Janine Dunlop
University of Cape Town/University of Pretoria
August, 2013
THE SOCIAL SCHOLAR
THE ESCAPE CLAUSE:
THIS IS NOT A „HOW TO USE ALL
THE SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS
FOR YOUR RESEARCH IN 3 EASY
STEPS‟ TALK.
The what scholar?
• social scholar
• digital scholar
• open scholar
• networked participatory scholar
“the open scholar is someone who makes their
intellectual projects and processesdigitally visible
and who invites and enco...
Czerniewicz
Czerniewicz
Can social media
really be used for
serious research?
Czerniewicz
How can social
media be used in
academia?
Rowlands
…for social and professional networking
…for dissemination, sharing
…for discussion, open reflection
…for collaboration, crowdsourcing:
http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/aroundthemall/2011/04/facebook-friends-of-social-networ...
…and more crowdsourcing: iSpot
“Informal” peer review: Altmetrics
2 case studies
SCHOLAR 1
“social scholarship is the future of
research, but at this stage, it has
only added another dimension to
research, rather ...
SCHOLAR 2
“the potential for the use of social
media in research is enormous. It
has already changed scholarship:
tweeted contributi...
GO FORTH AND SOCIALISE!
• Social media: a guide for researchers:
• http://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/communicating-and-dissemi...
“Whether we decide to be regular
participants, occasional contributors or intermittent
readers, the days when social media...
REFERENCES
• Czerniewicz, Laura. "Power and politics in a changing scholarly
communication landscape." (2013).
• Pearce, N...
Social scholarship
Social scholarship
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Social scholarship

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Slides for a talk about what I've found so far in my research into how scholars use social media during the research process.

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  • Social: networking; social butterfly; social media; talks a lot; broadcastsDigital: “the ability to participate in emerging academic, professional and research practices that depend on digital systems”; Uses digital sources; creates digital sources; uses emerging technologiesOpen: Open access; open science; open data; no paywallsNetworked participatory: George Veletsianos “scholars’ participation in online social networks to share, reflect upon, critique, improve, validate, and otherwise develop their scholarship.”
  • The CIBER research group. investigate the impact of social media tools on researchwork flow. At the heart of the research was a major international survey, covering 2000 researchers
  • Blogging, microblogging, institutional repositories. In 2011, Melissa Terras decided not only to upload her articles to her institutional repository, but also to blog about them and then to share the blog posts via Twitter. “What became clear to me very quickly was the correlation between talking about my research online and the spike in downloads of my papers from our institutional repository,” she writes. After blogging and tweeting about one of her papers, it immediately received 140 downloads and she found that the papers she blogged or tweeted were downloaded 11 times more than those not advertised via social media.
  • Social media, by its nature, encourages ongoing discussion and reflection about the process of research, something that is not possible via the traditional modes of scholarship publishing. As Veletsianos & Kimmons write, while it can be argued that scholars have always been social, their networks have been small and insular. Social media opens all stages of the research process up to discussion. An example of this is Grainne Conole’s “open reflection” on the process of writing a book on Cloudworks (http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/2155). Conole’sCloudworks space is an aggregation of her blog posts in which she reflects on the process of writing a book about the design of learning activities and content. Comments are invited and debate encouraged about the issues raised in the book.
  • Timothy Gowers blogged about a mathematical problem and received helpful input from his blog readersTeam of icthyologistscalled on their Facebook contacts to help them identify fish specimens
  • The premise of this site is to get people to share their pictures of wildlife in order to share their interests and to get help in identifying what they have “spotted”. Mark Weller points to a case in which a moth never before seen in the United Kingdom was identified via iSpot.
  • Altmetrics expand our view of what impact looks like, but also of what’s making the impact. This matters because expressions of scholarship are becoming more diverse. Articles are increasingly joined by:The sharing of “raw science” like datasets, code, and experimental designsSemantic publishing or “nanopublication,” where the citeable unit is an argument or passage rather than entire article.Widespread self-publishing via blogging, microblogging, and comments or annotations on existing work.
  • Her Twitter account (@Czernie) is used for sharing articles and blog posts about openness, e-learning, and the digital divide in Africa. She uses it primarily for research dissemination, by sharing links to articles she has written, articles in which she has been quoted, or for which she has been interviewed. She has also used Twitter to inform her followers of the content of the conferences she attends. She says that the one of her reasons for using Twitter is “to keep up with the zeitgeist.” By keeping track of conference hashtags, for example, she follows conferences she has not been able to attend and she also follows researchers in her field to keep up to date with the latest research and interests. Czerniewicz’s blog (http://lauraczerniewicz.co.za) is used to post observations about her field. She believes a blog must be focused on one topic and has to be interesting, so she does not post often, but when she posts, she believes she has something of value to say to her readers. A recent post is an example of this: “Clarifying confusion: open content, MOOCs and online learning” (http://lauraczerniewicz.co.za/2013/04/clarifying-confusion-open-content-moocs-online-learning/) is an explanation of the differences between open content, MOOCs and online learning. Although she invites comments on her blog, she does not receive many of these. She uses Delicious as a space to collect readings and sources for her research. (http://delicious.com/czernie) Delicious is open by nature, but she also shares this space with her blog readers by linking to it. Her primary way of using Delicious is by tagging sources she has posted and searching for sources others have posted. She has both a private, or closed, instance of Delicious, as well as a public one. Czerniewicz posts some of her talks on Slideshare. (http://www.slideshare.net/laura_Cz) She uses this space selectively, in that she does not post all of her presentations, believing instead that only those that are unique and offer a contribution to her field should be posted. Her slideshare on academic visibility online has received more than 7000 views. Czerniewicz says her LinkedIn profile (http://za.linkedin.com/pub/laura-czerniewicz/41/610/53b) is merely descriptive and is a tool to connect with other professionals. She has been contacted via LinkedIn by researchers who have been interested in connecting with her while visiting Cape Town.  Her Academia.edu account aggregates all her content. Her belief is that there should be one place where all her academic output can be found and this is how she uses Academia.edu. (http://uct.academia.edu/LauraCzerniewicz) None of these tools have been used by Czerniewicz to discuss her research process. They are mainly for the dissemination and promotion of her output. She firmly believes in keeping her personal and professional accounts separate, so for this reason, she has a Facebook page that has very high security settings and is only for posting messages about her private life.
  • A-rated researcher Rybicki uses Twitter to point his followers to articles and web pages of interest. (@edrybicki) He gets a lot of retweets from others, as well as significant interaction with other scientists. He tweets from his Scoop.it site, as well as his blog, and this guides followers back to these platforms.He uses scoop.it to collect and curate articles and web pages on the topics that interest him and to comment on them. (http://www.scoop.it/t/virology-news) This is primarily used as a communication tool with lay people. It is an information source for others, as he has read the article by the time he scoops it. He has found that many people are using scoop.it now and that it is a good platform for reaching a wide audience.  Rybicki’s blog (https://rybicki.wordpress.com) is used to discuss the topic of virology. His blog had 33 000 views in 2012 and it receives an average of 100 hits per day, with 144 000 hits since its inception in 2007. Rybicki receives a fair amount of comments (his most popular post received 22 comments), but he also receives emails in response to blog posts. Other social media tools used by Rybicki include Endnote for bibliographic reference management, a presence on Academia.edu and LinkedIn and a page on ResearchGate. He finds he gets more hits and interaction via the latter than via Academia.edu and LinkedIn.
  • Social scholarship

