ADB Ethernet
              Network Guide




Instruction
Manual




                              Lighting Technologies

M...
Index


Index
 What is the Ethernet Network ? ...............................................................................
Index


          Desktop list...............................................................................................
Index


Ethernet Pin Data....................................................................................................
Index



      Foreword: Introduction to Ethernet in lighting

Remember when DMX512 was new? Finally you could simply and ...
Foreword

There is a guide that outlines the specific rules which you should follow, published by The
Entertainment Servic...
Chapter 1


Chapter 1: Global information about Ethernet Networks and ADB
           Lighting Networks

What is the Ethern...
Chapter 1

What is the ADB Ethernet Network ?

ADB has chosen to work with a much faster Ethernet standard than normal: th...
Chapter 2



Chapter 2: Definitions concerning Ethernet and Networks

What is a network ?

A network is a collection of co...
Chapter 2

What is an IP Address ?

When you mail a letter in the post office, you need to write down the address on the e...
Chapter 2

What are 10BaseT and 100BaseTX ?

There are several standards of Ethernet. The most popular one is 10BaseT. "10...
Chapter 3



Chapter 3: Features of the ADB Ethernet Network

The ADB Network is a complete Lighting network with many fea...
Chapter 3

Full tracking is another feature of the ADB NETWORK. With full tracking operation between consoles,
every actio...
Chapter 4



Chapter 4: Examples of Ethernet Configurations

In this chapter, some systems utilising the ADB NETWORK will ...
Chapter 4



PHOENIX 2 and Laptop




In this example, a PHOENIX 2 is linked with a laptop via an Ethernet cross-link cabl...
Chapter 4



PHOENIX 5 and BACKUP




In this example, a PHOENIX 5 is linked with a PHOENIX Backup through an Ethernet cro...
Chapter 4

PHOENIX 10 and PHOENIX 5




In this example, a PHOENIX 10 is linked with a PHOENIX 5 through an Ethernet cross...
Chapter 4



Laptop and Netport




                                                                 NETPORT




This is a...
Chapter 4



Two desks in Synchro, 1 NETGATE XT and 4 NETPORT’s




                                                Ethern...
Chapter 4



Same Light Network as above but with Back-up system for the Hub



                                          ...
Chapter 4



System with 3 consoles, file server, laptop and many Ethernet DMX nodes.




Manual – page 20                ...
Chapter 4

This is another example of a Light Network. A theatre has two auditoriums. Each control room must
have at its d...
Chapter 5



Chapter 5: Software set-up configuration

Consoles configuration (PHOENIX and VISION 10 range)

If a new syst...
Chapter 5

    Set-up of remote monitors:

Install ISIS® on the EPU which will serve as “remote screens”.
Boot the EPU wit...
Chapter 6



Chapter 6: Software Applications of ISIS® software

Network Setup:

The “network setup” menu allows configura...
Chapter 6

        Slave (Bi-directional enabled)

When a desk is in slave mode, it is fully functional, but any manipulat...
Chapter 6

     Name
     Name of the console

     Type
     Type of console. Type can be:
     P10:    PHOENIX 10
     P...
Chapter 6

      Node Setup

Allows any node on the network to be configured. All the nodes present on the ADB network
wil...
Chapter 6

       Example of configuring a NETGATE:

       The NETGATE needs to output the following:
       Port 1 : DMX...
Chapter 6

•            Video

[ ] select (with <enter>) whether the NETGATE XT monitor output will be active or not.
Moni...
Chapter 6

       Name :            name of the remote screen. It is important to give a name to the Remote
              ...
Chapter 6

Examples of keystrokes:

<Menu> <F6{Network}>                              Enters the Network menu.
<F6{Local D...
Chapter 6

     Examples of keystrokes:-

      <Menu> <F5{Tools}> <F6{Directory list})>

     Rename :                Ren...
Chapter 7



Chapter 7: Laptop, fileserver and desktop

Laptop and pcmcia


To install ISIS® software on a laptop, the OS ...
Chapter 8



Chapter 8: NETGATE


NETGATE provides the gateway to transfer DMX512 data to and from Art-Net Ethernet. Art-N...
Chapter 7

Ethernet

The Ethernet connection is via a screened Cat5 RJ45 connection.
Network wiring may use either UTP or ...
Chapter 8

DMX512 Pin Data

The DMX512 input is connected to the male 5 pin XLR on the rear panel. The input is terminated...
Chapter 9



Chapter 9: NETGATE XT

NETGATE XT provides the gateway to transfer DMX512data to and from Art-Net Ethernet. A...
Chapter 9

Ethernet

The Ethernet connection is via a screened Cat5 RJ45 connection.
Network wiring may use either UTP or ...
Chapter 9

DMX512 Pin Data

The DMX512 input is connected to the male 5 pin XLR on the rear panel. The input is terminated...
Chapter 10



Chapter 10: NETPORT and NETPORT XT

NETPORT provides the gateway to transfer DMX512data to and from Art-Net ...
Chapter 10

    2. DMX B OUT – idem DMX A OUT - Shows that Art-Net data for the DMX-Hub’s selected
       subnet is being ...
Chapter 10

Power-On Sequence

NETPORT executes a power-on self-test that requires approximately 5 seconds. When the self-...
Chapter 11



Chapter 11: Ethernet Switch

What is a switch?

A network with hubs but without “Switches” can get bogged do...
ADB Ethernet Network Guide
ADB Ethernet Network Guide
ADB Ethernet Network Guide
ADB Ethernet Network Guide
ADB Ethernet Network Guide
ADB Ethernet Network Guide
ADB Ethernet Network Guide
ADB Ethernet Network Guide
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ADB Ethernet Network Guide

