the Status field. DMM SHOW PORT Status field definitions are unique for the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module. Table 4-4 lists the Status field definitions for ports on the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module. Table 4-4 SHOW PORT Status Field Definitions Status Field Indication Definitions NOT INSERTED The port is set to isolated mode. CONNECTING The port is attempting to connect with the backplane network. OKAY The port is connected normally to the backplane network. SPEED MISMATCH The speed of the port (as set for the corresponding Cisco interface) does not match the speed of the backplane network to which it is assigned. LOST LOCK The 3Com port has lost synchronization with the corresponding Cisco interface.
  • 57. TROUBLESHOOTING 5 This chapter provides hardware troubleshooting information to use if the CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Module fails to operate correctly. After reviewing the information in this chapter, if you cannot correct the problem, contact your 3Com representative for further assistance. For IOS software-related troubleshooting information, refer to the appropriate Cisco Systems manual. For information on interpreting router module LEDs, refer to Chapter 4, Monitoring Operation. This chapter contains the following sections: s Troubleshooting Startup Problems s Troubleshooting Network Connection Problems s Troubleshooting WAN Connection Problems s Correcting Operating Malfunctions s Recovering a Lost Password Troubleshooting This section describes how to troubleshoot startup problems on the Startup Problems CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module. When you first install the router module in the hub, the Cisco Systems router software runs a full set of hardware diagnostic tests. If the router module fails diagnostics, the MOD STATUS LED does not turn off. This indicates a problem with the router module hardware or software. Refer to the appropriate Cisco Systems troubleshooting documentation for corrective action.
  • 58. 5-2 CHAPTER 5: TROUBLESHOOTING Troubleshooting If the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module does not appear to be Network routing traffic properly on the network, it may indicate that there is no Connection connection to the network. Perform the following troubleshooting Problems actions: s From the 3Com management interface (for example, CoreBuilder 5000 Distributed Management Module), verify that the router module backplane port is set to the appropriate backplane network (channel). s Use the DMM SHOW PORT command and check the Status field for the port. Refer to Using the SHOW PORT VERBOSE Command on page 4-12. s Use the ping utility to confirm there is network connectivity. s Verify that your router configuration is valid. Refer to the Cisco Systems Troubleshooting Internetworking Systems guide for more information. Troubleshooting If you suspect that the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module has WAN Connection lost WAN connectivity, perform the following troubleshooting actions: Problems s Verify that you have the correct cable for your configuration. Refer to Appendix B, Cabling Specifications, for lists of approved cables, cable specifications, and pinouts. s If you are using a: DCE cable – Verify that a clock rate is defined in the router WAN interface configuration. DTE cable – Verify that no clock rate is defined in the router WAN interface configuration. s Verify that your router configuration is valid. Refer to the Cisco Systems Troubleshooting Internetworking Systems guide for more information.
  • 59. Correcting Operating Malfunctions 5-3 Correcting Table 5-1 lists the symptoms, possible causes and corrective actions of Operating operating malfunctions for the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Malfunctions Module. . Table 5-1 Troubleshooting Malfunctions Symptom Possible Cause Corrective Action Module does not Module is not fitted To ensure that the module is fitted correctly, power up correctly against remove the module from the slots and replace it backplane. in the slots. Place the module in different slots in the hub. Power mode is not Ensure that power mode is enabled for the slot. enabled for slot. The hub is not Check that the hub is receiving power. receiving electrical Test for power at the wall outlet by plugging in power. another device. If the wall outlet is not receiving power, select another outlet on a different circuit. Attached terminal does The terminal is Follow the troubleshooting procedures not operate malfunctioning. recommended by the terminal manufacturer. Cables are unattached. Make sure that the cable connections at both ends are secure. Cables are not the Make sure that the cable attached to the correct type. terminal conforms to the specification. Refer to Appendix B for cabling specifications. The console is Check the console port configuration. configured incorrectly. Note: You can use TELNET to verify port configurations. Refer to the Cisco Systems Router Products Configuration and Reference documents for more information. Verify that the port is configured as: s 8-bit data s No parity s 2 stop bits s 9600 baud rate s Flow control parameters set to Xon and Xoff
  • 60. 5-4 CHAPTER 5: TROUBLESHOOTING Table 5-1 Troubleshooting Malfunctions (continued) Symptom Possible Cause Corrective Action The terminal fails to The terminal is not Power off the terminal, wait 30 seconds, and respond to commands receiving commands. then power on again. entered at the keyboard The keyboard cable is If the terminal still does not respond to attached incorrectly. commands, power off the terminal and disconnect the keyboard cable. Then re-attach the keyboard cable and power on the terminal. Cables are not the Make sure that the cable attached to the correct type. terminal conforms to the specification. Refer to Appendix B for cabling specifications. The console port is Check the state of the LEDs on the front of the malfunctioning. module. If the LEDs indicate a problem, contact your supplier for assistance. Recovering a Lost To recover a lost password: Password 1 Attach an ASCII terminal to the router module console port. 2 Configure the terminal to operate at 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits. 3 Enter the SHOW VERSION command to display the existing configuration register value. Note this value for later use in step 13. 4 If the Break function is disabled on the router (refer to Table C-1), power cycle the router (turn off the router, wait 5 seconds, and then turn it on again). If the Break function is enabled, go to step 5. 5 Within 60 seconds of turning on the router, press the Break key. Pressing this key causes the terminal to display the bootstrap program prompt (>). 6 To reset the virtual configuration register (VCR) to boot from the boot ROMs and ignore NVRAM, enter the O/R (Reset VCR Value) command at the bootstrap prompt: > o/r 0x2141 To recover a lost password, you must be able to see it when you display configuration information. To see the password, be sure to set the configuration register so that the router module engine ignores the contents of the NVRAM.
  • 61. Recovering a Lost Password 5-5 7 Initialize the router by entering the I (Initialize) command as follows: >i The router power cycles and the configuration register is set to 0x2141 (ignore Break key, ignore NVRAM, boot from ROM). The router boots the boot ROM system image and prompts you with the following system configuration dialog prompt: --- System Configuration Dialog --- 8 Enter No in response to the system configuration dialog prompts until the following system message appears: Press RETURN to get started! 9 Press Return. The boot ROM prompt appears as follows: Router(boot)> 10 Enter the ENABLE command to enter the EXEC mode in the boot ROM image. The prompt changes to the following: Router(boot)# 11 Enter the SHOW CONFIGURATION EXEC command to display the password in the configuration file and to display any boot system commands. 12 To exit configuration mode, press Ctrl-Z. 13 Restore the virtual configuration register to the value noted in step 3. Use the CONFIGURE TERMINAL command to restore the value: router# configure terminal Enter system configuration commands, one per line. Edit with DELETE, CTRL/W, and CTRL/U; end with CTRL/Z config-reg 0xYYYY ^Z where YYYY is the value noted in step 3 14 Reboot the router and use the recovered password. Refer to Appendix C for more information about the virtual configuration register.
  • 62. PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS A This appendix contains the following hardware specifications for the 3Com CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Module: s General Specifications s Electrical Specifications s Environmental Specifications s Mechanical Specifications
  • 63. A-2 APPENDIX A: PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS General Table A-1 identifies general specifications for the router module. Specifications Table A-1 General Router Module Specifications Specification Description Processor 100 MHz IDT Orion RISC* Main Memory (DRAM) 8, 16, or 32 MB Shared Memory (DRAM) 4, 8, or 16 MB Flash Memory 4, 8 MB Nonvolatile RAM 128 or 512 KB Boot ROM 128 to 512 KB Boot Flash 4 MB Network Interface FDDI Multi-Mode, Dual Attachment Station Options FDDI Multi-Mode, Single Attachment Station FDDI Single Mode, Dual Attachment Station Quad Serial ATM OC3, Multi-Mode ATM OC3, Single Mode Token Ring Interface 4 backplane connection Synchronous Serial EIA/TIA-232, EIA/TIA-449, V.35, X.21 (NRZ/NRZI† and Interfaces DTE/DCE‡), EIA-530 (NRZ/NRZI and DTE). All serial (Quad Serial NIM) cables use a DB-60 connector. Console and Auxiliary Asynchronous serial Ports * The Orion microprocessor is based on the MIPS R4400 and is pin-compatible. † NRZ = Nonreturn to zero. NRZI = Nonreturn to zero inverted. ‡ DTE = Data terminal equipment. DCE = Data communications equipment.
