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Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment
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Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment

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  • 1. Canon imageRUNNER Devices in a Wireless Network Environment VeriTest, a division of Lionbridge Technologies, is a leading provider of independent outsourced testing and consulting. VeriTest conducts tests and provides results. VeriTest does not provide any guarantees, warranties or certifications of compatibility, reliability, or suitability to task of the product being tested. VeriTest does not claim that it will find all defects, incompatibilities or anomalies in any product.
  • 2. Table of Contents Purpose of this Document ............................................................................................................... 3 Introduction to Wireless Technology ............................................................................................... 3 How do personal and corporate wireless networks compare? ................................................... 3 What is Bluetooth? ...................................................................................................................... 4 IEEE 802.15.1 Standard ......................................................................................................... 4 What is Wi-Fi? ............................................................................................................................. 4 IEEE 802.11 Standards .......................................................................................................... 4 802.11a............................................................................................................................... 5 802.11b (Wi-Fi) ................................................................................................................... 5 802.11g (Wi-Fi Compatible)................................................................................................ 5 What is spread spectrum? .......................................................................................................... 5 FHSS .................................................................................................................................. 5 DSSS .................................................................................................................................. 5 OFDM ................................................................................................................................. 5 How do the Wi-Fi standards compare?....................................................................................... 6 Are all Wi-Fi products compatible? ............................................................................................. 6 How are Wi-Fi devices connected to a WLAN? .......................................................................... 6 What are some WLAN design considerations? .......................................................................... 7 First Step................................................................................................................................. 7 Path Loss ................................................................................................................................ 7 RF Interference ....................................................................................................................... 7 AP Placement ......................................................................................................................... 7 How secure is Wi-Fi? .................................................................................................................. 7 MAC Address Filtering ............................................................................................................ 8 SSID........................................................................................................................................ 8 WEP ........................................................................................................................................ 8 VPN......................................................................................................................................... 8 IPSec (IP Security) Protocols ................................................................................................. 8 Wireless Compatibility Verification Testing ..................................................................................... 9 Security Settings ..................................................................................................................... 9 Test Procedure for Basic Wireless Configuration................................................................. 10 Test Procedure for Wireless Configuration with a Print Server ............................................ 11 Test Procedure for Wireless Configuration with a Wireless Bridge ...................................... 13 Test Results................................................................................................................................... 14 Using MFPs in a Wi-Fi Environment.............................................................................................. 15 What are the different ways to connect an MFP in a Wi-Fi environment?............................... 15 What are the top points I should tell customers who want to connect their MFP in a Wi-Fi environment?............................................................................................................................. 15 Additional Information.................................................................................................................... 16 Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 2
