Marc 21 Session 1
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  • We will be referring to the handout on Commonly Used MARC Tags throughout the course, so be sure to have it with you for all the sessions.
  • A list of these resources is also available on the NLC web site, linked from the cataloging services page.
  • Library of Congress web site has explanations of the various MARC fields, along with general information and announcements.
  • People who have taken the basic skills class have already seen this, but this “Understanding MARC” publication is available both in print and online.
  • OCLC Bibliographic Formats and Standards is also a good source of information.
  • MARC allows the information contained in a catalog record (or bibliographic record) to be exchanged between systems. You can import records from LOC or OCLC because of this. AACR2 rules tell you how to form the information that fits into the MARC framework. AACR2 and MARC are two different entities. We’re mainly focusing on MARC, but it will be necessary to discuss AACR2 to explain some things we talk about.
  • ISO 2709 – 1973 – International standard ANSI Z39.2 – 1971 – National standard These standards allow vendors to design ILS to manipulate MARC data.
  • MARBI, etc., meet at ALA Conferences Versions of MARC – LC MARC in the 1960s, US MARC in the 1980s, MARC 21 in 2000
  • We will be focusing on bibliographic data, but there are also MARC standards for other categories of data.
  • This is an example of bibliographic information in card format.
  • This is the same information in raw MARC format – this is what the computer understands.
  • OCLC translates the raw MARC data to look like this.
  • The public interface of WorldCat uses the same information to create a display like this.
  • Because of MARC format, the information from a record in OCLC…
  • … can be downloaded into your own system. This is how the information looks in the Commission’s Mandarin system.
  • Various libraries can display MARC-formatted data in different ways, and can choose which data to display. For example the notes field from the original record is missing in this display.
  • Another example of how MARC information is displayed.
  • Another example of how MARC info is displayed.
  • Another example of how MARC info is displayed.
  • Another example of how MARC info is displayed.
  • MARC records are made up of both fixed and variable fields. This is an image of the fixed fields as they appear in OCLC. The fixed fields are used to indicate various aspects of the items you are cataloging.
  • One of the things that the fixed fields indicate is the type of item. It is important to use this field correctly (don’t use book records for CDs, etc.) We’ll see why this is important later. These are the most common type codes, but there are some others, such as k for 2-d non-projected images, and r for realia (which you might use for games or cake pans.)
  • The bibliographic level field describes the form in which the item is published. The most commonly used levels are m, s, and i, which is fairly new. The other ones are used occasionally.
  • This cheat-sheet can help you remember the codes for type and level that are most commonly seen with some various forms of items.
  • When creating a new record, you will have the choice of what kind of record you want to create. This is what it looks like in OCLC Connexion.
  • You can also do this when creating records in your own system. This is what it looks like in Mandarin.
  • Parts of a MARC record are record structure, data content, and content designation. Record structure includes the leader, which identifies the beginning of a new record. (This is something that catalogers have no control over.) Record structure also includes the record directory. For the rest of the record, data content is what is put into the content designation.
  • The indicators are referred to as individual numbers – i.e., “one-oh”, not “ten.”
  • The handout on MARC tags lists the indicators and what they are used for, as well as the subfields. You’ll notice NR next to some fields and subfields – this means that that field or subfield is non-repeatable (can’t be used more than once.) The R means a field or subfield is repeatable.
  • For example, you will see that in this example the subfield b is repeatable.
  • The tags are grouped by hundreds, according to what type of fields they are. If you want to refer to a group of tags in the same 100, the shorthand for this is to say “1XX” for the 100 fields, for example.
  • Here is a bibliographic record in card format…
  • And here are the codes that go with the sections of the record.
  • Fields with parallel content are fields for which the last two digits are used consistently across fields to represent the same type of data. For example, a 100, 600, or 700 field is always a personal name. These fields with parallel content are also fields that require authority control.
  • Subject headings are also fields that require authority control.
  • The 001 field is generated by OCLC, LC, or your local system, wherever the record is created.
