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CCNA – Semester1




Chapter 11 - Configuring and
   Testing Your Network
      CCNA Exploration V4.0
Objectives

  •   Define the role of the Internetwork Operating System
      (IOS)
  •   Use Cisco CLI commands to perform...
Configuring Cisco Devices –
         IOS Basic
Cisco IOS




• Similar to a PC, a router or switch cannot function without an
  operating system. The Cisco Internetwork ...
Cisco IOS
•   The Cisco IOS provides devices with the following network services:
     – Basic routing and switching funct...
Cisco IOS
Access Methods
•   Access Methods
     – Console
     – Telnet or SSH
     – AUX port
Access Methods
•   Use the CLI to access various IOS configuration modes
    on a device
Console
• Console
     – Low speed serial connection to directly connect a
       computer or terminal to the console port...
Telnet and SSH
•   Telnet
     – Require active networking services on the device.
     – Run on layer 7 in OSI model
•   ...
AUX
•   Another way to establish a CLI session remotely is via a
    telephone dialup connection using a modem connected
 ...
Configuration file
Configuration files
•   Contain the Cisco IOS software commands used to
    customize the functionality of a Cisco device....
Types of Configuration Files
•   The running configuration file
     – used during the current operation of the device
   ...
Cisco IOS Modes
Cisco IOS Modes
 •   Different modes and the mode prompts in the CLI
Cisco IOS Modes
Cisco IOS Modes
Basic IOS Command Structure




    After entering each complete command, including any
     keywords and arguments, pres...
IOS command Conventions
Using CLI Help

  •   Using “?”
Using CLI Help
•   The IOS has several forms of help available:
     – Context-sensitive help
     – Command Syntax Check
...
Using CLI Help
Using CLI Help
Using CLI Help
•   Tab - Completes the remainder of the command or keyword
•   Ctrl-R - Redisplays a line
•   Ctrl-Z - Exi...
Using CLI Help
Examination Commands
Examination Commands
Examination Commands
IOS Configuration modes
IOS Configuration mode
• Interface mode - to configure one of the network
    interfaces (Fa0/0, S0/0/0,..)
•   Line mode ...
Applying a Basic Configuration
       Using Cisco IOS
Naming a device




 •   Some guidelines for naming conventions are that names should:
      – Start with a letter
      –...
Naming a device
• Two common approaches to establishing naming conventions:
    the location and the purpose
•   To remove...
Configuring Passwords and Using Banners

•   The passwords introduced here are:
     – Console password - limits device ac...
Console password
VTY and Enable password
Using Banners
Set Banner
•   Here are some examples of information to include in a
    banner:
     – "Use of the device is specifically...
Managing configuration files
After making changes to a configuration, consider
  these options for the next step:
• Make t...
Backup Configuration on TFTP Server




•   Backup Configuration on TFTP Server
    1. Enter the copy running-config tftp ...
Use a text file to backup and restore config
settings
Backup Configurations with Text Capture
(TeraTerm)
Restoring Text Configurations
•   When using HyperTerminal, the steps are:
    1. Locate the file to be copied into the de...
Configuring interfaces
Configuring LAN interfaces
Configuring WAN interfaces
Configuring interfaces




                  Do not affect to router operation
Configuring interfaces
Verifying Connectivity
Select, Apply, and Verify Appropriate
Addressing Parameters to a Host
Testing the Stack
Testing the Interface Assignment
Testing the Interface Assignment
Testing the local NIC Assignment
•   Use the ping command to determine if the IP protocol is
    properly bound to an NIC
Testing Local Network
•   Use the ping, extended ping command to determine if a
    host can actively communicate across t...
Testing Gateway and Remote Connectivity

•   Use the ping command in the CLI to determine if the IP
    protocol is operat...
Testing Gateway and Remote Connectivity
Tracing and Interpreting Trace Results
Tracing and Interpreting Trace Results

•   Identify several conditions that might cause the test
    to fail
Monitoring and
Documenting of Networks
Basic Network Baselines
                    •   One of the most effective
                        tools for monitoring and...
Basic Network Baselines
 Host capture
 1. Right-click the command prompt window, then click Select All.
 2. Press Ctrl-C t...
Capturing and Interpreting Trace Information
Learning About the Nodes on the Network
Learning About the Nodes on the Network
Summary
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Ca Ex S1 M11 Configuring And Testing Your Network

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Transcript of "Ca Ex S1 M11 Configuring And Testing Your Network"

