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Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
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Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network

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  • 1. Chapter 3 Pedestrian Route Network
  • 2. A journey of one thousand miles begins with a single step. Lao Tse, Chinese Philosopher The Pedestrian Master Plan designates impact. Streets not included in the net- a Pedestrian Route Network that work may also need pedestrian extends throughout Oakland. The net- improvements. The Pedestrian Route work identifies common walking routes Network should not be used as an to schools, transit, neighborhood com- argument against pedestrian improve- mercial districts, and other pedestrian ments on streets that are not designat- destinations. These routes respond to ed as part of the Pedestrian Route community concerns regarding safe Network. A survey of the Pedestrian routes to these destinations and across Route Network is included as an major streets. It includes city routes, appendix. For implementation, the district routes, neighborhood routes, proposed projects would require walkways, and trails. additional review by traffic engineer- ing and under the California The Pedestrian Route Network identi- Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). fies those streets in greatest need of Furthermore, engineering judgment is improvement and those areas where necessary to determine the specific improvements will have the greatest locations and features of each project. Pedestrian Master Plan | 41
  • 3. Selection of Routes The following criteria were used to Connect schools, transit, senior cen- identify a draft route network that was ters, disability centers, libraries, then refined through community and parks, neighborhoods, and commer- staff input. Routes were selected to: cial districts. Include other areas of high pedestrian activity. Address areas with a history of pedestrian collisions. Provide routes through and between neighborhoods. Overcome barriers including free- ways, railroad tracks, and topogra- phies that separate neighborhoods. Complement existing and proposed bike paths, lanes, and routes. Facilitate connections to bus stops and routes. Reinforce transit-oriented develop- ment around BART stations. Highlight creeks, shorelines, ridge- lines, and other natural features. 42 | Pedestrian Master Plan
  • 4. TU TUN LN NE Parks A Z ALCATR SHATTUCK Water City Route MO District Route LO SKY UN UN 51S E LIN AK PAB Neighborhood Route T E TA SN I IN Downtown Ped. Zone SAN JR PH MILES AY GRA MLK 0 0. 5 1 2 DW RE GRA HO TELE LA ND OA ES DE BR K LA MAN N OL NC SEE DETAIL PARK LI REDWOO FO D M O AC TH AR I LL TH HUUR R GH Y AR HI IN M ER SE KELL IN TE RN AT GO BA IO OL NA LF N NC L LIN RO KS F FT S HEGENBERG ENBERG SA SA N N LE EAAN N DR DR MAP 3 PEDESTRIAN ROUTE NETWORK Pedestrian Master Plan | 43
  • 5. Downtown Pedestrian District The Pedestrian Master Plan designates Market areas and the Lakeside, The designation of the Downtown the downtown area as a pedestrian dis- Madison Square, and Lafayette Square Pedestrian District indicates the City’s trict based on high levels of pedestrian neighborhoods. It also includes Lake commitment to the downtown as a activity, the number of pedestrian trip Merritt. Its designation as a pedestrian safe and enjoyable place to walk. The generators, and a pedestrian-friendly district reflects the high density of following two chapters identify poli- street grid. This designation signifies commercial, residential, cultural, and cies and design elements that should that every street in the pedestrian recreational uses all within walking serve both as resources and bench- district is a pedestrian route, compara- distance and well-served by transit. marks for ensuring that these and ble to the routes identified throughout The designation also reinforces the future planning processes in the down- the rest of the City. In addition to Land Use and Transportation town area promote pedestrian safety this general designation, pedestrian Element’s promotion of a transit- and access. routes are identified in the downtown oriented downtown. to specify the most important streets Within the Downtown Pedestrian for prioritizing pedestrian improve- District, current pedestrian-related plan- ments. The selection of these routes ning processes include the following: reflects those streets with the highest pedestrian use, the best connectivity, Chinatown Environmental and pedestrian improvements proposed Justice Planning Grant by the concurrent planning processes Downtown Streetscape Master Plan listed below. Downtown Parking and This Downtown Pedestrian District is Circulation Master Plan bounded by and includes Brush Street, Estuary Plan Grand Avenue, El Embarcadero, Lakeshore Avenue, Channel Park, and Lake Merritt Master Plan the Oakland Inner Harbor. It includes City Center, Chinatown, Uptown, Jack London Square, and Produce 44 | Pedestrian Master Plan
  • 6. MAP 4 DOWNTOWN PEDESTRIAN DISTRICT Pedestrian Master Plan | 45
  • 7. Safe Routes to School The Pedestrian Route Network con- Adult crossing guards While the Safe Walks to School pro- nects every public school, park, recre- gram is focused on criminal activity, Student safety patrols ational center, and library in the City it is another important resource for of Oakland. The neighborhood routes Parent volunteers developing a seamless approach to of the network were selected from safe routes to school in the City. Safe Walks to School program local streets both to serve these desti- The Pedestrian Master Plan recom- nations and provide through routes The Pedestrian Master Plan recom- mends that a citywide parent volunteer for pedestrians. These destinations mends that these programs be coordi- program be established to provide were given priority because of the nated to ensure that all schools have training, safety equipment, and coordi- large number of pedestrian trips that adequate traffic safety programs. nation such that parents who are con- they generate and community concern Adult crossing guards and student cerned with school safety can help con- over the safety of children walking to safety patrols are already used at tribute to solutions. This program these destinations. This section many schools. However, financial con- should