  • 3. Purpose of this Document The purpose of this document is to introduce the concept of wireless fidelity networks and to present the results of testing performed by VeriTest to verify that Canon imageRUNNER multi- function printers (MFPs) are compatible with wireless industry standards. Introduction to Wireless Technology This section includes an introduction to wireless technology and how it can be used in personal and corporate networking. How do personal and corporate wireless networks compare? There are basically two types of wireless networks that can be used for connecting devices: • Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN): Bluetooth™ technology is used to create a WPAN, also called a “piconet”, to connect all of the Bluetooth-enabled electronic devices immediately surrounding a user, wherever that user is located. (See “Bluetooth” in this document.) • Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN): Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) technology is used to create a WLAN to connect devices in a corporate environment that adhere to the IEEE 802.11 standards for wireless networking. Table 1 compares the wireless network environments and their uses. Table 1. Comparison of Personal and Corporate Wireless Networks Wireless/ Wireless Usage Scenario Standard Network Bluetooth WPAN - Instantly connecting a notebook PC to another Bluetooth enabled notebook to transfer a file. - Walking up to a shared printer and printing a document without connecting a printer cable. - Collaboratively working on a document using Microsoft NetMeeting, where participants are wirelessly connected. - Connecting to the Internet via a cellular phone. Wi-Fi WLAN - Always being connected to a corporate LAN while moving about in an office or campus. - Access to corporate network data at performance levels equivalent to a wire-based LAN connection. - Access to Hot Spots at airports and coffee shops. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 3
  • 4. What is Bluetooth? Bluetooth™ is a low-bandwidth wireless networking technology that was developed to create a short-range (10-meter) wireless voice and data link between many devices such as: • Desktop PCs • Notebook PCs • Personal digital assistants (PDAs) • Cellular phones • Digital Cameras • Test and measurement equipment • Personal Printers Bluetooth includes the following specifications: • Bluetooth communicates on a frequency of 2.45 GHz, which has been set aside by international agreement for the use of industrial, scientific, and medical devices (ISM). • Bluetooth devices are able to communicate with other devices within a 10-meter range. • A data channel hops randomly 1,600 times per second between the 79 (United States and Europe) or 23 (Japan) RF channels. • Bluetooth devices in a piconet share a common communication data channel with a total capacity of 1 megabit per second (Mbps). • A piconet has a master and up to seven slaves. The master transmits in even time slots, slaves in odd time slots. IEEE 802.15.1 Standard The Standards Board of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association (IEEE-SA) has approved the IEEE Standard 802.15.1 ("Wireless MAC and PHY Specifications for Wireless Personal Area Networks (WPANs™). IEEE 802.15.1 is adapted from and is fully compatible with portions of the Bluetooth v1.1 wireless specification. NOTE: Although Bluetooth is a very prominent wireless technology for personal networking, the remainder of this document focuses on the features of Wi-Fi in the corporate printing environment. What is Wi-Fi? Wireless Fidelity, or "Wi-Fi", is the popular term for a high-frequency wireless local area network (WLAN). Wi-Fi technology is rapidly gaining acceptance in many companies as an alternative to a wired LAN and is also being used in many home networks. Many airports, hotels, and fast-food facilities now offer public access to a Wi-Fi network, which are known as “hotspots”. Although many hotspots charge a daily or hourly rate for access, some are free. IEEE 802.11 Standards The IEEE 802.11 standards specify a wireless "over-the-air" interface between a wireless client and a base station or access point, as well as among wireless clients, on a Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN). These standards address both the Physical (PHY) and Media Access Control (MAC) layers and are tailored to resolve compatibility issues between manufacturers of WLAN equipment. All 802.11 standards use the Ethernet protocol and CSMA/CA (carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance) for path sharing. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 4