  1. 1. ADB Ethernet Network Guide Instruction Manual Lighting Technologies M 2143 1106.02.143
  2. 2. Index Index What is the Ethernet Network ? .............................................................................. 6 Is the Ethernet Network expensive ? ...................................................................... 6 What are the major benefits of the Ethernet Network ? .......................................... 6 How does Ethernet benefit a lighting network ? ...................................................... 6 What is the ADB Ethernet Network ? ...................................................................... 7 How does the ADB Ethernet work ?........................................................................ 7 Does Ethernet replace DMX? ................................................................................. 7 ADB service ............................................................................................................ 7 What is a network ? ................................................................................................ 8 What is a LAN ? ...................................................................................................... 8 What is a Peer-to-peer network ? ........................................................................... 8 What is a Client/server network ? ........................................................................... 8 What is a server ? ........................................................................................ 8 What is a client ? .......................................................................................... 8 What is a File server ? ............................................................................................ 8 What is a Protocol ? What is TCP/IP ? .................................................................. 8 What is an IP Address ?.......................................................................................... 9 What is a Subnet Mask ? ........................................................................................ 9 What is a Router/Gateway ? ................................................................................... 9 What is Ethernet ? .................................................................................................. 9 How does Ethernet work ? ...................................................................................... 9 What are 10BaseT and 100BaseTX ? .................................................................. 10 What is half-duplex vs. full-duplex ?...................................................................... 10 PHOENIX 2 and Laptop ........................................................................................ 14 Case 1: ISIS® installed on the laptop.......................................................... 14 Case 2: Windows installed on the laptop.................................................... 14 Case 3: ISIS® and Windows installed on the laptop (Dual Boot). ............... 14 PHOENIX 5 and BACKUP .................................................................................... 15 Case 1: PHOENIX backup configured as “Backup”.................................... 15 Case 2: PHOENIX backup configured as “Remote screens”. .................... 15 Case 3: PHOENIX backup configured as “Remote gate”. .......................... 15 PHOENIX 10 and PHOENIX 5.............................................................................. 16 PHOENIX 10 and PHOENIX 5.............................................................................. 16 PHOENIX 5 and 4 NETPORT’s ............................................................................ 16 Laptop and Netport ............................................................................................... 17 Two desks in Synchro, 1 NETGATE XT and 4 NETPORT’s ................................. 18 Same Light Network as above but with Back-up system for the Hub.................... 19 System with 3 consoles, file server, laptop and many Ethernet DMX nodes......... 20 Consoles configuration (PHOENIX and VISION 10 range) ................................... 22 Software ..................................................................................................... 22 Hardware.................................................................................................... 22 Remote screens configuration .............................................................................. 22 Set-up of remote monitors:......................................................................... 23 Network Setup: ..................................................................................................... 24 Synchro ...................................................................................................... 24 Switch Synchro role from master to slave .................................................. 25 www.adblighting.com Manual – page 1 Issue: 1.01
  3. 3. Index Desktop list................................................................................................. 25 Desk Synchro ............................................................................................. 26 Network setup ............................................................................................ 26 File server list ............................................................................................. 30 Local DMX setup ........................................................................................ 30 File Manager .............................................................................................. 31 Directory manager...................................................................................... 31 Set-up General ........................................................................................... 32 Laptop and pcmcia................................................................................................ 33 File server ............................................................................................................. 33 Overview ............................................................................................................... 34 DMX512 Inputs ..................................................................................................... 34 DMX512 Outputs .................................................................................................. 34 Ethernet ................................................................................................................ 35 Network Sharing ................................................................................................... 35 Network Indicators ................................................................................................ 35 System Setup........................................................................................................ 35 Splitter Operation .................................................................................................. 35 Loop Through Operation ............................................................................ 35 Inputs ......................................................................................................... 35 DMX512 Pin Data ................................................................................................. 36 Ethernet Pin Data.................................................................................................. 36 Power Supply........................................................................................................ 36 Power-On Sequence............................................................................................. 36 Art-Net................................................................................................................... 36 Specifications:....................................................................................................... 36 Overview ............................................................................................................... 37 DMX512 Inputs ..................................................................................................... 37 DMX512 Outputs .................................................................................................. 37 Ethernet ................................................................................................................ 38 Network Sharing ................................................................................................... 38 System Setup........................................................................................................ 38 Splitter Operation .................................................................................................. 38 Loop Through Operation ............................................................................ 38 Inputs ......................................................................................................... 38 DMX512 Pin Data ................................................................................................. 39 Ethernet Pin Data.................................................................................................. 39 Power Supply........................................................................................................ 39 Power On Sequence ............................................................................................. 39 Art-Net................................................................................................................... 39 Specifications:....................................................................................................... 39 Overview ............................................................................................................... 40 DMX512 Outputs .................................................................................................. 40 Ethernet ................................................................................................................ 40 Network Indicators ................................................................................................ 40 System Setup........................................................................................................ 41 Splitter Operation .................................................................................................. 41 DMX512 Pin Data ................................................................................................. 41 Manual – page 2 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  4. 4. Index Ethernet Pin Data.................................................................................................. 41 Power Supply........................................................................................................ 41 Power-On Sequence............................................................................................. 42 Art-Net................................................................................................................... 42 Specifications:....................................................................................................... 42 What is a switch? .................................................................................................. 43 KEY FEATURES LCS-883R-SW16N......................................................... 44 KEY FEATURES LCS-883R-SW24N......................................................... 44 www.adblighting.com Manual – page 3 Issue: 1.01