  • I mentioned the leader briefly before. This is generated by the computer and the cataloger has no control over it. The 008 is the fixed fields that we talked about before.
  • In OCLC, the 008 looks like this and is easier to read. When it is read by the computer, it is translated to a string of numbers and letters.
  • This is what the 008 looks like in our Mandarin system.. It appears as a single string in the record, but it can be expanded and edited.
  • The codes entered in the 008 show up in the string of characters read by the computer.
  • The 008 fields determine how things display in your local system. For example, the audio book and large type icons in this catalog display because those icons are linked to fields in the 008. (The difference between the CD audiobook and the cassette audiobook is determined by something else, which we will discuss later.)
  • Here’s an example: Here is the 008 for a regular format book.
  • And here is the 008 for a large print book. The d in the form field indicates large print.
  • The 006 field and 007 field are used to describe physical characteristics that can’t be coded in the fixed fields. The 006 field is used for additional material information that is not included in the fixed field; the coding is the same for this field as for the fixed field. For example, you would use this field in you had a serial that was issued on CD. You could cover the characteristics relating to it being a serial in the fixed field and describe the characteristics relating to it being a computer resource in the 006. The 007 is used to describe additional physical characteristics that can not be covered in the fixed field. The 007 is required for some categories of resources, like videorecordings or electronic resources.
  • To go back to our earlier example, the 007 field is where the information to provide the icon for either CD audio book or cassette audio book comes from. This is why codes are important – your local system draws on the codes to display information.
  • In a situation like that, where both items are audio books, in the fixed field, the type designation is the same for both (i for sound recording).
  • However, the 007 field is where the two are distinguished. The top one has s for sound recording and d for sound disc, while the bottom one has s for sound recording and s for sound cassette.
  • As another example, you can see in this screenshot from WorldCat how the information from the 007 field is used.
  • In this example, it looks like the 007 was incorrectly coded. The record
  • This week’s assignment has questions about your institution’s use of MARC records. It is due next Wednesday, August 5.
  • Our next session will cover fields 245 to 250. Remember to bring your Commonly Used MARC tags to that session.

Marc 21 Session 1 Marc 21 Session 1 Presentation Transcript

  • Understanding MARC 21 Bibliographic Records Session 1 Presented by Emily Dust Nimsakont PowerPoint by Devra Dragos, Nebraska Library Commission; revised by Sharon Mason, Charity Martin & Emily Dust Nimsakont
  • Agenda
    • Handouts
    • What is MARC/History of MARC
    • Automated systems
    • Parts of a MARC record
      • Content Designation
        • Variable fields
        • Fixed fields or Variable control fields
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  • MARC vs. AACR2
    • MA chine R eadable C ataloging
      • Communication standard
      • Framework for catalog record
      • vs.
    • Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2 nd ed., revised
      • Rules for describing items in a catalog record
  • Communication Standards
    • ISO 2709—Bibliographic Information Exchange
      • ISO=International Organization for Standardization
      • http://www.iso.ch
    • ANSI Z39.2—Bibliographic Information Interchange
      • ANSI=American National Standards Institute
      • http://www.ansi.org
  • History of MARC
    • Pilot project (1966-1968)
      • Henriette Avram, Library of Congress
      • Used for automation of process to print cards or catalogs (book catalogs, microfiche catalogs, etc.)
    • MARC Development Office/MARC Standards Office, MARBI (Machine Readable Form of Bibliographic Information)
    • Variants of MARC
    • MARC 21—current standard
  • MARC 21 Formats
    • Bibliographic Data
    • Authority Data
    • Community Information
    • Holdings Data
    • Classification Data
  • FIC Kaplow, Robert. KAP The cat who killed Lilian Jackson Braun : a parody / by Robert Kaplow. – Beverly Hills, Calif. : New Millennium Press, 2004, c2003. 213 p. ; 18 cm. In this bawdy parody, Ms. Jackson's headless body has been discovered in a men's room of a bar in Lower Manhattan. The police are busy filming reality television shows, so it falls to Braun's writer friend James Qafka and his Siamese cats, Ying-Tong and Poon-Tang, to solve the ghastly mystery. 1932407391 (pbk.) 1. Braun, Lilian Jackson--Fiction. 2. Manhattan (New York, N.Y.) --Fiction. I. Title.