  • 5. 802.11a The 802.11a specification is a high-performance standard that operates on 12 channels in the 5 GHz frequency band and delivers up to 54 megabits per second (Mbps) data transfer rate (up to five times faster than 802.11b, reducing interference issues, improving quality of streaming media, and providing extra bandwidth for big files). It uses a modulation scheme known as orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) that makes possible data speeds as high as 54 Mbps but, most commonly, communication takes place at 6 Mbps, 12 Mbps, or 24 Mbps. 802.11b (Wi-Fi) The 802.11b (Wi-Fi) standard is the most commonly used standard for wireless networking and wireless broadband. This IEEE standard operates on three channels in the 2.4 GHz, unregulated spectrum. It shares the spectrum with cordless phones, microwave ovens and many Bluetooth products. Using direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) modulation scheme, it transfers data at speeds of 11 Mbps per channel, at distances of up to 300 feet. 802.11g (Wi-Fi Compatible) The 802.11g standard is the most recently approved standard that offers wireless transmission on three channels in the 2.4 GHz band (the same band as 802.11b, only with better security). It operates over relatively short distances at up to 54 Mbps using OFDM. What is spread spectrum? Spread spectrum is a modulation technique that spreads data transmissions across the entire available frequency band in a prearranged scheme. This type of modulation makes the signal less vulnerable to noise, interference, and snooping. Spread spectrum technology also permits many users to share a frequency band with minimal interference from other users and from devices such as microwave ovens. The following paragraphs describe the various spread spectrum technologies in the order of their introduction as industry standards. FHSS With frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS), a transmitting and receiving station are synchronized to “hop” from channel to channel in a predetermined pseudorandom sequence. The prearranged hop sequence is known only to the transmitting and receiving station. In the U.S. and Europe, IEEE 802.11 specifies 79 channels and 78 different hop sequences. If one channel is jammed or noisy, the data is simply retransmitted when the transceiver hops to a clear channel. 802.11 networks using FHSS are limited to 1- and 2-Mbps data rates. DSSS With direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS), each bit to be transmitted is encoded with a redundant pattern called a chip, and the encoded bits are spread across the entire available frequency band. The chipping code used in a transmission is known only to the sending and receiving stations, making it difficult for an intruder to intercept and decipher wireless data encoded in this manner. The redundant pattern also makes it possible to recover data without retransmitting it if one or more bits are damaged or lost during transmission. DSSS is used in 802.11b networks. OFDM Frequency division multiplexing (FDM) is a technology that transmits multiple signals simultaneously over a single transmission path, such as a cable or wireless system. Each signal travels within its own unique frequency range (carrier), which is modulated by the data. Orthogonal FDM's (OFDM) spread spectrum technique distributes the data over a large number of carriers that are spaced apart at precise frequencies. This spacing provides the "orthogonality" in this technique which prevents the demodulators from seeing frequencies other than their own. The benefits of OFDM are high spectral efficiency, resiliency to RF interference, and lower multi- path distortion. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 5
  • 6. How do the Wi-Fi standards compare? Table 2 compares data rates, operating ranges, and environments for the IEEE 802.11a, b, and g standards. Table 2. Comparison of 802.11 Standards Standard Data Rate Operating Range* Environment 85 ft (26 m) - 802.11a 6-24 Mbps ATM systems 165 ft (60 m) 802.11b 11 Mbps 160 ft (48 m) Home 802.11g 54 Mbps 90 ft (27 m) Office * Typical open indoor office environment through cubicle walls. 802.11g is an exciting new technology that offers additional performance, while providing investment protection for 802.11b clients through backward compatibility. By using previous technologies and economies of scale, 802.11g devices are available at little or no additional cost relative to 802.11b. As such, there are many reasons to begin migrating from 802.11b to 802.11g. 802.11g is not, however, a panacea for WLAN capacity issues. When operating in mixed-mode environments, the throughput and capacity improvements are very modest. Even with advances like CTS to Self, and when operating in 802.11g-only mode, capacity will be limited by the small number of available 2.4 GHz channels. Recognizing this, vendors will soon begin providing dual- band 802.11a/g clients at attractive prices. Vendors like Cisco today provide dual radio access points that simultaneously support 5 GHz 802.11a and 2.4 GHz 802.11g for association with almost any type of 802.11 client. As WLAN capacity needs increase, network professionals are well-advised to begin deploying a dual-band infrastructure to access the far greater capacity available with 802.11a. As such, 802.11g should be viewed as a portion of an overall WLAN architecture, not a substitute for 802.11a. 802.11g is a "bridge" technology and an ideal means for migrating from low-capacity 802.11b