  5. 5. Index Foreword: Introduction to Ethernet in lighting Remember when DMX512 was new? Finally you could simply and easily hook up one manufacturer's console with another manufacturer's dimmer with a single two-wire cable! Or is that four-wire? Wait a second; doesn't it need to be a shielded cable? Exactly what cable are you supposed to use? And what about hooking up more dimmer packs and other devices? For years after the introduction of digital control signals and DMX512, people were wiring systems with all kinds of cables, in all kinds of wiring plans. For the most part, things worked OK, except that sometimes your system might fail unexpectedly (usually about 10 minutes prior to curtain). A favourite story involves a theatre where the lights would occasionally flash wildly for unexplained reasons, then return to normal functioning. It was eventually discovered that the symptom occurred only when one of the dressing room toilets was flushed. The immediate solution was to lock up the bathroom so that no one could use it during performances. Finally, the problem was diagnosed as a grounding potential problem between the power source at the dimmers and at the control console, which interfered with the control signal. When the toilet was flushed, the water in the drain pipe would make contact and conduct between the two different grounds across a section of non-conducting PVC pipe. It's a good story, but typically the problem was in the incorrect wiring of the control signal. This was due largely because there was little information readily available to end users about correctly wiring DMX512 according to the rules of RS-485, the communication standard on which DMX512 is based. Finally in 1994, eight years after the DMX512 Standard was formally adopted, PLASA and USITT jointly published the pamphlet Recommended Practice for DMX512: A Guide for Users and Installers. This booklet has cleared up a significant amount of confusion about cable types, termination and wiring rules. As a result, we all enjoy more reliable systems than when DMX512 was first introduced. Today the performance lighting industry is experiencing another quantum leap in communications technology: Ethernet. Most of us know Ethernet from office computer networks; now manufacturers are applying this technology to control systems. Ethernet is used to operate a LAN (Local Area Network). It is roughly analogous to a "party line" on a telephone in which everyone can hear everyone else. All the devices on an Ethernet network can hear or speak to all other devices, so many types of information can flow between all points on the network. Ethernet has a much greater bandwidth and the speed of signal transmission is roughly 40 to 400 times faster than that of DMX512. These two characteristics of Ethernet make it an obvious choice for a new signal medium. Signals for controlling dimmers and other devices, sending multiple remote video images and system control commands can all be sent on the same set of wires. But there are considerably more stringent rules that must be followed in designing the wiring plans for Ethernet systems. Unlike DMX512, which could be somewhat forgiving in its implementation, Ethernet either works or it doesn't. There are a number of different cable media for use with Ethernet, but the most common (and those often found in lighting equipment) is UTP (Unshielded Twisted Pair, also known as Category Five cable). UTP topologies are by their very nature "star" topologies, in which all devices are connected by individual cables – called segments – to ports on a central hub. This is an active electrical device that hears and repeats signals from each port onto all other ports. Each port on the hub is automatically terminated, as is each device at the end of the UTP cable, so no terminators are required. What's even better, if the cable on one port of the hub is faulty, that particular segment of the star will not function, but it will not affect the functions on all the other segments connected to the hub. Ethernet functions at two speeds: 10 Mb/s (mega-bits per second) or 100 Mb/s. With the march of computer technology advancing at an accelerated rate (and lighting technology following closely behind), it is easy to see that what were relatively new technologies quickly become obsolete. So you will want to install cable in your building that won't need to be pulled out and replaced in the next ten years. Category Five UTP cable will support 100 Mb/s Ethernet, but it will only do so if you follow the length limitations and topology rules of "fast" Ethernet. Manual – page 4 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  6. 6. Foreword There is a guide that outlines the specific rules which you should follow, published by The Entertainment Services and Technology Association (ESTA). This guide aims to specifically help you avoid problems similar to those that were experienced in the initial introduction of DMX512. ESTA's “Recommended Practice for Ethernet Cabling Systems in Entertainment Lighting Applications” is a long title, but it accurately describes the important rules for installing new control systems so that they will provide as many years of reliable service as possible. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 5 Issue: 1.01
  7. 7. Chapter 1 Chapter 1: Global information about Ethernet Networks and ADB Lighting Networks What is the Ethernet Network ? The Ethernet Network is the most widely-used transmission network in the world. It was designed to transmit data at high speed between connected computers on a LAN (local area network). Because information is transmitted as ‘packets’ of data, it achieves very high transmission speeds – typically 10Mbit/sec. The Ethernet Network has been standardised by the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) to the IEEE 802.3 standard with TCP/IP being a typical transmission protocol. A detailed cabling information guide to these standards is available from PLASA or ESTA. Is the Ethernet Network expensive ? Because Ethernet Network technology has been widely adopted by the computer industry, standard Ethernet components are now affordable. For instance, cables, connectors, Network Interface Cards for computers and Ethernet hubs are all available easily around the world and most electrical contractors are now well-versed in the installation of Ethernet Network systems. What are the major benefits of the Ethernet Network ? As a long-established and proven network topology, the Ethernet Network offers many benefits. The most significant are : • Acceptability and availability that world-wide use provides • General standardisation of cables and connectors • High bandwidth and high-speed • Bi-directional standard allowing devices to both send and receive instructions How does Ethernet benefit a lighting network ? A lighting network structured around an Ethernet communications system allows different parts of your lighting system to be interconnected. This means that one control desk can be connected to another one located in a remote location to enable data transfer between the two. Both lighting desks could send data to a printer. With the Ethernet Network, a remote visual display could be provided in the theatre auditorium or in a TV studio to allow designers and electricians to see what is going on. Although DMX 512 has been remarkably successful in its wide acceptance, it is not always capable of carrying the quantity and variety of data required in a large modern lighting system. DMX data can be sent over the Ethernet network allowing a wide variety of lighting information to be sent around a building and then picked off where and when it is required. Furthermore, if data storage is required, for instance for a large scale HF radio riggers/designers system or for interfacing a designer’s laptop, this can be achieved by connecting the EIA-232 port on a PC or server to the system. Closing contacts can be used to remotely trigger events programmed on the console - making it a versatile user-programmable function with unlimited possibilities! Connecting the Ethernet Network with directional radio to link systems in different buildings is simple. It is equally easy to connect it to telephone or ISDN for long distance remote control. Manual – page 6 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  8. 8. Chapter 1 What is the ADB Ethernet Network ? ADB has chosen to work with a much faster Ethernet standard than normal: the 100Mbit/s Fast Ethernet. This version is completely compatible with the normal 10Mbit/s Ethernet, yet throughput is typically some 400 times higher than DMX. Furthermore, the data can be sent down a low cost cable [CAT5] to allow data transmission distances (from a console or computer to an Ethernet hub) of up to 100 metres. Where greater distances are required, fibre optic cabling can be used for long distance trunks or risers through buildings. How does the ADB Ethernet work ? The ADB Ethernet Network is based on the globally accepted Ethernet and TCP/IP protocols. This allows for simple or complex networks to be created. The simple network comprises a number of network nodes such as lighting consoles and NETGATES that are linked together by 10BaseT cable. This is an eight-core, Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cable known widely as UTP CAT5 or a Shielded Twisted Pair (STP) cable know as STP CAT5. In a simple network, the NETGATE nodes receive information from the ADB Ethernet Network and then perform specific tasks defined by the ADB NETGATE software. ADB VISION 10 and PHOENIX consoles are fitted with a Network Interface Card (NIC). Retrofits to older units are possible. The NIC in the console establishes bi-directional communication with the ADB Ethernet Network. Once this is completed, the Ethernet data from the console can be transmitted to the NETGATE or NETPORT or NETPORTXT, which converts it and sends out DMX, on a different cable, to the dimmers, scrollers or to moving lights. The ADB NETGATE node allows 4 x output universes each of 512 channels of DMX and 4 x input universes each of 512 channels of DMX to be sent down one Ethernet cable. The ADB NETPORT and NETPORTXT nodes allow two output universes each of 512 channels. Does Ethernet replace DMX? NO. Ethernet does not allow daisy-chaining, like DMX 512 does, so Ethernet’s hub-and-spoke distribution involves more electronic boxes which could fail. Also a UTP/STP cable cannot be longer than 100 m (from active part to active part) which means that to cover say 250 m you can do with one DMX cable run; with Ethernet you’ll have to insert two amplifiers. A good & reliable system will be a well-thought combination of Ethernet and DMX. It may be wise to have a number of DMX universes wired directly from the console to e.g. the main dimmers. In the event of failure in one of the Ethernet building blocks, you will still have control over these dimmers. ADB service ADB Ethernet Networks are complex systems requiring careful and expert connectivity and configuration. For this reason, network configuration requirements must be defined and specified in detail before ADB can implement and ship your system. ADB provide a network specialist to help you design and configure your system before it is delivered, to ensure long life and trouble-free operation. If in doubt, please ask before releasing final drawings. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 7 Issue: 1.01