  • 64. Electrical Specifications A-3 Electrical Table A-2 identifies the electrical specifications for the router module. Specifications Table A-2 Electrical Router Module Specifications Voltage Amps (Watts) Power Requirements +5 VDC 19.0 A (95.0 W) (with NIM) –5 VDC 0.05 A (0.25 W) +12 VDC 0.5 A (6.0 W) –12 VDC 0.08 A (1.0 W) –2 VDC 0.05A (0.1 W) (102.35 W Total) Environmental Table A-3 identifies environmental specifications for the router module. Specifications Table A-3 Environmental Router Module Specifications Operating Temperature 0 °C to 50 °C (32 °F to 122 °F) Storage Temperature -10 °C to 66 °C (22 °F to 138 °F) Humidity Less than 95%, noncondensing BTU/hr 349.31 BTUs/hr Mechanical Table A-4 identifies the mechanical specifications of the router module. Specifications Table A-4 Mechanical Router Module Specifications CoreBuilder 5000 Width 3.0” (7.62 cm) Network Router Module Length 10.875” (27.623 cm) (with NIM) Height 15.250” (38.735 cm) Weight 8.5 lbs (3.859 kg)
  • 65. CABLING SPECIFICATIONS B Use the information in this appendix to verify that the cables you use meet equipment requirements. For proper operation, use only approved cables when you install all equipment. This appendix describes: s Console and Auxiliary Port Cables s Quad Serial NIM Cables Console and This section specifies the cable pinouts of the console and auxiliary Auxiliary Port ports of the CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Module. You can use Cables any cable that meets the pinout specifications described in this section. All pins not listed are not connected. This section describes the following cabling specifications: s Console Port Pinouts s Auxiliary Port Pinouts
  • 66. B-2 APPENDIX B: CABLING SPECIFICATIONS Console Port Pinouts Table B-1 identifies the pinout specifications for the console port. Table B-1 Console Port Pinout Specification Pin Signal Name Input/Output 1 Frame GND — 2 Received Data Input 3 Transmitted Data Output 4 Request To Send Looped to Clear To Send 5 Clear To Send Looped to Request To Send 6 Connected to Pin 8 Output 7 Signal Ground — 8 Data Carrier Detect Output 20 Data Terminal Ready Input Auxiliary Port Table B-2 identifies the pinout specifications for the auxiliary port. Pinouts Table B-2 Auxiliary Port Pinout Specification Pin Signal Name Input/Output 1 Frame GND — 2 Transmitted Data Output 3 Received Data Input 4 Request To Send Output 5 Clear To Send Input 7 Signal Ground — 8 Data Carrier Detect Input 20 Data Terminal Ready Output
  • 67. Quad Serial NIM Cables B-3 Quad Serial NIM This section specifies cable pinouts for each type of synchronous serial Cables cable supported by the Quad Serial NIM (Network Interface Module) on the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module. This section describes: s EIA-530 DTE Synchronous Serial Cable Pinouts s EIA-232 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Assembly and Pinouts (DB-25) s EIA-449 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Assembly and Pinouts (DB-37) s V.35 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Assembly and Pinouts s X.21 DTE and DCE Serial Cable Pinouts (DB-15) In Table B-3 through Table B-11, serial pinouts for DTE and DCE cables use arrows to indicate signal direction: s → indicates DTE to DCE s ← indicates DCE to DTE Due to the small pins on the DB-60 connector, you should not attempt to manufacture or solder these cables.
  • 68. B-4 APPENDIX B: CABLING SPECIFICATIONS EIA-530 DTE Figure B-1 shows the EIA-530 serial cable assembly and Table B-3 lists Synchronous Serial the cable pinouts (Part Number ERM530-CAB). Arrows in the table Cable Pinouts indicate signal direction: s → indicates DTE to DCE s ← indicates DCE to DTE J1-46 J1-45 60-pin connector 25-pin connector J1-16 J2-13 J1-15 J2-25 H1972 J2-14 J1-1 J2-1 J1-30 Connectors are not to scale J1-31 J1-60 Figure B-1 EIA-530 Cable Assembly Table B-3 EIA-530 Cable Pinout Specifications Direction 60 Pin1 Signal 25 Pin1 Signal DTE DCE2 J1-46 Shield_GND J2-1 Shield Shorted J1-47 MODE_2 — — J1-48 GND — — Shorted J1-49 MODE_1 J1-11 TxD/RxD+ J2-2 BA(A), TxD+ → J1-12 TxD/RxD– J2-14 BA(B), TxD- → J1-28 RxD/TxD+ J2-3 BB(A), RxD+ ← J1-27 RxD/TxD– J2-16 BB(B), RxD- ← J1-9 RTS/CTS+ J2-4 CA(A), RTS+ → J1-10 RTS/CTS– J2-19 CA(B), RTS- → J1-1 CTS/RTS+ J2-5 CB(A), CTS+ ← J1-2 CTS/RTS– J2-13 CB(B), CTS- ← J1-3 DSR/DTR+ J2-6 CC(A), DSR+ ← J1-4 DSR/DTR– J2-22 CC(B), DSR- ← J1-5 DCD/DCD+ J2-8 CF(A), DCD+ ← J1-6 DCD/DCD– J2-10 CF(B), DCD- ←
  • 69. Quad Serial NIM Cables B-5 Table B-3 EIA-530 Cable Pinout Specifications (continued) Direction 60 Pin1 Signal 25 Pin1 Signal DTE DCE2 J1-24 TxC/RxC+ J2-15 DB(A), TxC+ ← J1-23 TxC/RxC– J2-12 DB(B), TxC- ← J1-26 RxC/TxCE+ J2-17 DD(A), RxC+ ← J1-25 RxC/TxCE– J2-9 DD(B), RxC- ← J1-44 LL/DCD J2-18 LL → J1-45 Circuit_GND J2-7 Circuit GND — J1-7 DTR/DSR+ J2-20 CD(A), DTR+ → J1-8 DTR/DSR– J2-23 CD(B), DTR- → J1-13 TxCE/TxC+ J2-24 DA(A), TxCE+ → J1-14 TxCE/TxC– J2-11 DA(B), TxCE- → J1-51 GND — — Shorted J1-52 MODE_DCE 1Any pin not referenced is not connected. 2 The EIA-530 interface cannot be operated in DCE mode. A DCE cable is not available for the EIA-530 interface. EIA-232 DTE and Figure B-2 shows the EIA-232 serial cable assembly. Table B-4 lists the DCE Serial Cable DTE cable pinouts (Part Number ERM232-CAB). Table B-5 lists the DCE Assembly and cable pinouts (Part Number ERF232-CAB). Arrows in the tables indicate Pinouts (DB-25) signal direction: s → indicates DTE to DCE s ← indicates DCE to DTE J1-46 J1-45 60-pin connector 25-pin connector J1-16 J2-13 J1-15 J2-25 H1972 J1-1 J2-14 J2-1 J1-30 Connectors are not to scale J1-31 J1-60 Figure B-2 EIA-232 Serial Cable Assembly
  • 70. B-6 APPENDIX B: CABLING SPECIFICATIONS Table B-4 EIA-232 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-25) 60 Pin1 Signal Note Direction 25 Pin1 Signal J1-50 MODE_0 Shorting Group — — — J1-51 GND J1-52 MODE_DCE J1-46 Shield_GND Single — J2-1 Shield GND J1-41 TxD/RxD Twisted pair no. 5 → J2-2 TxD Shield — — Shield — J1-36 RxD/TxD Twisted pair no. 9 ← J2-3 RxD Shield — — Shield — J1-42 RTS/CTS Twisted pair no. 4 → J2-4 RTS Shield — — Shield — J1-35 CTS/RTS Twisted pair no. 10 ← J2-5 CTS Shield — — Shield – J1-34 DSR/DTR Twisted pair no. 11 ← J2-6 DSR Shield — — Shield — J1-45 Circuit GND Twisted pair no. 1 — J2-7 Circuit GND Shield Shield J1-33 DCD/LL Twisted pair no. 12 ← J2-8 DCD Shield — — Shield — J1-37 TxC/NIL Twisted pair no. 8 ← J2-15 TxC Shield — — Shield — J1-38 RxC/TxCE Twisted pair no. 7 ← J2-17 RxC Shield — — Shield — J1-44 LL/DCD Twisted pair no. 2 → J2-18 LTST Shield — — Shield — J1-43 DTR/DSR Twisted pair no. 3 → J2-20 DTR Shield — — Shield — J1-39 TxCE/TxC Twisted pair no. 6 → J2-24 TxCE Shield — — Shield — 1 Any pin not referenced is not connected.
