<ul><li>A Workshop for  Library Staff </li></ul>Jessica Chamberlain Northeast Library System
In 2000, the Association for Library Service to Children and the Public Library Association responded to research studies ...
Teaching parents and other caregivers how to support the early literacy development of their children was the basis for th...
In 2008, a joint ALSC/PLA Task Force was created to evaluate the first edition of ECRR. In 2009, Dr. Susan B. Neuman and D...
<ul><li>Features of Every Child Ready to Read ®  2nd Edition: </li></ul><ul><li>Workshops are based on updated research. <...
<ul><li>ECRR 2nd Edition is based on  </li></ul><ul><li>early literacy research. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Prevention of R...
Let’s examine what the research says. Children develop early literacy skills beginning  at birth. Children start to develo...
Not all skills are equal.
Public libraries are wonderful places to help children learn both key literacy skills: <ul><li>Decoding (Constrained) </li...
Five early literacy practices develop early literacy skills and help children get ready to read. ECRR is a parent educatio...
This begins an overview of the Every Child Ready  to Read ®  Parent Workshop. Selected slides and  the corresponding talki...
ECRR 2nd Edition explains why is it important for children to get ready to read  before  they start school. Children who s...
ECRR 2nd Edition explains why parents  are so important in helping their children  get ready to read. You are your child’s...
F Y I To become successful readers,  children need to: ECRR 2nd Edition explains what early literacy skills children need ...
Aa  Bb  Cc  Dd  Ee  Ff  Gg  Hh  Ii  Jj  Kk  Ll  Mm  Nn  Oo  Pp Qq  Rr  Ss  Tt  Uu  Vv   Ww  Xx  Yy  Zz <  /  *  #  >  +   ...
ECRR 2nd Edition explains that reading is more  than decoding words. Good readers  understand the meaning  of what they re...
ECRR 2nd Edition explains that learning  to decode words is the strongest predictor of  early  reading success. What is de...
What is comprehension? ECRR 2nd Edition explains that to be  good readers, children need to make sense  of (comprehend)  w...
Five simple practices help children get ready to read. ECRR 2nd Edition helps parents understand how to use the five pract...
ECRR 2nd Edition encourages parents  to use the language  they know best to help their children get  ready to read.
This section of the workshop previews each of the five practices parents can use to develop early literacy skills. ECRR 2n...
ECRR 2nd Edition shows parents how talking helps children get ready to read. Talking: Children learn about language by lis...
Singing helps children get ready to read. Singing: Songs are a natural way to learn about language.  Singing: <ul><ul><ul>...
Reading is the single  most important way  to help children get  ready to read. Reading: Reading together or shared readin...
Writing helps children get ready to read. Writing: Reading and writing go together.
Playing helps children get ready to read. Playing: Children learn about language through different kinds of play.
Every Child Ready to Read ®  2nd Edition emphasizes the impact  environment has on developing literacy skills. Children’s ...
Your library helps children  get ready to read. The workshops include optional slides that you  can use to showcase materi...
Talking and reading:  We have books for you to take  home and read together.
Singing:  We have music to borrow.
We have programs for all ages.
Join us for more fun workshops! <ul><li>Fun for Parents and Children </li></ul><ul><li>Fun with Letters </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>How to get a library card </li></ul><ul><li>How to find us online </li></ul><ul><li>How to contact us for more   i...
Further information about Every Child Ready to Read ®  2 nd  Edition is available in the ECRR Manual, CD,  and online at w...
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NCompass Live: Every Child Ready to Read @ your library

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Every Child Ready to Read® @ your library® (ECRR) is a parent education initiative. It stresses that early literacy begins with the primary adults in a child's life. The 2nd Edition of Every Child Ready to Read® @ your library®, released in 2011, builds on the 1st Edition, first introduced in 2004. The 2nd Edition incorporates recommendations that evolved out of an in-depth evaluation of the original initiative and an extensive literature review. Jessica Chamberlain, director of the Northeast Library System, will review the program, highlight the changes that were made in the 2nd Edition, and explain how you can incorporate early literacy education into your library's existing programs.
NCompass Live - September 7, 2011.