    1. 1. Janine Dunlop University of Cape Town/University of Pretoria August, 2013 THE SOCIAL SCHOLAR
    2. 2. THE ESCAPE CLAUSE: THIS IS NOT A „HOW TO USE ALL THE SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS FOR YOUR RESEARCH IN 3 EASY STEPS‟ TALK.
    3. 3. The what scholar?
    4. 4. • social scholar • digital scholar • open scholar • networked participatory scholar
    5. 5. “the open scholar is someone who makes their intellectual projects and processesdigitally visible and who invites and encourages ongoing criticism of their work and secondary uses of any or all parts of it – at any stage of its development.” (Burton)
    6. 6. Czerniewicz
    7. 7. Czerniewicz
    8. 8. Can social media really be used for serious research?
    9. 9. Czerniewicz
    10. 10. How can social media be used in academia?
    11. 11. Rowlands
    12. 12. …for social and professional networking
    13. 13. …for dissemination, sharing
    14. 14. …for discussion, open reflection
    15. 15. …for collaboration, crowdsourcing: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/aroundthemall/2011/04/facebook-friends-of-social-networking- scientists-help-identify-fish/
    16. 16. …and more crowdsourcing: iSpot
    17. 17. “Informal” peer review: Altmetrics
    18. 18. 2 case studies
    19. 19. SCHOLAR 1
    20. 20. “social scholarship is the future of research, but at this stage, it has only added another dimension to research, rather than changing it fundamentally”
    21. 21. SCHOLAR 2
    22. 22. “the potential for the use of social media in research is enormous. It has already changed scholarship: tweeted contributions get more citations, and alt.metrics can have a huge impact on the visibility of research”
    23. 23. GO FORTH AND SOCIALISE! • Social media: a guide for researchers: • http://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/communicating-and-disseminating- research/social-media-guide-researchers • The digital academic: social and other digital media for academics • http://www.slideshare.net/dlupton/e-academia-20688345 • Twitter for academics: • http://ots.evansville.edu/support/training/twitterforacademics.pdf • Handbook of social media for researchers and supervisors: • http://www.slideshare.net/fred.zimny/vitae-innovate- openuniversitysocialmediahandbook2012
    24. 24. “Whether we decide to be regular participants, occasional contributors or intermittent readers, the days when social media competence was optional…are running out. Social media have become the single most effective way of gathering research news and commentary and many debates preceding and following publication take place online. Social media are currently a frontier for scientific discussion.” Stafford, Tom, and Vaughan Bell. "Brain network: social media and the cognitive scientist." Trends in Cognitive Sciences (2012).
    25. 25. REFERENCES • Czerniewicz, Laura. "Power and politics in a changing scholarly communication landscape." (2013). • Pearce, Nick, et al. "Digital scholarship considered: How new technologies could transform academic work." in education 16.1 (2012). • Rowlands, Ian, et al. "Social media use in the research workflow." Learned Publishing 24.3 (2011): 183-195. • Veletsianos, George, and Royce Kimmons. "Networked participatory scholarship: emergent techno-cultural pressures toward open and digital scholarship in online networks." Computers & Education 58.2 (2012): 766-774.
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