  • 00922nam 2200217Ia 45 0001001300000003000600013005001700019008004100036040001300077020002200090043001200112049000900124100002000133245007700153260006500230300002100295520029900316600003600615651004100651994001200692ocm55654318 OCoLC20050909094919.0040615r20042003cau 000 1 eng d aMPIcMPI a1932407391 (pbk.) an-us-ny aTPBB1 aKaplow, Robert.14aThe cat who killed Lilian Jackson Braun :ba parody /cby Robert Kaplow. aBeverly Hills, Calif. :bNew Millennium Press,c2004, c2003. a213 p. ;c18 cm. aIn this bawdy parody, Ms. Jackson's headless body has been discovered in a men's room of a bar in Lower Manhattan. The police are busy filming reality television shows, so it falls to Braun's writer friend James Qafka and his Siamese cats, Ying-Tong and Poon-Tang, to solve the ghastly mystery.10aBraun, Lilian JacksonvFiction. 0aManhattan (New York, N.Y.)vFiction. aC0bTPB
  • Automated Systems
    • Software is required to manipulate and display a MARC record
      • Union catalogs/Databases
        • OCLC--Connexion/WorldCat
      • Local automated systems
        • Catalog module
        • OPAC—In-house/Web
      • Editors
        • MARC Magician
  • 00922nam 2200217Ia 45 0001001300000003000600013005001700019008004100036040001300077020002200090043001200112049000900124100002000133245007700153260006500230300002100295520029900316600003600615651004100651994001200692ocm55654318 OCoLC20050909094919.0040615r20042003cau 000 1 eng d aMPIcMPI a1932407391 (pbk.) an-us-ny aTPBB1 aKaplow, Robert.14aThe cat who killed Lilian Jackson Braun :ba parody /cby Robert Kaplow. aBeverly Hills, Calif. :bNew Millennium Press,c2004, c2003. a213 p. ;c18 cm. aIn this bawdy parody, Ms. Jackson's headless body has been discovered in a men's room of a bar in Lower Manhattan. The police are busy filming reality television shows, so it falls to Braun's writer friend James Qafka and his Siamese cats, Ying-Tong and Poon-Tang, to solve the ghastly mystery.10aBraun, Lilian JacksonvFiction. 0aManhattan (New York, N.Y.)vFiction. aC0bTPB
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  • Types of Records
    • a: Language material [Text]
    • c: Printed music
    • e: Cartographic material
    • g: Projected medium
    • i: Nonmusical sound recording
    • j: Musical sound recording
    • m: Computer file
    • o: Kit
    • p: Mixed materials
  • Levels
    • a: Monographic component part
    • b: Serial component part
    • c: Collection
    • d: Subunit
    • i: Integrating resource
    • m: Monograph/Item
    • s: Serial
  • Workform Type Bib. level Books a,t a,c,d,m Continuing resources a b,i,s Visual materials g,k,r,o a,b,c,d,i,m,s Maps e a,b,c,d,i,m,s Sound recordings i,j a,b,c,d,i,m,s Scores c a,b,c,d,i,m,s Computer files m a,b,c,d,i,m,s Mixed materials p c,d,i
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  • Parts of a MARC Record
    • Record Structure
    • Data Content
      • Description
      • Subject headings
      • Classification numbers
      • Main and added entries
    • Content Designation
      • Fixed fields
      • Variable fields
  • Variable Fields
    • Contain specific pieces of information identified by:
      • Tags
      • Indicators
      • Delimiters
      • Subfield codes
  • Tags Cartoon from: Bibliotoons: A Mischievous Meander Through the Stacks & Beyond by Gary Handman.
  • Tags
    • Three-digit numbers
      • Example: 245 = Title and statement of responsibility
      • As in:
      • 245 10 $a Once upon a town : $b the miracle of the North Platte Canteen / $c Bob Greene.
