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Service Design für Alle?!

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Präsentation von der IA Konferenz in Köln vom 15.5.2010

Präsentation von der IA Konferenz in Köln vom 15.5.2010

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  • Just a quick definition of servicedesign here, I think I dont have to explain anyone here what it is they are doing all day long. ;-)
  • Followin Shostacks approach, we can classify every product and every service along this axis somewhere from „product only with no service“ to „service without product“. (Go through the line quickly)
  • Now to create a rich user experience, we have to add the accompanying component to the respective „product“, be it a product or a service. If we look at the product of „cosmetics“, we have a strong tangible component, which we need to add the virtual, the intangible component such as image and service to. For Airline Travel, which has very few physical evidence, we need to make that physicality more visible to create a complete experience for the user.
  • „ In the enlarged European Union of 25 countries, some 23 million SMEs provide around 75 million jobs and represent 99% of all enterprises.” SMEs are difficult to define since they are a “grown organism” and are a subset of all companys. There are several definitions which all seem to have some core elements.
  • Official EU Defnition, which then is important for subsidies etc.
  • SMEs are often confronted with market deficiencies. SMEs frequently have difficulties in obtaining capital or credit, particularly in the early start-up phase. Their restricted resources may also reduce access to new technologies or innovation.
  • Now lets look at what is the problem with design for SMEs...
  • But then, why do we do all this? Why is Designing and Design Process so important? Hollins & Hollins point out the origin of costs in Product Design: What is clear here is, that, the earlier we recognize errors and mistakes and correct them, the less money we „waste“.
  • Now this what they suggest it looks like for service design. So we can see that we can save the 50% implementation cost, or even more, if we find that our idea is a failure, or even better: optimize the design so that it becomes a success early in the process.
  • Now this what they suggest it looks like for service design. So we can see that we can save the 50% implementation cost, or even more, if we find that our idea is a failure, or even better: optimize the design so that it becomes a success early in the process.
  • Normal: Forschung -> Individualisierung -> optimierung J etzt: an welchen Stellen kann ich standardisieren?
  • They all have these steps in common. IDEO would call step 1 INSPIRATION, step 2 and 3 IDEATION and step 4 IMPLEMENTATION. The 5th step here is a resume after the project is finished, evaluation during the process happens continuously in the prototyping phases. The final evaluation phase is critical for SMEs to see the benefits of design and encourage further innovation.
  • Next, we need to identity tools which we can easily apply to these parties.
  • Questionnaire (customer) Interviews (employee) Observation (customer, competition) Storyboard (all) Character Profiles (professional) Personas (employee) Offering Map (all) Mock Up (customers) Blueprint (professional) Use Cases (professional) Service Prototype (customer)
  • Questionnaire (customer) Interviews (employee) Observation (customer, competition) Storyboard (all) Character Profiles (professional) Personas (employee) Offering Map (all) Mock Up (customers) Blueprint (professional) Use Cases (professional) Service Prototype (customer)
  • First I analyzed all the existing services in the company to get a status quo.
  • Those were then compiled in a matrix. On the horizontal axis we have the intent to create revenue to the left and the intent to create brand image to the right. On the vertical axis we have the net-cost to the customer upward, and net-cost to the company down. To give some examples: The repair of glasses costs money for the customer and creates revenue for the company. A contact lens consult costs money depending on the status of the customer. If he or she is a new customer, the company charges regular fees. If it is a returning customer the service might be provided for free. If the service is provided for free, the customer feels valued, increasing positive feelings toward the brand. The Satisfaction Guarantee is something which is a free service for the customer, creates cost for the company, but creates a positive image with the customer.
  • Now who are some of the stakeholders to SMEs.
  • Lets look at some of the stakeholders with respect to their proximity to the company and information they have about and from the company
  • I have selected some parties which are fairly easily available to SMEs for co-creation. Public, Banks and Suppliers could be included with statistical information, but access to those can be very difficult.
