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Digital Porfolio
 

Digital Porfolio

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Using digital forfolio as assessment

Using digital forfolio as assessment

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    Digital Porfolio Digital Porfolio Presentation Transcript

    • http://www.voki.com/php/viewmessage/?chsm=b111cb88ec7eac2e08cd3c8b7851e585&mId=306816
    • Ensuring Student Success
      Research Topic: Digital Portfolios
      Complex Reasoning Process: Systems Analysis
      Presentation By:
      Margaret Cochrane
      Mary-Ann Edwards
      Stuart Macadam
      Andrew Steggall-Lewis
    • Overview
      • Today we are going to present our research about Digital Portfolios through the lens of Systems Analysis.
      • Specifically, we will present research findings to identify how Digital Portfolios support assessment and learning
      • In other words, how are Digital Portfolios able to Ensure Student Success?
    • Independent research findings from surveys
      • 16 teachers from the local community were surveyed
      • 85% of teachers surveyed were not familiar with Digital Portfolios
      • Therefore, they were not aware of how they can be a valuable tool to support assessment and learning
      • Of the 15% of teachers who were familiar with Digital Portfolios, only half utilized them in their classroom
      • However, this 7% of teachers identified Digital Portfolios as a very valuable tool for learning and assessment
    • What is a Digital Portfolio?
      • Traditional Portfolio - a purposeful collection of authentic and diverse evidence that have been selected, organized, reflected upon and presented to demonstrate understanding and growth overtime to satisfy a determined set of criteria
      • Digital Portfolio - added benefits of enabling the portfolio developer to collect and organize artifacts in many formats, for example: audio, video, graphics, text, and hypertext links
      • Digital Portfolios can be created for different purposes
      • Student created Digital Portfolios - illustrate efforts, progress, achievement and reflection throughout their learning journey, and are used for formative and summative assessment
    • What is a Digital Portfolio?
      • Hartselle-Young & Morris (1999, p.105) assert that a “digital portfolio is a multifaceted tool which can be used to fill several different purposes, but the most important is that it promotes learning among both students and teachers. This type of portfolio will be an important asset to schools and individuals as society heads into the Digital Age”
    • Through the lens of Systems Analysis
      • Research was conducted using Systems Analysis
      • Systems Analysis “is the process of analysing the parts of a system and the manner in which they interact” (Mazarno & Pickering, 1997, p.246)
      • A system consists of numerous parts that interact with one another for specific purposes
      • Often, systems exist within systems
    • Through the lens of Systems Analysis
      • For example: Smith, Lynch and Knight’s Learning Management design phases form a system with three parts. Each of these parts can be viewed as further systems
      Learning Management Design System
      Smith, Lynch & Knight, 2007, p.81
    • Through the lens of Systems Analysis
      • The Ascertainment and Reporting Phase can be further analysed as the Assessment System:
      Learning Management Design System
      Assessment System
      Smith, Lynch & Knight, 2007, p.81
    • Our system for analysis: Utilizing Digital Portfolios for supporting Assessment and Reporting
    • How do we analyse the System?
      The Analysis is framed around four key questions:
      What are the parts of the system?
      What are things that are related to the system but are not a part of it?
      How do the parts affect each other?
      What would happen if various parts stopped or changed their behaviour?
      Marzano & Pickering, 1997, p.249
    • 1. What are the parts of the system?
    • 2. What are things that are related to the system but are not a part of it?
      Home Environment
    • 2. What are things that are related to the system but are not a part of it?
      Home Environment
      Attitudes & Perceptions
    • 2. What are things that are related to the system but are not a part of it?
      Home Environment
      Attitudes & Perceptions
      Classroom Environment
    • 2. What are things that are related to the system but are not a part of it?
      Home Environment
      Attitudes & Perceptions
      HoM
      Classroom Environment