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  • Points to make This workshop provides: An introduction to the second edition of Every Child Ready to Read ® (ECRR) @ your library ® , which is based on the five early literacy practices of talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing. Information about the importance of developing early literacy skills in children from birth to age five. Background information about workshop content. A preview of the ECRR workshop for parents and caregivers, which includes information about how to help children get ready to read and why parents and caregivers are so important in this effort.
  • Points to make Background information: Because they serve children for years before they begin school, public libraries have many opportunities to provide early literacy and learning experiences. In 2000, the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) and the Public Library Association (PLA) looked at what they could do to help children develop early literacy skills and be better prepared to learn to read once they started school.
  • Points to make Background information: ALSC and PLA partnered with national researchers and organizations that serve young children to develop a program to help every child get ready to read. By beginning in the years before school, Every Child Ready to Read ® (ECRR) helps prepare children for reading success once they enter school. ALSC and PLA concluded that public libraries could have an even greater impact on early literacy through an approach that focused on educating parents and caregivers. Every Child Ready to Read ® is a parent education initiative. This is an essential point to remember and reinforce with staff. If the primary adults in a child’s life can learn more about the importance of early literacy and how to nurture early literacy skills at home, the effect of library efforts can be multiplied many times. The focus on educating parents and caregivers was a significantly different approach for many libraries, but one that has proven its value since the first edition of Every Child Ready to Read ® was introduced in 2004. Public libraries across the U.S. have used ECRR 1st Edition to help parents, grandparents, childcare providers, and other caring adults get children ready to read.
  • Points to make Every Child Ready to Read ® 1st Edition was evaluated by two researchers, educators, and reading experts. Dr. Susan B. Neuman and Dr. Donna Celano:* Measured the impact of Every Child Ready to Read ® (ECRR) @ your library ® . Used feedback from surveys and interviews of users and nonusers to help determine whether changes were needed. Conducted an extensive literature review to determine whether ECRR workshops should be modified based on current research. Made recommendations for updating workshops. After a careful review of the evaluation and recommendations, the ALSC/PLA Task Force selected Dr. Neuman to update the curriculum for ECRR workshops, incorporating research and suggestions from both users and nonusers of the first edition of ECRR . The result is the new and expanded second edition of Every Child Ready to Read ® @ your library ® . *Susan B. Neuman, Ed.D., is a Professor in Educational Studies at the University of Michigan specializing in early literacy development. Previously, she served as the U.S. Assistant Secretary of Elementary and Secondary Education. At Michigan, she has directed the Center for the Improvement of Early Reading Achievement (CIERA), focusing on early childhood policy, curriculum, and early reading instruction for pre-kindergarten through third grade. Dr. Neuman has written extensively on early literacy and learning. Her latest books include the Handbook of Early Literacy Research Volume 3 (2011) and Preparing Teachers for the Early Childhood Classroom (2010).  Donna Celano, Ph.D., is currently Assistant Professor of Communication at La Salle University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Dr. Celano’s research focuses on low- and middle-income children’s access to books and computers. Previous projects include a study of branch library renovations and their influences on children’s access to books and technology and Books Aloud, a “book flood,” incorporating parent education and teacher training in Philadelphia childcare centers.  Dr. Neuman and Dr. Celano co-authored the report, “The Role of Public Libraries in Children’s Early Literacy Development” (Pennsylvania Library Association, 2001) as well as other articles and editorials about early literacy.
  • Points to make Every Child Ready to Read ® 2nd Edition incorporates the following recommendations from the evaluation of ECRR 1st Edition: Workshops are based on updated research and use less educational jargon. Workshops present strategies for developing early literacy skills within the framework of five early literacy practices: talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing. The five practices are familiar to parents and caregivers, which makes them easier to use and integrate into everyday life. The five practices can be adapted and used with children of different ages. ECRR 2 nd Edition emphasizes the importance of vocabulary, background knowledge, and comprehension. These are skills that children continue to learn throughout their school years. The importance of a stimulating learning environment is also highlighted. Children learn early literacy skills by interacting with adults and also by interacting with their physical surroundings. Attributes of supportive early literacy and learning environments are described. Workshop content is provided through PowerPoint presentations. Talking points serve as guidelines for information to cover. Workshop formats are modular for greater flexibility. Presentations can be customized with different activities, as well as with logos, photos, and other information. Handouts that correlate to the five early literacy practices and booklists for each practice are provided as .pdfs or Word documents.