  • Analysis of competitors
  • Customer Journey
  • Customer analysis / questionnaire
  • Interviews and brainstormings with employees
  • Following the Brainstorming Phase with employees, the various steps of providing the service are broken down into the different views for better analysis.
  • Interviews and brainstormings with CEO and experts.
  • How does convergence change the rules of the game in converging sectors?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Service Design! … für Alle? Prof. Jürgen Faust, Thomas Schönweitz IA Konferenz 2010, 15.05.2010
    • 2. Eine kurze Definition: Pinhanez C. 2009. Services as Customer Intensive Systems. Design Issues 25(2): 3-13 Service Design “ Service design is simply the application of human-centric ideas and methods of design to services.” (Pinhanez, 2009, p. 3).
    • 3. Entwicklung des Design Produkte Nützlichkeit Funktionalität Universelle Ästhetik Güter, Dienstleistungen und Identitäten Vermarktungsfähigk. Symbolische Vielfalt Traditionelle und lokale Ästhetik Interfaces Neutrale Interaktivität Verständlichkeit Rekonfigurierbarkeit /Anpassungsfähigkeit Multiuser Systeme/ Netzwerke Informativität Netzwerke Zugang Projekte Soziale Gültigkeit Richtung Einsatz Diskurse Generativity Rearticulability Solidarität 20. Jahrhundert 21. Jahrhundert
    • 4. Produkte und Dienstleistungen Shostack GL. 1977. Breaking Free from Product Marketing. The Journal of Marketing 41(2): 73-80
    • 5. Produkte und Dienstleistungen Shostack GL. 1977. Breaking Free from Product Marketing. The Journal of Marketing 41(2): 73-80
    • 6. KMUs (kleine und mittlere Unternehmen)
      • Bolton Report
      • Inhabergeführt
      • Finanziell unabhängig
      • Kleiner Marktanteil
      • Dept. Of Trade and Industry
      • Klein: 0 - 200 Mitarbeiter
      • Mittlere: 201 - 500 Mitarbeiter
      Bruce, D et al.: Effective design management for small businesses, Design Studies 20 (1999) 297–315
    • 7. Definition von KMUs der EU
      • „ Die Größenklasse der Kleinstunternehmen sowie der kleinen und mittleren Unternehmen (KMU) setzt sich aus Unternehmen zusammen, die weniger als 250 Personen beschäftigen und die entweder einen Jahresumsatz von höchstens 50 Mio. EUR erzielen oder deren Jahresbilanzsumme sich auf höchstens 43 Mio. EUR beläuft.“ .
      • (Europäische Kommission, 2003)
      Auszug aus Artikel 2 des Anhangs zur Empfehlung 2003/361/EG
    • 8. Charakteristika von KMUs Begrenzte finanzielle Ressourcen Begrenzter Bereich Begrenzte Kapazitäten bei F&E Flache Hierarchien Lokaler Fokus Schnellere Reaktionszeit Mehr Optionen für Förderung und Subventionen Weniger politischer Einfluss Begrenzter Marktanteil
    • 9. Gründe für das Fehlschlagen von Design bei KMUs
      • Fehlender Einsatz des Managements für Design
      • Schlechte Finanzierung der Projekte, z.B. unzureichende Bereitstellung finanzieller Mittel für das Projekt
      • Unzureichende Einbindung von Design Kompetenzen
      • Unvollständige Design-Briefings, z.B. fehlende Berücksichtigung von Kundenwünschen und Bedürfnissen, Preisstrategien etc.