  9. 9. Chapter 2 Chapter 2: Definitions concerning Ethernet and Networks What is a network ? A network is a collection of connected intelligent computing devices. The connection is not necessarily a fancy one. A connection between two computers by direct cabling is qualified to be a network. What is a LAN ? A Local Area Network (LAN) is a smaller network within one location or between several buildings. What is a Peer-to-peer network ? This type of network is also known as File Sharing. A centralized server is absent from this configuration. In file sharing, every computer on the network can be a server and a client at any time. What is a Client/server network ? One or more centralised servers regulate data and services for the clients. • What is a server ? A server is a dedicated computer for serving clients only, it should do nothing else except serving. A server should never be used for running desktop applications. • What is a client ? The relationship between the server and the client is named client-server model. A client is a role rather than a particular type of computer hardware or software. When a server requests services from another server, the first server becomes a client. When a printer is connected to a server, the printer is also regarded as a client. What is a File server ? A file server is a server that stores files for user access. Usually it also performs the function of a print server, which shares network printers among users. When files are being accessed, the CPU of the client computer handles the computation. What is a Protocol ? What is TCP/IP ? Networks need a set of rules and procedures to govern the transmission of data. These rules together form a protocol. Different network products have different protocols such as AppleTalk in Macintosh networks, NetBEUI in Windows networks, TCP/IP in UNIX and the Internet. Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is also used in the ADB Network. TCP divides data into smaller segments for transmission as well as providing error checking and flow control. IP performs the function of addressing and selecting the routes of connection. Manual – page 8 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  10. 10. Chapter 2 What is an IP Address ? When you mail a letter in the post office, you need to write down the address on the envelope. By the same token, transferring data among computing devices requires addressing. IP handles addressing by assigning an IP number to every computing device on the TCP/IP network. Let's use mailing address as an analogy again. A mailing address consists of different levels such as country, state, city, street, and apartment number. Similarly, an IP address is composed of four chunks of 8-bit binary numbers such as 129.219.199.15, which represent different levels of the address. For easier identification, these binary numbers are translated into decimal numbers that we use everyday. The metaphor of physical address falls apart when it involves the concept of logical addressing. In physical addressing, apartment 1 and apartment 2 should be physically next to each other. However, IP addressing groups computing devices logically according to administrative needs. Two computers which carry IP addresses as 120.219.199.10 and 129.219.199.11 may have no geographical proximity at all. What is a Subnet Mask ? A state is divided into several counties. Similarly, a network is spilt into many sub-networks. The Subnet Mask indicates how many sub networks are located in this network and determine whether routing is necessary. What is a Router/Gateway ? When computing devices are located in the same subnet, they can connect to each other directly without an intermediate station. But when they do not belong to the same subnet, a router or a gateway is needed to connect them. Today these two terms are almost inter-changeable, but indeed they are slightly different. A router passes information among networks with the same protocol whereas a gateway connects different networks and translates between protocols. What is Ethernet ? Ethernet is a type of network cabling and signalling specifications developed by Xerox in the late 1970. No computer should be an island. With Ethernet, file sharing and printer sharing among machines became possible. Greek philosopher Aristotle coined the term “ether” to describe the “divine element” in the heaven. In the 17th century, French philosopher and mathematician Rene Descartes theorized that the universe has no void; all space, including the heaven and the earth, is filled with ether, which is composed of very fine particles. In short, "ether" is said to be a kind of substance that exists everywhere. Although this is a misconception, network developers still adopted the term "ether" and therefore "Ethernet" means "a network of everywhere." Strictly speaking, Ethernet means conforming to ISO/IEC 8802-3 or IEEE 802.3 (international standard). How does Ethernet work ? Ethernet uses a communication concept called data-grams to get messages across the network. The Ethernet data-grams take the form of self-contained packets of information. These packages have fields containing information about the data, their origin, their destination and the type of data. The data field in each package can contain up to 1500 bytes. Take mailing as a metaphor. An Ethernet package is not just a letter. It is also provided with the sender address, the receiver address, the stamp indicating what the package's contents are. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 9 Issue: 1.01
  11. 11. Chapter 2 What are 10BaseT and 100BaseTX ? There are several standards of Ethernet. The most popular one is 10BaseT. "10" stands for signalling speed: 10 mega bits per second. "100" is simply 100 mega bits per second (fast Ethernet). "Base" means Base-band, which uses a single carrier frequency so that all devices connected to the network can hear all transmissions. "T" stands for twisted pair cable. Both 10BaseT and 100BaseTX can support twisted pair segments up to 100 meters with only one transceiver per segment. What is half-duplex vs. full-duplex ? Ethernet suffers from collisions when it is running in half-duplex mode. What is half-duplex? CB radio is a typical example of half-duplex. When using a CB radio, you can either send a message or receive a message at one time. When two or more computers attempt to send data at the same time, a collision occurs. Nevertheless, switches make it possible to run Ethernet in full-duplex mode. In this mode, two computers establish a point-to-point connection in full-duplex and thus collisions are avoided. ADB uses full-duplex mode for communication between consoles, and between consoles and NETPORT, NETPORT XT … Manual – page 10 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  12. 12. Chapter 3 Chapter 3: Features of the ADB Ethernet Network The ADB Network is a complete Lighting network with many features. The Network is developed to the customer’s needs and made as simple as possible for the user. One of the main advantages of the ADB Network is that it is Plug and Play based: it is very easy to configure a system. This results in a system that can easily be expanded. This way of working was a very important aspect of the ADB Network specification. The protocol used on the ADB Network is ART-Net. This protocol is becoming a standard in lighting industry Networks. More and more manufactures are starting to use this protocol. This has the advantage that different nodes and programs from different manufactures can be connected. As an example of this uniformity, common programs as WYSIWYG, Sand-Net and many others support the ART-Net protocol. In other words, connecting the ADB Network to WYSIWIG system works without any extra costs or a conversion box. Another feature of the ADB Network is the simplicity of the wiring. One cable enables the distribution of various types of signals over a single type of cord: DMX universes, monitors, console tracking, printers data, show data, etc. Because of this, distribution of the DMX signals throughout a building becomes easy. The difficulties with complex DMX hard-patches are solved. Ethernet will distribute the DMX signals to DMX nodes such as NETGATE, NETGATE XT, NETPORT, NETPORT XT. An ADB NETGATE is an Ethernet node that provides up to 4 DMX inputs and up to 4 DMX outputs. The ADB NETGATE XT provides the same DMX input and output options as the ADB NETGATE, together with an SVGA visual display output, eight external line connections for closing contact applications, plus eight MACRO keys on the front panel. The extra features of the ADB NETGATE XT improve the operational flexibility by allowing users to place a remote SVGA screen in a choice of location: for instance with the Lighting Director in the auditorium during rehearsals. The ADB NETPORT is an Ethernet node that provides 2 DMX outputs. This node is very useful when distributing DMX data to all locations of a venue. NETPORT XT additionally links the deporting and programming features of ADB dimmers with the venue’s Ethernet network. Up to 16 independent DMX universes (a total of 8192 DMX addresses) are available on the ADB NETWORK with ISIS® software. Any of these universes can be available on the DMX output of each ADB Ethernet to DMX-node. To have more than one universe present on the ADB Network, it is necessary to enter a software key in the ISIS® software of the lighting console. Because of this concept, it is easy to upgrade the amount of universes: order a software key and more universes become available. In this way, the user benefits without having to worry about complicated hardware updates or difficult system configuration. The ADB NETGATE and ADB NETGATE XT can read DMX data from other sources, using its DMX input. Thanks to this input, consoles on the ADB NETWORK can read the DMX from other non- Ethernet consoles. So it is also possible to send DMX from a console without network capability through the ADB NETWORK to different DMX devices (Dimmers, Moving heads, etc). This means that an old manual console having 0 to 10V output, with a multiplexer (analogue to digital converter) and a NETGATE, can have its control information sent through the ADB NETWORK. The old ADB SM 11 manual desk can still be used! www.adblighting.com Manual – page 11 Issue: 1.01
  13. 13. Chapter 3 Full tracking is another feature of the ADB NETWORK. With full tracking operation between consoles, every action taken on one of the desks is automatically and immediately tracked by the other consoles in real time. One of the strengths of the full tracking is that at all times each console can be fully synchronised with another console; all data, configuration, screen information, and so on is transferred within a virtually instantly. Another important issue is that in a master/slave system, if the master breaks down the slave will automatically take over without the output (stage) being affected. The type of tracking system implemented is dependent upon configuration of the synchro set-up. More detailed information regarding this set-up can be found in the chapter below. The ADB NETWORK allows fast data exchange between different parts of the system. All kinds of data can be sent to different parts of the system. Due to the multi-tasking environment, saving or loading of shows, sending data to a printer, etc. can be achieved simultaneously. In larger networks, consoles can be connected to dedicated file servers for central storage of shows and back-up files. Another advantage of using the ADB NETWORK is the Multi-operator programming. Two or more operators from two or more consoles can program a show simultaneously: for example, one for the conventional and one for the intelligent fixtures. Subsequently, both parts of the show can be merged into a single showfile and, more importantly, replayed from just one console. This situation has the additional advantage that with a system comprising two consoles, the second can act as a backup during the show. Different parts of different shows can be merged into one new show. This allows a very efficient and fast way to make new shows. An example is to load the house patch into a show that has been plotted in another venue, or an operator can load his profiles into a show plotted by another operator (such as macros, screen configurations, etc). Each node with a video output and ISIS® software can act as a remote screen. So laptops, desktop PCs, and consoles on the network can be used as remote screens. This function is standard with the ISIS® lighting software. Up to four remote screens can be connected to each network node. The NETGATE XT has the remote screen feature as standard. ISIS® software is common to the PHOENIX-range and VISION10-range of lighting control consoles. Therefore, all functions programmed on one type of console can be run from any other desk. ADB NETWORK Nodes: • NETPORT • NETGATE • NETGATE XT • 16 port Ethernet Switch • 24 port Ethernet Switch All ADB lighting devices, and all ART-Net lighting devices are compatible with the ADB NETWORK. Manual – page 12 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  14. 14. Chapter 4 Chapter 4: Examples of Ethernet Configurations In this chapter, some systems utilising the ADB NETWORK will be explained as examples. These are only a few different systems: if more information is needed about these or any other systems, please refer to the ADB Projects Department. The members of the Projects Department will help you with all your questions, and advise on the special needs of the system you require for your venue, theatre, television studio, or other application. ADB Ethernet Networks are complex systems requiring careful and expert connectivity and configuration. For this reason, network configuration requirements must be defined and specified in detail before ADB can implement and ship your system. ADB can provide a network specialist to help design and configure your system before it is delivered to ensure long life and trouble-free operation. In the first part of the chapter, three ADB Ethernet synchro systems are described: • PHOENIX 2 and Laptop • PHOENIX 5 and PHOENIX Back-up • PHOENIX 10 and PHOENIX 5 In the second part, ADB Ethernet Light networks are described: • PHOENIX 5 and 4 NETPORT’s • LAPTOP and NETPORT • NETWORK 1 • NETWORK 1 with redundancy • NETWORK 2 www.adblighting.com Manual – page 13 Issue: 1.01