  • 71. Quad Serial NIM Cables B-7 Table B-5 EIA-232 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-25) 60 Pin1 Signal Note Direction 25 Pin1 Signal J1-50 MODE_0 Shorting Group — — — J1-51 GND J1-46 Shield_GND Single — J2-1 Shield GND J1-36 RxD/TxD Twisted pair no. 9 ← J2-2 TxD Shield — — Shield — J1-41 TxD/RxD Twisted pair no. 5 → J2-3 RxD Shield — — Shield — J1-35 CTS/RTS Twisted pair no. 10 ← J2-4 RTS Shield — — Shield — J1-42 RTS/CTS Twisted pair no. 4 → J2-5 CTS Shield — — Shield — J1-43 DTR/DSR Twisted pair no. 3 → J2-6 DSR Shield — — Shield — J1-45 Circuit GND Twisted pair no. 1 — J2-7 Circuit GND Shield — — Shield J1-44 LL/DCD Twisted pair no. 2 → J2-8 DCD Shield — — Shield — J1-39 TxCE/TxC Twisted pair no. 7 → J2-15 TxC Shield — — Shield — J1-40 NIL/RxC Twisted pair no. 6 → J2-17 RxC Shield — — Shield — J1-33 DCD/LL Twisted pair no. 12 ← J2-18 LTST Shield — — Shield — J1-34 DSR/DTR Twisted pair no. 11 ← J2-20 DTR Shield — — Shield — J1-38 RxC/TxCE Twisted pair no. 8 ← J2-24 TxCE Shield — — Shield — 1 Any pin not referenced is not connected.
  • 72. B-8 APPENDIX B: CABLING SPECIFICATIONS EIA-449 DTE and Figure B-3 shows the EIA-449 serial cable assembly. Table B-6 lists the DCE Serial Cable DTE cable pinouts (Part Number ERM449-CAB). Table B-7 lists the DCE Assembly and cable pinouts (Part Number ERF449-CAB). Arrows in the tables indicate Pinouts (DB-37) signal direction: s → indicates DTE to DCE s ← indicates DCE to DTE J1-46 60-pin connector (J1) 37-pin connector (J2) J1-45 J2-19 J1-16 J2-37 J1-15 H1973 J1-1 J2-20 J1-30 J2-1 Connectors are not to scale J1-31 J1-60 Figure B-3 EIA-449 Serial Cable Assembly Table B-6 EIA-449 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-37) 60 Pin1 Signal Note Direction 37 Pin1 Signal J1-49 MODE_1 Shorting Group — — — J1-48 GND J1-51 GND Shorting Group — — — J1-52 MODE_DCE J1-46 Shield_GND Single — J2-1 Shield GND J1-11 TxD/RxD+ Twisted pair no. 6 → J2-4 SD+ J1-12 TxD/RxD– → J2-22 SD– J1-24 TxC/RxC+ Twisted pair no. 9 ← J2-5 ST+ J1-23 TxC/RxC– ← J2-23 ST– J1-28 RxD/TxD+ Twisted pair no. 11 ← J2-6 RD+ J1-27 RxD/TxD– ← J2-24 RD– J1-9 RTS/CTS+ Twisted pair no. 5 → J2-7 RS+ J1-10 RTS/CTS– → J2-25 RS– J1-26 RxC/TxCE+ Twisted pair no. 10 ← J2-8 RT+ J1-25 RxC/TxCE– ← J2-26 RT–
  • 73. Quad Serial NIM Cables B-9 Table B-6 EIA-449 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-37) (continued) 60 Pin1 Signal Note Direction 37 Pin1 Signal J1-1 CTS/RTS+ Twisted pair no. 1 ← J2-9 CS+ J1-2 CTS/RTS– ← J2-27 CS– J1-44 LL/DCD Twisted pair no. 12 → J2-10 LL J1-45 Circuit_GND — J2-37 SC J1-3 DSR/DTR+ Twisted pair no. 2 ← J2-11 DM+ J1-4 DSR/DTR– ← J2-29 DM– J1-7 DTR/DSR+ Twisted pair no. 4 → J2-12 TR+ J1-8 DTR/DSR– → J2-30 TR– J1-5 DCD/DCD+ Twisted pair no. 3 ← J2-13 RR+ J1-6 DCD/DCD– ← J2-31 RR– J1-13 TxCE/TxC+ Twisted pair no. 7 → J2-17 TT+ J1-14 TxCE/TxC– → J2-35 TT– J1-15 Circuit_GND Twisted pair no. 9 — J2-19 SG J1-16 Circuit_GND — J2-20 RC 1 Any pin not referenced is not connected. Table B-7 EIA-449 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-37) 60 Pin1 Signal Note Direction 37 Pin1 Signal J1-49 MODE_1 Shorting group — — — J1-48 GND J1-46 Shield_GND Single — J2-1 Shield GND J1-28 RxD/TxD+ Twisted pair no. 11 ← J2-4 SD+ J1-27 RxD/TxD– ← J2-22 SD– J1-13 TxCE/TxC+ Twisted pair no. 7 → J2-5 ST+ J1-14 TxCE/TxC– → J2-23 ST– J1-11 TxD/RxD+ Twisted pair no. 6 → J2-6 RD+ J1-12 TxD/RxD– → J2-24 RD– J1-1 CTS/RTS+ Twisted pair no. 1 ← J2-7 RS+ J1-2 CTS/RTS– ← J2-25 RS– J1-24 TxC/RxC+ Twisted pair no. 9 → J2-8 RT+ J1-23 TxC/RxC– → J2-26 RT– J1-9 RTS/CTS+ Twisted pair no. 5 → J2-9 CS+ J1-10 RTS/CTS– → J2-27 CS– J1-29 NIL/LL Twisted pair no. 12 → J2-10 LL J1-30 Circuit_GND — J2-37 SC
  • 74. B-10 APPENDIX B: CABLING SPECIFICATIONS Table B-7 EIA-449 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-37) (continued) 60 Pin1 Signal Note Direction 37 Pin1 Signal J1-7 DTR/DSR+ Twisted pair no. 4 → J2-11 DM+ J1-8 DTR/DSR– → J2-29 DM– J1-3 DSR/DTR+ Twisted pair no. 2 ← J2-12 TR+ J1-4 DSR/DTR– ← J2-30 TR– J1-5 DCD/DCD+ Twisted pair no. 3 → J2-13 RR+ J1-6 DCD/DCD– → J2-31 RR– J1-26 RxC/TxCE+ Twisted pair no. 10 ← J2-17 TT+ J1-25 RxC/TxCE– ← J2-35 TT– J1-15 Circuit_GND Twisted pair no. 8 — J2-19 SG J1-16 Circuit_GND — J2-20 RC 1 Any pin not referenced is not connected. V.35 DTE and DCE Figure B-4 shows the V.35 serial cable assembly. Table B-8 lists the DTE Serial Cable cable pinouts (Part Number ERMV35-CAB). Table B-9 lists the DCE cable Assembly and pinouts (Part Number ERFV35-CAB). Arrows in the tables indicate signal Pinouts direction: s → indicates DTE to DCE s ← indicates DCE to DTE J1-46 60-pin connector (J1) 15-pin connector (J2) 34 J1-45 J2-B J1-16 J2-D J1-15 J2-A J2-C J2-KK J2-MM J1-1 H1975 J2-LL J1-30 Connectors are not to scale J2-NN J1-31 J1-60 Figure B-4 V.35 Serial Cable Assembly