      Bruce, D et al.: Effective design management for small businesses, Design Studies 20 (1999) 297–315
    • 10. Wie werden Ressourcen bei Produktentwicklungen eingesetzt? Hollins G. & Hollins B. 1993. Total Design : Managing the design process in the service sector. Pearson Education: London 41,9% in der Konzept Phase 45,6% in der Produktion
    • 11. Empfohlene Ressourcenverteilung für SD Projekte Hollins G. & Hollins B. 1993. Total Design : Managing the design process in the service sector. Pearson Education: London 50% in der Konzept Phase 50% in der Implementierung
    • 12. Empfohlene Ressourcenverteilung für SD Projekte Hollins G. & Hollins B. 1993. Total Design : Managing the design process in the service sector. Pearson Education: London Investitionen in Analyse und Design reduzieren das Risiko und die Kosten von Fehlschlägen.
    • 13.
      • Anaylse durch Einbindung von Stakeholdern
      • Standardisierter Designprozess
        • Verwendung von Templates
      • Tools und deren Verwendung früh auswählen
      • So früh wie möglich Prototypes erstellen, um Stakeholder zu überzeugen
        • Prozess der Verfeinerung klar machen
        • Einbindung der Stakeholder rechtzeitig kommunizieren
      Wie kann man den Designprozess für KMU‘s optimieren?
    • 14. Wie kann man den Designprozess für KMU‘s optimieren?
    • 15. Vereinfachter Service Design Prozess
    • 16. Tool-Auswahl Template
    • 17. Service Design Tools für KMUs
    • 18. Service Design Tools für KMUs ANALYSE DESIGN ENTWICKLUNG UMSETZUNG Beobachtung Interviews Fragebogen Stakeholder Bestimmung Storyboard Character Profiles Personas Angebots Maps Mock Up Blueprint Use Cases Service Prototypen
    • 19. Kombination von Prozess und Tools Beobachtung Stakeholder Fragebogen, Interview Story Board Character Profile Mock Up Angebots Map Personas UseCase BluePrint Prototype SERVICE
    • 20. Fallstudie
      • Augenoptik Kette in München
      • Gegründet 1980
      • 5 Filialen
      • 37 Employees
      • < 5 Mio. Umsatz jährlich
      •  KMU
    • 21.  
    • 22. Services Diagramm / Status Quo
    • 23. Analyse der Informationsquellen
    • 24. Stakeholder
      • Wettbewerber
      • Kunden
      • Mitarbeiter
      • Geschäftsleitung
      • Kooperationspartner
      • Zulieferer
      • Öffentlichkeit / PR
      • Öffentlichkeit / Lokale Gemeinde
      • Banken
      • Staat
      • ...
    • 25. Stakeholder Levels
    • 26. Stakeholder Levels
    • 27. Methods used
    • 28.  
    • 29.  
    • 30.  
    • 31. Produktlebenszyklus
    • 32.  
    • 33. Service Blueprint
    • 34. Erkenntnisse
      • Erfolgreiche Gestaltung eines neuen Service
      • Schaffung eines Bewusstseins für die Notwendigkeit von Service Design
      • Hohes Engagement und Motivation der Mitarbeiter
      • Schnelle und Effektive Ergebnisse unter begrenztem Budget / Zeitrahmen
      • Viele Lösungen gefunden zu Aufgaben-Fremden Problemen
      • Viele Ideen für weitere Dienstleistungen
      • Veränderungen in Firmenprozessen steigerten die Mitarbeitermotivation
      • Steigerung der Innovationsfähigkeit des Unternehmens
    • 35. Service Design für Alle!?
      • Ergebnis:
      • Vereinfachung des Designprozesses möglich
      • Schnelles Prototyping schafft V e rtrauen
      • Verfügbare Informationsquellen und Stakeholder sind wertvolle Quellen
      • Wenige mächtige Service Design Tools reduzieren Komplexität
      • Probleme:
      • Service Design bleibt komplex!
      • Erfahrener Designer notwendig der durch den Prozess führt
      • Reduzierte Effektivität durch Generalisierung
      • Ergebnisse auch hier nicht messbar (quantitativ)
    • 36. Mehr Info: www.mhmk.de und www.servicebydesign.de Connect at XING , LinkedIn and Twitter ( @netsaver ) Vielen Dank!

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