  1. 1. CCNA – Semester1 Chapter 11 - Configuring and Testing Your Network CCNA Exploration V4.0
  2. 2. Objectives • Define the role of the Internetwork Operating System (IOS) • Use Cisco CLI commands to perform basic router and switch configuration and verification • Given a network addressing scheme, select, apply, and verify appropriate addressing parameters to a host • Use common utilities to verify network connectivity between hosts • Use common utilities to establish a relative performance baseline for the network
  3. 3. Configuring Cisco Devices – IOS Basic
  4. 4. Cisco IOS • Similar to a PC, a router or switch cannot function without an operating system. The Cisco Internetwork Operating System (IOS) is the system software in Cisco devices. It is the core technology that extends across most of the Cisco product line.
  5. 5. Cisco IOS • The Cisco IOS provides devices with the following network services: – Basic routing and switching functions – Reliable and secure access to networked resources – Network scalability • The IOS operational details vary on different internetworking devices, depending on the device's purpose and feature set. • The services provided by the Cisco IOS are generally accessed using a command line interface (CLI). • The IOS file: several megabytes, is stored in a semi-permanent memory area called flash. Flash memory provides non-volatile storage. • Using flash memory allows the IOS to be upgraded to newer versions or to have new features added. The IOS may be copied into RAM when the device is powered on and the IOS runs from RAM when the device is operating. This function increases the performance of the device.
  6. 6. Cisco IOS
  7. 7. Access Methods • Access Methods – Console – Telnet or SSH – AUX port
  8. 8. Access Methods • Use the CLI to access various IOS configuration modes on a device
  9. 9. Console • Console – Low speed serial connection to directly connect a computer or terminal to the console port on the router or switch. – Provides out-of-band access to a router – Often used to access a device when the networking services have not been started or have failed. • Examples of console use are: – The initial configuration of the network device – Disaster recovery procedures and troubleshooting where remote access is not possible – Password recovery procedures • The device should be located in a locked room or equipment rack to prevent physical access.
  10. 10. Telnet and SSH • Telnet – Require active networking services on the device. – Run on layer 7 in OSI model • Secure Shell (SSH) protocol – Like telnet but more secure access – Stronger password – Uses encryption when transporting session data – Use can use ssh client on PC name: Putty http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/downl oad.html • As a best practice, always use SSH in place of Telnet whenever possible.
  11. 11. AUX • Another way to establish a CLI session remotely is via a telephone dialup connection using a modem connected to the router's AUX port • Can used locally, like console port • Console port is also preferred over the auxiliary port for troubleshooting because it displays router startup, debugging, and error messages by default.
  12. 12. Configuration file
  13. 13. Configuration files • Contain the Cisco IOS software commands used to customize the functionality of a Cisco device. • Commands are parsed (translated and executed) by the Cisco IOS software when the system is booted (from the startup-config file) or when commands are entered in the CLI while in configuration mode. • A Cisco network device contains two configuration files: – The running configuration file - used during the current operation of the device – The startup configuration file - used as the backup configuration and is loaded when the device is started
  14. 14. Types of Configuration Files • The running configuration file – used during the current operation of the device – Changes to the running configuration will immediately affect the operation of the Cisco device • The startup configuration file – used as the backup configuration and is loaded when the device is started – The startup configuration file or startup-config file is stored in non-volatile RAM (NVRAM)
  15. 15. Cisco IOS Modes
  16. 16. Cisco IOS Modes • Different modes and the mode prompts in the CLI
  17. 17. Cisco IOS Modes
  18. 18. Cisco IOS Modes
  19. 19. Basic IOS Command Structure  After entering each complete command, including any keywords and arguments, press the <Enter> key to submit the command to the command interpreter.
  20. 20. IOS command Conventions
  21. 21. Using CLI Help • Using “?”
  22. 22. Using CLI Help • The IOS has several forms of help available: – Context-sensitive help – Command Syntax Check – Hot Keys and Shortcuts
  23. 23. Using CLI Help
  24. 24. Using CLI Help
  25. 25. Using CLI Help • Tab - Completes the remainder of the command or keyword • Ctrl-R - Redisplays a line • Ctrl-Z - Exits configuration mode and returns to the EXEC • Down Arrow - Allows user to scroll forward through former commands • Up Arrow - Allows user to scroll backward through former commands • Ctrl-Shift-6 - Allows the user to interrupt an IOS process such as ping or traceroute • Ctrl-C or Ctrl-Z - Aborts the current command and exits the configuration mode
  26. 26. Using CLI Help
  27. 27. Examination Commands
  28. 28. Examination Commands
  29. 29. Examination Commands