  • 75. Quad Serial NIM Cables B-11 Table B-8 V.35 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to Winchester-Type 34-Pin) 60 Pin1 Signal Note Direction 34 Pin1 Signal J1-49 MODE_1 Shorting Group — — — J1-48 GND J1-50 MODE_0 Shorting Group — — — J1-51 GND J1-52 MODE_DCE J1-53 TxC/NIL Shorting Group — — — J1-54 RxC_TxCE J1-55 RxD/TxD J1-56 GND J1-46 Shield_GND Single — J2-A Frame GND J1-45 Circuit_GND Twisted pair no. 12 — J2-B Circuit GND Shield — — Shield — J1-42 RTS/CTS Twisted pair no. 9 → J2-C RTS Shield — — Shield — J1-35 CTS/RTS Twisted pair no. 8 ← J2-D CTS Shield — — Shield — J1-34 DSR/DTR Twisted pair no. 7 ← J2-E DSR Shield — — Shield — J1-33 DCD/LL Twisted pair no. 6 ← J2-F RLSD Shield — — Shield — J1-43 DTR/DSR Twisted pair no. 10 → J2-H DTR Shield — — Shield — J1-44 LL/DCD Twisted pair no. 11 → J2-K LT Shield –— — Shield — J1-18 TxD/RxD+ Twisted pair no. 1 → J2-P SD+ J1-17 TxD/RxD– → J2-S SD– J1-28 RxD/TxD+ Twisted pair no. 5 ← J2-R RD+ J1-27 RxD/TxD– ← J2-T RD– J1-20 TxCE/TxC+ Twisted pair no. 2 → J2-U SCTE+ J1-19 TxCE/TxC– → J2-W SCTE– J1-26 RxC/TxCE+ Twisted pair no. 4 ← J2-V SCR+ J1-25 RxC/TxCE– ← J2-X SCR– J1-24 TxC/RxC+ Twisted pair no. 3 ← J2-Y SCT+ J1-23 TxC/RxC– ← J2-AA SCT– 1 Any pin not referenced is not connected.
  • 76. B-12 APPENDIX B: CABLING SPECIFICATIONS Table B-9 V.35 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to Winchester-Type 34-Pin) 60 Pin1 Signal Note Direction 34 Pin1 Signal J1-49 MODE_1 Shorting group — — — J1-48 GND J1-50 MODE_0 Shorting Group — — — J1-51 GND J1-53 TxC/NIL Shorting Group — — — J1-54 RxC_TxCE J1-55 RxD/TxD J1-56 GND J1-46 Shield_GND Single — J2-A Frame GND J1-45 Circuit_GND Twisted pair no. 12 — J2-B Circuit GND Shield — — Shield — J1-35 CTS/RTS Twisted pair no. 8 ← J2-C RTS Shield — — Shield — J1-42 RTS/CTS Twisted pair no. 9 → J2-D CTS Shield — — Shield — J1-43 DTR/DSR Twisted pair no. 10 → J2-E DSR Shield — — Shield — J1-44 LL/DCD Twisted pair no. 11 → J2-F RLSD Shield — — Shield — J1-34 DSR/DTR Twisted pair no. 7 ← J2-H DTR Shield — — Shield — J1-33 DCD/LL Twisted pair no. 6 ← J2-K LT Shield — — Shield — J1-28 RxD/TxD+ Twisted pair no. 5 ← J2-P SD+ J1-27 RxD/TxD– ← J2-S SD– J1-18 TxD/RxD+ Twisted pair no. 1 → J2-R RD+ J1-17 TxD/RxD– → J2-T RD– J1-26 RxC/TxCE+ Twisted pair no. 4 ← J2-U SCTE+ J1-25 RxC/TxCE– ← J2-W SCTE– J1-22 NIL/RxC+ Twisted pair no. 3 → J2-V SCR+ J1-21 NIL/RxC– → J2-X SCR– J1-20 TxCE/TxC+ Twisted pair no. 2 → J2-Y SCT+ J1-19 TxCE/TxC– → J2-AA SCT– 1 Any pin not referenced is not connected.
  • 77. Quad Serial NIM Cables B-13 X.21 DTE and DCE Figure B-5 shows the X.21 serial cable assembly. Table B-10 lists the Serial Cable Pinouts DTE cable pinouts (Part Number ERMX21-CAB). Table B-11 lists the DCE (DB-15) cable pinouts (Part Number ERFX21-CAB). Arrows in the tables indicate signal direction: s → indicates DTE to DCE s ← indicates DCE to DTE J1-46 60-pin connector (J1) 15-pin connector (J2) J1-45 J2-8 J1-16 J2-15 J1-15 H1974 J1-1 J2-9 J1-30 J2-1 Connectors are not to scale J1-31 J1-60 Figure B-5 X.21 Cable Assembly Table B-10 X.21 DTE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-15) 1 60 Pin Signal Note Direction 15 Pin1 Signal J1-48 GND Shorting Group — — — J1-47 MODE_2 J1-51 GND Shorting Group — — — J1-52 MODE_DCE J1-46 Shield_GND Single — J2-1 Shield GND J1-11 TxD/RxD+ Twisted pair no. 3 → J2-2 Transmit+ J1-12 TxD/RxD– → J2-9 Transmit– J1-9 RTS/CTS+ Twisted pair no. 2 → J2-3 Control+ J1-10 RTS/CTS– → J2-10 Control– J1-28 RxD/TxD+ Twisted pair no. 6 ← J2-4 Receive+ J1-27 RxD/TxD– ← J2-11 Receive– J1-1 CTS/RTS+ Twisted pair no. 1 ← J2-5 Indication+ J1-2 CTS/RTS– ← J2-12 Indication– J1-26 RxC/TxCE+ Twisted pair no. 5 ← J2-6 Timing+ J1-25 RxC/TxCE– ← J2-13 Timing– J1-15 Control_GND Twisted pair no. 4 — J2-8 Control GND Shield — Shield — 1 Any pin not referenced is not connected.
  • 78. B-14 APPENDIX B: CABLING SPECIFICATIONS Table B-11 X.21 DCE Cable Pinouts (DB-60 to DB-15) 60 Pin1 Signal Note Direction 15 Pin1 Signal J1-48 GND Shorting Group — — — J1-47 MODE_2 J1-46 Shield_GND Single — J2-1 Shield GND J1-28 RxD/TxD+ Twisted pair no. 6 ← J2-2 Transmit+ J1-27 RxD/TxD– ← J2-9 Transmit– J1-1 CTS/RTS+ Twisted pair no. 1 ← J2-3 Control+ J1-2 CTS/RTS– ← J2-10 Control– J1-11 TxD/RxD+ Twisted pair no. 3 → J2-4 Receive+ J1-12 TxD/RxD– → J2-11 Receive– J1-9 RTS/CTS+ Twisted pair no. 2 → J2-5 Indication+ J1-10 RTS/CTS– → J2-12 Indication– J1-24 TxC/RxC+ Twisted pair no. 4 → J2-6 Timing+ J1-23 TxC/RxC– → J2-13 Timing– J1-15 Control_GND Twisted pair no. 5 — J2-8 Control GND Shield — — Shield — J1-48 GND Shorting Group — — — J1-47 MODE_2 1 Any pin not referenced is not connected.