  • Indicators
    • Digits or blanks that give the computer instructions or information about the data contained in the field
      • Example: in a 245 field, the indicators 10 = Author main entry; no nonfiling characters
      • As in:
      • 245 10 $a Once upon a town : $b the miracle of the North Platte Canteen / $c Bob Greene.
  • Delimiters
    • Tell the computer where each subfield starts
    • Sometimes denoted with $, #, _, or ǂ
  • Subfield codes
    • Single letters or digits indicate what type of information is in a subfield
      • Example: in a 245 field, a=title proper; b=remainder of title; c=statement of responsibility
      • As in:
      • 245 10 $a Once upon a town : $b the miracle of the North Platte Canteen / $c Bob Greene.
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  • Tags by hundreds
    • 0XX Control info., classification, codes, etc.
    • 1XX Main entries
    • 2XX Titles, edition, imprint
    • 3XX Physical description, etc.
    • 4XX Series statements
    • 5XX Notes
    • 6XX Subject access fields
    • 7XX Added entries
    • 8XX Series added entries, holdings, location, etc.
    • 9XX Locally-defined uses
  • FIC Kaplow, Robert. KAP The cat who killed Lilian Jackson Braun : a parody / by Robert Kaplow. – Beverly Hills, Calif. : New Millennium Press, 2004, c2003. 213 p. ; 18 cm. In this bawdy parody, Ms. Jackson's headless body has been discovered in a men's room of a bar in Lower Manhattan. The police are busy filming reality television shows, so it falls to Braun's writer friend James Qafka and his Siamese cats, Ying-Tong and Poon-Tang, to solve the ghastly mystery. 1932407391 (pbk.) 1. Braun, Lilian Jackson--Fiction. 2. Manhattan (New York, N.Y.) --Fiction. I. Title.
  • FIC Kaplow, Robert. KAP The cat who killed Lilian Jackson Braun : a parody / by Robert Kaplow. – Beverly Hills, Calif. : New Millennium Press, 2004, c2003. 213 p. ; 18 cm. In this bawdy parody, Ms. Jackson's headless body has been discovered in a men's room of a bar in Lower Manhattan. The police are busy filming reality television shows, so it falls to Braun's writer friend James Qafka and his Siamese cats, Ying-Tong and Poon-Tang, to solve the ghastly mystery. 1932407391 (pbk.) 1. Braun, Lilian Jackson--Fiction. 2. Manhattan (New York, N.Y.) --Fiction. I. Title. 099 $a 100 $a 245 $a : $b / $c. . – 260 $a : $b, $c. 500 020 650 $a -- $v. 651 $a -- $v. 245 1
  • Parallel Content
    • X00 Personal names
    • X10 Corporate names
    • X11 Meeting names
    • X30 Uniform titles
    • X40 Bibliographic titles
  • Parallel Content
    • X50 Topical terms
    • X51 Geographic terms
  • System-generated Fixed Fields
    • 001—control number
    • 003—MARC code for organization whose control number is contained in field 001
    • 005—date and time of last transaction
  • Partially System-generated Fixed Fields
    • Leader
    • 008—Coded general information
  • Translates to: 008 010807s2001 cau 000 0 eng d Book
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  • Continuing resources Translates to: 008 011217c20019999nyuar0 d 0 a0eng d
  • Translates to: 008 000414p19991998nyu088 vleng d Visual materials
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  • Form: d=large print
  • Other Control Fields
    • 006—Additional material characteristics
    • 007—Physical description fixed field
  • 007 Field
    • Different values for different types of material, eg.:
      • Maps
      • Videorecordings
      • Sound recordings
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  • 007 sd fungnn---ed s=sound recording d=sound disc 007 ss lunjlc s=sound recording s=sound cassette
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  • Assignment
    • http://www.nlc.state.ne.us/netserv/training/marcsum09.html
    • Due by 8AM Thursday, August 6, 2009
  • Next Session
    • Title and edition fields