  15. 15. Chapter 4 PHOENIX 2 and Laptop In this example, a PHOENIX 2 is linked with a laptop via an Ethernet cross-link cable. With this configuration, there are several different ways of using the system. These situations are described below. • Case 1: ISIS® installed on the laptop. • Remote control – Bi-directional tracking • Remote screens • Off-line editor • Case 2: Windows installed on the laptop. • File server • Case 3: ISIS® and Windows installed on the laptop (Dual Boot). • Remote control – Bi-directional tracking • Remote screens • Off-line editor • File server Note for Case 3: Dual Boot is required. ISIS® must be on the C Drive. Manual – page 14 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  16. 16. Chapter 4 PHOENIX 5 and BACKUP In this example, a PHOENIX 5 is linked with a PHOENIX Backup through an Ethernet cross-link cable. Case 1: PHOENIX backup configured as “Backup”. • Bi-directional tracking • DMX backup (up to 4 DMX universes out and 1 DMX universe in) • Case 2: PHOENIX backup configured as “Remote screens”. • Remote screens • Case 3: PHOENIX backup configured as “Remote gate”. • DMX Output (up to 4 DMX universes out and 1 DMX universe in) • Remote screens www.adblighting.com Manual – page 15 Issue: 1.01
  17. 17. Chapter 4 PHOENIX 10 and PHOENIX 5 In this example, a PHOENIX 10 is linked with a PHOENIX 5 through an Ethernet cross-link cable. This is a complete backup system. In this case the PHOENIX 10 will probably be the master and the PHOENIX 5 will be the slave. If the master fails to respond, the slave will automatically take over. Due to the Bi-directional tracking and DMX backup (up to 4 DMX universes out and 1 DMX universe in), the desk operator can immediately work on the slave (which becomes master) and even more importantly nothing will be changed at the output (Stage) during this alteration. The combination of master/slave with two consoles offers the highest level of Backup with the greatest security. Note: for longer distances (above 100m), a hub is required and cables are standard (instead of cross- link) PHOENIX 5 and 4 NETPORT’s Ethernet HUB PHOENIX5 NETPORT This is an example of a small Light Network. Two DMX universes will be distributed at 4 locations. To achieve this system we need to use a hub: the hub is the heart of the system. From the hub, patch cords (patch cord UTP/CAT5 or STP/CAT5) are used to connect to each node. The nodes are one PHOENIX 5 desk and 4 NETPORT’s. Note: For this system a special software key is needed. One universe is available without a key; for additional universes a software key is required. Manual – page 16 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  18. 18. Chapter 4 Laptop and Netport NETPORT This is an example of a very small Light Network. Using a laptop with ISIS® software, one DMX universe will be distributed to a single location. This system we only requires an Ethernet Cross link cable, a NETPORT and a laptop with an internal network card (PCMCIA). The Ethernet cable will be connected between the laptop and the NETPORT. This is a very affordable way of using ISIS® software. All functions of the ISIS® software are available. It is possible to use the keyboard of the laptop to program a show, but this way of working is not recommended. This system is much more useful if the show is programmed on a PHOENIX console and simply replayed on the laptop. This way of working can be useful to run a show in, for example, a museum or gallery. Note: Output 1 and 2 of the NETPORT share the same DMX universe. If a second DMX universe is needed software key is required. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 17 Issue: 1.01
  19. 19. Chapter 4 Two desks in Synchro, 1 NETGATE XT and 4 NETPORT’s Ethernet HUB PHOENIX5 NETPORT NETGATE XT PHOENIX2 NETGATE This is an example of a Light Network. The PHOENIX 5 and PHOENIX 2 are set in Bi-directional synchro mode: PHOENIX 5 is probably the master, PHOENIX 2 is the slave in the system. The system has 4 DMX universes, 2 universes for the fixed dimmers, one for the moving lights and colour changers and one as spare. On the stage, a remote screen and the 4 DMX universes shall be available. Within the venue, four locations shall be available for the single universe for the moving lights and colour changers and for the spare universe. In the dimmer room all universes shall be available. To achieve this system we need a hub: the hub is the heart of the system. From the hub, patch cords (patch cord UTP/STP/CAT5) are used to connect to each node. The nodes needed for this system are: • PHOENIX 5 and PHOENIX 2 • NETGATE XT: Remote screen and 4 universes on stage • NETGATE: 4 universes in the dimmer room • 4 Netport’s: 2 universes (moving lights/colour changers and spare) at the 4 locations in the venue. For the software configuration of this system, please refer to the configuration chapter. Ethernet cable lengths are also an important consideration (refer to chapter 12 ). Note: For this system, a special software key is needed. One DMX universe works without a key; for more DMX universes a software key is necessary. Manual – page 18 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  20. 20. Chapter 4 Same Light Network as above but with Back-up system for the Hub NETPORT NETPORT Ethernet HUB Cross link cord UTP/CAT5 PHOENIX5 Ethernet HUB PHOENIX2 NETGATE XT NETGATE XT NETGATE NETGATE This system offers the same features as above, the only difference being that this system contains redundant units. All the nodes that receive information from the PHOENIX consoles are doubled, to serve as back-ups. The consoles are working in master-slave synchro mode: PHOENIX 5 is the master, and the PHOENIX 2 is slave. As can be seen on the drawing, each universe is available twice at each location. This means that each universe must be merged into a single output. Merging can be done in different ways: EURODIM III has two DMX-inputs, so the dimmer itself does the required merge. In the case where no double DMX-input is available, an external merger is needed. The link between the two HUBs is made via a Cross Link UTP/STP/CAT5 cable. If the first HUB goes down (or the master desk has difficulties), the slave console will automatically take over. The slave no longer receives control data from the master. Due to the double console system, the desk operator can immediately work on the slave (which becomes master) and even more importantly, nothing will be changed at the output (Stage) during this alteration. The combination of master/slave with two consoles double HUB and double output nodes offers the highest level of Backup with the greatest security for a Light Network system. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 19 Issue: 1.01
  21. 21. Chapter 4 System with 3 consoles, file server, laptop and many Ethernet DMX nodes. Manual – page 20 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  22. 22. Chapter 4 This is another example of a Light Network. A theatre has two auditoriums. Each control room must have at its disposal a PHOENIX 10 console. A third console a PHOENIX 5- must be universal, and will serve as a back-up desk for one of the PHOENIX 10s during performances, or will be used as a designer’s desk on the seventh row during rehearsals in one of the auditoriums. In the technical director’s office, a desktop PC must be available to store all the shows. The lighting designer must have the option to prepare some parts of a show whilst out of the theatre. In one of the auditoriums, 4 DMX universes and a remote screen are needed on the stage. The dimmer room must be supplied with 4 DMX universes. The dimmer room accommodates the dimmers for both auditoriums. Each auditorium also requires the potential to have 2 DMX universes at eight different locations. To build this system we also need a hub: the hub is central in the system. From the hub, patch cables (patch cord UTP/STP/CAT5) are used to connect to each node. The nodes needed for this system are: • Two PHOENIX 10 and one PHOENIX 5 • NETGATE XT: Remote screen and 4 universes on stage • NETGATE: 4 universes in the dimmer room • 16 NETPORT’s: 2 universes each • Two extra Hub’s (distance between Nodes and Hub is too large, so extra Hub’s are needed (see also Chapter 13: Technical literature about Ethernet applications) For the software configuration of this system, please refer to the configuration chapter. Ethernet cable lengths are an important consideration (refer to chapter 12). Note: For a system with more than one DMX universe, a special software key is necessary. When ordering, do not forget to state the amount of universes required. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 21 Issue: 1.01
  23. 23. Chapter 5 Chapter 5: Software set-up configuration Consoles configuration (PHOENIX and VISION 10 range) If a new system is installed, or a console is added to an existing system, the console(s) need to be configured. This configuration will, under normal conditions, only be done once. The console set-up is accessible via ISIS® software: <Menu> <F1> <System Setup> <ENTER> <F8> The System Set-up can now be used. Use the alphanumeric keyboard is to select the different set-up features. The set-up features cited are only involved with NETWORK set-ups. To configure other features in the set-up menu, please refer to the ISIS® user guide. Software • Network offers 3 modes: No Network Synchro Ethernet: Only the synchro function is available. Full Ethernet: All Ethernet functions are available. • NetCard Serial Number: Given by the network card. • Key: Will be issued by ADB – A software key is necessary if full Ethernet is needed. (Also required if more than 360 Channels are needed) • Note: Enabling “Synchro Ethernet” or “Full Ethernet” disables the old EIA-485 synchro link. Please apply a label “disabled” next to the serial synchro connector once Ethernet is used. • Hardware Network configuration • Name: Name you give to the desk (eg. PHOENIX 5) Important: it is necessary to give a name. • IP: Given by the network card Remote screens configuration This application allows up to four remote monitors on the Ethernet network. The application “Remote monitors” requires a system with Full Ethernet enabled (this requires a key-code). The applications will run on each EPU with ISIS® software (Console, desktop, laptop, etc.). Manual – page 22 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  24. 24. Chapter 5 Set-up of remote monitors: Install ISIS® on the EPU which will serve as “remote screens”. Boot the EPU with ISIS® installed. The EPU will boot to the ISIS® set-up Menu. The selection of the different set-up features is made by the alpha-numeric keyboard. Select Hardware: Select the feature ‘Act as a remote monitor’ and press <F8> to confirm. Exit the system set-up menu via the function ‘save and exit’. If the remote screens feature needs to be configured on an EPU with ISIS® already running, the ISIS® system set-up is accessible via ISIS software: <Menu> <F1> <System Setup> <ENTER> <F8> The System Set-up can now be used. If the remote system is rebooted it automatically goes to the “remote monitors”. To exit the “remote monitors”, push <escape> on the alphanumeric keyboard. After exiting the remote monitors, the ISIS® Shell appears. A shutdown of the system needs to be done from the Shell. For application of “remote monitors” please refer to Chapter 6. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 23 Issue: 1.01