  • 79. VIRTUAL CONFIGURATION C REGISTER The CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Module has a 16-bit virtual configuration register, which is written into the nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM). This appendix describes the virtual configuration register (VCR), the factory-default settings for the register, and the procedures for changing those settings. This appendix contains the following sections: s VCR Tasks s VCR Bit Definitions s Changing VCR Settings s Enabling Booting From Flash Memory VCR Tasks Use the virtual configuration register to perform the following tasks: s Set and display the configuration register value s Force the system into bootstrap mode s Select a boot source and default boot filename s Enable or disable the Break function s Control broadcast addresses s Set the console terminal baud rate s Load operating software from ROM s Enable booting from a TFTP (Trivial File Server Protocol) server
  • 80. C-2 APPENDIX C: VIRTUAL CONFIGURATION REGISTER VCR Bit Definitions Table C-1 defines each of the virtual configuration register memory bits. To avoid confusion and possibly disabling the router, remember that valid register settings may be combinations of settings and not just the individual settings listed in Table C-1. For example, the factory-default value of 0x2102 is a combination of settings. Table C-1 Virtual Configuration Register Bit Values Bit No.* Hex Value Meaning 00 to 03 0x0000 to Boot field 0x000F 06 0x0040 Causes system software to ignore NVRAM contents 07 0x0080 OEM bit enabled 08 0x0100 Break function disabled 09 — Unused 10 0x0400 IP broadcast with all zeros 11 to 12 0x0800 to Engine management terminal baud rate 0x1000 13 0x2000 Boot default ROM software if network boot fails 14 0x4000 IP broadcasts do not have net numbers 15 0x8000 Enable diagnostic messages and ignore NVRAM contents * The factory-default value for the configuration register is 0x2102. This value is a combination of settings (bit 13 = 0x2000, bit 8 = 0x0100, and bits 00 through 03 = 0x0002). Boot Field The lowest four bits of the virtual configuration register (bits 3, 2, 1, and 0) form the boot field. The boot field specifies a binary number. Table C-2 defines the boot field binary values. Table C-2 Boot Field Values (Configuration Register Bits 00 to 03) Bit Boot Field Meaning 0 0x1 Stays at the system bootstrap prompt. 1 0x2 Boots system image in system ROM. 2 to 3 0x4 to 0xF Specifies a default netboot filename and enables boot system commands that override the default netboot filename.
  • 81. VCR Bit Definitions C-3 Setting Boot Field Values To set the boot field values: s If you set a boot field value to 0, you must boot the operating system manually. To boot the operating system manually, enter the B command at the bootstrap prompt: > b [tftp] flash IJ09140Z For more information on the B command, refer to the Cisco Systems Router Products Configuration Guide. s If you set the boot field value to a value in the range of 0x2 through 0xF, and a valid system boot command is stored in the configuration file, then the router module boots the system software as directed by that value. s If you set the boot field to any other bit pattern, the router module uses the resulting number to form a default boot filename for netbooting (refer to Default Boot Filenames on page C-3). In the following example, the virtual configuration register is set to boot the router module from Flash memory and to ignore the Break function at the next reboot of the router module: router# configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. Edit with DELETE, CTRL/W, and CTRL/U; end with CTRL/Z config-register 0x102 boot system flash IJ09140Z ^Z router# Default Boot Filenames The network server creates a default boot filename as part of the automatic configuration process and stores the binary value in the virtual configuration register. To form the boot filename, the server starts with cisco and links the octal equivalent of the boot field number, a hyphen, and the processor-type name. Table C-3 lists the default boot filenames or actions for the processor.
  • 82. C-4 APPENDIX C: VIRTUAL CONFIGURATION REGISTER A boot system configuration command in the router module configuration in NVRAM overrides the default netboot filename. Table C-3 Default Boot Filenames Action/ Filename Bit 3 Bit 2 Bit 1 Bit 0 bootstrap mode 0 0 0 0 ROM software 0 0 0 1 cisco2-4500 0 0 1 0 cisco3-4500 0 0 1 1 cisco4-4500 0 1 0 0 cisco5-4500 0 1 0 1 cisco6-4500 0 1 1 0 cisco7-4500 0 1 1 1 cisco10-4500 1 0 0 0 cisco11-4500 1 0 0 1 cisco12-4500 1 0 1 0 cisco13-4500 1 0 1 1 cisco14-4500 1 1 0 0 cisco15-4500 1 1 0 1 cisco16-4500 1 1 1 0 cisco17-4500 1 1 1 1 Break Function Bit 8 controls the way the server interprets the engine management terminal Break key. The server interprets the Break key in the following ways: s Setting bit 8 (the factory default) causes the processor to ignore the console Break key. s Clearing bit 8 causes the processor to interpret the Break key as a command to force the system into the bootstrap monitor, which halts normal operation. A Break command can be sent during the first 60 seconds of a system reboot, regardless of the configuration settings.
  • 83. VCR Bit Definitions C-5 Internet Protocol Bit 10 controls the host portion of the Internet Protocol (IP) broadcast Broadcast Address address as follows: s Setting bit 10 causes the processor to use all zeros. s Clearing bit 10 (the factory default) causes the processor to use all ones. Bit 10 interacts with bit 14, which controls the network and subnet portions of the broadcast address. Table C-4 lists the combined effect of bits 10 and 14. Table C-4 Broadcast Address Destination Settings Bit 14 Bit 10 Address (<net> <host>) Off Off <ones> <ones> Off On <zeros> <zeros> On On <net> <zeros> On Off <net> <ones> Engine Management Bits 11 and 12 determine the baud rate of the engine management Terminal Baud Rate terminal. Table C-5 lists the bit settings for the four available baud rates. The factory-set default baud rate is 9600. Table C-5 Engine Management Terminal Baud Rate Settings Baud Bit 12 Bit 11 9600 0 0 4800 0 1 1200 1 0 2400 1 1 Bootload Failure Bit 13 determines the server response to a bootload failure as follows: Response s Setting bit 13 causes the server to load operating software from ROM after five unsuccessful attempts to load a boot file from the network. s Clearing bit 13 causes the server to continue attempting to load a boot file from the network indefinitely. The default setting for bit 13 is cleared.
  • 84. C-6 APPENDIX C: VIRTUAL CONFIGURATION REGISTER NVRAM Disable Bit 15 determines whether or not the server uses the contents of NVRAM as follows: s Setting bit 15 causes the server to ignore the configuration file in NVRAM and to enable diagnostic messages. s Clearing bit 15 causes the server to use the contents of NVRAM. Changing VCR To change the values in the configuration register while running the Settings system software: 1 Enter the ENABLE command and your password to enter the privileged level. router> enable Password: router# 2 At the privileged-level system prompt (router#), enter the CONFIGURE TERMINAL command. The system displays information about the configuration commands. router# configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. Edit with DELETE, CTRL/W, and CTRL/U; end with CTRL/Z 3 To set the contents of the configuration register, enter the CONFIG-REGISTER command, where yyyy is a hexadecimal number preceded by 0x (refer to the Note on page C-2) config-register 0xyyyy 4 Exit configuration mode by pressing Ctrl-Z. The new value settings are saved to memory. However, the new settings do not take effect until the system software reloads when the router module engine reboots. 5 To display the configuration register value currently in effect and the value that will be used at the next reload, enter the exec mode SHOW VERSION command. The value appears on the last line of the screen display as in the following example: Configuration register is 0x142 (will be 0x102 at next reload)
  • 85. Enabling Booting From Flash Memory C-7 6 Reboot the router module engine. The new value takes effect. Configuration register changes take effect only when the server restarts. To restart the server, power off and then power on the router module or issue a reload command from the engine management terminal. Enabling Booting To enable booting from Flash memory, set configuration register bits 3, From Flash Memory 2, 1, and 0 to a value between 2 and 15. To enter configuration mode, while in the system software image specify a Flash filename from which to boot. For example: router# configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. Edit with DELETE, CTRL/W, and CTRL/U; end with CTRL/Z boot system flash IJ09140Z To disable the Break key and enable the BOOT SYSTEM FLASH command, enter the CONFIG-REGISTER command with the value shown in the following example: router# configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. Edit with DELETE, CTRL/W, and CTRL/U; end with CTRL/Z config-reg 0x2102 ^Z router#
  • 86. FDDI PRECAUTIONS D The information in this appendix is a requirement of the CDRH division of the FDA. This appendix contains the following sections: s FDDI Laser Safety Information s Processing FDDI Laser Safety The FDDI components in the CoreBuilder™ 5000 Network Router Information Module comply with the following standards for CLASS 1 LASER safety: s 21 CRF 1040.10 and 1040.11 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (FDA) s IEC Publications 825 (International Electrotechnical Commission) s CENELEC EN 60825 (European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization) When operated within its performance specification limits, the laser transceiver output meets the CLASS 1 accessible emission limit of all three standards. Class 1 levels of laser radiation are not considered to be hazardous. The use of optical instruments increases eye hazard. When viewing the output optical port the power must be removed from the transmitter section. The label in Figure D-1 satisfies the safety certification requirements for the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module.