augment – not compete – with explains how the Pedestrian Route straints limit adult crossing guards to the existing programs of adult crossing Network can contribute to establish- those schools with the most severe guards and student safety patrols. ing a comprehensive and seamless safety concerns. Some schools that Citywide coordination is necessary to “Safe Routes to School” program have requested adult crossing guards ensure that these programs work in the City. do not have them. While student safe- together effectively. ty patrols play an invaluable role, they The Pedestrian Master Plan recom- are not used at some locations because To help develop safe routes to school, mends that the City develop designat- of the traffic risk to the patrols them- the Pedestrian Route Network identi- ed “safe routes to school” by integrat- selves. At some schools, parent volun- fies candidate streets at the citywide ing existing school safety programs teers are organizing to fill gaps that level for targeted crossing and sidewalk with targeted sidewalk and crossing are not covered by the adult crossing improvements. These routes should be improvements. The existing school guards or the child safety patrols. refined and further specified based on safety programs include the following: local knowledge of traffic safety condi- 46 | Pedestrian Master Plan
  • 8. Safe Routes to Transit tions at each of the approximately at least 148,000 weekday pedestrian Local Transit Streets 100 schools in the district. trips and BART generates at least Hegenberger/73rd Avenue 57,000 weekday pedestrian trips. Safe For each individual school, these College Avenue Routes to Transit helps operationalize routes will help identify where physical Bancroft Avenue the Land Use and Transportation improvements and safety programs Park Boulevard Element’s designation of transit streets will have the largest impact. At the 23rd Avenue and its policy directive for promoting citywide level, the pedestrian/vehicle 35th Avenue alternative modes of transportation. collision data for pedestrians 17 years 40th Street Targeted street improvements for these and under and within one-quarter mile groups will improve pedestrian safety The Pedestrian Route Network also of a school identifies which schools in and access while promoting trans- designates routes that radiate out from the district are in most immediate need portation alternatives in the City. each BART station to adjoining neigh- of safety improvements. Connecting homes to transit with non- borhoods and commercial districts. Safe Routes to Transit motorized trips has the added benefit The identification of these routes by “Safe Routes to Transit” is a strategy of reducing cold starts. the Pedestrian Master Plan is a for targeting street improvements resource for station area planning The Pedestrian Route Network identi- where they are the most needed and processes to promote pedestrian safety fies key routes that serve AC Transit will have the greatest impact. In the and access. Pedestrian planning bus lines and BART stations. These City of Oakland, AC Transit generates around BART stations is especially routes include the “transit streets” important given the emerging transit- designated by the Land Use and oriented development at Fruitvale, Transportation Element: MacArthur, West Oakland, and Regional Transit Streets Coliseum stations. The 12th Street, 19th Street, Rockridge, and Lake San Pablo Avenue Merritt stations already have high lev- International Boulevard els of pedestrian activity that warrant Telegraph Avenue improved pedestrian infrastructure. Foothill Boulevard MacArthur Boulevard Pedestrian Master Plan | 47
  • 9. Route Types A street’s physical form shapes how it They provide the most direct connec- They are places for people to meet is used and perceived. By identifying a tions between walking and transit and and they provide the basis for neigh- pedestrian route network, establishing connect multiple districts in the City. borhood life. They are used for walk- policies, and defining design elements, ing to school, walking for exercise, the Pedestrian Master Plan suggests District routes have a more local and safe walking at night. improving existing streets by empha- function as the location of schools, community centers, and smaller Walkways are off-street routes that pro- sizing their human scale. The proposed scale shopping. They are often located vide shortcuts for pedestrians. They are changes promote pedestrian safety and within a single district and help to most common in older neighborhoods access while improving the appearance define the character of that district. with hilly terrain and long street blocks. of streets. Approximately 200 walkways exist in City routes designate streets that are Neighborhood routes are local the City of Oakland with the highest destinations in themselves – places to streets that connect to schools, parks, concentrations located in the Upper live, work, shop, socialize, and travel. recreational centers, and libraries. Rockridge, Montclair, Trestle Glen, San ILLUSTRATION 1 CITY ROUTE SECTION ILLUSTRATION 3 DISTRICT ROUTE SECTION ILLUSTRATION 5 NEIGHBORHOOD ROUTE SECTION ILLUSTRATION 2 CITY ROUTE ILLUSTRATION 4 DISTRICT ROUTE ILLUSTRATION 6 NEIGHBORHOOD ROUTE 48 | Pedestrian Master Plan
  • 10. Antonio, Fruitvale, and Eastmont neigh- veyed the existing walkways in the City. borhoods and along Glen Echo Creek. The resulting walkway maps and survey Particularly in hilly areas where street data are provided in Appendix B. Trails access may be limited or indirect, walk- are off-street routes that often follow ways provide important alternate routes natural features like creeks, ridges, for emergency evacuation. and shorelines. They are much longer than walkways, sometimes unpaved, Most of the approximately 200 walk- and separated from streets. ways are located on City controlled rights-of-way for underground sewers. At least 200 additional rights-of- way exist as potential sites for future walkway development. As part of the planning process for this document, volunteers from the Citizens Pedestrian Advisory Committee sur- ILLUSTRATION 8 WALKWAY ROUTE SECTION ILLUSTRATION 10 WALKWAY ROUTE SECTION ILLUSTRATION 7 NEIGHBORHOOD HILL ROUTE ILLUSTRATION 9 WALKWAY ROUTE ILLUSTRATION 11 WALKWAY ROUTE Pedestrian Master Plan | 49

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