  • Points to make Over the last 20 years, there have been a number of congressionally-mandated reports on the development of early literacy: Prevention of Reading Difficulties (Snow, Burns, &amp; Griffin, 1998) examined early literacy development from birth through age eight. National Reading Panel Report (2000) focused on preschool through age nine. National Literacy Panel on Language-Minority Children and Youth (August &amp; Shanahan, 2006) focused on the needs of non-native English speakers in learning to read and write. National Early Literacy Panel (2008) focused on the birth through kindergarten years. Together, these reports are enormously consistent in emphasizing the skills children need in order to become successful readers. The Every Child Ready to Read ® Parent Workshop incorporates key research findings and provides information to help parents and other caregivers get children ready to read.
  • Points to make What the research says: Children’s reading success in school starts with positive language and literacy experiences beginning at birth. If children develop pre-reading skills before they start kindergarten, they can focus on learning to read once they begin school. Children who start kindergarten ready to learn to read have greater success throughout their school years. They are more likely to read at or above grade level by the end of 2nd grade. Children who read at or above grade level by the end of 4th grade are much more likely to graduate from high school and be successful readers and learners throughout their life. Learning to read involves two key sets of skills: decoding and comprehension. Children must learn to decode print. They need to understand that the words they hear and say can be written with letters (the code). They also need to learn that letters represent the sounds they hear in words. Children need to understand or comprehend what print says. They need to learn the meanings of individual words. They also need to understand the meanings of the books or stories they read. Both sets of skills are critical to becoming a successful reader.
  • Points to make Not all reading skills are equal. Research by Dr. Scott Paris (2006) pointed to skills that have short-term and long-term impact on becoming a good reader. These are “constrained” and “unconstrained” skills, respectively. Constrained skills include decoding skills like noticing print and knowing letter names and sounds. Constrained skills: Have a fixed end point; once they are mastered, you don’t continue to learn more about these skills. For example, once a child recognizes the letters of the alphabet in their different forms (lowercase and uppercase, in different fonts, etc.), he or she does not keep getting better at naming letters. Vary in when children learn them. The age at which children learn letter sounds can vary. Most children, however, learn letter sounds and other constrained skills by about 3rd grade. Help you learn other skills but are not an end in themselves. Unconstrained skills include vocabulary and comprehension. These skills: Do not have an end point. Children continue to learn new vocabulary and improve comprehension throughout their school years. Take longer to learn. As children continue to have literacy experiences, their acquisition of vocabulary and comprehension skills will accelerate, and they will become better and better at understanding what they read. Parents and caregivers can help children develop constrained and unconstrained skills with ECRR 2nd Edition.
  • Points to make Constrained skills, like knowing letter names and sounds, are the strongest predictors of early reading success. Yet if these are the only skills children have, they are likely to struggle in learning to read. Vocabulary and comprehension are the foundational skills, laid early on, that eventually determine children’s long-term reading achievement and their success in “reading to learn.” These skills will determine whether children enjoy reading or not. They also determine whether students will be able to read and interpret more complex textbooks and understand more advanced subject matter. Libraries have traditionally supported the unconstrained skills that help ensure overall and long-term reading success. Through the Every Child Ready to Read® initiative, public libraries help parents and other caregivers learn how to develop these critical skills in children. IMPORTANT: Information about constrained and unconstrained skills is background primarily for library staff. These terms and definitions are not included in the parent workshop. The focus of the parent workshop and parent-child workshops is to learn how to develop early literacy skills through five fun practices that parents and caregivers can easily incorporate into everyday activities. Using the terms “constrained” and “unconstrained” with parents and caregivers is not recommended.