  • 87. D-2 APPENDIX D: FDDI PRECAUTIONS CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT IEC 825, Class 1 LED Device. For connection only to Class 1 LED Devices. Figure D-1 Required Class 1 Laser Product Label Processing The Laser transceiver may be wave soldered and aqueous rinsed so long as the process plug, provided with each unit, is properly installed on the units optical port. The transceiver case may not be exposed to solvents such as 1-1-1 - trichloroethane, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, or trichloroethylene. The transceiver pins may be wave-soldered at 240 oC for up to 10 seconds. The transceiver case deformation temperature is 160 oC.
  • 88. TECHNICAL SUPPORT E 3Com provides access to technical support information through a variety of services. This appendix describes these services. Information contained in this appendix is correct at time of publication. For the very latest, access 3Com Corporation’s World Wide Web site as described below. This appendix describes: s Online Technical Services s Support From Your Network Supplier s Support From 3Com Corporation s Returning Products for Repair s Accessing the 3Com MIB s Contacting 3Com Technical Publications Online Technical 3Com offers worldwide product support 24 hours a day, 7 days a Services week, through the following online systems: s World Wide Web Site s 3Com Bulletin Board Service s 3ComFacts Automated Fax Service s 3ComForum on CompuServe Online Service
  • 89. E-2 APPENDIX E: TECHNICAL SUPPORT World Wide Web Site Access the latest networking information on 3Com Corporation’s World Wide Web site by entering our URL into your Internet browser: http://www.3Com.com/ This service features news and information about 3Com products, customer service and support, 3Com Corporation’s latest news releases, NetAge Magazine, and more. 3Com Bulletin Board 3ComBBS contains patches, software, and drivers for all 3Com Service products, as well as technical articles. This service is available through modem or ISDN 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Access by Analog Modem To reach the service by modem, set your modem to 8 data bits, no parity, and 1 stop bit. Call the telephone number nearest you: Country Data Rate Telephone Number Australia up to 14400 bps 61 2 9955 2073 Brazil up to 14400 bps 55 11 547 9666 France up to 14400 bps 33 1 6986 6954 Germany up to 28800 bps 4989 62732 188 Hong Kong up to 14400 bps 852 2537 5608 Italy (fee required) up to 14400 bps 39 2 27300680 Japan up to 14400 bps 81 3 3345 7266 Mexico up to 28800 bps 52 5 520 7853 P. R. of China up to 14400 bps 86 10 684 92351 Singapore up to 14400 bps 65 534 5693 Taiwan up to 14400 bps 886 2 377 5840 U.K. up to 28800 bps 44 1442 438278 U.S.A. up to 28800 bps 1 408 980 8204 Access by Digital Modem ISDN users can call 3ComBBS using a digital modem for fast access up to 56 Kbps. To access 3ComBBS using ISDN, use the following number: 408 654 2703
  • 90. Online Technical Services E-3 3ComFacts 3Com Corporation’s interactive fax service, 3ComFactsSM, provides data Automated Fax sheets, technical articles, diagrams, and troubleshooting instructions on Service 3Com products 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call 3ComFacts using your Touch-Tone telephone using one of these international access numbers: Country Telephone Number Hong Kong 852 2537 5610 U.K. 44 1442 278279 U.S.A. 1 408 727 7021 Local access numbers are available within the following countries: Telephone Telephone Country Number Country Number Australia 1 800 123853 Netherlands 06 0228049 Belgium 0800 71279 Norway 800 11062 Denmark 800 17319 Portugal 0505 442 607 Finland 98 001 4444 Russia (Moscow only) 956 0815 France 05 90 81 58 Spain 900 964 445 Germany 0130 81 80 63 Sweden 020 792954 Italy 1678 99085 U.K. 0800 626403 3ComForum on 3ComForum is a CompuServe-based service containing patches, CompuServe Online software, drivers, and technical articles about 3Com products, as well Service as a messaging section for peer support. To use 3ComForum, you need a CompuServe® account. To use 3ComForum: 1 Log on to CompuServe. 2 Type go threecom 3 Press Return to view the 3ComForum main menu.
  • 91. E-4 APPENDIX E: TECHNICAL SUPPORT Support From Your If additional assistance is required, contact your network supplier. Network Supplier Several suppliers are authorized 3Com service partners who are qualified to provide a variety of services, including network planning, installation, hardware maintenance, application training, and support services. If you contact your network supplier for assistance, have the following information ready: s Diagnostic error messages s A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels s Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable If you are unable to contact your network supplier, refer to the following section on how to contact 3Com.
  • 92. Support From 3Com Corporation E-5 Support From If you are unable to receive support from your network supplier, 3Com Corporation technical support contracts are available from 3Com. Contact your local 3Com sales office to locate your authorized service provider using one of the following numbers: Regional Sales Office Telephone Number Regional Sales Office Telephone Number 3Com Corporation 3Com Ireland 353 1 820 7077 U.S.A. 800 NET 3Com or 3Com Japan 81 3 3345 7251 1 408 764 5000 3Com Latin America 3Com ANZA Argentina 54 1 312 3266 East 61 2 9937 5000 Brazil 55 11 546 0869 West 61 3 9866 8022 Chile 56 2 633 9242 3Com Asia Limited Colombia 57 1 629 4110 China 86 10 68492 568 (Beijing) Mexico 52 5 520 7841 86 21 6374 0220 Ext 6115 Peru 51 1 221 5399 (Shanghai) Venezuela 58 2 953 8122 Hong Kong 852 2501 1111 3Com Mediterraneo India 91 11 644 3974 Italy 39 2 253011 (Milan) Indonesia 62 21 523 9181 39 6 5279941 (Rome) Korea 82 2 319 4711 Malaysia 60 3 732 7910 3Com Middle East 971 4 349049 Singapore 65 538 9368 3Com Nordic AB Taiwan 886 2 377 5850 Denmark 45 39 27 85 00 Thailand 662 231 8151 4 Finland 358 0 435 420 67 3Com Benelux B.V. Norway 47 22 18 40 03 Belgium 32 725 0202 Sweden 46 8 632 56 00 Netherlands 31 30 6029700 3Com Russia 007 095 2580940 3Com Canada 3Com South Africa 27 11 807 4397 Calgary 403 265 3266 Montreal 514 683 3266 3Com UK Limited 44 131 2478558 (Edinburgh) Ottawa 613 566 7055 44 161 8737717 (Manchester) Toronto 416 498 3266 44 1628 897000 (Marlow) Vancouver 604 434 3266 3Com France 33 1 69 86 68 00 3Com GmbH Austria 43 1 5134323 Czech and Slovak Republics 42 2 21845 800 Germany 49 30 3498790 (Berlin) 49 89 627320 (Munich) Hungary 36 1 250 83 41 Poland 48 22 6451351 Switzerland 41 31 996 14 14
  • 93. E-6 APPENDIX E: TECHNICAL SUPPORT Returning Products Before you send a product directly to 3Com for repair, you must first for Repair obtain a Return Materials Authorization (RMA) number. Products sent to 3Com without RMA numbers are returned to the sender unopened, at the sender’s expense. To obtain an RMA number, call or fax: Country Telephone Number Fax Number U.S.A. and Canada 1 800 876 3266, option 2 408 764 7120 Latin America 1 408 326 7801 408 764 7120 Europe, South Africa and 44 1442 438125 44 1442 435822 Middle East Outside Europe, U.S.A., 1 408 326 7804 1 408 764 7120 and Canada Accessing the The 3Com Management Information Base (MIB) describes commands 3Com MIB that enable you to manage 3Com SNMP-based products. The MIB is available over the Internet on an anonymous FTP server. Updates to these MIBs are released as new 3Com products are introduced. To access Internet versions: 1 FTP to ftp.3com.com (151.104.9.65). 2 Enter the login name anonymous. 3 Enter your full Internet e-mail address as the password (for example, jdoe@company.com). 4 Change to the /pub/mibs directory using the command cd/pub/mibs. 5 Read the readisd.txt file to determine the MIB or MIBs you need to manage your 3Com products. 6 To view the 3Com MIB, OID, or schema entries, enter the ls command. s To pause the display, press Ctrl+S. s To continue the display, press Ctrl+Q. 7 Copy the MIB, OID, or schema files to your current directory using the appropriate command (for example, get isd.mib). 8 Exit the FTP session using the quit command.
