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Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
Polymeric materials for organic solar cells
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Polymeric materials for organic solar cells

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  • 1. NESLİHAN YAĞMUR 23/01/2013 POLYMERIC MATERIALS FOR ORGANIC SOLAR CELLS 1
  • 2. Organic Photovoltaic Cells  Organic photovoltaic cells are solar cells that utilize organic polymers and small molecules as the active layer for light absorption and charge transport http://www.solarcell.net.in/2
  • 3. Organic Photovoltaic Cells  Solar cells are designed using a p- n junction with both n and p-type materials such that the free holes and electrons flow in opposite directions, producing a direct current. http://www.solarcell.net.in/3
  • 4. The Steps for the Charge Transfer 1) Excitation on donor 2) Excitation delocalized on a donor-acceptor complex 3) Charge-transfer initiated. 4) Charge separation. 4
  • 5. Diagram of the Donor and Acceptor 5
  • 6. Advantages of Polymeric Materials  Compared to silicon structures, organic materials have several advantages: 1) Low cost of the technology 2) Possible to achieve fully flexible structures, 3) Relatively low voltages. 6
  • 7. Polymeric Materials  Materials having a delocalized electron system can absorb sunlight, create photogenerated charge carriers, and transport these charge carriers.  Organic solar cells generally focuses either on solution processable organic semiconducting polymers. 7
  • 8. Donor (P-Type) Examples 8
  • 9. Polymeric Materials as Donor  1. Phthalocyanine  2. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) “P3HT” 9
  • 10. 1. Phthalocyanine  C32H18N8  Molecular Mass: 514.54 g mol−1 10
  • 11. 1. Phthalocyanine Hazards:  Do not breathe dust  Avoid contact with skin  Avoid contact with eyes 11
  • 12. 1. Phthalocyanine  Unsubstituted phthalocyanines strongly absorb light between 600 and 700 nm, thus these materials are blue or green.  Substitution can shift the absorption towards longer wavelengths, changing the color from pure blue to12
  • 13. 2. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) “P3HT”  (C10H14S)n  Melting Point: 238 °C  High molecular weight http://www.1-material.com/node/31 13
  • 14. Acceptor (N-Type) Examples 14
  • 15. Polymeric Materials as Acceptor  1. Perylene  2. Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride “PTCDA”  3. Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester “PCBM”  4. Buckminsterfullerene “C60” 15
  • 16. 1. Perylene  C20H12  Molar mass: 252.31 g mol−1  Melting Point: 276- 279 °C S. Güneş, H. Neugebauer, Conjugated Polymer-Based Organic Solar Cells, 2007 16
  • 17. 1. Perylene  The perylene molecule consists of two naphthalene mole cules connected by a carbon-carbon bond at the 1 and 8 positions on both molecules.  All of the carbon atoms in perylene are sp2 hybridized.S. Güneş, H. Neugebauer, Conjugated Polymer-Based Organic Solar Cells, 200717
  • 18. 1. Perylene  It or its derivatives may be carcinogenic  Do not breathe dust  Avoid contact with skin  Avoid contact with eyes . http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perylen e 18
  • 19. 1. Perylene  It has an absorption maximum at 434 nm. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perylen e 19
  • 20. 2. Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride “PTCDA”  C24H8O6  Molar Mass: 392.32 g · mol -1  Melting Point: > 300 ° C 20
  • 21. 2. Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride “PTCDA”  Harmful if swallowed  May cause respiratory irritation.  Avoid breathing dust / fume / gas / mist / vapors / spray. 21
  • 22. 3. Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester “PCBM”  C72H14O2  Molar Mass: 910.88 g mol−1 22
  • 23. 3. Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester “PCBM”  It is a more practical choice for an electron acceptor when compared with fullerenes because of its solubility in chlorobenzene.  This allows for solution processable donor/acceptor mixes, a necessary property for "printable" solar cells.23
  • 24. 4. Buckminsterfullerene “C60”  C60  Molar Mass: 720.64 g mol−1  Density: 1.65 g/cm3  Melting Point: sublimates at ~600 °C S. Güneş, H. Neugebauer, Conjugated Polymer-Based Organic Solar Cells, 2007 24
  • 25. 4. Buckminsterfullerene “C60”  The C60 molecule is extremely stable, being able to withstand high temperatures and pressures. S. Güneş, H. Neugebauer, Conjugated Polymer-Based Organic Solar Cells, 2007 25
  • 26. References  S. Gunes, H. Neugebauer, Conjugated Polymer- Based Organic Solar Cells, 2007  A. Moliton1, R. Hiorns, Review of electronic and optical properties of semiconducting π-conjugated polymers: applications in optoelectronics, 2004  A. Facchetti, π-Conjugated Polymers for Organic Electronics and Photovoltaic Cell Applications, Northwestern University, 2011  www.wikipedia.com 26
  • 27. Thank You for Your Attention 27

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