  30. 30. IOS Configuration modes
  31. 31. IOS Configuration mode • Interface mode - to configure one of the network interfaces (Fa0/0, S0/0/0,..) • Line mode - to configure one of the lines (physical or virtual) (console, AUX, VTY,..) • Router mode - to configure the parameters for one of the routing protocols • Remember, as configuration changes are made within an interface or process, the changes only affect that interface or process. • Once a change has been made from the global mode, it is good practice to save it to the startup configuration file stored in NVRAM. – Router#copy running-config startup-config
  32. 32. Applying a Basic Configuration Using Cisco IOS
  33. 33. Naming a device • Some guidelines for naming conventions are that names should: – Start with a letter – Not contain a space – End with a letter or digit – Have characters of only letters, digits, and dashes – Be 63 characters or fewer
  34. 34. Naming a device • Two common approaches to establishing naming conventions: the location and the purpose • To remove the name of a device, use: • AtlantaHQ(config)# no hostname • Router(config)#
  35. 35. Configuring Passwords and Using Banners • The passwords introduced here are: – Console password - limits device access using the console connection – Enable password - limits access to the privileged EXEC mode – Enable secret password - encrypted, limits access to the privileged EXEC mode – VTY password - limits device access using Telnet
  36. 36. Console password
  37. 37. VTY and Enable password
  38. 38. Using Banners
  39. 39. Set Banner • Here are some examples of information to include in a banner: – "Use of the device is specifically for authorized personnel." – "Activity may be monitored." – "Legal action will be pursued for any unauthorized use."
  40. 40. Managing configuration files After making changes to a configuration, consider these options for the next step: • Make the changed configuration the new startup configuration. • Return the device to its original configuration. • Remove all configuration from the device.
  41. 41. Backup Configuration on TFTP Server • Backup Configuration on TFTP Server 1. Enter the copy running-config tftp command. 2. Enter the IP address of the host where the configuration file will be stored. 3. Enter the name to assign to the configuration file. 4. Answer yes to confirm each choice. • Removing All Configurations – erase startup-config – reload router
  42. 42. Use a text file to backup and restore config settings
  43. 43. Backup Configurations with Text Capture (TeraTerm)
  44. 44. Restoring Text Configurations • When using HyperTerminal, the steps are: 1. Locate the file to be copied into the device and open the text document. 2. Copy all of the text. 3. On the Edit menu, click paste to host. • When using TeraTerm, the steps are: 1. On the File menu, click Send file. 2. Locate the file to be copied into the device and click Open. 3. TeraTerm will paste the file into the device.
  45. 45. Configuring interfaces
  46. 46. Configuring LAN interfaces
  47. 47. Configuring WAN interfaces
  48. 48. Configuring interfaces Do not affect to router operation
  49. 49. Configuring interfaces
  50. 50. Verifying Connectivity
  51. 51. Select, Apply, and Verify Appropriate Addressing Parameters to a Host
  52. 52. Testing the Stack
  53. 53. Testing the Interface Assignment
  54. 54. Testing the Interface Assignment
  55. 55. Testing the local NIC Assignment • Use the ping command to determine if the IP protocol is properly bound to an NIC
  56. 56. Testing Local Network • Use the ping, extended ping command to determine if a host can actively communicate across the local network
  57. 57. Testing Gateway and Remote Connectivity • Use the ping command in the CLI to determine if the IP protocol is operational on a local host
  58. 58. Testing Gateway and Remote Connectivity
  59. 59. Tracing and Interpreting Trace Results
  60. 60. Tracing and Interpreting Trace Results • Identify several conditions that might cause the test to fail
  61. 61. Monitoring and Documenting of Networks
  62. 62. Basic Network Baselines • One of the most effective tools for monitoring and troubleshooting network performance is to establish a network baseline. A baseline is a process for studying the network at regular intervals to ensure that the network is working as designed. • Use the output of the ping command, saved into logs, and repeated over time, to establish relative network performance
  63. 63. Basic Network Baselines Host capture 1. Right-click the command prompt window, then click Select All. 2. Press Ctrl-C to copy the output. 3. Open a text editor. 4. Press Ctrl-V to paste the text. 5. Save the text file with the date and time as part of the name. IOS capture 1. On the Transfer menu, click Capture Text. 2. Choose Browse to locate or type the name of the saving the file. 3. Click Start to begin capturing text 4. Execute the ping command in the user EXEC mode or at the privileged EXEC prompt. The router will place the text displayed on the terminal in the location chosen. 5. View the output to verify that it was not corrupted. 6. On the Transfer menu, click Capture Text, and then click Stop Capture.
  64. 64. Capturing and Interpreting Trace Information
  65. 65. Learning About the Nodes on the Network
  66. 66. Learning About the Nodes on the Network
  67. 67. Summary
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