  • 94. Contacting 3Com Technical Publications E-7 Contacting 3Com If you have comments or questions on 3Com Technical Publications Technical documents, contact the Technical Publications group by fax at Publications (508) 229-1551. 02/06/97
  • 95. INDEX Cisco commands Numerics b (boot) C-3 3Com Bulletin Board Service (3ComBBS) E-2 Boot System 5-5, C-4 3Com parameters 3-5 to 3-6 Boot System Flash C-7 3Com sales offices E-5 Break (interrupt) C-4 3Com URL E-2 Config-register C-3, C-6, C-7 3ComFacts E-3 Configure Terminal C-3, C-6 3ComForum E-3 Enable 5-5, C-6 Flash-related C-2 i (initialize) 5-4 A o/r (reset) 5-4 Reload C-7 ATM Show Configuration 5-5 connecting the NIM 2-12 Show Version C-6 LEDs 4-9 Cisco parameters 3-3 to 3-5 Audience of Manual 1 CiscoWorks 1-9 Auxiliary port Commands connections 3-3 Cisco see Cisco commands DMM B see DMM commands b (boot) command C-3 Compression 1-9 Base model 1-3 CompuServe E-3 Baud-rate settings C-5 Config-register command C-3, C-6, C-7 Boot field C-4 Configuration 3-2 to 3-6 Boot System command 5-5, C-4 3Com parameters 3-5 to 3-6 Boot System Flash command C-7 Cisco NIM connections 3-3 Booting Cisco parameters 3-3 to 3-5 from Flash memory C-7 displaying 4-10 to 4-13 Bootload-failure response C-5 network connection 3-5 Break (interrupt) command C-4 NVRAM 3-2 bulletin board service E-2 overview 3-1 ring speed 3-4, 3-5 unmanaged hub 3-2 C Configure Terminal command C-3, C-6 Cable Connections auxiliary port B-2 ATM 2-12 console port B-2 Auxiliary port 3-3 DCE 5-2 console port 3-2 DTE 5-2 FDDI MM, DAS 2-7 EIA/TIA-232 DTE/DCE B-5 FDDI MM, SAS 2-8 EIA/TIA-449 DTE/DCE B-8 FDDI SM, DAS 2-10 EIA-530 DTE B-4 management terminal 3-2 multi-mode fiber-optic 2-7 NIM 2-7 to 2-11 single mode fiber-optic 2-8 Optical bypass switch 2-9 V.35 DTE/DCE B-10 Quad Serial 2-11 X.21 DTE/DCE B-13 Quad Serial model 2 - 1 1
  • 96. 2 INDEX Connector auxiliary port 3-3 E console port 3-2 EIA/TIA-232 DTE/DCE cable pinouts B-5 FC type 2-10 EIA/TIA-449 DTE/DCE cable pinouts B-8 MIC type 2-7 EIA-530 DTE cable pinouts B-4 Console port Electrical specifications A-3 connections 3-2 Electrostatic discharge settings C-5 precautionary procedures 2-1 troubleshooting 5-3 Enable command 5-5, C-6 conventions Enterprise software feature set 1-7 text, About This Guide 3 Environmental specifications A-3 CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module architecture 1-2 configuration 3-2 to 3-6 F FDDI support 1-6 fax service. See 3ComFacts functions 1-1 FC connector 2-10 hot swap capability 1-10 FCC notice ii models 1-3 FDDI network control 1-9 connecting the MM, DAS model 2-7 network management 1-9 connecting the MM, SAS model 2-8 precautionary procedures 2-1 connecting the Quad Serial model 2-11 product description 1-1 connecting the SM, DAS model 2-10 purposes 1-1 laser safety information D-1 quick installation 2-2 multi-mode fiber 1-6 reliability 1-10 precautions D-1 typical applications 1-4, 1-5 single-mode fiber 1-6 unpacking 2-2 supported interfaces 1-6 WAN support 1-6 FDDI MM, DAS model 1-3 FDDI MM, SAS model 1-3 FDDI SM, DAS model 1-3 D Filenames DAS default for netbooting C-4 Multi-mode 2-7 Flash memory single mode 2-10 booting from C-7 Data compression 1-9 Flash-related commands C-2 DCE cable 5-2 Desktop plus IBM software feature set 1-7 Desktop software feature set 1-7 G Dial-on-demand routing 1-9 General specifications A-2 DIP switch restoring base board positions 2-4 DMM commands SHOW MODULE 4-11 H SHOW MODULE VERBOSE 4-11 Hardware components 1-2 SHOW PORT 4-11 Hot swap capability 1-10, 2-5 SHOW PORT VERBOSE 4-12 SHOW VERSION 5-4 DTE cable 5-2 Dual Attachment Station see DAS
  • 97. INDEX 3 I N i (initialize) command 5-4 Netboot C-4 Installation default filenames C-4 grounding techniques 2-1 Network hot swap capability 2-5 control 1-9 preparations 2-4 Network connection procedure 2-5 configuration 3-5 quick 2-2 limitations 3-6 Interfaces Network Interface Connections Cisco 3-1 see NIM relation to 3Com ports 3-1 Network management 1-9 Internet Protocol attaching a terminal 3-2 see IP TELNET 1-9 Interrupt network supplier support E-4 see Break (interrupt) command NIM IP broadcast address architecture 3-3 IP/IPX software feature set 1-7 ATM 2-12 configuration 3-3 connections 2-7 to 2-11 J FDDI MM, DAS 2-7 Jumper plugs FDDI MM, SAS 2-10 restoring base board positions 2-4 FDDI SM, DAS 2-8 restoring CPU board positions 2-5 Quad Serial 2-11 Non-volatile random access memory see NVRAM NVRAM K Cisco C-6 Key, Break (interrupt) C-4 configuration 3-2 L O Laser safety D-1 o/r (reset) command 5-4 certification label D-1 Online technical services E-1 LEDs Operating malfunctions 5-3, 5-4 ATM 4-9 Optical bypass switch 2-9 common 4-2 FDDI 4-6 monitoring 4-1 to 4-8 Quad Serial 4-7, 4-9 P Parameters Cisco 3-3 to 3-5 Password M recovering 5-4 Mechanical specifications A-3 Pinouts Memory specifications A-2 auxiliary port cable B-2 MIBs console port cable B-2 3Com E-6 EIA/TIA-232 DTE/DCE serial cable B-5 MIC connector 2-7 EIA/TIA-449 DTE/DCE serial cable B-8 Models 1-3 EIA-530 DTE serial cable B-4 base 1-3 V.35 DTE/DCE serial cable B-10 FDDI MM, DAS 1-3 X.21 DTE/DCE serial cable B-13 FDDI MM, SAS 1-3 Ports FDDI SM, DAS 1-3 3Com 3-1 Quad Serial 1-3 relation to Cisco interfaces 3-1 Multi-mode fiber FDDI interface 1-6 Precautionary procedures 2-1
  • 98. 4 INDEX Protocol translation 1-7 Specifications Protocols supported electrical A-3 FDDI 1-6 environmental A-3 WAN 1-6 general A-2 mechanical A-3 memory A-2 Q System Quad Serial model 1-3 software C-7 QuadSerial connecting 2-11 T technical support E-1 R 3Com URL E-2 Recovering a lost password 5-4 bulletin board service E-2 Reliability 1-10 fax service E-3 Reload command C-7 network suppliers E-4 returning products for repair E-6 product repair E-6 Ring Speed using CompuServe E-3 configuring 3-4, 3-5 TELNET 1-9 Routing verifying port configurations 5-3 dial-on-demand 1-9 Troubleshooting console port 5-3 network connection 5-2 operating malfunctions 5-3, 5-4 S software 5-1 SAS startup 5-1 Multi-mode 2-8 WAN connections 5-2 Show Configuration Cisco command 5-5 Typical applications SHOW MODULE command 4-11 FDDI model 1-5 SHOW MODULE VERBOSE command 4-11 Quad Serial model 1-4 SHOW PORT command 4-11 SHOW PORT Status field 4-13 SHOW PORT VERBOSE command 4-12 Show Version Cisco command C-6 U SHOW VERSION command 5-4 Unpacking 2-2 Simple Network Management Protocol URL E-2 see SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) commands E-6 V Single Attachment Station V.35 DTE/DCE cable pinouts B-10 see SAS Virtual Configuration Register 5-5 Single mode fiber FDDI interface 1-6 bit definitions C-2 to C-6 SNMP 1-9 boot field C-4 SNMP. See Simple Network Management Protocol changing C-3, C-6 Software loading from Flash memory C-7 Software feature sets 1-7 to 1-8 W Desktop 1-7 World Wide Web E-2 Desktop plus IBM 1-7 WWW E-2 Enterprise 1-7 IP/IPX 1-7 X X.21 DTE/DCE cable pinouts B-13