  • Points to make Parents may not feel they know how to help their children get ready to read. The six skills in the first edition of Every Child Ready to Read ® were hard for some parents to remember. The second edition of Every Child Ready to Read ® presents five simple practices that can be done at home to help children learn important early literacy skills and get ready to read. These practices are more familiar to parents. They are easy to incorporate into everyday routines. Because they are fun to do, parents are more likely to use these practices on a regular basis to help their children develop early literacy and pre-reading skills.
  • [Throughout the workshops, instructions for presenters are bold and in red. Points to make to the audience are bulleted and in black. You can use the points as they appear or put them in your own words. Remember that you can customize the workshops and PowerPoint presentations for your library and service population. You can substitute different materials and activities. You can add photos of your library or outreach activities, your library logo, your URL, and other information.] Points to make to parents and caregivers From the time they are infants, children learn language and other important skills that will help them learn to read. Whether your child is four days old or four years old, it is not too early or too late to help him or her develop important literacy and pre-reading skills. Developing early literacy skills now will make it easier for your child to learn to read when he or she starts school. You can help your child learn language and other early literacy skills with simple activities. These are easy to make part of your everyday routine and are fun for both you and your child.
  • Points to make to parents and caregivers Children’s reading success in kindergarten and beyond begins with positive language and literacy experiences from the time they are infants. If children develop pre-reading skills before they start kindergarten, they can focus on learning to read once they begin school. Children who start kindergarten ready to learn to read have greater success throughout their school years. They are more likely to read at or above grade level by the end of 2nd grade. Children who read at or above grade level by the end of 4th grade are much more likely to graduate from high school and be successful readers and learners throughout their lives.
  • Points to make to parents and caregivers You have been your child’s teacher from the day he or she was born. You know more about your child than anyone else. You are in the best position to help your child get ready to read because: Young children have shorter attention spans. You can do activities for short bits of time throughout the day. You can help your children learn in ways and at times that are best for them. Parents are tremendous role models—if your children see that you think reading is important and enjoy it, they will follow your lead. Children learn best by doing—and they love doing things with YOU.
  • Points to make to parents and caregivers Learning to read involves two key skills: Children must learn to decode print. They need to understand that the word they hear and say can be written with letters (the code). They need to learn that letters represent the sounds they hear in words. Children need to understand or comprehend what print says. They need to learn the meaning of individual words. They also need to understand the meaning of the books or stories they read.
  • Points to make to parents and caregivers After parents read the sentence, point out that they decoded the symbols, matched the symbols to the sounds, and read the words.
  • Points to make to parents and caregivers If you don’t know what “hipple” and “roffs” mean, you do not know what the sentence means. Children can learn to decode words but not understand what they are reading and what it means. To become good readers, children must decode words and interpret their meaning. Let’s look at some of the things children need to learn in order to decode words and then understand their meaning. These are skills children need to develop before they actually learn to read. That is why it is important to start now to get your child ready to read .
  • Points to make to parents and caregivers Remember that children need two key skills. The first is decoding. In order to decode words, children need to: Notice print, understand that printed words stand for spoken words, and know how a book works: how to open a book, turn pages, and follow words on a page from left to right. Know letter names and sounds. Be able to hear and play with the sounds in words. Knowing letter names and sounds and being able to hear and play with the sounds in words are the strongest predictors of early reading success.
  • Points to make to parents and caregivers To become successful readers, children need to understand the meaning of what they read. Making sense of written language—comprehension—is at the heart of what it means to be a good reader. Vocabulary and comprehension skills start to develop from the time a child is an infant. A baby listens to what parents and caregivers say and learns the meaning of words. The more language experiences children have, the more words they learn and the better they become at understanding the meaning of what is being said. This will help children understand the meaning of written words as they learn to read.
  • Points for library staff Since the five practices are more familiar to parents than the six skills from ECRR 1st Edition, parents will find it easier to integrate the five practices into everyday life. At the same time, these simple practices are powerful ways to help children develop early literacy skills. The idea of early literacy “practices” is important. A practice connotes a habitual activity, something that is repeated regularly and becomes a habit. Stress to parents the importance of engaging their children in early literacy practices on a daily basis. The accumulation of early literacy experiences will help children get ready to read. Points to make to parents and caregivers We are going to talk about five of the best ways to help children learn pre-reading skills and get ready to read. These five practices are easy to do with children of all ages. They can be done at home, at the doctor’s office, in the car, or anywhere you and your child spend time together. When you leave the library today, you will have ideas for how to use these practices to help your child get ready to read.