    • 2. What are things that are related to the system but are not a part of it?
      Home Environment
      Attitudes & Perceptions
      HoM
      School Culture
      Classroom Environment
    • 2. What are things that are related to the system but are not a part of it?
      Home Environment
      Attitudes & Perceptions
      HoM
      School Culture
      Assessment Philosophy
      Classroom Environment
    • 3. How do the parts affect each other?
    • Student – Learning Manager
      • Digital Portfolios incorporate ICTs as a learning tool which promotes the engagement of today’s learners, known as ‘Digital Natives’
      • Digital Portfolios provide opportunities for both assessment for learning and assessment of learning
      • Black & William (1998) state that “formative assessment is an essential component of classroom work and that its development can raise standards of achievement”
      • Students may participate in the selection of their work
      • Digital Portfolios provide an excellent medium for student-teacher conferencing
      • Conferences could be recorded and added to Digital Portfolios as an audio file for future reference
    • Student – Learning Manager
      • Feedback can help them to learn and reflect on their achievements and plan their future progress
      • Student reflection is a critical component of Digital Portfolios
      • Criteria matrixes embedded into students’ Digital Portfolios, being explicit and easily accessible
      • Each section of a criteria matrix could be hyperlinked to provide additional elaborations
      • Digital Portfolio development concurrently brings together opportunities for ICT skill development for both the student and the LM
    • 3. How do the parts affect each other?
    • Learning Manager - School
      • Learning Manger is responsible for ensuring that students’ Digital Portfolios address the Essential Learnings
      • Students’ results embedded into Digital Portfolios, thus placing them within the context of their work
      • LMs can readily provide both formal and informal school reporting to parents and caregivers that is responsive to individual needs and can be used to plan future learning.
      • School provides ICT resources and support to the Learning Manager
    • Learning Manager - School
      • Critical for Digital Portfolios to be secured with password protection, due to the confidential nature of the assessment process, so that only appropriate audiences have access.
      • When utilizing ICTs, Learning Managers are responsible for adhering to school policies regarding internet safety
    • 3. How do the parts affect each other?
    • Student - School
      • Students are able to address the required Essential Learnings
      • When utilizing ICTs, students are responsible for adhering to school policies regarding internet safety
      • School policies regarding Inclusive practices ensures that all students have sufficient access to ICTs
      • School provides resources necessary for creating Digital Portfolios
      • Relevant stakeholders (parents and care givers) are able to readily view students learning – they can identify improvements in students work over time and be aware of learning needs in the future
    • 4. What would happen if various parts stopped or changed their behaviour?
      Future Possibilities?
    • 4. What would happen if various parts stopped or changed their behaviour?
      Future Possibilities?
    • 4. What would happen if various parts stopped or changed their behaviour?
      Future Possibilities?
    • Example of Digital Portfolio
      http://learningplace.eq.edu.au/cx/resources/items/1c35e289-bab8-76e6-ae93-82deafc70b82/1/docs/click-me-only.htm
      http://learningplace.eq.edu.au/cx/resources/items/1c35e289-bab8-76e6-ae93-82deafc70b82/1/docs/student/HOME1.html
    • Conclusion
      • Digital Portfolios enable students to celebrate their success throughout their learning journey
    • Brady, L., Kennedy, K. (2005) Celebrating Student Achievement: Assessment and Reporting.Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Prentice Hall
      Marzano, R.J. & Pickering, D. J. (1997). Dimensions of Learning: Teachers
      manual. Colarado, USA: Mc REL.
      Smith, R.,Lynch, D., & Knight, B A. (2007).Learning Management: Transitioning teachers for national and international change. Fench Forest NSW. Pearson Educational Australia.
      http://mtsu32.mtsu.edu:11773/class_portfolios.html
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_portfolio
      http://mtsu32.mtsu.edu:11773/
      http://mtsu32.mtsu.edu:11773/
      http://jpkc.scnu.edu.cn/xxjsjy/webcourse/ztyx/read/05/18/01.pdf
      References