networks to the high-capacity, dual-band WLANs of the very near future. Are all Wi-Fi products compatible? The Wi-Fi Alliance is a non-profit association formed in 1999 to certify interoperability of wireless LAN products based on the IEEE 802.11 specification. The group also seeks to create a global brand and identity for 802.11-based wireless LAN (WLAN) products. All 802.11a, b, and g products can be called “Wi-Fi” products, but only products that pass Wi-Fi Alliance testing can label their products as “Wi-Fi Certified” (a registered trademark). For more information about the Wi-Fi Alliance, go to: www.wi-fi.com How are Wi-Fi devices connected to a WLAN? Successful deployment of a WLAN requires careful planning and network design. This process includes determining network applications, coverage requirements, number of users, client device types, and equipment selection. In addition, unlike wired networks, planners must assess environmental obstacles that can impede radio frequency (RF) signal transmissions. WLANs can be implemented in “infrastructure mode” or “ad hoc” mode. In infrastructure mode, each wireless client computer “associates” with an access point (AP) via a radio link. The AP connects to the 10/100- Mbps Ethernet using a standard Ethernet cable, and provides the wireless client computer with access to the wired Ethernet network. Ad hoc mode is the peer-to- peer network mode, which is suitable for very small installations. Infrastructure mode is commonly implemented in enterprise networks. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 6
  • 7. What are some WLAN design considerations? First Step The first step in designing a wireless network is to determine the requirements for the network. This includes identifying the areas that need to be covered, the number of users and the types of devices they will use, applications, environment, and so forth. From these requirements, network designers can begin to determine how many access points (APs) are required and where they must be placed. The goal is to ensure adequate RF coverage to stationary and roaming users of the wireless network. A key activity of this design process is to perform a site survey to determine the required coverage; number, density, and location of APs; number of users; and channel selections. In addition, the site survey can identify conditions that inhibit performance through path loss, as well as RF interference. Path Loss Path loss refers to the loss of signal power experienced between the AP and the client system as the distance between the two increases. Path loss is affected by transmission distance; obstacles such as walls, ceilings, and furniture; and the frequency of the transmission. Generally, the higher the frequency of the signal, the shorter the transmission distance is. Multipath loss occurs as an RF signal bounces off objects in the environment such as furniture and walls while en route to its destination. The result is that an RF signal can take more than one path, arriving as multiple signals at its destination. This can impact performance significantly. RF Interference RF interference is caused by other RF sources that also operate in the 2.4-GHz frequency band. These sources can include microwave ovens and cordless phones. In addition, emerging Bluetooth™ personal area network devices operate in this frequency band and can interfere with 802.11 transmissions. AP Placement AP placement is typically determined using a combination of theoretical principles and a thorough site survey. The site survey uses building plans and physical site tours to identify optimal placement of APs. The resulting plan should take into account usage patterns and adverse conditions that can impact performance. Under good conditions, an AP can provide coverage up to approximately 150 feet (46 meters) indoors. An example of an environment where this distance could be achieved is a relatively open environment with high ceilings and no hard-wall offices or other impediments to the RF signal. In this environment, the AP can be placed high to provide an unimpeded signal to the wireless clients. In office environments with walls (including cube walls) and other impediments, a more typical range is 75 to 80 feet (23 to 24 meters). Once the APs are installed, IT personnel can test the implementation by roaming the premises with a laptop and observing variations in signal strength. A poor signal or poor throughput at a particular location would be an indication that an adjustment in AP placement, density, or channel selection is required. How secure is Wi-Fi? Wi-Fi offers easy wireless network set-up, access, and use. But because the standard was designed with only limited security capabilities – basically, to foil casual eavesdropping rather than more powerful forms of attack – it’s essential for IT professionals to understand that Wi-Fi is vulnerable to breaches in security. Unless adequately protected, a WLAN can be susceptible to access from the outside by unauthorized users, some of whom have used the access as a free Internet connection. Companies that have a WLAN are urged to add security safeguards such as the Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) encryption standard, the setup and use of a virtual private network (VPN) or IPSec, and a firewall or DMZ. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 7