  25. 25. Chapter 6 Chapter 6: Software Applications of ISIS® software Network Setup: The “network setup” menu allows configuration of the synchro mode, the data transfer mode (desk synchro) and also provides information about all the consoles on the ADB NETWORK. In the case where full Ethernet is available, the “network setup” menu also allows configuration of the Ethernet to DMX nodes, the remote screens, the files servers and the local DMX setup. These options will be hidden if full Ethernet is absent. Synchro The Ethernet synchro line is a crossed UTP/STP cat 5 cable from console to console, or two standard UTP/STP cat 5 patch cords and a hub/switch. In the case where the master does not respond/breaks down, there will be an automatic change-over from the master to slave. The Ethernet synchro line between two (or more) consoles is kept permanently connected; it can be enabled or disabled via ISIS® as required. In a system with two or more desks, only one desk can be the Master, all others must be slaves. Examples of keystrokes <Menu> <F6{Network}> Enters the Network menu <F1{Setup Synchro})> Selects the synchro mode dialogue <Enter> and arrows or wheel To make the synchro mode selection <Enter> Confirms the selection <arrow down> <Enter> Select bi-directional mode: [ ] disabled, [x] enabled <F8> Confirms the selection and exits the dialogue box Master When a desk is in Master mode, it is fully functional, and its backup slave desk simultaneously tracks all manipulations carried out on it. If a desk is set to Master mode, a desk connected through the Ethernet synchro will automatically be set to Slave. If a system is set to master- slave Ethernet synchro, the master must be set to ‘off’ to disable the Ethernet synchro. Slave (Bi-directional disabled) When a desk is in slave mode, it is fully functional, and any manipulation carried out on the master is tracked by the slave. If a desk is set to slave mode, a desk connected through the Ethernet synchro will not automatically be set to master. If a system is set to master-slave Ethernet synchro, the master needs to be set to ‘off’ to disable the Ethernet synchro - changing the slave to ‘off’ mode will have no effect, and the slave will remain as slave. Manual – page 24 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  26. 26. Chapter 6 Slave (Bi-directional enabled) When a desk is in slave mode, it is fully functional, but any manipulation carried out on the master or the slave will be simultaneously tracked on all desks. If a desk is set to slave mode, a desk connected through the Ethernet synchro connected desk will not automatically be set to master. If a system is set to master-slave Ethernet synchro, the master needs to be set to ‘off’ to disable the Ethernet synchro - changing the slave to ‘off’ mode will have no effect, and the slave will remain as slave. Off When a desk is set to ‘off’ mode, it is fully functional and independent of any synchro- connected console. Changing a master desk to ‘off’ in a master-slave system breaks the synchro link between them. Setting the slave to ‘off’ will remain in the original mode. Working in synchro mode When working in master/slave mode, the slave tracks all manipulations that are made on the master desk. This means that if the master console fails, all work done has been automatically transferred to the slave console. Work can be continued on the slave console from the point of the master console failure, with no visible difference at the output. The slave console contains exactly the same memories etc, as the master console. However, when switching to master/slave mode, it is important to ensure that the two (or more) consoles are in the same status (Desk synchro). Switch Synchro role from master to slave This function will change the synchro role. In the case where a master/slave system exists, the slave will become master and vice versa.This function is interesting when, for example, a master/slave system exists and a show needs to be loaded from the slave. Examples of keystrokes <Menu> <F6{Network}> Enters the Network menu <F2{Switch Synchro role})> Switch, confirm and exit Desktop list This list gives the status and the configuration of all the desks present on the network. Examples of keystrokes <Menu> <F6{Network}> Enters the Network menu <F3{Desktop list})> Displays the desk configuration <F8> Exits to Network Menu. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 25 Issue: 1.01
  27. 27. Chapter 6 Name Name of the console Type Type of console. Type can be: P10: PHOENIX 10 P5: PHOENIX 5 P2: PHOENIX 2 V10: VISION10 IP Address Gives the Internet Protocol (IP) address of the console (node) Local Gives the state of the console Local: Local console Remote: Remote console Sync Gives the state of the synchro mode (Off, Master or Slave) Bidir Indicates whether the bi-directional mode is enabled (Y) or disabled (N). Disabled means that the synchro is unidirectional. Desk Synchro This function will send all work and configuration data from one console to the other console(s) on the network. This function will only work in combination with master/slave mode. The desk synchro function will work from master to slave and vice versa if bi-directional mode is selected, but only from master to slave in the case of unidirectional synchro. Examples of keystrokes <Menu> <F6{Network}> Enters the Network menu <F4{Desk Synchro})> Opens the dialogue box and asks to confirm the desk synchro <F8> Confirm, executes and exits the dialogue box This function is very useful if, for example, the master is used for show plotting. Before a performance, the slave will be connected to the master. Using the desk synchro function, it takes only a few moments to set both desks to the same state. Note: The above functions are available in the standard software – the functions below are only available in Full Ethernet software, if full Ethernet is absent, these functions will he hidden. Network setup Allows the configuration of any node on the ADB NETWORK. The different nodes on the network can be Ethernet to DMX nodes, remote monitors, file servers, print servers, etc. Manual – page 26 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  28. 28. Chapter 6 Node Setup Allows any node on the network to be configured. All the nodes present on the ADB network will be displayed when the dialogue box is opened. Adding a new node to the ADB NETWORK is plug and play; it will be detected automatically. The different types of node that will be detected by the ADB NETWORK are: NETGATE NETGATE XT NETPORT NETPORT XT Remote screen Not all the nodes on the ADB NETWORK are displayed in this dialogue box; nodes such as file servers, consoles, and laptops are not displayed. Only the nodes with Ethernet to DMX functions and remote screens are displayed in this dialogue box. Examples of keystrokes: <Menu> <F6{Network}> Enters the Network menu <F5{Network config})> <F1{node config}> Dialogue box displays all the nodes present on the ADN NETWORK. To configure a node, select a node from the list and press <F1{Edit}> For each node, the configuration setup is different, so each possible node configuration is displayed below: NETGATE In Use : [ ] select (with enter) whether the NETGATE is to be used or not. Name : name of the particular NETGATE. It is important to give a name to the NETGATE because it will be much easier to recognize it by name than by IP Address. IP Address : given by NETGATE. This number is the unique address of the node. Subnet : given by the NETGATE. The Subnet address is set on the NETGATE (refer to Chapter 9).The subnet can be considered as a ‘box address’. Status : given by the NETGATE. Gives information such as whether the NETGATE is switched on, working correctly, etc. • Out Enable: [ ] Select (with <enter>) whether the DMX output will be active. The NETGATE can handle up to 4 DMX output universes (from up to sixteen different universes). The output of the node will be dependent on the settings of the output address wheels of the NETGATE. The ISIS software will then read the settings of these wheels. Each of the 4 possible outputs of the ISIS software can now be linked to the NETGATE. This is done by enabling the chosen line. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 27 Issue: 1.01
  29. 29. Chapter 6 Example of configuring a NETGATE: The NETGATE needs to output the following: Port 1 : DMX line 1 (channels 0001 – 0512) Port 2 : DMX line 2 (channels 0513 – 1024) Port 3 : DMX line 4 (channels 1537 – 2048) Port 4 : DMX line 4 (channels 1537 – 2048) • How to do? Firstly, the NETGATE needs to be configured. Set rotation wheel 1 of output port 1 to address 4. Set rotation wheel 2 of output port 2 to address 8. Set rotation wheels 3 and 4 of output ports 3 and 4 to address B. The addresses are freely chosen in this example. The only important thing is that the address for wheels 3 and 4 must be identical. Addresses that are chosen for the input must also be different from those used as the outputs. On another NETGATE, the same addresses can be used again, because each NETGATE has a subnet, or BOX address. In other words, each NETGATE has a unique address. Secondly, the software configuration must be set. If the wheels are set on the NETGATE as described above, the ISIS software will display the following information for the ports: DMX Enable Port 1 [ ] 4 A 2 [ ] 8 B 3 [ ] B C 4 [ ] B D Enabling the DMX lines 1, 2, 3 and 4 completes the configuration. • In Enable: [ ] Select (with <enter>) whether the DMX input will be active. The NETGATE can handle up to 4 DMX input universes (from up to sixteen different universes). Which DMX input the ISIS software receives is dependent on the settings of the address wheels of the NETGATE. The ISIS software will read the settings of these wheels. Each of the 4 possible inputs of the NETGATE can now be linked to the ISIS software. This is achieved by enabling the chosen line. NETGATE XT A NETGATE XT is a NETGATE with extra features. To configure the standard configuration and setup please refer to the section above. Setup of the NETGATE XT features: To select these options, go inside the NETGATE XT editor and press: <F1 more> Manual – page 28 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  30. 30. Chapter 6 • Video [ ] select (with <enter>) whether the NETGATE XT monitor output will be active or not. Monitor selection: select which monitor you want to see at the NETGATE XT monitor output. (See also remote monitor below) • External Lines [ ] select (with <enter>) whether the NETGATE XT external lines will be active or not. Editing the external lines: <F1> enables the line you want use. Programming of the external lines: see user manual. • Programmable Keys [ ] select (with <enter>) whether the NETGATE XT external lines will be active or not. Editing the external lines: <F2> Programmable Keys: <F1> to <F8> refer to the 8 keys on the NETGATE XT. In the consoles, a macro can be programmed for each key. Programming of the macros: See ISIS® user manual. NETPORT The configuration of the NETPORT is similar to a NETGATE, but only two DMX output universes (from up to sixteen different universes) can be handled. The output of the node will be dependent on the settings of the output address wheels of the NETPORT. The ISIS® software will read the settings of these wheels. Each of two possible outputs from the ISIS® software can now be linked to the NETPORT: enabling the chosen line does this. NETPORT XT The NETPORT XT is similar to the NETPORT but will also handle the conversion between ADN and Ethernet. NETPORT XT is required if you wish to connect ADB dimmers with Remote Programming and Reporting (standard on EURORACK, MEMORACK, MEMOPACK, …) ADN is The Advanced DIMMER NETWORK protocol (refer to ADB dimmer manual “Programming Digital Dimmers and NETBUS”). Remote screens To configure a remote monitor, select a remote monitor in the node config list and press <F1 {Edit}> to edit the remote screen. Remote screen configuration: In Use [ ] select (with <enter>) whether the remote screen will be activated or not. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 29 Issue: 1.01
