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Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
Library 2.0 & the Humanities
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Library 2.0 & the Humanities

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NFAIS - Humanities Roundtable, New York, NY, October 22, 2007

NFAIS - Humanities Roundtable, New York, NY, October 22, 2007

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    1. Library 2.0 & the Humanities NFAIS Humanities Roundtable October 22, 2007 Nicole C. Engard
    2. What is Library 2.0? <ul><li>The heart of Library 2.0 is user-centered change. It is a model for library service that encourages constant and purposeful change, inviting user participation in the creation of both the physical and the virtual services they want, supported by consistently evaluating services. It also attempts to reach new users and better serve current ones through improved customer-driven offerings. </li></ul>Casey, M. E., & Savastinuk , L. C. (2006, September 1). Library 2.0: Service for the next-generation library. Library Journal . Retrieved from http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6365200.html
    3. Fostering Collaboration <ul><li>Allow user reviews/notes </li></ul><ul><li>Allow for sharing of resources (quick links) </li></ul><ul><li>Allow for notifications of updates </li></ul><ul><li>Allow for user added descriptors </li></ul>
    4. No Collaboration
    5. No Collaboration
    6. Some Collaboration http://www.worldcat.org
    7. More Collaboration http://www.worldcat.org
    8. All Collaboration http://www.librarything.com
    9. What Can You Do? <ul><li>Add tools to allow for user collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Add tools for user communication </li></ul><ul><li>Allow for “My” pages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Customization of homepages per user </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provide RSS access to results lists </li></ul><ul><li>Add recommendations for similar resources </li></ul>
    10. Why should we do it? <ul><li>Library patrons are expecting it and libraries are looking for alternate solutions … </li></ul>
    11. How do we do it? <ul><li>Tags, reviews, notes and bookmarks are all structured data that will fit into your existing databases </li></ul><ul><li>The Sciences & IT communities are already doing it: https://www.safariu.com/flash/safariu-flash.html </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This was all done with structured XML & the MarkLogic XML Content Server. </li></ul></ul>
    12. Thank You Nicole C. Engard Metadata Librarian Princeton Theological Seminary Libraries Email: [email_address] Web: http://web2learning.net

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