  • 8. There are three approaches to securing access to a WLAN: • Built-in 802.11 mechanisms: Media Access Control (MAC) address filtering, Service Set Identifier (SSID), and Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) • Virtual private network (VPN)-based security solution • Wireless security add-ons: VPN or IPSec MAC Address Filtering This mechanism registers valid MAC addresses in use and permits only recognized MAC addresses to establish communication with wireless access points. These MAC addresses are burned into network access devices during manufacture and are designed to be unique. However, this mechanism is not foolproof. Software tools permit such addresses to be imitated, or “spoofed”, and ongoing monitoring of wireless communications often allows valid MAC addresses to be learned over time. MAC address filtering is most effective when it's used in conjunction with the other approaches, such as VPN. SSID Wi-Fi access points use a special value called a SSID (Service Set Identifier) to distinguish wireless networks from one another. Access points often arrive preconfigured with defaults set by the manufacturer; if these values (which are well known) aren't changed, it's easy for outsiders to detect and attempt to access a WLAN. SSIDs should always be reset, and normal rules for setting strong passwords also apply. WEP In the 802.11 standard, WEP is defined as "protecting authorized users of a WLAN from casual eavesdropping." As such, WEP is not a very strong form of protection and is subject to numerous exploits based on vulnerabilities and weaknesses. WEP is based on a stream cipher called RC4, which is a symmetric encryption algorithm. The same key used to encrypt WEP traffic is also used to decrypt that same traffic. For that reason, that key is called a shared key. Because stream ciphers encrypt ongoing streams of data, they're easy and efficient to implement in hardware. But any given stream of communications should be encrypted with a unique key that is never reused to avoid potential compromise of intercepted traffic. VPN Special added protocol layers and encryption services allow traffic between a sender and a receiver to be further secured while in transit across public or other unsecure network links (such as the Internet). Most experts recommend the use of VPN or similar technologies any time sensitive data must traverse unsecure links or media (such as WLANs). IPSec (IP Security) Protocols IPSec protocols provide mechanisms for establishing security associations between pairs of devices. In fact, IPSec may be used to establish private end-to-end communications between pairs of computers, so that an additional layer of security is imposed above and beyond whatever Wi-Fi controls may be in place. This mechanism is quite similar to that used in VPNs (virtual private networks), in which additional security is used to make connections across inherently unsecure links. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 8
  • 9. Wireless Compatibility Verification Testing The purpose of the Canon wireless compatibility verification testing was to demonstrate that imageRUNNER devices can connect to a WLAN and to verify that imageRUNNER devices are compatible with industry wireless standards. The testing focused on verifying that the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 printer functions correctly with current wireless standard protocols (i.e. 802.11a, 802.11b and 802.11g.) NOTE: Canon’s imageRUNNER devices, which are designed and built utilizing Canon’s imagePlatform standard device architecture, behave in the same manner with respect to network printing functionality. Please go to www.usa.canon.com or www.imagerunner.com for the latest list of imagePlatform-based imageRUNNER models. Canon imageRUNNER device drivers are designed and built with a common driver architecture. The differences with each model reflect the different finishing capability of the respective devices; the underlying driver functionality is the same across all imagePlatform based imageRUNNER models. NOTE: Cisco was selected for the test configurations because Cisco is the industry leader in access points and wireless PC cards and represents what would typically be found in a corporate WLAN environment. Other popular manufacturers of wireless products include 3Com, Linksys, and D-Link. Three different test configurations were used for the compatibility verification testing: 1. The basic wireless configuration 2. The wireless configuration with a print server 3. The wireless configuration with a wireless bridge Security Settings During all testing, WEP was turned on with a custom WEP key. There are many different types of wireless security methods. WEP was used for the testing because it was considered the most commonly used method. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 9