  31. 31. Chapter 6 Name : name of the remote screen. It is important to give a name to the Remote screen because it will be much easier to recognize it by name than by IP Address. IP Address : Given by the remote monitor. Status : Given by the remote monitor. Video Enable[ ] select (with enter) whether the remote monitor output will be active or not. Remote screen selection: select the default screen(s) which will be sent to the remote screen(s). File server list Allows the utilisation of any node on the network that can serve as a file server. All the nodes connected on the ADB network will automatically be displayed in the dialogue box. Adding a new node to the ADB NETWORK is plug and play. This window gives all the file servers found on the network during the latest refresh plus file servers connected since then. Examples of keystrokes: <Menu> <F6{Network}> Enters the Network menu. <F5{Network config})> <F2{File server list})> Opens the file server dialogue box. A file server can be a console, a laptop, a desktop, … Pre (present) indicates that the server is present. Con (connected) indicates that the server is public. Use (in use) indicates that the server can be used. The server gives IP address and name. Clear will clear the window. Use asks the server whether you have access to it. Refresh will scan the network and auto-detect instantly all the servers now present on the network. Refresh will not detect units that are switched off, physically disconnected, or via a node that is disconnected from the ADB NETWORK (refer below to Network info). Local DMX setup A console (PHOENIX-VISION range) has one physical DMX input. ISIS® software handles 4 different DMX input data streams These 4 can be selected from 16 universes on the Ethernet network and the physical input on the console. Local DMX setup is used when you wish to attribute the physical input on the console to one of the four input streams of ISIS®. In that case, three input data streams remain available for signal coming from an Ethernet node. Manual – page 30 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  32. 32. Chapter 6 Examples of keystrokes: <Menu> <F6{Network}> Enters the Network menu. <F6{Local DMX Setup})> Opens the file server dialogue box. Enable [ ] (with <enter>) to enable the physical DMX Input. Select (with <enter>) which line is to be available. Only one local DMX input line can be selected. • Network Info This window displays the status of the network. Examples of keystrokes: <Menu> <F6{Network}> Enters the Network menu. <F6{Network info})> Opens the file server dialogue box. The dialogue box allows also the user to disconnect the desk from the ADB NETWORK. Enable [ ] (with <enter>) to connect the node to the ADB NETWORK. The advantage of the option to disconnect a console from the ADB NETWORK is that all other configurations of the console remain unchanged. • File Manager The file manager provides all the information about all shows stored on the different servers (public/shared) and on the local console. Examples of keystrokes: <Menu> <F1{File}> <F1{Manager })> Locked : Name of console where the show is locked. Server : Name of the server where data are stored. St. (Status) : “Cur” => Current show loaded. “Pak” => Show packed. Abbr : Abbreviated name for the show. Name : Name of the show. Last Modification : Last recorded date. Rename : Rename of show. Delete : Delete show. Copy : Copy show. (Un) pack : Zip and unzip a show. (Un) lock : If you are not the owner of the show, then you need to unlock this show before you can use the show.. Most of above functions are not possible if the show is locked. • Directory manager With the directory manager, you can create directories on the harddisk. One of those directories can be made public: this means that the data inside this directory can be shared over the ADB NETWORK. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 31 Issue: 1.01
  33. 33. Chapter 6 Examples of keystrokes:- <Menu> <F5{Tools}> <F6{Directory list})> Rename : Rename the directory. Delete : Delete the directory. Important : all show(s) in this directory will be deleted. New : Create a new directory. Public : Make directory Public: i.e. can be used by other desks/servers on the network. Only one directory per desk can be public. • Set-up General Examples of keystrokes: <Menu> <F7{}> <F3{General})> <F{Synchro show copy})> Synchro Show Copy: [ ] enable (with enter) to activate the desk synchro function. This feature will copy all data and configuration from the master desk to the n-slaves every time the desk is started. Manual – page 32 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  34. 34. Chapter 7 Chapter 7: Laptop, fileserver and desktop Laptop and pcmcia To install ISIS® software on a laptop, the OS needs to run on Linux. If an other OS is needed (e.g. Windows) a multiple boot needs to be made. The Customer must do configuration and maintenance of this laptop (NOT ADB). Installation of the ISIS® software: • Linux OS: inslin => Installation of Linux • ISIS® software: setup => Installation of ISIS® • Reboot the laptop. • PCMCIA driver: pcmcia => Installation of the drivers for the pcmcia Ethernet cards. • Reboot the laptop. For more information about this installation please contact ADB-TTV. File server The configuration of the file server on Windows NT is very easy. A standard PC with ADB Ethernet Card and Windows NT(or Win 2000) is necessary. Create a directory with name ISIS®; SHARE it, with ACCES type set to FULL. File server is configured. Linux does not support the Windows encryption. For this reason we need to install a small program on WindowsNT. This small program is on the ISIS® software CD-ROM. ( *.reg file) Configuration : IP address : 2.x.x.x ( where x = 1< x < 254 ) Subnet : 255.0.0.0 www.adblighting.com Manual – page 33 Issue: 1.01
  35. 35. Chapter 8 Chapter 8: NETGATE NETGATE provides the gateway to transfer DMX512 data to and from Art-Net Ethernet. Art-Net is a public domain standard for transmitting lighting control data over Ethernet. Use of Ethernet allows standard IT industry products and cabling to be used for the data distribution infrastructure. NETGATE connects to a 10BaseT network via an RJ45 connector. All connections are mounted on the rear of the product. The Art-Net protocol is designed to allow distribution of 256 DMX512 Universes (a total of over 32,000 channels). The DMX Universes are organized as 16 Sub-nets each containing 16 Universes. Front panel controls allow the user to easily select the Sub-net for each NETGATE and the Universe for each DMX512-A input and output. All inputs and outputs provide status indicators. Overview The NETGATE is a 1RU rack mount solution to the transfer of large amounts of lighting data over a wide area. NETGATE uses a 10BaseT Ethernet link for this purpose. NETGATE can translate four DMX512 inputs into Ethernet and simultaneously translate Ethernet into four DMX512 outputs. DMX512 Inputs The DMX512 inputs accept both flavours of DMX (pre and post 1990). A receive data indicator is provided for each input. The input is optically isolated from the output. This is of particular benefit in removing earth loop problems in large installations and outdoor events. The DMX512 input is terminated at 120 ohms. The inputs are connected via 5pin male XLRs wired to the USITT standard. DMX512 Outputs The DMX512 outputs produce the 1990 DMX512 standard. The outputs are continuously refreshed irrespective of whether data is available from the network. The outputs are connected via 5pin female XLRs wired to the USITT standard. Each output is provided with an indicator; the indicator illuminates to show that changing data is being transmitted. Manual – page 34 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  36. 36. Chapter 7 Ethernet The Ethernet connection is via a screened Cat5 RJ45 connection. Network wiring may use either UTP or STP cable. The screen connection of the RJ45 is connected to chassis and mains earth. Network Sharing The Art-Net protocol used by NETGATE is based on the TCP/IP protocol. This means that it will coexist on the same network as any other standard Ethernet protocol. This is of particular benefit when adding NETGATE distribution into an existing site that already contains a network. However, some consideration must be given to the available bandwidth of the network. Art-Net uses a compression algorithm that ensures that the minimum bandwidth is used when DMX512 inputs are not changing. However, a fast changing DMX512 input will use about 3% of the bandwidth available on 10BaseT. The system installer must ensure that if a shared network is used, enough bandwidth is available to ensure that the DMX512 data is not delayed by heavy network traffic. Network Indicators Two indicators are provided to show network status: 1. Active - Shows that there is data on the network although not necessarily Art-Net. 2. Data - Shows that Art-Net data for the NETGATE’s selected subnet is being received. System Setup The entire system is setup with nine rotary controls on the front panel. The controls consist of: 1. Subnet - This wheel selects one of the sixteen possible subnets available in the Art-Net protocol. The subnet can be considered as a ‘box address’. 2. Input Address - Each DMX512 input has an input address wheel. This wheel selects one of the sixteen DMX universes available on each subnet. 3. Output Address - Each DMX512 output has an output address wheel. This wheel selects one of the sixteen DMX universes available on each subnet. DMX data is simply transferred from one NETGATE to another by setting the subnets to the same value and then matching the input address to the output address. Splitter Operation The output addresses can be set to identical values if required, to produce identical DMX512 outputs on the same NETGATE, or across the network. • Loop Through Operation The NETGATE, because of space constraints, does not provide DMX512 loop through connectors. However if this is desired, setting the input address and output addresses to identical values on the same NETGATE will produce the same result. • Inputs The input address wheels for any given sub-net must not be set to identical values, as this would cause two DMX512 signals to attempt to use the same space. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 35 Issue: 1.01