  • Points to make to parents or caregivers If English is not your first language, speak to your child in the language you know best. This allows you to explain things to your child more fluently. Your child will be able to translate what he or she knows later, rather than having to learn both the concept and the English word at the same time.
  • Points for library staff Each of the five early literacy practices is introduced and briefly discussed over the next five slides. These five slides include only a portion of the information in the actual PowerPoint presentations. The PowerPoint for the Parent Workshop includes the most comprehensive information about each practice. The introduction and instruction sheet for the PowerPoint also provides information.
  • Points to make to parents or caregivers Conversations between parents and children are one of the best ways to help children learn new information and new words. Make sure your child has lots of opportunities to talk with you, not just listen to you talk. Respond to what your child says, and follow his or her lead. One way to help children learn more from a conversation is to repeat a child’s request or comment and paraphrase it. You also can expand on your child’s comments and stretch out the conversation with additional explanations. Use new words. Good readers have a large vocabulary. Knowing lots of words helps children better understand what they read. Take turns. Children are just beginning to learn to have a conversation. It is important for parents to ask questions and listen to what children say in response. Make connections. Recalling past events and connecting them to current and future activities helps children develop an understanding that language can represent events that are not happening now.
  • Points to make to parents or caregivers Songs help children develop listening skills and pay attention to the rhythms and rhymes of spoken language. Most songs have a different note for each syllable. This helps children break down words so they hear individual sounds. Singing also slows down language so children can hear different parts of words and notice how they are alike and different. Clapping along to rhythms helps children hear the syllables in words, and it improves motor skills. Singing helps children learn new words and adds to their general knowledge.
  • Points to make to parents or caregivers No matter what your child’s age, reading together with your child—or shared reading—is the single most important activity that you can do to help your child get ready to read. Reading books introduces children to “rarer” words that they may not hear in everyday conversation. Knowing more words helps children become better readers. Shared reading develops a love of reading and an appreciation of books. Children who enjoy being read to are more likely to want to learn to read themselves. A child’s interest in reading is an important predictor of later reading achievement. .
  • Points to make to parents or caregivers Reading and writing go together. Both are ways to represent spoken words and to communicate information. Children become aware that printed letters stand for spoken words as they see print used in their daily lives. They develop a knowledge of the purpose and meaning of reading through writing. As children scribble and draw, they practice eye-hand coordination and exercise the muscles in their fingers and hands. This helps develop the fine motor control they need to hold a pencil or crayon and to write letters and words.
  • Points to make to parents or caregivers Play is one of the best ways for children to learn language and literacy skills. Play helps children think symbolically: a ruler becomes a magic wand, today becomes a time when dinosaurs were alive, a playmate becomes an astronaut exploring space. Through play, children realize that one thing can stand for another. This also helps children understand that written words stand for real objects and experiences. Pretend play helps children think symbolically and develop oral language skills. As children play store or pretend to be an animal, they talk about what they’re doing. They practice putting thoughts into words. Dramatic play helps develop narrative skills as children make up a story about what they’re doing. This helps them understand that stories happen in an order: first, next, last.
  • Points for library staff Some workshops have handouts you can distribute to reinforce the points you are making. As you preview each workshop prior to presentation, note what materials and handouts to have available. Points to make to parents and caregivers You are your child’s first teacher, and your home is where your child begins to learn. You can make your home a great place to learn, and help your child get ready to read. It does not take money to create special spaces where you and your child can talk, sing, read, write, and play. Here are a few ideas. [At this point in the workshop, the presenter distributes the “Getting Ready to Read at Home” handout. The handout includes ideas for creating an effective and affordable early literacy and learning environment at home. It emphasizes that it does not take expensive toys or computers to develop early literacy skills.]