  • 99. 3Com Corporation LIMITED WARRANTY For purposes of this warranty, the CoreBuilder 5000 Network Router Module is considered an Internetworking product. HARDWARE 3Com warrants its hardware products to be free from defects in workmanship and materials, under normal use and service, for the following lengths of time from the date of purchase from 3Com or its Authorized Reseller: Internetworking products 1 year Network adapters Lifetime Ethernet stackable hubs and Unmanaged Ethernet fixed port repeaters Lifetime* (1 year if not registered) *Power supply and fans in the stackable hubs and unmanaged repeaters 1 year Other hardware products 1 year Spare parts and spares kits 90 days If a product does not operate as warranted above during the applicable warranty period, 3Com shall, at its option and expense, repair the defective product or part, deliver to Customer an equivalent product or part to replace the defective item, or refund to Customer the purchase price paid for the defective product. All products that are replaced will become the property of 3Com. Replacement products may be new or reconditioned. Any replaced or repaired product or part has a 90-day warranty or the remainder of the initial warranty period, whichever is longer. 3Com shall not be responsible for any software, firmware, information, or memory data of Customer contained in, stored on, or integrated with any products returned to 3Com for repair, whether under warranty or not. SOFTWARE 3Com warrants that the software programs licensed from it will perform in substantial conformance to the program specifications therefor for a period of 90 days from the date of purchase from 3Com or its Authorized Reseller. 3Com warrants the media containing software against failure during the warranty period. No updates are provided. 3Com’s sole obligation with respect to this express warranty shall be (at 3Com’s discretion) to refund the purchase price paid by Customer for any defective software products, or to replace any defective media with software which substantially conforms to 3Com’s applicable published specifications. Customer assumes responsibility for the selection of the appropriate applications program and associated reference materials. 3Com makes no warranty or representation that its software products will work in combination with any hardware or applications software products provided by third parties, that the operation of the software products will be uninterrupted or error free, or that all defects in the software products will be corrected. For any third-party products listed in the 3Com software product documentation or specifications as being compatible, 3Com will make reasonable efforts to provide compatibility, except where the noncompatibility is caused by a “bug” or defect in the third party’s product. STANDARD WARRANTY Standard warranty service for hardware products may be obtained by delivering the defective product, SERVICE accompanied by a copy of the dated proof of purchase, to 3Com’s Corporate Service Center or to an Authorized 3Com Service Center during the applicable warranty period. Standard warranty service for software products may be obtained by telephoning 3Com’s Corporate Service Center or an Authorized 3Com Service Center, within the warranty period. Products returned to 3Com’s Corporate Service Center must be pre-authorized by 3Com with a Return Material Authorization (RMA) number marked on the outside of the package, and sent prepaid, insured, and packaged appropriately for safe shipment. The repaired or replaced item will be shipped to Customer, at 3Com’s expense, not later than 30 days after receipt of the defective product by 3Com. WARRANTIES EXCLUSIVE IF A 3COM PRODUCT DOES NOT OPERATE AS WARRANTED ABOVE, CUSTOMER’S SOLE REMEDY FOR BREACH OF THAT WARRANTY SHALL BE REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE PAID, AT 3COM’S OPTION. TO THE FULL EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, THE FOREGOING WARRANTIES AND REMEDIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND ARE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, TERMS, OR CONDITIONS, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, EITHER IN FACT OR BY OPERATION OF LAW, STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE, INCLUDING WARRANTIES, TERMS, OR CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND SATISFACTORY QUALITY. 3COM NEITHER ASSUMES NOR AUTHORIZES ANY OTHER PERSON TO ASSUME FOR IT ANY OTHER LIABILITY IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, OR USE OF ITS PRODUCTS.
  • 100. 3COM SHALL NOT BE LIABLE UNDER THIS WARRANTY IF ITS TESTING AND EXAMINATION DISCLOSE THAT THE ALLEGED DEFECT IN THE PRODUCT DOES NOT EXIST OR WAS CAUSED BY CUSTOMER’S OR ANY THIRD PERSON’S MISUSE, NEGLECT, IMPROPER INSTALLATION OR TESTING, UNAUTHORIZED ATTEMPTS TO REPAIR OR MODIFY, OR ANY OTHER CAUSE BEYOND THE RANGE OF THE INTENDED USE, OR BY ACCIDENT, FIRE, LIGHTNING, OR OTHER HAZARD. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY TO THE FULL EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, 3COM ALSO EXCLUDES FOR ITSELF AND ITS SUPPLIERS ANY LIABILITY, WHETHER BASED IN CONTRACT OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE), FOR INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR PUNITIVE DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, OR FOR LOSS OF REVENUE OR PROFITS, LOSS OF BUSINESS, LOSS OF INFORMATION OR DATA, OR OTHER FINANCIAL LOSS ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, USE, PERFORMANCE, FAILURE, OR INTERRUPTION OF ITS PRODUCTS, EVEN IF 3COM OR ITS AUTHORIZED RESELLER HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES, AND LIMITS ITS LIABILITY TO REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE PAID, AT 3COM’S OPTION. THIS DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES WILL NOT BE AFFECTED IF ANY REMEDY PROVIDED HEREIN SHALL FAIL OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE. Some countries, states, or provinces do not allow the exclusion or limitation of implied warranties or the limitation of incidental or consequential damages for certain products supplied to consumers, so the above limitations and exclusions may be limited in their application to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights which may vary depending on local law. GOVERNING LAW This Limited Warranty shall be governed by the laws of the state of California. 3Com Corporation, 5400 Bayfront Plaza, Santa Clara, CA 95052-8145 (408) 764-5000 10/20/96

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