  37. 37. Chapter 8 DMX512 Pin Data The DMX512 input is connected to the male 5 pin XLR on the rear panel. The input is terminated at 120 ohms and cannot be looped. The DMX512 input is optically isolated from mains earth. Cable connection is as follows: Pin 1 Protective ground: connect to cable screen Pin 2 Data complement: connect to twisted pair wire Pin 3 Data true: connect to twisted pair wire Pin 4 Not used Pin 5 Not used Ethernet Pin Data Power Supply The internal power supply requires a 90-240V AC input with an earth connection. The mains fuse should only be replaced with a 3.15A Slow Blow type. Power-On Sequence NETGATE executes a power-on self-test that requires approximately 25 seconds. When the self-test is complete, each LED is sequentially illuminated prior to normal operation. Art-Net See chapter 12 – “Art-Net” Specifications: Listing: CE IP Rating: Indoor use Power: 250W Input Voltage: 90-250VAC Height: 1RU Width: 19” Rack Weight: 2,32 Kg DMX: XLR5 Network: RJ45 Mains: IEC Manual – page 36 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  38. 38. Chapter 9 Chapter 9: NETGATE XT NETGATE XT provides the gateway to transfer DMX512data to and from Art-Net Ethernet. Art-Net is a public domain standard for transmitting lighting control data over Ethernet. Use of Ethernet allows standard IT industry products and cabling to be used for the data distribution infrastructure. NETGATE XT connects to a 10BaseT network via an RJ45 connector. All connections are mounted on the rear of the product. The Art-Net protocol is designed to allow distribution of 256 DMX512Universes (a total of over 32,000 channels), SVGA screen data, external line data, macro data, etc (refer to Art-Net protocol). Front panel controls allow the user to easily configure all the settings of the NETGATE XT. Overview The NETGATE XT is a 2RU rack mount solution to the transfer of large amounts of lighting data and related lighting information over a wide area. NETGATE XT uses a 10BaseT Ethernet link for this purpose. NETGATE XT can translate four DMX512 inputs into Ethernet and simultaneously translate Ethernet into four DMX512 outputs, and also translates Ethernet into SVGA visual display output, eight external line connections for closing contact applications into Ethernet, plus eight MACRO keys into Ethernet. DMX512 Inputs The DMX512 inputs accept both flavors of DMX (pre and post 1990). A receive data indicator is provided for each input. The input is optically isolated from the output. This is of particular benefit in removing earth loop problems in large installations and outdoor events. The DMX512 input is terminated at 120 ohms. The inputs are connected via 5pin male XLRs wired to the USITT standard. DMX512 Outputs The DMX512 outputs produce the 1990 DMX512 standard. The outputs are continuously refreshed irrespective of whether network data is available. The outputs are connected via 5pin female XLRs wired to the USITT standard. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 37 Issue: 1.01
  39. 39. Chapter 9 Ethernet The Ethernet connection is via a screened Cat5 RJ45 connection. Network wiring may use either UTP or STP cable. The screen connection of the RJ45 is connected to chassis and mains earth. Network Sharing The Art-Net protocol used by NETGATE XT is based on the TCP/IP protocol. This means that it will coexist on the same network as any other standard Ethernet protocol. This is of particular benefit when adding NETGATE XT distribution into an existing site that already contains a network. However, some consideration must be given to the available bandwidth of the network. Art-Net uses a compression algorithm that ensures that the minimum bandwidth is used when DMX512 inputs are not changing. However, a fast changing DMX512 input will use about 3% of the bandwidth available on 10BaseT. The system installer must ensure that if a shared network is used, enough bandwidth is available to ensure that the DMX512 data is not delayed by heavy network traffic. System Setup The entire system is setup with push buttons and a display on the front panel. The controls consist of: 1. Subnet – Select by way of push buttons and the display one of the sixteen possible subnets available in the Art-Net protocol. The subnet can be considered as a ‘box address’. 2. Input Address – By the way of the push buttons and the display is it possible to address each DMX 512 input to one of the sixteen DMX universes available on each subnet. 3. Output Address - By the way of the push buttons and the display is it possible to address each DMX 512 output to one of the sixteen DMX universes available on each subnet. DMX data is simply transferred from one NETGATE to another by setting the subnets to the same value and then matching the input address to the output address. 4. Monitor – Select by way of the push button of internal information of the NETGATE XT will be displayed or the information from the ADB Ethernet Network. 5. Macro trigger – Push buttons to trigger macro’s across the ADB Ethernet Network. 6. External lines – Input to trigger external closing contacts across the ADB Ethernet Network. Splitter Operation The output addresses can be set to identical values if required, to produce identical DMX512 outputs both on the same NETGATE XT or across the network. • Loop Through Operation The NETGATE XT provide DMX512 loop through connectors. • Inputs The input address wheels for any given sub-net must not be set to identical values as this would cause two DMX512 signals to attempt to use the same space. Manual – page 38 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  40. 40. Chapter 9 DMX512 Pin Data The DMX512 input is connected to the male 5 pin XLR on the rear panel. The input is terminated at 120 ohms and cannot be looped. The DMX512 input is optically isolated from mains earth. Cable connection is as follows: Pin 1 Protective ground: connect to cable screen Pin 2 Data complement: connect to twisted pair wire Pin 3 Data true: connect to twisted pair wire Pin 4 Not used Pin 5 Not used Ethernet Pin Data Power Supply The internal power supply requires a 90-240V AC input with an earth connection. The mains fuse should only be replaced with a 3.15A Slow blow type. Power On Sequence NETGATE XT executes a power on self-test that requires approximately 25 seconds. When the self- test is complete, each LED is sequentially illuminated prior to normal operation. Art-Net See Chapter 12 – “Art-Net” Specifications: Listing: CE IP Rating: Indoor use Power: 250W Input Voltage: 90-250VAC Height: 2RU Width: 19” Rack Weight: DMX: XLR5 Network: RJ45 Mains: IEC www.adblighting.com Manual – page 39 Issue: 1.01
  41. 41. Chapter 10 Chapter 10: NETPORT and NETPORT XT NETPORT provides the gateway to transfer DMX512data to and from Art-Net Ethernet. Art-Net is a public domain standard for transmitting lighting control data over Ethernet. Use of Ethernet allows standard IT industry products and cabling to be used for the data distribution infrastructure. NETPORT connects to a 10BaseT network via an RJ45 connector. NETPORT XT additionally provides who bi-directional communication with ADB dimmers (ADN Advanced Dimmer Network). Overview The NETPORT is housed in stand alone box; height 1 RU, width 9.5”. 19” front panels are available to mount one or two units in a 19” rack. NETPORT uses a 10BaseT Ethernet link for this purpose. NETPORT can translate Ethernet into two DMX512 outputs. DMX512 Outputs The DMX512 outputs produce the DMX512 standard. If no data have been received since power-up, then the outputs will not produce a DMX signal. If data was received from the network for a DMX output, then these data will be refreshed until new data is received from the network. The outputs are connected via 5pin female XLRs wired to the USITT standard. Each output is provided with an indicator, the indicator illuminates to show that changing data is being transmitted. The presence of a pair (M+F) of XLR 5 connectors allows NETPORT to be inserted conveniently in a DMX daisy-chain (not necessary at the end of the line). Inserting NETPORT (XT) in a daisy-chain meets the EIA-485 standard, but requires termination at both ends of the daisy-chain. Ethernet The Ethernet connection is via a screened Cat5 RJ45 connection. Network wiring may use either UTP or STP cable. The screen connection of the RJ45 is connected to chassis and mains earth. Network Indicators Five indicators show the NETPORT status: 1. DMX A OUT – Shows that DMX data are being sent : a. Blinking: data are refreshed with new data from Ethernet. b. Steady: DMX is being sent but values are not updated from Ethernet. Manual – page 40 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  42. 42. Chapter 10 2. DMX B OUT – idem DMX A OUT - Shows that Art-Net data for the DMX-Hub’s selected subnet is being received. 3. ETH – Shows that Ethernet data is being received 4. ADN – Shows that ADN data is present 5. RUN – shows that the NETPORT is running. System Setup The entire system is setup with three rotary controls on the front panel. The controls consist of: 1. Subnet - This wheel selects one of the sixteen possible subnets available in the Art-Net protocol. The subnet can be considered as a ‘box address’. 2. Output Address – The two DMX512 outputs have an output address wheel. This wheel selects one of the sixteen DMX universes available on each subnet. Splitter Operation The output addresses can be set to identical values if required, to produce identical DMX512 outputs either on the same NETPORT, or across the network. DMX512 Pin Data Cable connection is as follows: Pin 1 Protective ground: connect to cable screen Pin 2 Data complement: connect to twisted pair wire Pin 3 Data true: connect to twisted pair wire Pin 4 Data ADN complement: connect to twisted pair wire Pin 5 Data ADN true: connect to twisted pair wire Ethernet Pin Data Power Supply External power supply, supplied with NETPORT/NETPORTXT www.adblighting.com Manual – page 41 Issue: 1.01
  43. 43. Chapter 10 Power-On Sequence NETPORT executes a power-on self-test that requires approximately 5 seconds. When the self-test is complete, each LED is sequentially illuminated prior to normal operation. Art-Net See chapter 12 – “Art-Net”. Specifications: Listing: CE IP Rating: Indoor use Power Requirements: 8VDC to 12VDC @ 1,6mA: Height: 1RU Width: 9.5” Weight: DMX: XLR5 Network: RJ45 Mains: IEC Manual – page 42 www.adblighting.com Issue: 1.01
  44. 44. Chapter 11 Chapter 11: Ethernet Switch What is a switch? A network with hubs but without “Switches” can get bogged down quickly as traffic rises. Traffic jams occur because data is forced to wander the entire network in search of its destination. A switch corrects traffic jam problems by ensuring that data goes straight from its origin to its proper destination, with no wandering in-between. Switches remember the address of every node on the network, and anticipate where data needs to go. Nodes connected to a switch can expect an immediate 40%-60% increase in performance. A switch can also connect networks of different speeds together. A 100Mbps network, for example, could be connected to a slower 10Mbps network by inserting a switch between the two networks. In this way, switches are good for migrating to faster network speeds without having to discard older legacy network hardware. If you do more than simple file and printer sharing, you should definitely consider a switch. Switch prices have fallen drastically since 1998, and many are priced only slightly higher than regular hubs – and since most hubs can't offer the performance benefits of switching, buying a switch is a smart move for any network, even if you have only a few users. In short, if your network needs maximum bandwidth and speedy performance, buy switches instead of hubs. Longshines 10/100 Mbps Fast Ethernet Switches LCS-883R-SW16N or LCS-883R-SW24N The device is a powerful, high-performance Fast Ethernet switching hub, with all 16 ports capable of 10 or 100Mbps auto-negotiation operation (NWay). This means the switch could automatically negotiate with the connected partners on settings such as network speed and duplex mode. It is ideal for micro-segmenting large networks into smaller, connected subnets for improved performance, enabling bandwidth demanding multimedia and imaging applications. Moreover, the 10/100Mbps auto- sensing ability provides an easy way to migrate 10Mbps to 100Mbps networks with no pain. Compared to the shared 10Mbps or 100Mbps networks, the switching hub delivers a dedicated 10/100Mbps connection to every attached client with no bandwidth congestion issue. Store-and- forward switching mode promises the low latency, plus eliminates all the network errors – including runt and CRC error packets. www.adblighting.com Manual – page 43 Issue: 1.01

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