  • Points for library staff Use the slides at the end of the workshops to reinforce the five practices of talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing by briefly highlighting how your library supports each one. Have different materials, program calendars, brochures about services, etc. available. Customize what you say, depending on your audience and collections. Points to make to parents and caregivers The library has many materials and ideas you can use to talk, sing, read, write, and play with your child. It doesn’t matter if your child is four days old or four years old, we have books, music, programs, and services to help your child develop language and pre-reading skills. Here are just a few examples.
  • Points for library staff This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add any of the following to the right side of the slide: a photo of your library, suggestions for books that parents and children can check out, or related information of your choice. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.)   Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and collections. Show examples of materials to children, parents, and caregivers.
  • Points for library staff This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add any of the following to the right side of the slide: a photo of your library, a list of the types of CDs, book/CD combinations, and other materials children and parents can check out, or related information of your choice. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.)   Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and collections. Show examples of materials to children, parents, and caregivers.
  • Points for library staff This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to programs the library offers, show the cover of a brochure or calendar, or add a list of upcoming programs. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.)   Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and resources. Have program brochures or calendars available.
  • Points for library staff This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to one of the other ECRR programs. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.)
  • Points for library staff Customize this slide with the name of your library, a graphic of your library card, your URL, or other library information. Customize what you say, depending on your audience. Have a library card application available, offer a tour of Youth Services, hand out a program brochure, etc.
  • Points for library staff For more information about early literacy, the five early literacy practices, and presenting the workshops, refer to the Every Child Ready to Read ® Manual and CD.
  • NCompass Live: Every Child Ready to Read @ your library

    1. 1. <ul><li>A Workshop for Library Staff </li></ul>Jessica Chamberlain Northeast Library System
    2. 2. In 2000, the Association for Library Service to Children and the Public Library Association responded to research studies that found a significant percentage of children were entering kindergarten without the early literacy skills needed to learn to read.
    3. 3. Teaching parents and other caregivers how to support the early literacy development of their children was the basis for the first edition of Every Child Ready to Read ® @ your library ® . ECRR 1st Edition focused on six early literacy skills.
    4. 4. In 2008, a joint ALSC/PLA Task Force was created to evaluate the first edition of ECRR. In 2009, Dr. Susan B. Neuman and Dr. Donna Celano were commissioned to conduct the evaluation and make recommendations. Building on Success: Every Child Ready to Read ® @ your library ® 2nd Edition was released in 2011.
    5. 5. <ul><li>Features of Every Child Ready to Read ® 2nd Edition: </li></ul><ul><li>Workshops are based on updated research. </li></ul><ul><li>The framework of five practices—talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing—are used to develop early literacy skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Practices can be used with children from birth to age five. </li></ul><ul><li>Two broad sets of skills are emphasized: decoding and comprehension. </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of a stimulating early literacy and learning environment is highlighted. </li></ul><ul><li>Workshops are presented as PowerPoint presentations with talking points rather than a script. </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop formats are modular for greater flexibility and customization. </li></ul>ECRR 2nd Edition focuses on five early literacy practices.
    6. 6. <ul><li>ECRR 2nd Edition is based on </li></ul><ul><li>early literacy research. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Prevention of Reading Difficulties </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>National Reading Panel </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>National Literacy Panel on Language-Minority Children and Youth </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>National Early Literacy Panel </li></ul></ul></ul>The five early literacy practices in ECRR 2nd Edition are based on updated research.
    7. 7. Let’s examine what the research says. Children develop early literacy skills beginning at birth. Children start to develop early literacy skills beginning at birth. Children who begin school with well-developed early literacy skills have greater success learning to read and generally have greater success throughout their school years. The most important skills children need to develop are decoding and comprehension skills.
    8. 8. Not all skills are equal.
    9. 9. Public libraries are wonderful places to help children learn both key literacy skills: <ul><li>Decoding (Constrained) </li></ul><ul><li>Comprehension (Unconstrained) </li></ul>Every Child Ready to Read ® 2nd Edition provides a framework to teach parents and caregivers how to help children develop these skills. Libraries provide important resources parents and caregivers can use to help children get ready to read. Public libraries have a long tradition of helping children get ready to read.
    10. 10. Five early literacy practices develop early literacy skills and help children get ready to read. ECRR is a parent education initiative. Turn research into good early literacy practices at home with simple early literacy practices that parents and children can enjoy together.