  • 10. Test Procedure for Basic Wireless Configuration The basic wireless configuration consisted of the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 printer connected to a Cisco Aironet 1200 wireless access point (AP) via a network hub (see Fig. 1). The Client PC was a Toshiba laptop that contained the specified wireless PC cards. (See Table 3.) Table 3. Hardware Tested for Basic Wireless Configuration 802.11 Vendor Product a b g Canon imageRUNNER 5020 Printer Toshiba Laptop configured with XP Professional (SP1) Cisco Aironet 1200 Series 802.11 a/b/g Access Point Cisco Aironet 802.11a/b/g Wireless CardBus Cisco Aironet 350 Series PC Card The following basic configuration test procedure was used to test the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 printer for IEEE 802.11a, b, and g protocols with the Cisco Aironet 802.11a/b/g Wireless CardBus Adapter and for IEEE 802.11b only with the Cisco Aironet 350 Series PC Card: 1. Configure the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 with a static IP address and attach it to the network hub. 2. Configure the Cisco Aironet 1200 Wireless Access Point with a static IP address on the same subnet and connect it to the hub. 3. Attach the Cisco Aironet 802.11a/b/g Wireless CardBus Adapter and install the necessary drivers and software. 4. Configure the laptop with a static IP address within the same subnet. 5. Verify connectivity using the DOS Ping command to ping the printer across the wireless connection. 6. Install the Canon PCLSe-C V6.3 driver on the laptop. 7. Using Microsoft Word, print a 5-page job containing multi-font text and graphics. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 10
  • 11. Test Procedure for Wireless Configuration with a Print Server The print server wireless configuration is more typical of a corporate wireless configuration (see Fig. 2). This configuration consisted of the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 printer connected to an NT print server that was connected to the Cisco Aironet 1200 wireless endpoint via a network hub. The Client PC was a Toshiba laptop that contained the specified wireless PC cards. (See Table 4.) Table 4. Hardware Tested for Wireless Configuration with a Print Server 802.11 Vendor Product a b g Canon imageRUNNER 5020 Printer Compaq Windows NT print server (SP6) Toshiba Laptop configured with XP Professional (SP1) Cisco Aironet 1200 Series 802.11 a/b/g Access Point Cisco Aironet 802.11a/b/g Wireless CardBus Cisco Aironet 350 Series PC Card Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 11
  • 12. The following print server configuration test procedure was used to test the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 printer for IEEE 802.11a, b, and g protocols with the Cisco Aironet 802.11a/b/g Wireless CardBus Adapter and for IEEE 802.11b only with the Cisco Aironet 350 Series PC Card: 1. Configure the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 with a static IP address. 2. Install a Windows NT 4.0 print server with Service Pack 6 and attach it to the network hub. 3. Install the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 on the NT print server. 4. Configure the Cisco Aironet 1200 Wireless Access Point with a static IP address on the same subnet and connected it to the hub. 5. Attach the Cisco Aironet 802.11a/b/g Wireless CardBus Adapter on the laptop and install the necessary drivers and software. 6. Configure the laptop with a static IP address within the same subnet. 7. Verify connectivity by using the DOS Ping command to ping the printer across the wireless connection. 8. Install Canon imageRUNNER 5020 with the Cannon PCLSe-C V6.3 driver on the laptop. 9. Using Microsoft Word, print a 5-page job containing multi-font text and graphics. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 12
  • 13. Test Procedure for Wireless Configuration with a Wireless Bridge The wireless bridge configuration is more typical of a corporate wireless configuration that has multi-wireless connectivity (see Fig. 3). The test configuration consisted of the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 printer connected to a wireless Cisco Aironet 350 Workgroup Bridge. The bridge was associated with the Cisco Access point. The client laptop used a Cisco 350 series card and a Cisco card that was capable of using 802.11a/b/g. The Generic client PC was added to simulate print activity typical from the LAN side of a cooperate network. (See Table 5.) Table 5. Hardware Tested for Wireless Configuration with a Wireless Bridge 802.11 Vendor Product a b g Canon imageRUNNER 5020 Printer Generic Generic XP Client PC Toshiba Laptop configured with XP Professional (SP1) Cisco Aironet 1200 Series 802.11 a/b/g Access Point Cisco Aironet 802.11a/b/g Wireless CardBus Cisco Aironet 350 Series PC Card Cisco Aironet 350 Workgroup Bridge Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 13
  • 14. The following print configuration test procedure was used to test the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 printer for IEEE 802.11a, b, and g protocols with the Cisco Aironet 802.11a/b/g Wireless CardBus Adapter and for IEEE 802.11b only with the Cisco Aironet 350 Series PC Card and a Cisco 350 Wireless Bridge: 1. Configure the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 with a static IP address. 2. Configure the wireless Cisco Aironet 350 Workgroup Bridge with an IP address on the same network 3. Configure the Cisco Aironet 1200 Wireless Access Point with a static IP address on the same subnet and connected it to the hub. 4. Configure the generic client PC with an IP address and attach it to the hub. 5. Attach the Cisco Aironet 802.11a/b/g Wireless CardBus Adapter on the laptop and install the necessary drivers and software. 6. Configure the laptop with a static IP address within the same subnet. 7. Verify connectivity by using the DOS Ping command to ping the printer across the wireless connection. 8. Install the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 with the Cannon PCLSe-C V6.3 driver on the laptop. 9. Install the Canon imageRUNNER 5020 with the Cannon PCLSe-C V6.3 driver on the generic client PC. 10. Using Microsoft Word, print a 5-page job containing multi-font text and graphics. Test Results The Canon imageRUNNER 5020 performed as expected in all wireless configurations. No degradation in print job speed or print quality was observed during testing in any of the configurations tested. Other results may vary, depending on environmental parameters such as signal distance and protocol used (IEEE 802.11a, b, or g). The testing simulated the most common wireless configurations that may be seen in a corporate WLAN environment. The testing proved that a print job sent over any single 802.11a,b, or g wireless connection will print as expected. It also confirmed that a print job can travel across more than one protocol without encountering any functional or performance issues. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 14
  • 15. Using MFPs in a Wi-Fi Environment The following paragraphs present design considerations for using multifunction printers (MFPs) in a Wi-Fi environment. What are the different ways to connect an MFP in a Wi-Fi environment? A multifunction printer connects to a wireless network in much the same way that it connects to any corporate LAN. The following three methods are the most commonly used to connect an MFP in a Wi-Fi environment: 1. Basic Wireless Configuration: An MFP is connected to an Ethernet LAN, the Ethernet LAN is connected to an access point (AP), and the AP communicates wirelessly with a laptop PC. (See Fig. 1.) 2. Wireless Configuration with a Print Server: An MFP is connected to an NT print server, the NT print server is connected to the Ethernet LAN, the Ethernet LAN is connected to an AP, and the AP communicates wirelessly with a laptop PC. (See Fig. 2.) 3. Wireless Configuration with a Wireless Bridge: An MFP is connected to a wireless bridge, the wireless bridge communicates wirelessly with an AP, which then communicates wirelessly with a laptop PC. In addition, an XP client PC may be connected to an Ethernet hub, which is then connected to the AP. (See Fig. 3.) What are the top points I should tell customers who want to connect their MFP in a Wi-Fi environment? The following top points can be used to help customers make informed decisions about connecting their MFP in a Wi-Fi environment: • Advantages of connecting an MFP in a Wi-Fi environment: Connecting your MFP in a Wi-Fi environment 1) allows you to print from anywhere in your office with a laptop and 2) gives you access to corporate data at LAN-equivalent performance levels. • WLAN planning and design: Successful deployment of your MFP in a wireless LAN environment requires the same planning and network design as when you are connecting any other Wi-Fi device. Your IT department should perform a site survey to determine the following requirements: 1) the required wireless coverage, 2) the number, density, and location of access points (APs), 3) the number of users, 4) the channel selections that will be used for wireless communications, and 5) conditions that may potentially inhibit wireless performance, such as path loss and radio frequency interference. • Connecting an MFP in a WLAN configuration: In a corporate environment, your MFP will most commonly be connected in infrastructure mode, which includes a wireless access point (AP), a wireless network interface card (NIC) that plugs into a laptop or PC, and an Ethernet LAN. • Wi-Fi security: When connecting your MFP in a WLAN configuration, your IT department should be urged to add security safeguards such as: wired equivalent privacy (WEP) encryption, setting up a virtual private network (VPN) or IP security, and a firewall. Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 15
  • 16. • Compatibility of Wi-Fi devices: Using or enabling proprietary extensions (security, authentication schemes, roaming capabilities, and key management) usually require that wireless APs and network cards be supplied by a single vendor. Proprietary extensions are not suitable for heterogeneous environments with a mix of hardware. Although the extensions provide added security benefits, they limit future flexibility. Before choosing to implement these features, your IT department should assess all the environments that must be supported in addition to the corporate WLAN, including home office and public WLANs. Additional Information The following additional information and references may be helpful in understanding Wi-Fi technology and WLAN environments: Wi-Fi Alliance Home Page: http://wi-fi.com IEEE Wireless Standards Zone: http://standards.ieee.org/wireless/ Microsoft’s White Paper on using wireless in a LAN environment with windows XP: http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/evaluate/wrlsxp.mspx Capacity Coverage & Deployment Considerations for IEEE 802.11g (Cisco Systems): http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps4570/products_white_paper09186a00801d6 1a3.shtml Title: Canon imageRUNNER Devices in Wireless Network Environments Prepared By: VeriTest Page: 16

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