    11. 11. This begins an overview of the Every Child Ready to Read ® Parent Workshop. Selected slides and the corresponding talking points are included to familiarize you with the workshop’s content. ECRR 2nd Edition focuses on how parents can help their children develop early literacy skills with five simple practices.
    12. 12. ECRR 2nd Edition explains why is it important for children to get ready to read before they start school. Children who start kindergarten with good pre-reading skills have an advantage. They are ready to learn to read.
    13. 13. ECRR 2nd Edition explains why parents are so important in helping their children get ready to read. You are your child’s first teacher. You know your child best. Children learn best by doing, and they love doing things with you.
    14. 14. F Y I To become successful readers, children need to: ECRR 2nd Edition explains what early literacy skills children need to develop in order to learn to read. <ul><li>Learn a code </li></ul><ul><li>Understand its meaning </li></ul>
    15. 15. Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz < / * # > + ** [ = ) ] ~ : ]] { ++ } // ^ ! [[ (( >> | [ *<: }><#. F Y I Reading is learning the code.
    16. 16. ECRR 2nd Edition explains that reading is more than decoding words. Good readers understand the meaning of what they read. Reading is understanding the meaning. Leah is hipple when she roffs with her mom.
    17. 17. ECRR 2nd Edition explains that learning to decode words is the strongest predictor of early reading success. What is decoding? <ul><li>Noticing print </li></ul><ul><li>Knowing letter names and sounds </li></ul><ul><li>Hearing the sounds that make up words </li></ul>
    18. 18. What is comprehension? ECRR 2nd Edition explains that to be good readers, children need to make sense of (comprehend) what they read. <ul><li>Knowing what words mean (vocabulary) </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding the meaning of printed language </li></ul>
    19. 19. Five simple practices help children get ready to read. ECRR 2nd Edition helps parents understand how to use the five practices to develop early literacy skills.
    20. 20. ECRR 2nd Edition encourages parents to use the language they know best to help their children get ready to read.
    21. 21. This section of the workshop previews each of the five practices parents can use to develop early literacy skills. ECRR 2nd Edition provides activities parents can use to help their children get ready to read.
    22. 22. ECRR 2nd Edition shows parents how talking helps children get ready to read. Talking: Children learn about language by listening to parents talk and joining in the conversation. Talking, telling stories, and stretching conversations are ways children learn new information, new vocabulary, and other early literacy skills.
    23. 23. Singing helps children get ready to read. Singing: Songs are a natural way to learn about language. Singing: <ul><ul><ul><li>Develops listening skills. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Slows down language so children can hear the different sounds in words, a key decoding skill. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Helps children learn new words and information. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Reading is the single most important way to help children get ready to read. Reading: Reading together or shared reading: <ul><li>Develops vocabulary and comprehension. </li></ul><ul><li>Nurtures a love for reading. </li></ul><ul><li>Motivates children to want to learn to read. </li></ul>
    25. 25. Writing helps children get ready to read. Writing: Reading and writing go together.
    26. 26. Playing helps children get ready to read. Playing: Children learn about language through different kinds of play.
    27. 27. Every Child Ready to Read ® 2nd Edition emphasizes the impact environment has on developing literacy skills. Children’s home environment can help them get ready to read
    28. 28. Your library helps children get ready to read. The workshops include optional slides that you can use to showcase materials, programs, and services at your library that support early literacy skills. You can include or delete these slides. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information .
    29. 29. Talking and reading: We have books for you to take home and read together.
    30. 30. Singing: We have music to borrow.
    31. 31. We have programs for all ages.
    32. 32. Join us for more fun workshops! <ul><li>Fun for Parents and Children </li></ul><ul><li>Fun with Letters </li></ul><ul><li>Fun with Words </li></ul><ul><li>Fun with Science and Math </li></ul>
    33. 33. <ul><li>How to get a library card </li></ul><ul><li>How to find us online </li></ul><ul><li>How to contact us for more information </li></ul>
    34. 34. Further information about Every Child Ready to Read ® 2 nd Edition is available in the ECRR Manual, CD, and online at www.everychildreadytoread.org.

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